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A Report of

STUDY ON
PRIVATE LABEL BRAND VS NATIONAL BRAND

For

FUTURE VALUE RETAIL LTD


Submitted to the
Department of Management Studies
in partial fulfillment of the
Post Graduate Diploma in Management
Under the Guidance of

Mr.SREEKANTH S.V.

by

ANUDEEP KAKKERLA

BATCH-18 FO-43

S C M S

SCMS – COCHIN

SCMS CAMPUS, PRATHAP NAGAR, MUTTOM, ALUVA, COCHIN-683106

September 2010
DECLARATION

I, the undersigned, hereby declare that this project report entitled


“Study on private label brands vs National brands” has been
written and submitted under the guidance of Mr.Sreekanth S.V
and is my original work.
I understand that detection of any copying is liable to be punished
in any way the school deems fit.

Date : ANUDEEP KAKKERLA


( FO 43 )
S C M S

SCMS – COCHIN

SCMS CAMPUS, PRATHAP NAGAR, MUTTOM, ALUVA,COCHIN-683106.

CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the project work entitled ' Study on


Private label brands vs National brands' has been carried out
under my guidance by Anudeep kakkerla in partial fulfillment of his
Post Graduate Diploma in Management during the academic year
2009 - 2011.

Date: Mr.SREEKANTH S.V


(FACULTY GUIDE)
S C M S

SCMS – COCHIN

SCMS CAMPUS, PRATHAP NAGAR, MUTTOM, ALUVA, COCHIN-683106.

This is to certify that the project work entitled 'Study on

Private label brands vs National brands ' has been carried out by
Anudeep kakkerla in partial fulfillment of his Post Graduate
Diploma in Management.

Date : Dr.V.RAMAN NAIR


(DIRECTOR)
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

First and foremost, I would like to thank the Almighty God for helping me to
complete this project successfully. I would also like to thank FUTURE VALUE
RETAIL LTD. and SCMS-COCHIN for giving me this opportunity and also for
their generous support.

I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude to my guide, Mr. Chenna


Bullanawar, Store manager-Big Bazaar Hubli for his tremendous help and
encouragement with my project. I also thank Mr. Vilas Nair, Marketing faculty-
SSTM. I am highly indebted to both of them for their invaluable advice and
intellectual guidance throughout my project. During the entire period of the study,
they were always availabel to show the right direction and advice in spite their
heavy and hectic work schedule.

I would like to thank Prof. K. J. Paulose, Dean and project coordinator of SCMS-
Cochin for his support and guidance to get this project done. I would like to extend
my sincere thanks to the SCMS faculty guide, Mr.Sreekanth S.V, Faculty
SCMS-COCHIN who with friendly touch showed me the right path to
accomplish the daunting task.

I am highly indebted to all those who offered their tireless support during the
course of the project and grateful to everybody’s contribution and collaboration

ANUDEEP KAKKERLA
(FO 43)
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter No. Topic Page No.

1 Introduction and theoretical back 1


ground of the study

2 Research Methodology 7

3 Industry and company Profiles 11

4 Analysis and Interpretation of data 19

5 Findings and conclusions 41

6 Suggestions and Recommendations 44

7 Bibliography 46

8 Appendix 48
List of Tables
Table No Particulars Page No
Table-1 Big bazaar’s products and it’s own brands 18
Table-2 New product seeking customers and gender cross tabulation 20

Table-3 Buying decisions influencing factor: cross tabulation 21

Table-4 Brand conscious customers: gender cross tabulation 22

Table-5 Frequency analysis of Big Bazaar’s departments 23

Table-6 Customer frequency and Brand awareness Cross tabulation 24


Table-7 PLB awareness frequency tabulation cross tabulation 25
Table-8 PLB awareness frequency tabulation 26
Table-9 Electronics’ PLB and gender cross tabulation 27

Table-10 Perception on PLB and gender cross tabulation 28

Table-11 Perception on PLB’s quality and gender cross tabulation 29

Table-12 Brand conscious customers and buying decision cross tabulation 30

Table-13 Perception about change in buying decisions with the influence of 31


display
Table-14 Attributes frequency tabulation 32

Table-15 Factor frequency tabulation 33

Table-16 Most preferred Koryo appliance frequency tabulation 34

Table-17 New product shift frequency and Sach preference cross tabulation 35

Table-18 Factor frequency tabulation 36

Table-19 Tasty treat preference and buying decision cross tabulation 37

Table-20 Influencing factor frequency tabulation 38

Table-21 New product shift frequency and satisfaction level tabulation 39

Table-22 Cross tabulation Gender: PLBS : New product shift 40


List of Figures

Figure No Particulars Page No


Figure-1 PLB conceptual frame 5
Figure-2 Global view of PLB 6
Figure-3 PLB penetration 6
Figure-4 New product seeking customers and gender cross tabulation 20

Figure-5 Buying decisions influencing factor: cross tabulation 21

Figure-6 Brand conscious customers: gender cross tabulation 22

Figure-7 Frequency analysis of Big Bazaar’s departments 23

Figure-8 Customer frequency and Brand awareness Cross tabulation 24


Figure-9 PLB awareness frequency tabulation cross tabulation 25
Figure-10 PLB awareness frequency tabulation 26
Figure-11 Electronics’ PLB and gender cross tabulation 27

Figure12 Perception on PLB and gender cross tabulation 28

Figure-13 Perception on PLB’s quality and gender cross tabulation 29

Figure-14 Brand conscious customers and buying decision cross 30


tabulation

Figure-15 Perception about change in buying decisions with the influence 31


of display
Figure-16 Attributes frequency tabulation 32

Figure-17 Factor frequency tabulation 33

Figure-18 Most preferred koryo appliance frequency tabulation 34

Figure-19 New product shift frequency and Sach preference cross 35


tabulation
Figure-20 Factor frequency tabulation 36

Figure-21 Tasty treat preference and buying decision cross tabulation 37

Figure-22 Influencing factor frequency tabulation 38

Figure-23 New product shift frequency and satisfaction level tabulation 39


LIST ABBREVIATIONS

1) PRIL : Pantaloon Retail India Ltd


2) FVRL : Future value Retail Ltd
3) PLB : Private Label Brand
4) NB : National Brand
5) VM : Visual merchandising
6) ALL : A Little Large
7) DJ & C : Denim jeans & casuals
8) TT : Tasty treat
9) POS : Point of sale
10) POP : Point of purchase
11) SC : supply chain
12) FMCG :Fast Moving Consumer Goods
13) FDI : Foreign Direct Investment
14) CSO : Central Statistical Organization
15) GRDI : Global Retail Development Index
16) WRC : World Retail Congress
17) JV : Joint venture
18) SPSS : Statistical Package for Social sciences
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Private label brands are all set to spoil the party for the national brands since
recent times. Top multi brand retailers including shoppers stop, Lifestyle, Reliance
trends, Hypercity and the Future value retail ltd plan to aggressively push own
brands at par with established ones and the new ones.

Big Bazaar intends to promote it’s private labels as national brands and license it
to other retailers where PLB contribute 20-25% of total sales. In this scenario PLB
strategy is being the most preferred one to any retailer to survive in the industry.

This research was started by finding out benefits and possibilities in introducing
private labels against national brands. For this, Big Bazaar India’s biggest hyper
market chain gave me the platform. Right from understanding various
contributions made by private brands to various departments. And their margins,
which were very much attractive. Finally through various data collection tools,
data was analyzed for proper understanding of the problem.

Few well known private brands of Big Bazaar keep showing great result and even
competing with the national brands. On this fact plate, recommendations were
designed to suit the applicability.

Promoting private brands as similar to national brands will give positive results in
terms of sales. As per the final figures from this show that Big Bazaar can
introduce more private brands in the future.
CHAPTER I

Introduction and theoretical


background of the study

1
Introduction and theoretical background of the study
Growth of organized retail chain in India has also led to growth of private label
brands in India. Indian economy has seen average growth rate of 6.8 percent since
1994, putting purchasing power in the hands of customer. Though initial growth of
private label brands in India has been limited to certain categories like grocery and
apparel, it is expected to expand into many other categories as well. The CSO
estimated the economic growth of India for the last quarter of 2005-2006 to be 9.3
percent, marginally below 9.9 percent registered for China in the same period. For
the same, given scope for high growth, management consultancy A. T. Kearney
has placed India on top of its Global Retail Development Index in 2006. Currently,
organized retail in India is estimated to have only 3 percent share. In the total retail
market, it is expected to grow at 25-30 percent. Thus, with the growth of
organized retail in India, the private label brands are also expected to grow as
experienced in other developed countries. The growth of private label brands in
India presents an interesting opportunity for the retailer to understand the
motivations of consumers behind choice of private label brands.

Meaning of Private Label Brands:


A private-label product is a manufactured good that a retailer purchases from a
supplier, with the intention of renaming, repackaging and selling it under the
distributor‟s own brand name. Depending on the agreement between a
manufacturer and a retailer, the manufacturer sometimes handles the packaging
and labeling for the retailer for an additional charge. Otherwise, the retailer is
responsible for the process of dressing up the product as its own. Thus, it can be
said that Brands owned not by a manufacturer or producer but by a retailer or
supplier who gets its goods made by a contract manufacturer under its own label
are called private label brands. Manufacturers use either their own name, that of a
middleman, or a combination of both when they are marketing their products.

2
Private labeling occurs when middlemen, usually large retailers or wholesalers,
develop their own brand. Building a following from scratch through private-label
products, especially in rough economic times, is challenging because smaller
retailers do not have the marketing budget compared to their larger-sized
competition.

Evolution of private label brands:


The definition of private label branding has evolved significantly over time. Some
would argue the term “private label” is a misnomer of great proportions. There is
no question that the words “private label” acknowledges the birth, history and
existence of generic and store brands. Yet, the term does not adequately capture
the extent to which private label has progressed. Today's retail marketers are
managing their proprietary brands with the same combination of care and
innovation as manufacturers of national brands. In recent years, retailers have been
liberating themselves from the traditional definition of private label marketing as
being the poor relative of national brand consumer goods, and, in doing so,
opening up huge opportunities for private label branding. These opportunities
require the adoption of a different set of marketing and branding practices to
support and propel the retailer‟s business and marketing ideals for its private label
brands.

The key to successful marketing management for today‟s retailers is to understand


the contribution and role of their proprietary or “own” brands in the long-term
business strategy and marketing mix of the retail store and consider both the
supply side and the demand side of the equation. Effective category management
can enable retailers to solidify and optimize supply chain relationships. Strategic
brand management goes hand in hand with these endeavors to establish
sustainable points of difference in each aisle and segment within the store.

3
It also spurs decisions about how to appropriately define the retailer‟s “own”
brand portfolio in order to galvanize consumers to connect and reconnect with its
franchise in a compelling manner.

Benefits of Private Label Brands:


1) Since manufacturers' (producers') brands have large advertising
expenditures built into their cost, a private labeler is able to buy the same
goods at a lower cost and thus sell them at a lower price and/or at a better
profit margin.
2) In addition, private labelers have more control over pricing and are able to
advantageously display their own brands for maximum impact. For
example, a grocery store can quickly reduce the price of its own private-
label brand in order to meet or beat a competitor's price. Or the grocery
store can create a special point-of-purchase advertising display and/or give
its brand predominant shelf space in order to boost sales.
3) Private-label brands are usually priced lower than comparable
4) Manufacturers' brands and therefore appeal to bargain-conscious
consumers. An example of a private-label brand would be a supermarket
product bearing a store label with a product's name. As already mentioned,
retailers like PLBs because of their potential to increase store loyalty, chain
profitability, control over shelf space, bargaining power over
manufacturers.

4
Introduction to private brand strategy:

Private brand strategy has become a superior category of management skills and a
basis for establishing customers‟ shopping preference in retail channels. The
marketing channels are facing increasingly fierce challenges, which include
continuous development, new product types, new category management and new
privately own brands that meet customers‟ diverse demands. With rapid marketing
advancement, more innovative types of retail channels, such as department stores,
hypermarkets, wholesale warehouses, warehouse clubs, shopping malls, shopping
centers, power centers, theme/festival centers and outlet centers are develop and
introduced into the market.

Fig-1 PLB conceptual frame:

5
Fig-2 Global view of PLB:

Fig-3 PLB penetration:

6
CHAPTER 2
Research Methodology

7
Research Methodology

Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem,


formulating a hypothesis, collecting the facts or data, analyzing the fact and
reaching certain conclusion either in the form of solutions towards the concerned
problems. Thus methodology not only talks about the research methods but also
consider the logic behind the method we use behind the context of our research
study.

Defining the research problem

Review about the concept of project

Sample designing

Collection of data through structured questionnaire

Analysis of data

Interpretation and report writing

8
Title: A Study on private label brands vs national brands.

Primary objective:

 To understand the possibility of success when retailers introduce private


brands.
Secondary objectives:
 To explore if buying choices are made based on brand loyalty.
 To analyze whether customers actively seek for new brands or strict to old
brands.
Sampling Plan:
 Target Population: Individuals between the age group of 18 to 70 years
will be chosen as the target population. The people under this age group
who are frequent visitors and shoppers to Big Bazaar, Hubli.
 Sampling Procedure: The sampling procedure using here is simple
random sampling. Simple random sampling means each sample in the
population has equal chance to be picked up for the study.
 Sample Size: A sample of 150 customers can be taken in order to carry the
study.
 Sample Elements: The sample elements will consist of people who visit
and shop from Big bazaar.
Data Collection:
Data is the information which will be collected from various sources. It concerns
with gather accurate information about the problem.
Data collection mode: Two methods can be used to collect the relevant data,
which are essential for the study.

9
 Primary Data: Data will be collected to obtain desired information
through structured questionnaire.
 Secondary Data: Data is collected through books, magazines, newspapers
and internet…etc

Plan of Analysis:
The collected data from both primary and secondary sources will be tabulated in
the form of tables. The data collection through questionnaire will be analyzed in
detail and divided into various categories of preferences. By giving inputs to
various methods in SPSS i can observe the impact of visual merchandising on
buying decisions of customers. The analysis of data using SPSS will give the
meaningful conclusion for my research.

Limitations of the study:


There are a few limitations to the study that may arise due to the following
reasons:
1. Reluctance of the sample to give a proper feedback.
2. The study is confined just to Hubli,Karnataka.
3. Language barrier prevailed.

10
CHAPTER 3
Industry & Company Profiles

11
INDUSTRY & COMPANY PROFILES:

The retail scenario is one of the fastest growing industries in India over the last
couple of years. The Indian retail industry is the third largest in the world.
Comprising of organized and unorganized sectors, though initially, the retail
industry in India was mostly unorganized consists of small and medium grocery
store, medicine stores, subzi mandi, kirana stores, paan shops etc. however with
the change of tastes and preferences of the consumers, the industry is getting more
popular these days and getting organized as well. More than 90% of retailing in
India fall into the unorganized sector, the organized sector is largely concentrated
in big cities. Organized retail in India is expected to grow 25-30 per cent yearly
and is expected to increase from Rs35, 000crore in 2004-05 to Rs109, 000 crore
($24 billion) by 2010.
Retail formats in India:

Format Description The Value Proposition


Branded Stores Exclusive showrooms either owned or Complete range available
franchised out by a manufacturer. for a given brand, certified
product quality
Specialty Focus on a specific consumer need, carry Greater choice to the
Stores most consumer,
of the brands available comparison between brands
is possible
Department Large stores having a wide variety of One stop shop catering to
Stores products, varied/
organized into different departments such consumer needs
as
clothing, house wares, furniture,
appliances,
toys, etc.
Supermarkets Extremely large self-service retail outlets One stop shop catering to
varied
consumer needs

12
Discount Stores offering discounts on the retail Low Prices
Stores price
through selling high volumes and reaping
economies of scale
Hypermarket Larger than a supermarket, sometimes Low prices, vast choice
with a available
warehouse appearance, generally located including services such as
in
cafeterias
quieter parts of the city
Convenience Small self-service formats located in Convenient location and
Stores crowded extended
urban areas Operating hours.
Shopping An enclosure having different formats of Variety of shops available
Malls in store
to each other.
retailers, all under one roof.

Major Retailers in India

Future Group: Pantaloon is one of the biggest retailers in India with more than
450 stores across the country. Headquartered in Mumbai, it has more than 5
million sq. ft retail space located across the country. It's growing at an enviable
pace and is expected to reach 30 million sq. ft by the year 2010.

Tata Group: Tata group is another major player in Indian retail industry with its
subsidiary Trent, which operates Westside and Star India Bazaar. Established in
1998, it also acquired the largest book and music retailer in India „Landmark‟ in
2005. Trent owns over 4 lakh sq. ft retail space across the country.

RPG Group: RPG Group is one of the earlier entrants in the Indian retail market,
when it came into food & grocery retailing in 1996 with its retail Food world
stores. Later it also opened the pharmacy and beauty care outlets „Health & Glow‟.

13
Reliance: Reliance is one of the biggest players in Indian retail industry. More
than 300 Reliance Fresh stores and Reliance Mart are quite popular in the Indian
retail market. It's expecting its sales to reach Rs. 90,000 crores by 2010.

AV Birla Group: AV Birla Group has a strong presence in Indian apparel


retailing. The brands like Louis Phillipe, Allen Solly, Van Heusen, and Peter
England are quite popular. It's also investing in other segments of retail. It will
invest Rs. 8000-9000 crores by 2010.

Challenges facing Indian retail industry:

 The tax structure in India favors small retail business


 Lack of adequate infrastructure facilities
 High cost of real estate
 Dissimilarity in consumer groups
 Restrictions in Foreign Direct Investment
 Shortage of retail study options

The Future:

The retail industry in India is currently growing at a great pace and is expected to
go up to US$ 833 billion by the year 2013. It is further expected to reach US$ 1.3
trillion by the year 2018. As the country has got a high growth rates, the consumer
spending has also gone up and is also expected to go up further in the future. In the
last four year, the consumer spending in India climbed up to 75%. As a result, the
India retail industry is expected to grow further in the future days. By the year
2013, the organized sector is also expected to grow at a rate of 40%.

14
 According to Government of India estimate the retail sector is likely to
grow to a value of Rs. 2,00,000 crore (US$45 billion) and could yield 10 to
15 million retail jobs in the coming five years; currently this industry
employs 8% of the working population in India which is the second largest
employment provider after agriculture.
 India continues to be among the most attractive countries for global
retailers. According to the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion,
approximately US$ 47.43 million was the amount of Foreign Direct
Investment (FDI) inflow as on September 2009, in single-brand retail
trading.

More than 80% of the retail sector in the country is concentrated in the large cities.
A study reveals that among the more than 20 locations, for organized retail in
India, Mumbai was found to be the most preferred location followed closely by
Bangalore in the second position.

Future Trends:

 Lifestyle International, a division of Landmark Group, plans to have more


than 50 stores across India by 2012–13.
 Shoppers Stop has plans to invest Rs250 crore to open 15 new
supermarkets in the coming three years.
 Pantaloon Retail India (PRIL) plans to invest US$ 77.88 million this fiscal
to add up to existing 2.4 million sq ft retail space. PRIL intends to set up
155 Big Bazaar stores by 2014, raising its total network to 275 stores.
 Timex India will open another 52 stores by March 2011 at an investment of
US$ 1.3 million taking its total store count to 120. In the first six months of
the current fiscal ending September 30, 2009, the company has recorded a
net profit of US$ 1.2 million.

15
The Future Group:
Future Group, led by its founder and Group CEO, Mr. Kishore Biyani, is one of
India's leading business houses with multiple businesses spanning across the
consumption space. While retail forms the core business activity of Future Group,
group subsidiaries are present in consumer finance, capital, insurance, leisure and
entertainment, brand development, retail real estate development, retail media and
logistics.
Led by its flagship enterprise, Pantaloon Retail, the group operates over 12 million
square feet of retail space in over 71 cities and towns and 65 rural locations across
India. The group owns several leading formats including Pantaloons, Big Bazaar,
Food Bazaar, Home Town, eZone and Central. Pantaloon Retail was awarded
the International Retailer of the Year - 2007, by the US-based National Retail
Federation, the largest retail trade association and the Emerging Market Retailer of
the Year 2007 at the World Retail Congress in Barcelona.
Future Group believes in developing strong insights on Indian consumers and
building businesses based on Indian ideas, as espoused in the group's core value of
'Indianness'. The group's corporate credo is, 'Rewrite rules, Retain values'.

Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited:


Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited, is India‟s leading retailer that operates multiple
retail formats in both the value and lifestyle segment of the Indian consumer
market. Headquartered in Mumbai (Bombay), the company operates over 16
million square feet of retail space, has over 1000 stores across 73 cities in India
and employees over 30,000people.

16
The company‟s leading formats include Pantaloons, a chain of fashion
outlets, Big Bazaar, a uniquely Indian hypermarket chain, Food Bazaar, a
supermarket chain, blends the look, touch and feel of Indian bazaars with aspects
of modern retail like choice, convenience and quality and Central, a chain of
seamless destination malls. Some of its other formats include Brand Factory, Blue
Sky, ALL, Top 10 and Star & Sitara.

Future Value Retail Limited is a wholly owned subsidiary of Pantaloon Retail


(India) Limited. This entity has been created keeping in mind the growth and the
current size of the company‟s value retail business, led by its format divisions, Big
Bazaar and Food Bazaar.

The company operates 134 Big Bazaar stores, 170 Food Bazaar stores, among
other formats, in over 70 cities across the country, covering an operational retail
space of over 6 million square feet. As a focussed entity driving the growth of the
group's value retail business, Future Value Retail Limited will continue to deliver
more value to its customers, supply partners, stakeholders and communities across
the country and shape the growth of modern retail in India.

Big Bazaar:
Big Bazaar is not just another hypermarket. It caters to every need of your family.
Where Big Bazaar scores over other stores is its value for money proposition for
the Indian customers.
At Big Bazaar, you will definitely get the best products at the best prices - that's
what we guarantee. With the ever increasing array of private labels, it has opened
the doors into the world of fashion and general merchandise including home
furnishings, utensils, crockery, cutlery, sports goods and much more at prices that
will surprise you. And this is just the beginning. Big Bazaar plans to add much
more to complete your shopping experience.

17
Brief view of Big Bazaar’s Products and it’s own brands:
Fashion Dept Food Bazaar GM-Home Gm-fashion

Table-1 (Big bazaar’s products and it’s own brands)


Staples PURE &
Denims & T-shirts
FRESH Utensils Depot
AFL, DJ & C

Luggage
Fabrics & Cut pieces
Fruits & Vegetables Furniture carriers
AFL
Electronics
Formal wear
Ready to cook TT KORYO, SENSUI
KNIGHTHOOD
Casual wear
Non food CM
DJ & C
Party wear
Species
NYX
Ethnic wear
Live kitchen
SPUNK
Accessories
RIA RITU
Under garments
SHYLA
Night wear
SHYLA
Dress material
RIA RITU
Saree SHRISTHI
Foot wear DJ &C

18
CHAPTER 4
Analysis &
Interpretation of Data

19
New product seeking customers: gender segmentation

Gender Total
male % Female % %
Always 31 33.3 16 28.1 47 31.3
Mostly 24 25.8 16 28.1 40 26.7
Sometimes 15 16.1 17 29.8 32 21.3
Rarely 15 16.1 3 5.3 18 12
First visit 8 8.6 5 8.8 13 8.7

Total 93 100 57 100 150 100

Table-2 (New product seeking customers and gender cross tabulation)

35

30
31
25
24
20
male
15 17
16 16 15 15 Female
10

5 8
3 5
0

always mostly Sometimes Rarely First visit

Fig-4 (New product seeking customers and gender segmentation)

Interpretation:
75.3% of male and 85.1% of female are frequent visitors, on the whole 89.3% are
frequent visitors to the Big Bazaar. So trial customers are too less for Big Bazaar
as compared to other hypermarkets.

20
Buying decisions influencing factor: gender segmentation

Gender Total
male % Female % %
BD Brand 50 53.8 18 31.6 68 45.3
Lower price 13 14 19 33.3 32 21.3
Higher quality 10 10.8 15 26.3 25 16.7
After sales service 10 10.8 0 0 10 6.7
wide range availability of products 10 10.8 5 8.8 15 10
Total 93 100 57 100 150 100

Table-3 (Buying decisions influencing factor: cross tabulation)

60

50
50
40

30

20 male
18 19 Female
10 13 15
10 10 0 10 5
0

brand lowerprice higher afetr sales wide range


quality service avalability of
products

Fig-5 (Buying decisions influencing factor: gender segmentation)

Interpretation:
53.8% of male makes buying decision based on brand, 37% of female makes
buying decision based on brand and lower price. On the whole 66.6% are looking
for brand with lower price. Now customer‟s slogan has become „Brand with lower
price‟.

21
Brand conscious customers: gender segmentation

Gender Total
male % Female % %
Strongly agree 35 37.6 5 8.8 40 26.7
Agree 48 51.6 32 56.1 80 53.3
Disagree 5 5.4 15 26.3 20 13.3
Strongly disagree 5 5 5 8.8 10 6.7
Total 93 100 57 100 150 100

Table-4 (Brand conscious customers: gender cross tabulation)

60

50
48
40

35
30 32 male
Female
20

15
10

5 5 5 5
0

strongly agree agree disagree strongly disagree

Fig-6 (Brand conscious customers: gender segmentation)

Interpretation:
89.2% of male, 64.9% of female are brand conscious customers. On the whole
80% respondents are brand conscious. So brand slogan shouldn‟t leave while
introducing PLBs.

22
Ranking the Segments where branded products are most preferred.

Frequency Percent Valid Percent


Fashion 18 12.0 12.0
Food 46 30.7 30.7
Non food 67 44.7 44.7
Electronics 11 7.3 7.3
Foot wear 8 5.3 5.3

Total 150 100.0 100.0

Table-5 (Frequency analysis of Big Bazaar’s departments)

8
18
11

Fashion
Food
Non food
46
Electronics
Foot wear
67

Fig-7 ( Big Bazaar’s most branded preferred departments)

Interpretation:

44.7% are saying „non food segment‟ is the most preferred, 30.7% has given food
segment as 2nd preference. In the Food Bazaar, non-food dept is the most brand
sensitive area.

23
Medium of awareness of different available brands in Big Bazaar…

Medium of brand awareness Total


Brand Advertising( Prior Sales Paging in
promotion print/digital) customer people the store
Always 15(34.9) 18(34.6) 6(26.1) 5(27.8) 3(21.4) 47(31.3)
Mostly 11(25.6) 11(21.2) 9(39.1) 4(22.2) 5(35.7) 40(26.7)
Sometimes 6(14) 9(17.3) 7(30.4) 6(33.3) 4(28.6) 32(21.3)
Rarely 10(23.3) 4(7.7) 1(4.3) 2(11.1) 1(7.1) 18(12)
First visit 1(2.3) 10(19.2) 0 1(5.6) 1(7.1) 13(8.7)

Total 43(100) 52(100) 23(100) 18(100) 14(100) 150(100)

Table-6(Customer frequency and Brand awareness Cross tabulation)

20
18
16
14
12
10
8
always
6 mostly
4
2 Sometimes
0
Rarely
First visit

Fig-8(Analysis on customer visit: brand conscious customer segmentation)

Interpretation:

Big bazaar‟s most preferable five mediums are able to convince 58% of frequent
visitors. Advertising (print/digital) is being the best reachable and economical
medium among all five.

24
Well known fashion private label brand…

Valid
Frequency Percent Percent
DJ&C 68 45.3 54.8
AFL 47 31.3 37.9
Spunk 4 2.7 3.2
Knighthood 5 3.3 4.0
Total 124 82.7 100.0

Missing Customers 26 17.3

Total 150 100.0

Table-7(PLB awareness frequency tabulation cross tabulation)

5
4

DJ&C
AFL
47 Spunk
68
Knighthood

Fig-9(Analysis on PL brand awareness)

Interpretation:

The brands DJ & C and AFL are well known brands as 92.7% responded
positively towards them. Both were penetrated well in men‟s wear segment.
Dhoni‟s endorsement is playing major role in creating this turn towards these 2
brands.

25
Well known Food bazaar’s private label brand…

Frequency Percent Valid Percent


Tasty treat 52 34.7 46.0
Clean mate 3 2.0 2.7
Pure & Fresh 39 26.0 34.5
Care mate 2 1.3 1.8
Sach 17 11.3 15.0
Total 113 75.3 100.0

Missing System 37 24.7

Total 150 100.0


Table-8(PLB awareness frequency tabulation)

60

50
52

40
39
30

20
17
10
3 2
0

Tasty treat Clean mate Pure & Fresh Care mate Sach

Fig-10(Analysis on Food Bazaar’s PLB awareness)

Interpretation:

34.7% responded positively towards the brand Tasty treat, another 26% said pure
& fresh brand is also a well known brand in food category. But both are facing
tough competition from major FMCG manufacturers.

26
Awareness on private label brands in electronics…

Gender Total
male % Female % %
Koryo 88 94.6 48 84.2 136 90.7
Sensei 5 5.4 9 15.8 14 9.3
Total 93 100 57 100 150 100

Table-9(Electronics’ PLB and gender cross tabulation)

100

90
88
80

70

60

50 Koryo
48
40 Sensei

30

20

10
5 9
0

male Female

Fig-11(Analysis on Koryo and Sensui awareness)

Interpretation:

94.6% of male and 84.2% of female are aware of the electronics brand Koryo.
This was made by personal references and mouth talk in most of the times.

27
Private label brands are economical…

Gender Total
male % Female % %
Strongly agree 20 21.5 19 33.3 39 26
Agree 57 61.3 32 56.1 89 59.3
Neither agree nor disagree 7 7.5 5 8.8 12 8
Disagree 5 5.4 1 1.8 6 4
Strongly disagree 4 4.3 0 0 4 2.7
Total 93 100 57 100 150 100

Table-10(Perception on PLB and gender cross tabulation)

60
57
50

40

30
32
male
20
20 Female
19
10
7 5 5 1 4 0
0

Strongly Agree Neither agree Disagree Strongly


agree nor disagree disagree

Fig-12(Analysis on economical capability of PLB)

Interpretation:

82.2% of male and 89.4% of female are saying „Big Bazaar‟s private brands are
economical‟. Since PLS is being succeeded in the case of Big Bazaar PLB
merchandising.

28
Private label brands provide quality…

Total
male % Female % %
strongly agree 33 35.5 13 22.8 46 30.7
Agree 40 43 37 64.9 77 51.3
Neither agree nor disagree 11 11.8 3 5.3 14 9.3
Disagree 4 4.3 4 7 8 5.3
Strongly disagree 5 5.4 0 5 3.3
Total 93 100 57 100 150 100

Table-11(Perception on PLB’s quality and gender cross tabulation)

45
40
40
35 37
30 33
25
20
male
15
10
Female
13
11
5
3 4 4 5 0
0

strongly Agree Neither Disagree Strongly


agree agree nor disagree
disagree

Fig-13 (PLB’s quality: gender segmentation)

Interpretation:

78.5% of male and 87.7% of female are accepting „Big Bazaar‟s private brands are
providing quality‟. This attribute can compete with NB, so that PLB penetration
can be more effortless.

29
Change of buying decision towards private label brands…

Change of buying decision Total


Always Mostly Sometimes Rarely Never
strongly agree 5(18.5) 15(23.8) 13(39.4) 4(40) 3(17.6) 40(26.7)
agree 14(51.9) 32(50.8) 19(57.6) 5(50) 10(53.8) 80(53.3)
disagree 4(14.8) 13(20.6) 0 0 3(17.6) 20(13.3)
strongly disagree 4(14.8) 3(4.8) 1(3) 1(10) 1(5.9) 10(6.7)

Total 27(100) 63(100) 33(100) 10(100) 17(100) 150(100)


Table-12(Brand conscious customers and buying decision cross tabulation)

35

30

25

20
strongly agree
agree
15
disagree
10
strongly disagree
5

0
Always Mostly Sometimes Rarely Never

Fig-14(Analysis on shifting of brand conscious customer towards PLB )


Interpretation:

On the whole 43.8% of brand conscious customers change their buying decision
towards Big Bazaar‟s private brands. Another 16.3% who don‟t look for brand are
positively responded towards Big Bazaar‟s private brands.

30
Choosing private label brand DJ & C rather another national brand…

DJ & C preference Total


Yes % No % %
Always 17 20.5 6 14.6 23 18.5
Mostly 35 42.2 17 41.5 52 41.9
Sometimes 21 25.3 10 24.4 31 25
Rarely 4 4.8 4 9.8 8 6.5
Never 6 7.2 4 9.8 10 8.1

Total 83 100 41 100 124 100


Table-13( DJ & C preference and buying decision cross tabulation)

40

35
35
30

25

20 Yes
21
15 17 17 No

10
10
5
6 6
4 4 4
0

Always Mostly Sometimes Rarely Never

Fig-15(DJ & C preference: Buying decision segmentation)

Interpretation:
62.7% of male and 56.1% of female who change their buying decision towards
private brands prefer DJ & C. On the whole only 14.1% are not looking at DJ& C.
This made an U-turn towards PLBs.

31
Most influencing factor to prefer private label brand DJ & C…

Valid
Frequency Percent Percent
Lowers price 52 34.7 62.7
Dhoni's Endorsement 9 6.0 10.8
Quality 14 9.3 16.9
Wide range of availability 7 4.7 8.4
Latest models 1 .7 1.2

Total 83 55.3 100.0


Missing Customers 67 44.7
Total 150 100.0

Table-14(Attributes frequency tabulation)

1
7 price

14
Dhoni's Endorsement

Quality

52 Wide range of
9
availability
Latest models

Fig-16(DJ & C preference attribute segmentation)

Interpretation:

Lower price is the most influencing factor where 62.7% are expecting this from
the private brands. And quality is being the second most preferred one where
16.9% voted for that.

32
Lagging factor for DJ & C compared to another national brand…

Valid
Frequency Percent Percent
Lower Price 3 2.0 3.6
Dhoni's endorsement 11 7.3 13.3
Quality 9 6.0 10.8
Wide range of availability 16 10.7 19.3
latest models 44 29.3 53.0

Total 83 55.3 100.0


Missing Customers 67 44.7
Total 150 100.0

Table-15(Factor frequency tabulation)

3
11

Price
9 Dhoni's endorsement
Quality
44
Wide range of availability
latest models
16

Fig-17(Analysis on DJ & C preference lagging factor )

Interpretation:

53% said „Lack of latest models is the lagging factor in choosing DJ & C as the
preferred one‟. Another 19.3% are saying „DJ & C doesn‟t provide wide range of
availability‟.

33
Most preferred electronic appliance in the brand Koryo…

Frequency Percent Valid Percent


Small Appliances 62 41.3 41.3
Refrigerators 16 10.7 10.7
TV sets 22 14.7 14.7
Washing machines 47 31.3 31.3
Air Conditioner 3 2.0 2.0

Total 150 100.0 100.0

Table-16(Most preferred koryo appliance frequency tabulation)

47
Small Appliances
62
Refrigerators
TV sets
Washing machines
Air Conditioner

22
16

Fig-18(Analysis on preferred appliance in Koryo)

Interpretation:
41.3% and 31.3% are having Koryo preference in small appliances and washing
machines respectively. So Koryo brand penetration into small appliances can be
key success in PLS.

34
Preferring newly launched private label brand Sach than other FMCG
national brands…

Sach preference Total


Yes % No % %
always 7 33.3 40 31 47 31.3
mostly 4 19 36 27.9 40 26.7
Sometimes 3 14.3 29 22.5 32 21.3
Rarely 5 23.8 13 10.1 18 12
never 2 9.5 11 8.5 13 8.7

Total 21 100 129 100 150 100

Table-17(New product shift frequency and Sach preference cross tabulation)

45
40
40
35
36
30
25 29

20 Yes
15 No
10 13
11
5 7 4 3 5 2
0

always mostly Sometimes Rarely never

Fig-19(New product shift: Sach preference segmentation)

Interpretation:

86% are unaware of the brand such, only 14% said that „they aware of it‟. On
addition 58% are frequently new product shifting customers who said „no to sach‟.
So promos on Sach brand can make it as most preferred FMCG brand.

35
Factor which increase awareness of an FMCG private label brand Sach…

Valid
Frequency Percent Percent
Lower visibility in possible media 52 34.7 34.7
Lack of sales people promotion 11 7.3 7.3
Poor in store promotions 45 30.0 30.0
Lack of proper visual merchandising 42 28.0 28.0

Total 150 100.0 100.0


Table-18(Factor frequency tabulation)

60

50
52

40 45
42

30

20

10
11

Lower visibility in Lack of sales people Poor in store Lack of proper visual
possible media promotion promotions merchandising

Fig-20(Analysis on Sach awareness)

Interpretation:

As per 34.7% respondents, highier visilibility in the media may increase Sach
awareness. Another 30% said „instore promotions can increase Sach
awareness‟.Sales people promotions alone are not enough to create more
awareness on Sach.

36
Preferring private label brand Tasty treat rather another national brand…

Tasty treat preference Total


Yes % No % %
Always 15 18.3 5 16.1 20 17.7
Mostly 30 36.6 13 41.9 43 38.1
Sometimes 16 19.5 10 32.3 26 23
Rarely 6 7.3 2 6.5 8 7.1
Never 15 18.3 1 3.2 16 14.2

Total 82 100 31 100 113 100

Table-19(Tasty treat preference and buying decision cross tabulation)

35

30
30
25

20
Yes
15
16
15 15 No
13
10
10
5
6
5
2 1
0

Always Mostly Sometimes Rarely Never

Fig-21(Buying decision pattern: Tasty treat preference segmentation)

Interpretation:
44.9% prefer Tasty treat, who change their buying decision towards private
brands. 29% don‟t prefer tasty treat. TT is facing tough competition from various
competitors due to lack of proper promotion against them.

37
Factors that made the private label brand Tasty treat to be preferable by
most of the customers…

Frequency Percent Valid Percent


Free of chemical
2 1.3 2.4
ingredients
Special offers 53 35.3 64.6
Taste 17 11.3 20.7
Packaging 4 2.7 4.9
Freshness 6 4.0 7.3

Total 82 54.7 100.0


Missing Customers 68 45.3
Total 150 100.0
Table-20(Influencing factor frequency tabulation)

60

50 53

40

30

20

17
10

2 4 6
0

Free of Special offers Taste packaging Freshness


chemical
ingredients

Fig-22(Analysis on tasty treat impressiveness)


Interpretation:
64.6% felt that special offers of the tasty treat are the most attracting parameter to
buy. Another 20.7 % said taste is 2nd most preferred one.

38
On the whole, satisfaction level with the private label brands rather than
national brands…

Frequency Percent Valid Percent


Highly satisfied 42 28.0 28.0
Satisfied 86 57.3 57.3
Neither satisfied nor
3 2.0 2.0
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 19 12.7 12.7

Total 150 100.0 100.0

Table-21(New product shift frequency and satisfaction level tabulation)

19

3 Highly satisfied
42

Satisfied

Neither satisfied nor


dissatisfied
Dissatisfied

86

Fig-23(Analysis on satisfaction level with PLB)

Interpretation:

85.3% are satisfied with big Bazaar‟s private brands, only 12.7% is yet to be
satisfied. So PLB path in Big Bazaar is very focused due to strong efforts they
keep making. This is the right time where Big Bazaar can come with new PLBs in
to the market.

39
Table-22:

(Cross tabulation for Gender: PLB satisfaction: Impulsive buying towards


PLB)

Interpretation:
From the 1st day, my baby steps moved towards reaching my research objective.
Every move I made in this journey gave me immense and ironic facts about
Private label brands. This delivered broad idea on „Power of PLB‟.
81.7% of male respondents are satisfied with PLB performance where 59% are
first timers to PLB.
On the other side 91.6% of female respondents felt that „PLB succeed in providing
good performance‟, and 42% of them have come to PLB for the 1st time.
So PLBs can be introduced into Big Bazaar without 2nd thought, providing current
promotional activities on PLB need improvement.

40
CHAPTER 5

Key findings &


Conclusions

41
KEY FINDINGS:

1) Considering Hubli demographics and their preference towards hyper


market, Big Bazaar has competitive advantage over other store since it is
the only hyper market in the city.
2) Most of the customers are looking for brand with lower price.
3) Male customers were more brand conscious rather than female, it seems
male fashion private brands need intensive care while entering.
4) Non food department is the area where customers wouldn‟t compromise at
brand, 2nd would be the food department.
5) On the other side foot wear and electronics are the least bothered about
brands.
6) Among five promo mediums that Big Bazaar-Hubli follows, Advt in print
or digital is the most effective one.
7) Among the fashion private brands, DJ & C and AFL are well known brands
for the customers.
8) Among the Food Bazaar‟s private brands, Tasty treat and Pure & Fresh are
well known brands for the customers.
9) The brand Koryo is being the preferred one in electronics segment .
10) Customers felt that private brands are more economical and quality
assured.
11) Even the brand conscious customers have shifted towards private brands,
performance of these brands ii quite well interms of quality, lower price
and service.
12) Among fashon private brands, DJ & C is the brand which made higher
customer shift from national brand, like wise we got Tasty treat in Food
Bazaar and Koryo in electronics segment.
13) The non food segment private brand, Sach has least awareness among all
other available private brands in the store.

42
Conclusion:

Private label brands are all set to spoil the party for the national brands since
recent times. Top multi brand retailers including shoppers stop, Lifestyle,
Reliance trends, Hypercity and the Future value retail ltd plan to aggressively
push own brands at par with established ones and the new ones.

Big Bazaar intends to promote it‟s private labels as national brands and license
it to other retailers where PLB contribute 20-25% of total sales. In this scenario
possibility of success is very high if Big Bazaar continues to introduce more
private brands.

43
CHAPTER 6

Suggestions &
Recommendations

44
Suggestions and Recommendations:

1) This is the time to create a positive image of private brands for your
customer which will lead to stronger brand loyalty.
2) We have greater freedom with pricing strategy to create our own marketing
plans, so promos or melas should be private brand centric.
3) Reduce dependence on brand names for sales, other side private brand
needs to be promoted as national brand.
4) As of now better not to introduce more private brands in to the non food
and food segments. Since it is brand sensitive area.
5) Foot wear and electronics is the area where more no of private brands can
be introduced.
6) Advertising in print/digital media is being the best medium for promotions
so this is the place where customers get aware of new brands.
7) Fashion private brands such as Knighthood, Spunk and Matrix, electronics
private Sensui, Food bazaar‟s private brands Sach, caremate and cleanmate
need more promotional activities to be sensed by the customers frequently.
8) DJ & C should concentrate on providing latest models, this was the reason
for DJ & C rejection.
9) As of now, Koryo is best choose for small appliance so this the time to
grab attention towards it.
10) Higher visibility in possible media and proper visual merchandising can
increase the awareness of the brand Sach.

45
CHAPTER 7

BIBLIOGRAPHY

46
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Books

1. Kotler Philip, Marketing Management, Pearson Education Inc. 11th Edition.

2. C.R. Kothari, Research Methodology Methods and Techniques, New age


international Publishers, New Delhi, 2nd revised edition:2004.

3. Rajendra Nargundkar, Marketing Research, Tata McGraw Hill Education


Private Limited, New Delhi, 3rd edition: 2010.

4. Annual Reports, RAI, 2009-2010

Websites

http://www.rai.co.in / 12/08/2010.
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/2003/05/31/stories/2003053100
600600.htm / 29/08/2010.
http://india.smetoolkit.org/india/en/content/en/43270/Case-Study-
Maximizing-Retail- Sales / 23/07/2010.
http://www.brc.org.uk/plb242606 / 19/08/2010.
http://business.mapsofindia.com/india-retail-industry/ / 21/06/2010.
http://acnielson.com/powerof plb/6677242406 / 30/07/2010.

47
CHAPTER 8

APPENDICES

48
QUESTIONNAIRE
Hi! Hope you enjoyed the shopping. It would be really great if you can help me
(PGDM student of SCMS-COCHIN) in understanding few things that would make
shopping effective and entertaining.
Please help me by filling out this questionnaire and be a part of my Marketing
Research project.

Name of the Store: Big Bazaar Location: Hubli,


Karnataka
1. Do you actively seek newly launched products when you go out for
shopping?
 Always
 Mostly
 Sometimes
 Rarely
 Never
2. On which base you make buying decisions?
 Brand
 Lower price
 Higher quality
 After sales service
 Wide range availability of products
3. I am a Brand conscious customer…
 Strongly Agree
 Agree
 Neither Agree Nor Disagree
 Disagree

49
 Strongly Disagree
4. Rank the following Segments where branded products are most preferred.
 [ ] Fashion
 [ ] Food
 [ ] Non food
 [ ] Electronics
 [ ] Foot wear
5. How do you know about different available brands in Big Bazaar?
 Brand promotions
 Advertising(Print or Digital)
 Prior customer(Reference)
 Sales people
 Paging in the store
6. On which of these brands you are most aware of ?
 DJ&C Tasty treat Koryo
 AFL Clean Mate Sensei
 Spunk Pure & Fresh
 Knighthood Care Mate
 Matrix Sach

7. I am aware that “these Branded products are more economical.”


 Strongly Agree
 Agree
 Neither Agree Nor Disagree
 Disagree
 Strongly Disagree

50
8. I feel “these branded products are providing more quality than other
brands.”
 Strongly Agree
 Agree
 Neither Agree Nor Disagree
 Disagree
 Strongly Disagree
9. I change my buying decisions based on lower price / higher quality
/discounts of these brands.
 Always
 Mostly
 Sometimes
 Rarely
 Never
10. Do you prefer DJ&C rather Levi's Signature / Famous Basics?
 Yes [ ]
 No [ ]

If yes, rank the following attributes.

 [ ] Price
 [ ] Dhoni‟s endorsement
 [ ] Quality
 [ ] Wide range of availability
 [ ] Latest models
11. Rank your preferences in KORYO choose.
 [ ] Small appliances
 [ ] Refrigerators
 [ ] T.V Sets

51
 [ ] Washing machines
 [ ] Air conditioners
12. “Sachin Tendulkar is endorsing the brand SACH.” are you aware?
Yes No
If no, specify the reason
 Lower visibility in possible media
 Lack of sales people promotion
 Poor in-store promotions
 Lack of proper visual merchandising
13. Do you prefer TASTY TREAT rather Slice / Maaza / Frooti?
 Yes
 No
If yes, rank your preferences
 [ ] Free of chemical ingredients
 [ ] Special offers
 [ ] Taste
 [ ] Packaging
 [ ] Freshness
14. On the whole, have you satisfied with these brands?
 Highly satisfied
 Satisfied
 Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
 Dissatisfied
 Highly dissatisfied

52
Demographics

1. Name: ______________________________________________

2. Gender: Male / Female

3. Age: 10-20 / 20-30 / 30-40 / 40-50 /50 & above

4. Education:

5. Occupation: Student/ Employee /Business /any other (please specify)


_________________

6. Income range: 4k-10k / 10k-20k / 20k-30k /30k-40k/40k & above

7. Contact no:

53
About Hubli - Dharwad

Location : The twin cities of Hubli-Dharwad are located at a distance of around


420 KM north of Bangalore, the capital of Karnataka state and 550 KM south of
Mumbai. The city of Dharwad is just east of the famous Western Ghats and is
surrounded by hills and lakes. Dharwad district (before Re-organization of 1997)
covers an area of 13738 sq. KM and with a twin city population of about 9,
00,000. The city of Dharwad is the district head quarters and twin cities (Hubli-
Dharwad) are educational and financial, industrial hub for North Karnataka

Nearest Airport: The Airport at Hubli (18 KM). There are other nearby airports
like Belgaum (80 KM), Goa (160 KM), Bangalore (420 KM) and Mumbai (550
KM). From each of above cities there are numerous luxury buses and trains.

About Hubli

Hubli is a major city of this district and is a famous


industrial town. This historic town was known as Raya
Hubli and also as Elaya Puravada Halli during the ancient
times. This city metamorphosed into an important
commercial centre for trade in cotton and iron during the
reign of the Vijaynagara empire. The city is noted for its handloom textile units
and has many cotton ginning and processing mills.
The district has some of the important monuments like the beautiful temples,
churches, mosques, and monasteries that are worth a visit. Not to be missed are the
delicious Pedas, the specialty of the district.

54
Fact Sheet - Hubli

- Area 13738 SQ Km

- Population 9,000,00

- Languages Spoken English, Hindi, Kannada & Marathi.

- Climate Temperature 16-37 Degree C


Semiarid climate
15.21 N
75.07 E

- Airport Available

- Railway Hubli is well connected to Bangalore & Mumbai


by rail network. 18 trains passing through Hubli.

- Power On par with best in Karnataka.

- Water supply Futuristic water supply and sewage

- Telecom services Normal connections; ISDN at the rate of 64 /128


/384/512
Kbps; Intelligent networks; Broadband connectivity;
leased lines

- Internet services PSTN Dial up / ISDN Dial up / Leased

- Network Access Any data rates like 2/8 /34 /140 Mbps and multiple
access from customer premises on optical fiber system
Redundancy provided by optical fibers in SDH ring

- Leased line circuits Leased circuits of 64 Kbps, 2 Mbps available from any
Location in NK to national or international
destinations
. 2 / 8 / 140 Mb access can be provided from the users

55
premises on optical fiber system

- Real Estate Commercial cost / sq ft: 15-30 for rental, Rs 1,000 -


3,000 for
Purchase in Hubli city.

Housing Rent 2,500-5,000 for a two bedroom


apartment
Rs 700- 1,000/ sq.ft. for purchase of ready to occupy
apartments

- Education 72.1% literacy.

- Recreation Parks wide open spaces in addition to facilities like clubs,


theaters, etc.

- Health Care Fully equipped generic and specialty hospitals with


state -of-art facilities, both at Hubli and Dharwad

56
BIG BAZAAR-HUBLI

57
58
59

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