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Introduction

This is the report of a Policy Dialogue that took place on Saturday, May 24, 2008, at Mambayya House, Kano. The dialogue was organized by the Centre for Democratic Research and Training, Mambayya House, in collaboration with the Kano State Ministry of Justice, and was supported by the Law Firm of Dikko and Mahmoud, Kano. The report presents the introduction to the Policy Dialogue‟ its main deliberations, and findings of the exercise. Thereafter, recommendations are provided, which if implemented by the government and other stakeholders, the problem of traffic management in Kano would be overcome.

Many an inhabitant or important visitor to metropolitan Kano today expresses deep angst over the state of traffic and transportation system in the state, despite the fact that the state government is never neglectful of its responsibility in terms of building new roads and streets across the state. Indeed motorists and passengers on the streets of urban Kano wonder whether they are in the midst of a circus, given the chaotic nature of traffic movement and mode of driving, especially given the large population of Kano (which is the most populated state in Nigeria according to the 2006 Census figures).

The glaring reality in metropolitan Kano these days is a poor transport system, which is characterized by poor road networks, failed traffic lights, mountainous refuse dumps, over flooded gutters and roadside drainages, and encroachment into road surfaces by itinerant traders and hawkers of wares. Very few motorists seem to know or care to comply with traffic regulations, and often, there is hardly any authority to enforce such regulations. A deep sense of anger and frustration is written visibly on the faces of virtually all traffic users and pedestrians. Everything and everyone is at risk. The

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worst victims are women and children. People‟s health and wealth have never had it so bad, while convenience and comfort on the road had since become a foregone aspiration.

Chaotic traffic is admittedly common to most urban centres in Nigeria. Kano however, in recent past seems to have more than a fair share of this burden. The proliferation of motor-cycle taxis in the city is unmatched by any Nigerian town or city. The riders seem to generally operate above the law contributing to serious accidents, injuring many and contributing to increasing air and noise pollution. Some of them engage in petty crimes further compounding the nuisance. The problem, however, is not just „Yan Achaba‟. Our culture of road use has considerably worsened in recent years. Most road users don‟t respect traffic rules and regulations. Our streets, roads, side- walks, highways and the few open spaces remaining in the city have been taken over by traders, second hand car dealers, other small businesses, beggars and hawkers of all sorts of wares ranging from petrol to cigarettes. The authorities seem to be in a constant retreat on enforcement issues thereby broadening the scope of lawlessness. The situation is simply becoming unbearable.

Kano however has additional burden. It is evidently lagging behind in initiatives aimed at tackling these problems. Nothing apparently depicts the dire state of rule of law in Nigeria and in Kano in particular more than the chaos in roads and streets where the rule of law has been replaced by the Rule of All. If Kano must restore its glory as the Centre of Commerce, as a decent city to live and bring up our children, urgent and decisive steps need to be taken to restore it as a clean,

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attractive and efficient city with modern infrastructure including safe and decent public transport system.

Objectives Of The Dialogue The specific objectives of the Policy Dialogue were as follows:

To bring to the attention of all stakeholders, relevant authorities, and the general public the current chaotic situation in urban Kano regarding traffic management and urban mass transportation system;

To identify the key areas of failure and the factors responsible for such failure;

To identify the major effects and the social costs of the current situation;

To identify short term, medium term, and long term measures needed to address the problem; and

To recommend concrete measures that would help to co-ordinate and streamline efforts in tackling the problem.

Justification for the Dialogue It is in response to these urgent challenges that the Centre of Democratic Research and Training, Mambayya House, Bayero University, Kano in collaboration with the Kano State Ministry of Justice and with the support of the Law Firm of DIKKO & MAHMOUD convened this Policy Dialogue that brought stakeholders together to review the situation, identify short, medium and long term policy measures that need to be taken to reverse the current trends and enthrone an efficient traffic management system and transportation infrastructure in the State.

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Methodology

The policy dialogue was conducted in one day and comprises three sessions: The first session was a brief opening ceremony. The opening session comprises brief opening remarks by organizers and Chair of the session as well as a keynote presentation defining the broad issues of the dialogue. The participants then broke into five working groups. Each group discussed one major theme and come up with observations and recommendations. The discussion in each group was coordinated by a facilitator and lead discussant (s) identified on the basis of their area of expertise and interest. The final activity was another plenary session that synthesized all group presentations. It is envisaged that a Final Report will be published and circulated to the State and Local Government authorities and all stake holders.

Key Issues The following were the key issues addressed during the Policy Dialogue:

i) Road systems and their condition

ii) Modes of transportation in Kano

iii) Traffic laws and enforcement agencies (State and Federal)

iv) Population and general environmental issues

v) Traffic volume and explosion

vi) Condition of vehicles

vii) Awareness of traffic rules and regulations

viii) People‟s attitude towards traffic rules and regulations

ix) Parking and other facilities

x) Unauthorized structures on road sides

xi) Road networks, development and expansion

xii) Public transport system

xiii) Health risks posed by poorly maintained and driven vehicles

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Participanting Stakeholders Participants at the Policy Dialogue came from diverse backgrounds, but the following were the most conspicuous:

Kano State Ministry of Justice

Kano State House of Assembly

Kano State Judiciary

Ministry of Works

Ministry of Environment

Ministry of Planning and Budget

Ministry of Health

State Fire Service

Urban Planning and Development Agency

The State Police Command

Federal Road Safety Commission

Directorate of Vehicle Inspection

Board of Internal Revenue

The Hizba Board

The Sharia Commission

The Ulama (Islamic Scholars)

Community Leaders/Traditional Rulers

Trade and Labour Unions

Road Transport Unions

Commercial Motorcycle Unions

Environment Activists

Professional Associations

The Academia

The Media

Opening Session The Opening session commenced by the opening prayer delivered by Dr. Saidu Ahmed Dukawa, Director General, Hisbah Board. Welcome remarks were made by A.B. Mahmoud (SAN) and Malam Muzzammil Sani Hanga, who was drafted in as the chair of the occasion

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due to the unavoidable absence of the Kano State Attorney General and Commissioner of Justice, Barrister Aliyu Umar, offered an opening remarks.

In his introductory remarks A.B. Mahmoud (SAN) gave a brief back ground to the Policy Dialogue; examines the various thematic areas of the breakout sessions and defined the expected outcome at the end of the workshop. Describing the growing chaotic traffic situation in Kano, he said it has reached a crisis level and has continued to be compounded by the absence of decent and organized public transport system. Commercial motorcycle riders generally operate above the law, leading to fatal accidents, injuring many and contributing to increasing air and noise pollution. He also argued that most road users do not respect traffic rules and regulations. Indeed, many simply do not know them. The streets, roads side-walks, highways and the few open spaces in the city have been taken over by traders, second hand car dealers, other small business, beggars and hawkers of all sorts of wares ranging from petrol to cigarettes. The relevant authorities seem to be in constant retreat on law enforcement issues thereby broadening the scope of lawlessness. Consequently, the one day Policy Dialogue should be able to come up with specific recommendations on the short, medium and long term measures to address the present predicament.

In his opening remarks, the Chairman explained to the audience that the purpose of the forum was to look at the problems of traffic congestion in Kano. He said, historically, Kano had the refutation of attracting visitors, who came from far and wide to interact freely and transact businesses without any fear of molestation. Regrettably, looking at our roads and streets over the past few years, things have changed. Hardly could one

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get someone that is satisfied with the conduct of life in Kano.

He argued that movements on roads, streets and highways are good measure of the life of people living in any town and their Government. Therefore, as one takes a look at our roads, streets and highways, one could have an appreciation of the type of people living in Kano and their attitude toward the authorities. We have clearly failed to put the necessary pressure on the relevant authorities to plan and organize our roads, streets and highways in our cities and towns. We have been able to confirm that we are a people under a perpetual struggle for social justice.

Consequently, the people of Kano freely express their regrets and lamentations over plethora of problems along our roads, streets and highways. Despite the existence of traffic laws, the relevant authorities are in constant retreat to enforce them. The culture of indiscriminate hawking and unlawful use of public space constitute big problems in Kano. The highly unorganized motor cycle riders have added to the nuisance, noise and confusion on our roads.

Therefore, as a result of the chaotic traffic situation, Kano is in dire need of a dynamic and courageous government to enforce traffic laws, review old laws, embark on massive enlightenment on proper road usage and set a time frame for total compliance. All stakeholders must unite to ensure total compliance by all and sundry. We must also endeavour to learn from countries that are more organized.

Finally, the Chairman specially thanks Mambayya House for organizing the dialogue, and expressed appreciation to A.B. Mahmoud and the Kano State

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Ministry of Justice for their support. He also expressed the hope that the challenges on our roads, streets and highways would be overcome within six months.

Key Note Address The key note address was presented by the Head of Geography Department Bayero University, Kano, Malam M.A. Liman and is divided into five parts. Part one comprises the introduction, which explains the economic basis of transportation and how the organization and management of modes of transport determines the overall growth of any settlement. The second part highlights in brief the development of commercial transport services in Kano metropolis. This section argues that for settlements north of Nigeria Kano is the leader in commercial transport services dating back to the 1950s. The third part describes the features of commercial transport service in Kano which is dominated by private individuals or what he called the informal sector of the economy.

The fourth part examines the transport service problems in Kano. These consist of infrastructure related problems such as lack of bus stops, parking space, bus terminals etc. In addition, some of the problems are service management related; others still are user behaviour related problems. Most of the road users are ignorant of basic traffic regulations and have received no formal training prior to using the roads. The last part suggests ways forward. In the short term, the government must muster the political will to reclaim public space and preserve it for transportation only. In the medium term bus terminals, bus stops and parking spaces must be provided by the government at all major centres and along major streets and ensure legal protection to all road users and transport services consumers in Kano metropolis.

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Summary of Group Presentations/Discussions Group one looked at the theme Road Usage, Enforcement of Traffic Rules and Regulations, Licensing and Revenue Generation and the Role of Federal, State and Local Government Agencies. The group examined all aspects of road usage and enforcement of rules and regulations. Questions such as the following were asked: Why are rules not being enforced? How can these be enhanced? Does the State need a special agency for this? How can we ensure that all vehicle operators, motor-cycles, taxis, buses etc, are properly trained and licensed and know their responsibilities? Lagos State is battling the Federal Government to take over the issuance of driverslicense within the state which it believes would give it greater control and also allow it to determine its own standards. Should we look in that direction? Should the Ministry of Works establish or facilitate the establishment of driving schools in the state? Should motor cycle taxi or indeed any taxi not registered and licensed with the municipal authorities be allowed to operate? How best can the municipal authorities collaborate with the state government and federal agencies to enhance the institutional arrangements for better traffic management in the metropolis or have joint investments in public infrastructure? Should the state use enforcement as means of generating revenues, instilling discipline, sanitizing the road culture, and raising money to further invest in traffic management, in road signs and public transportation? Alhaji Danyaro Yakasai was the lead discussant in this group which was chaired by Malam Muzammil Sani Hanga. The rapporteur was Ibrahim Aliyu El-Yakub.

Group two looked at Urban Public Transport Systems, Modes of Transportation and Modern Urban Traffic

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Management Strategies and Models from Other States. Kano was a pace setter in this as in many other areas. Kano in 1989 had developed its own mass transit master plan with municipal bus service and even trams designed to use existing rail tracks in the city planned for the future. In the late sixties and early seventies Kano was perhaps the first city to have metered taxis and one of the first to have a modern bus service both municipal and inter-state. What happened to these initiatives? The group was lucky to have one of the brains behind the Abuja mass transit programme, a Kano born manager, Alhaji Tijjani Abdullahi. He oversaw the establishment of the Abuja Urban Mass Transit Company and Abuja Leasing Company. Alhaji Tijjani has shared his experience with the group. We have learnt from him the legal, institutional and financial arrangement used in Abuja. Several other initiatives are currently underway in Imo (Clean and Green Initiative), in Lagos in Kaduna and other cities. The initiative we have seen in Kano so far is the tri- cycle (A Daidaita Sahu). The Director General, Nigerian Institute of Transport Technology was also in this group as the lead discussant to provide additional technical guidance. Arch Umar Tofa was the facilitator. Alhaji Tijjani Mohammed Abdullahi was the second lead discussant, and Abubakar Aminu Ahmad the rapporteur.

Group three examined the sub-theme Public health, Public Safety and Environmental issues and Public Transportation in Kano. The absence of a decent and safe mode of public transport has resulted in tragic accidents and is contributing to serious hazards arising from noise and air pollution. Many people are either unaware or simply underrate the health hazards posed by the polluted environment they are subjected to. The Nigerian Environmental Protection Agency, in collaboration with state agencies is legally expected to

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set and enforce amongst other things minimum standards for air quality in our cities that is required for optimal human, animal and plant health. Have these standards been defined? Are they enforced? Why not? What is the State Ministry of Environment doing to ensure that these are enforced? Issues around climate change and global warming have become very topical recently. How do these affect us? Is environmental degradation in neighbouring states and countries or even in rural Kano contributing to the influx into the city? What are the long term implications? What should be our strategy of dealing with this in the short term and in the long term? Engr. Hussam Musa Karry was the lead discussant in this group under guidance of one of our leading physicians Dr. Musa Borodo. The rapporteur was Ismail Bala Garba.

Group four discussed Urban Planning, Population Explosion, Public Space and Issues of Public Transportation in Urban Kano. A lot has been heard in recent times about the Abuja Master Plan. Nothing is heard of master plans in other cities in Nigeria. But Kano had its own master plan detailed and comprehensive. It was presumably revised with the support of the UNDP in the early or mid seventies. Kano has had one of the best organized departments of urban and regional planning in the North and probably in the whole of Nigeria. For cities, is there an alternative to long term planning? Can we address problems of traffic management and public transportation effectively without proper planning? In the meantime, what should we do with traders, small businesses the hawkers etc that have taken over all our remaining open public spaces including walkways, streets, roads, road-divides etc? We have the representative of the Managing Director of Kano Urban Planning and Development Authority and former

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Managing Director, Kano State Urban Development Board, Arch. Mohammed Aminu Kani as the lead discussant, and Engr. Mustapha H. Bichi as the facilitator, M.B. Dan‟azumi was the rapporteur.

Group five looked at the sub-theme Attitudinal, Behavioural, Cultural and Religious Issues in Public Space and Transportation. The group discussed the more sensitive cultural, religious and behavioural issues around the use of public space and public transportation. Islam is a religion of peace. The rights

of the individual are carefully balanced against those of

the community. Yet we have seen how people in furtherance of their individual pursuits are all too willing to jeopardize our collective rights. Often, our indiscipline as a people is masked behind religious

obligations. Why are we quick to turn public roads and highways into praying grounds in total disregard for the needs of other users? It is practically impossible to travel into or out of Kano along certain major highways

at certain hours on Fridays as people have turned them

into praying grounds and do so with impunity. What about the sick people or women in labour who need to be ferried to the hospital. What about fire or other emergency services or simply other road users on their journeys? The government as part of its campaigns against indiscipline has erected signs on our streets with solemn prayers. But should we not have street names, roads signs etc to direct visitors and residents thereby easing movements on our roads and streets?

A leading Islamic scholar, Sheikh Ibrahim Khalil led

the discussion supported by a facilitator Dr. Khalil Ibrahim Sa‟id, former Librarian of Bayero University, Kano and senior officials of the Organization of Islamic Conference (OIC), Murtala Abubakar Ringim was the rapporteur.

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Observations, Challenges and Recommendations

At the end of the syndicate group discussions, reports were presented and discussed at the plenary session, after which the following observations, challenges, and recommendations were catalogued and adopted.

1. Observations The following are the key observations made at this one-day Policy Dialogue:

1. Many of the problems encountered today are transport infrastructure problems, which include the absence or non-provision of bus terminals, bus stops and parking spaces.

2. Roadsides in contemporary Kano serve as spaces for hawking wares, parking, mechanical workshops or concrete block industries. In addition, building materials, unserviceable vehicles, equipment and machine parts are dumped on roads causing congestion and posing danger to all roads users.

3. Another category of the problems is road user- behaviour. For instance, the average Nigerian road user is a bully, who is often ignorant of traffic regulations or has disrespect for them. Many such users lack a formal training in road use and are impatient when on the road.

4. Road users are not guaranteed protection from other users, just as traffic law violators are allowed to repeatedly commit their offences with impunity.

5. There exists the culture of defacing road signs where they exist, which renders them of no use to traffic and other road users.

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6. Kano State used to have efficient town planning regulations whose objective was to properly control public space usage. Such regulations have apparently disappeared and/or failed to properly be enforced by the relevant authority, namely Kano State Urban Planning and Development Agency (KNUPDA).

7. The traffic problem in Kano is manifold, and includes public health, safety and environmental issues. These include air pollution emanating mainly from motorcycles and rickety cars and buses, as well as direct physical injuries to road user especially pedestrians. The effect of air pollution today will most likely not manifest until a few years to come.

8. Other forms of hazard to road users are water hawking trolleys, which often cause serious injury or damage to road users, as well as rubbish and sewage dumped on road surfaces which pose great health hazards to the people.

9. Cultural and religious events also contribute to traffic congestion. For instance, Friday prayers, wedding ceremonies, religious lectures, etc all take up public space, which indeed is contrary to religious teachings.

2. Challenges Certain challenges exist which either cause or exacerbate the problems identified by this Policy Dialogue. The challenges include the following:

1. There is an apparent lack of political will on the part of government to properly address the current crisis situation in Kano. In other cases, the government or politicians are partly the cause of the traffic congestion witnessed, through, for instance, the

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purchase of motorcycles and giving them out to youths as a means of livelihood.

2. There are in existence conflicting or overlapping laws which need to be properly harmonized, and where the laws are clear of this conflict, they are not duly enforced as offenders often walk away with impunity, leading to repeated violation of such laws in the future.

3. Population explosion is a major challenge in urban planning and the protection of public space.

4. There is lack of an active regulatory body that is monitoring the air pollution in our environment and its sources.

5. There is a misperception that only the government owes its people certain responsibilities and not vice versa, and that government property could be misused or misappropriated, for example, pedestrian walkways, parking spaces, pavements, and even road surfaces, with impunity.

6. Manpower shortage is another challenge for the government agency charged with urban planning due to the rapid growth of the metropolitan Kano.

7. Political leaders, especially the executive, and bank vehicles do contribute to traffic law violations through their over speeding and undue haste when on the road. Their blaring sirens often harass and scare many an average road user.

Recommendations

In order to make any head-way in addressing the numerous problems cited above, the Policy Dialogue recommends the following short, medium and long term measures to the problems identified;

A. Short Term

1. Government must rise to its responsibility and muster the political will to put things under control

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and resist all criticisms in its effort to ameliorate this situation.

2. Religious exhortations should be employed in public enlightment regarding road use and the misappropriation of public space.

3. Massive publicity campaign is necessary by all stakeholders, but particularly the government, its agencies and individuals to educate the public appropriately.

4. Traffic law enforcement should be all- encompassing and all-inclusive. It should be insensitive to persons no matter their status in society or rank in government.

5. Strict no smoking regulation should be enforced in all public transportation vehicles to minimize air pollution and its attendant health hazards.

6. Traffic law offenders must be properly prosecuted in order to serve as a deterrent to other potential offenders. That is, laws need to be implemented properly by the relevant agency.

7. A task force needs to be set up which should study the traffic control systems in other states or countries, and find out what could be used as a model in Kano for efficient traffic management.

8. Government should urgently consider making some roads in urban Kano one way.

9. All public vehicles should have comfortable seats to guard against injuries and seat belts provided where required. Overloading such vehicles with passengers and goods should be strictly prohibited by the relevant government agency.

10. No animals should be allowed into public transport systems, and on our roads.

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B. Medium Term

1. Proper legal protection should be put in place for road users and transport service consumers including exhaust emission regulations for public health safety.

2. Government using its relevant agencies must endeavour to reclaim the streets from vendors, hawkers, refuse dumps, mechanics, beggars and other unauthorized users, as well as mark out the streets for effective traffic management.

3, The creation of job opportunities for the youth will slowly take many of them off the streets since many of them are in the commercial motorcycle business in the absence of a more decent job.

4. Government should improve the capacity of the urban planning agency, and also revise the Kano Master Plan which has been rendered ineffective by time and population growth.

5. Ministries of Health and Environment and their relevant parastatals should establish a team to address the issue of air pollution and its sources. Relevant laws on environmental protection against pollution need to be proposed or revised.

6. There is a strong perception that the reckless driving on our roads and many of consequent accidents caused are facilitated by the use of hard drugs by drivers. Thus, relevant agencies need to monitor this behaviour and undertake periodic blood tests to detect drivers using hard drugs.

7. Investment by private enterpreneurs is required for the establishment and sustainance of an efficient mass transit transport system in Kano.

8. Government should urgently relocate all road side mechanics, welding workshop etc to their

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permanent layout at Kwakwaci, Dawanau and Maikalwa. This is the practice in all big cities such as Abuja, Ilorin, Port-Harcourt, Owerri and Aba.

9.

Last Kano Master Plan was meant to cover the period between 1963 and 1983. Thus, Government should re-define the concept of structural development and revamp the dwindling structures, green parks etc.

10.

Government should urgently take measures to curtail indiscriminate immigration into Kano and integrate the traditional institution to monitor same so as to avert re-occurance of Maitatsine catastrophe and the recent Panshekara crisis.

C.

Long Term

1.

There is the need to provide bus terminals, bus stops, parking spaces, and a mass transit system that will end in a park-and-ride zone. Government should also declare a public transport zone in order to properly ease traffic congestion.

2.

The Ministry of Education should be encouraged to include proper road usage and other social issues in

the

relevant sections of the school curriculum in its

various schools.

3.

There is the need for government to identify a

relevant authority that would study the problems and be advising government on the way forward, on

continuous basis since the transportation challenges of urbanization are dynamic.

a

4.

In

order to control air pollution from exhaust

smoke, 2 stroke engine motorcycles should be phased out gradually and be replaced with 4 stroke

engines.

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5. The use of IT systems in traffic management will greatly improve compliance to laws and will reduce government responsibilities and manpower needs.

Conclusion The policy dialogue, which was primarily convened to address the current chaotic traffic conditions in urban Kano, with a view to recommending short term, medium term and long term broad policy measures needed to address the problem, attracted over one- hundred participants drawn from a wide range of stakeholders within the State and outside. Participants at the dialogue identified several factors behind the chaotic traffic situation in Kano ranging from proliferation of motor-cycle taxis, ignorant or disrespect of traffic rules and regulations by most road users, lack of enforcement of traffic rules, absence of bus terminals, bus stops and parking spaces and above all lack of political will on the part of government and its agencies to enforce the observance of traffic regulations. Accordingly, several practical policy measures were recommended to address the identified problems such as the urgent need to embark on massive publicity campaign to educate the road users and the general public, prosecute traffic law offenders no matter their status or rank in society, reclaiming the streets from hawkers, vendors and other unauthorized users as well as the need for government to muster the political will to address the problems. On the whole, participants at the dialogue concluded that all the recommendations articulated at the forum require attitudinal change on the part of the people to be achieved through sustainable sensitization campaigns and government firm resolve and commitment to enforce the observance of traffic rules and regulations in the state.

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APPENDICES

APPENDIX I: Welcome Address

Remarks by A.B. Mahmoud (SAN), OON, Fclarb To the One Day Policy Dialogue on TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM IN KANO

Organized by

Centre for Democratic Research and Training (Mambayya House) Bayero University, Kano

In Collaboration with the Kano State Ministry of Justice Supported by the Law Firm of DIKKO & MAHMOUD Saturday, 24 th May, 2008

I am greatly honoured and privilege to be called upon to give these introductory remarks at this one day policy dialogue on Traffic Management and Public Transportation in Urban Kano. No one in this hall will doubt the necessity and indeed the urgency for this workshop.

I intend in these remarks to give a brief background to this policy dialogue and also to sketch, with a broad brush, as it were, the various sub-themes for the workshop and what we expect to achieve at the end of today.

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First, the background: For a long while, my colleagues and I in the law firm of Dikko and Mahmoud, as I believe many of us in this hall, have agonised over the growing chaos, almost approaching the level of crisis of the state of traffic in Kano. This is compounded by the almost total absence of decent public transport system and the growing influx into the city. At various times we considered and debated about what we could do. In early January this year, the opportunity thankfully presented itself. The management of Mambayya House had tabled at the meeting of the governing council its proposed programme of activities for 2008. One item particularly caught my attention. It was tagged „public lecture for „Yan Achaba’. This was in line with our thought and we seized the opportunity immediately. In the discharge of the pleasant obligation to give back something to our community, I offered on behalf of our firm, to support the initiative. After further discussion, it was agreed that what was needed was to have a broad look at the problem of traffic management and public transportation generally. The governing board also decided that the government should be approached through the State Ministry of Justice to partner in this initiative. The Hon. Attorney General and His Excellency Malam Ibrahim Shekarau, the Governor of Kano State were approached and they fully and whole heartedly supported the idea. After several weeks of preparation by a steering committee headed by Dr. Haruna Wakili, the Director of the Centre, we are finally here today.

The broad issues are captured in a short concept paper. Some of you may have had the opportunity of reading it before now. Chaotic traffic is common to most urban centres in Nigeria. Kano however, in recent past seems to have more than a fair share of this burden. The proliferation of motor-cycle taxis in the city is unmatched by Nigerian town or city. The riders seem to

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generally operate above law contributing to serious accidents, injuring many and contributing to increasing air and noise pollution. Some of them engage in petty crimes further compounding the nuisance. The problem however is not just „Yan Achaba. Our culture of road use had considerably worsened in recent years. Most road users don‟t respect traffic rules and regulations. Indeed many simply don‟t know them. Our streets, roads, side-walks, highways and the few open spaces remaining in the city have been taken over by traders, second hand car dealers, other small businesses, beggars and hawkers of all sorts of wares ranging from petrol to cigarettes. The authorities seem to be in a constant retreat on enforcement issues thereby broadening the scope of lawlessness. The situation is simply becoming unbearable.

Kano however has additional burden. It is evidently lagging behind in initiatives aimed at tackling these problems. As lawyers, we are particularly worried about the deeper implications of seeming continued retreat in law enforcement. Nothing in my view depicts the dire state of rule of law in Nigeria and in Kano in particular more than the chaos in roads and streets where the rule of law has been replaced by the Rule of ALL. If Kano must restore its glory as the Centre of Commerce, as a decent city to live and bring up our children, urgent and decisive steps need to be taken to restore it as a clean, attractive and efficient city with modern infrastructure including safe and decent public transport system.

The structure of the workshop is that after opening session which includes a keynote presentation by the Head of Geography Department of Bayero University, Mal. M.A. Liman, we will then breakout into smaller groups. Each group will consider in-depth a particular sub-theme under the guidance of a facilitator and a

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presenter(s). Each group will come back with key issues and recommendations which will then be tabled at the 2 nd and final plenary session for consideration and adoption. These recommendations should identity short, medium and long term measures and strategies that need to be taken to address the problems.

Mr. Chairman, distinguished participants, let me now quickly attempt to throw up some issues on some of the thematic areas of the breakout sessions:

Group 1 will be looking at the theme „Road Usage, Enforcement of Traffic Rules and Regulations, Licencing and Revenue Generation and the Role of Federal, State and Local Government Agencies. We expect this group to look at all aspects of Road usage and enforcement of rules and regulations. Why are rules not being enforced? How can these be enhanced? Does the State need a special Agency with this? How can we ensure that all vehicle operators, motor-cycles, taxis, buses etc are properly trained and licenced and how their responsibilities? Lagos State is battling the Federal Government to take over the issuance of drivers licence within the state which it believes will give it greater control and also allow it to raise its own standards. Should we look in that direction? Should the Ministry of Works establish facilitate the establishment of driving schools in the state? Should motor cycle taxi or indeed any taxi not registered and licensed with the Municipal authorities before being allowed to operate? How best can the municipal authorities collaborate with the state government and Federal Agencies to enhance the institutional arrangements for better traffic management in the metropolis or eve joint investments in public infrastructure? Should the state enforcement as means of generating revenues or even use heavy fines for violations as a means of instilling discipline and sanitizing the road culture and raising monies to

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further invest in traffic management, in road signs and public transportation? Alhaji Danyaro Yakasai will be the lead discussant in this group which will be chaired by Prof. A.H. Yadudu.

Group 2 will be looking at Urban Public Transportation System, modes of transportation and Modern urban traffic management strategies and models from other states. Kano was a pace setter in this as in many other areas. This group will be looking at the technical issues. Kano in 1989 had developed its own Mass Transit Master plan with municipal bus service and even trams designed to use existing rail tracks in the city planned for the future. In the late sixties and early seventies I believe, Kano was perhaps the first city to have metered taxis and one of the first to have a modern bus service both municipal and inter state. What happened to these initiatives? We are lucky to have one of the brains behind the Abuja mass transit programme, a Kano man, Mal. Tijjani Abdullahi. He oversaw the establishment of the Abuja Urban Mass Transit Company and Abuja Leasing Company.Mal. Tijjani will share his experience with us.We will perhaps learn from him, the legal, institutional and financial arrangements used in Abuja. Several other initiatives are currently underway in Imo (Clean and Green Initiative), in Lagos in Kaduna and other cities. The initiative we have seen in Kano so far is the tricycle (A Daidaita Sahu). These cycles are in my view neither secure nor safe but more importantly do not represent the kind of bold initiative that is needed. The Director General Nigerian Institute of Transport Technology hopefully should be here to provide additional technical support and guidance. Arch Umar Tofa will be the facilitator.

Group 3 will look at the sub-theme Public Health, Public Safety and Environmental issues and Public Transportation in Kano. The absence of decent and

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safe mode of public transport has resulted in tragic accidents and is contributing to serious hazards arising from noise and air pollution. Many of us are either unaware or simply underrate the health hazards posed by the polluted environment we are subjected to. The Nigerian Environmental protection agency, in collaboration with state agencies is legally expected to set and enforce amongst other things the minimum standards for air quality in our cities that is required for optimal human, animal and plant health. Have these standards been defined? Are they enforced? Why not? What is our own state ministry of environment doing to ensure that these are enforced? Issues around climate change and global warming have become very topical recently how do these affect us? Is environmental degradation in neighbouring states and countries or even in rural Kano contributing to the influx into our city? What are the long term implications? What should be our strategy of dealing with this in short term and in the long term? Engr. Hussam Musa Karry will be the lead discussant in this groups under guidance of one our leading physicians Dr. Musa Borodo.

Group 4 will be looking at urban planning, population explosion, public space and issues of Public transportation in urban Kano. A lot has been heard in recent of Abuja master Plan. Nothing is heard of master plans in other cities in Nigeria. But Kano had its own master plan detailed and comprehensive. It was I believe last revised with the support of the UNDP in the early or mid seventies. We have had one of the best organized departments of urban and regional planning in the North and probably in the whole of Nigeria. For cities, is there an alternative to long term planning? Can we address problems of traffic management and public transportation effectively without proper planning? In the meantime, what should we do with traders, the small business, the hawkers etc that have

26

over all our remaining open public spaces including walkways, streets, roads, road-divides etc? We have the managing director of Kano urban planning and development authority Mal. Hassan Na‟abba to lead the discussion with Alh. Ibrahim Ado Kurawa as the facilitator.

Group 5 will be looking at the sub-theme „Attitudinal, Behavioural, Cultural and Religious issues in public space and transportation. We have a leading Islamic scholar, Sheikh Ibrahim Khalil to lead the discussion supported by a facilitator Dr. Khalil Ibrahim Sa‟ad. We hope this group will take a close look at some of the more sensitive cultural, religious and behavioural issues around use of public space and public transportation. Islam is a religion of space. The rights of the individual are carefully balance against those of the community. Yet we have seen how people in furtherance of their individual pursuits are all too willing to jeopardize our collective rights. Often our indiscipline as a people is masked behind religious obligations. Why are we quick to turn public roads and highways into praying grounds in total disregard for the needs of other users? It is practically impossible to travel into or out of Kano along certain major highways at certain hours on Fridays as people have turned them into praying grounds and do so with impunity. What about the sick people or women in labour who need to be ferried to hospital. What about fire or other emergency services or simply other road users on their journeys? The government as part of campaigns against indiscipline has erected signs in our streets with solemn prayers. That‟s fine. But should we not have street names, roads, signs etc to direct visitors and residents thereby easing movements on our roads and streets?

Mr. Chairman, the programme seems ambitious for a

I think what is important is to initiate

one day event.

27

the process. Hopefully, it will provide some basis for future action. Our objective is to identify some of the issues. We should be able to come up with specific recommendations on the short, medium and long terms strategies out of president predicament.

Mr. Chairman, Your Excellencies distinguished participants. We are all here to contribute to a common good. We are here because we are concerned. We want to live in a clean healthy environment we want to have decent, safe and secure means of moving from one location to another. We want our city to grow and develop as envisioned by its ancient founders; the Muhammadu Rumfas, the Sulaimans, the Dabos, the Bayeros, and its more recent visionary leaders the Audu Bakos the Rimis etc. It is our city and our future.

I thank you for your attention.

28

APPENDIX II: Key Note Address

POLICY DIALOGUE ON PUBLIC TRANSPORT SYSTEM IN KANO: PROBLEMS, CHALLENGES AND THE WAY FORWARD

Keynote address

By

Muhammad A. Liman Department of geography, Bayero University, Kano.

Introduction

It is a primary economic requirement to move things from one place to another and it is probably for this reason that inter-urban and intra-urban movement of people and goods is a necessary feature of any settlement. However, as the economy of the society changes so does this need to move things from one place to another. Thus, while in pre-industrial times settlements relied on non-motorized transport (NMT), contemporary settlements rely on motorized transport which requires facilities (such as road networks, parking spaces etc).

Whereas transport acts as an elastic band which gives the settlement some form of flexibility, it also acts as a bonding medium between the different social units in a settlement that are spatially located apart. We are, for instance, here today because there is some amount of dissatisfaction in the management of the transport system in Kano. When we dig a little deeper this translates to growing dissatisfaction between different strata of the society. Thus, how the different transport modes (owner-user or commercial) are organized and

29

the traffic managed determine the social as well as the

spatial organization and, ultimately, the overall growth of the settlement.

A settlement, therefore, is only as big as its

transportation system and settlements differ in how they

are able to organize their transport service. This can be

used as an index of the development of the settlement. Thus, the urban settlement can be judged and ranked on the availability, regularity and effectiveness of the commercial transport service catering for its inter-urban

as well as intra-urban movements. Using this yardstick we can evaluate Kano and make suggestions.

The Development of Commercial Transport Service in Kano Metropolis

Modern transport (i.e. motorized transport) is the baby of the Industrial Revolution, for settlements in Nigeria it is the off-shoot of colonial rule. The spatial development of what became Kano township, and subsequently Kano metropolis, has led to the introduction of the bicycle hire which can be considered as the earliest form of modern commercial transport service in Kano metropolis. Being an individual mode of transport, it is doubtful if it contributed much, and now no longer contributes to intra-urban movement. However, with the establishment of Kano as a railway terminus in 1911 and the subsequent relocation of the railway station from the Dan Agundi area (on the outskirts of Kano city) to its present location (within the CBD) the real need for a commercial transport service in Kano township was probably created. Many migrants who trooped into Kano needed the service. Thus, like in Britain, intra-urban transport service started as complementary to the rail system. The complementary nature of intra-urban transport was further exhibited when Kano was linked to the outside world by air and an international airport was built as a spatial receptacle

30

of this transport link. A commercial taxi service between the airport and the township came to life.

The subsequent agitation for self determination in the colonies at the end of the Second World War led to the establishment of industries in the colonies, in general, and Kano in particular. Although a palliative measure, it started the large-scale criss-cross movements that characterise an urban settlement, necessary for the emergence and sustenance of intra-urban commercial transport service.

For settlements north of Nigeria Kano is the leader in commercial transport service. The first commercial passenger bus service started in the 1950s. Whereas the earlier commercial taxi services established had no definite routes the commercial passenger bus services had definite routes - the normal path followed by commercial buses between two termini, one being the starting and the other being the destination where the bus turns round to make a round trip. Many bus routes start at the same terminus and such a terminus is known as a transfer terminal. In our case, Bata is a transfer terminal and so is Yan Kura, Jakara, and Asibiti (see table 1).

Features of Commercial Bus Service in Kano:

The operation of commercial transport service in Kano is dominated by the popular (private and informal) sector of the economy as can be seen in Table 1. More than 90% of commercial vehicles are therefore owned mostly by private commercial individuals. Yakamata Motors is the only private company popularly known to have participated in the commercial transport service sector in Kano. Government participates once in a while, and currently in the name of Kano Line.

31

Table 1: Commercial Bus Service Routes within Kano Metropolis (1950 1990s)

Sector

Period

From Bata to

From Jakara to

From Yan

Kura to

   

Panshekara

Asibiti

Mandawari

1951-1960

Tudun Wada

Gwauron Dutse

 
 

Gwammaja

 

1961-1970

 

Asibiti-„Yan Kura

Gwammaja

Popular

 

K/Raka-

Gwammaja-Kurna

Mandawari-

1971-1980

K/hudu

Gwale

Kawaji

 

Gwammaja-

Kurna

   

Rijiyar Lemo

1981-1990

„Yan kaba

Asibiti-Zoo Road

Mandawari-

S/titi

 

Asibiti-Tarauni

 
   

Badawa

   

Private

Kawo

   

(Yakamata

1990s

Tarauni

   

Motors)

„Yan kaba

   

Zoo Road

   
   

K/Hudu

Asibiti

BUK

K/Raka

Asibiti-Zoo Road

Dawanau

Public

Mandawari

Asibiti-Tarauni

Rijiyar Lemo

(Kano

1990s

Na‟ibawa

   

Line)

Panshekara

   

Tudun Wada

   

„Yan kaba

   

Key:

* Extension of an existing route originally served by the popular sector ** New addition but previously served from a different transfer terminal + Newly introduced routes Source: Adapted from Umar S. (1991), p. 36 & p. 41

32

Table 2: Commercial Bus Service Routes within Kano Metropolis

 

Distance

No. of

ROUTES

(km)

Buses

(Daily)

Asibiti-Gwale

3.5

a

39

Asibiti-Hotoro-Tsamiyar Boka

8.5

a

46

Asibiti-Mariri

12

a

54

Asibiti-Na‟ibawa

 

82

Asibiti-Panshekara

 

57

Asibiti-Sharada

4

a

37

Bata-Airport area

4

a

9

Bata-Badawa

4

b

49

Bata-Bela

9

a

23

Bata-Brigade

4

b

44

Bata-Dakata

5

b

49

Bata-Gezawa

 

69

Bata-Gwale

6

a

19

Bata-Gwammaja-Kurna

6

a

39

Bata-Jakara

5

b

29

Bata-Kawo-Giginyu

4

b

39

Bata-Kwanan Jaba

4.5

a

49

Bata-Kwanar Madobi-Yako

 

9

Bata-Mandawari-Sabon titi

6

b

68

Bata-Mariri

 

69

Bata-Na‟ibawa

11

b

69

Bata-Panshekara

19

b

59

Bata-Sharada

7

b

39

Bata-Tsamiyar Barde

4

a

49

Bata-Yan Kaba

6

b

59

Bata-Zoo Road-Sheka

9

a

58

Jakara-Kwanar Madobi-Yako

 

6

Jakara-Panshekara

 

43

Jakara-Sabon Tasha

 

17

Yan kura-Bachirawa

 

94

Yan kura-Dawanau

19

a

67

33

 

Distance

No. of

ROUTES

(km)

Buses

(Daily)

Yan kura-Gwammaja-Kurna

6 b

174

Yan kura-Janguza

18 b

74

Yan kura-Kabuga

7.5

a

172

Yan kura-Kurna

6.5

a

166

Yan kura-Rijiyar Lemo

 

133

Yan kura-Sabon Tasha

 

138

Sources: a = Fieldwork, 1998 b = Dambazau, (1998), p. 29

About 2,300 organised commercial buses service Kano daily. The operation of commercial transport service is coordinated by agents known as “‟yan kamasho” which has evolved into National Union of Road Transport Workers (NURTW). It has been largely responsible for whatever semblance of order there is in the general conduct of affairs relating to commercial transport service. NURTW dictates the hours of operation, method of operation, and pricing. Although availability of passengers and good roads play a role in determining routes the NURTW has the final say. It acts as an arbiter between the stakeholders - the passengers, the drivers, and the owners.

According to Obimah (1995) commercial transport available between 6.00 a.m. and 11.00 p.m with about 52% of the buses making between 6 10 round trips; some make up to 20 round trips. In addition, she found out that a journey of 4 km (Bata Brigade route) takes between 20 and 50 minutes. This is most probably because about 50% of the buses do between 9 to 12 stops on each trip; some make up to 28 stops on a trip. Also, there were nearly 20 regular and 7 occasional stop points mainly decided by passengers‟ request and bus conductors‟ judgment. Thus commercial bus service in Kano operates for about 15 hours daily. It operates wait

34

and load system at terminals and pick-and-drop anywhere system in between the terminals. Nonetheless commercial bus service in Kano is suffering from declining patronage for a number of reasons.

Transport & Transport Service Problems in Kano:

Some of the infrastructure related problems include bus stops, parking spaces etc. In addition, lack of bus terminals, particularly at the transfer terminals, constitutes a real problem. As a town planning principle roads should not be activity centers but should lead to activity centers. In Kano roads have been turned into activity centers rather than leading to activity centers. Thus, roadsides and streets serve as shops for wares and as parking spaces etc.

Probably the most significant transport service management related problem revolves around the failure to realize that contemporary transport is a product of industrialism and must be run based on the six principles of industrialism-standardization; specialization; concentration; centralization; synchronization; maximization. Some of the traffic management related problems we face, for instance, are not problems especially in comparison with any advanced country. For instance, I once heard Andrew Young (1999?) making the point (on NTA interview) that Nigerians going to the U.S. should choose to land in Atlanta which receives about 2,500 flights daily rather than New York which receives a lot more. In another example, Adams, (1981: 48) says “the amazing congestion of Lagos was being created by a number of cars that would cause scarcely a ripple if added to the traffic of one of Los Angeles‟ major freeways”.

User behaviour related problems are the more noticeable especially where the average road user is a bully, knows very little traffic regulations that he can be called ignorant and disrespectful of the little he knows.

35

In addition, virtually only a very small percentage of the road users have training (driving lessons) before getting on the road. Above all, nearly all road users, particularly in Kano, are impatient.

Road users have no visible legal protection that they can cling to or that can deter a prospective bad user. Thus, road users have no guaranteed protection from other road users and transport service consumers are not protected in any way. On this note many people seem to believe that the laws are there while not being enforced. In other words much of our transport problems arise from lack of political will.

Which Way Forward? Realistically, tackling transport and transport service problems in Kano should be done in phases. In the short term Government must muster the political will to take the bull by the horns. One of the things it has to do is to reclaim the streets and preserve it for transportation only. In addition it has to mark out the street furniture, manage the traffic, and especially prosecute traffic offenders. This ought to bring sanity on to our roads, at least in the short run.

In the medium term Government must muster the political will to provide bus terminals (at least in Bata and „Yan Kura), bus stops and parking spaces, with scheduled service. This should be done as a first step toward organizing transport service as an industrial business. It must also ensure legal protection to road users and transport service consumers.

Assuming all these are acceptable one thing is that Kano will not remain static and, as a matter of fact, once the short- and medium-term strategies succeed Kano will develop more and new problems will emerge. Government must therefore muster the political will to provide a Mass Transit System that will end in a Park-and-ride zone and declare a Public Transport zone.

36

Finally, in this era it is impossible to organize transport without information technology (IT). IT has many uses especially in Kano but I would recommend its use in traffic management, for a start, for a number of reasons. I am sure many more recommendations will emerge as we break into different groups of concern.

Thank you for listening.

37

Appendix III: Group Presentation

Group I

POLICY DIALOGUE ON TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM IN KANO.

ORGANISED BY:

CENTRE FOR DEMOCRATIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING, MAMBAYYA HOUSE

IN COLLABORATION WITH THE KANO STATE MINISTRY OF JUSTICE

SUPPORTED BY:

THE LAW FIRM OF DIKKO AND MAHMOUD, KANO

Topic/Sub Theme: Read Usage, Enforcement of Traffic Rules and Regulation, Licensing and Revenue Generation and the Role of Federal, State and Local Government Agencies.

Lead Discussant:

Alhaji Danyaro Ali Yakasai

Facilitator:

Mal. Muzzammil Sani Hanga

Rapporteur:

Ibrahim Aliyu El-Yakub

Venue: Room I

1. Alh. Abdullahi Sarki Nanurawa Kano

2. Muzzammil Sani Hanga

3. Abdulrazak Isma‟ila Bagwai

4. Danyaro Ali Yakasai

5. Sayyadi Muh‟d Yola

-

Wakilin Arewa

6. Usman Abdullahi

-

Fagge

7. Umar Sambo

- Hudaibiyya Foundation, Kano

38

8.

Abdullahi Galadi

-

9.

Yusuf Garba

10.

Musa Ibrahim Khaleel

11.

Hauwa Usman A.

12.

Adamu Isma‟ila Garki

13.

Tijjani Muhammad Sharief

14.

Ibrahim Hamisu

-

BUK, Kano

15.

Jamaluddeen Balarabe

-

Youth Council of

16.

Sulaiman A. Isah

-

Nigeria O/C MID

17.

Nura Muhd Fagge

-

Ministry of Justice

18.

Ya‟u Aliyu Adamu

-

Ministry of Justice

19.

Aminu D. Ahmed (DSC)

-

NSCDC,Kano Command

20.

Adegboke Iwale

-

FRSC RS 12, Kano

21.

Sadi Abdullahi Maikusa

-

Business man

22.

Dr. Sani Garba Diso

-

Rd. Traffic Dept.

23.

Rabi Ibrahim Waya

-

Kano Ministry of Justice

24.

Hanif S. Yusuf

-

Dikko & Mahmoud

25.

Peter Friday

-

Solicitor, Kano Dikko & Mahmoud

26.

Adamu Habibu Tukuntawa -

Abdulkarim Yusuf

 

Solicitor, Kano Acomoran

27.

-

Acomoran

28.

Alh. Bako Umar

-

M.U.R.T.W

29.

Yahuza Ahmed

-

Min. of Justice,

30.

Juwairiyya Badamasuiy

-

Kano Faculty of Law, BUK

The Facilitator opened the session and stated that we are expected in this working session to proffer solutions to the problems that were highlighted during the opening plenary session; and the role to be played by the various agencies involved in relation to the sub theme in order to impact a positive change in the sector under discussion.

39

In the course of discussion the following observations were made:-

i. That the traffic situation in Kano is in a chaotic state;

ii. That the problem above is as a result of non- observance of traffic rules and regulations by road users;

iii. That some of the traffic regulations are under the concurrent list of the constitution which has its advantages and the same time creates the friction between the Federal and the States Government;

iv. Lack of political will on the part of the government to enforce traffic rules and regulations in order to bring about positive change in attitude in roads users;

v. That majority of the problems are caused by commercial road users, more especially commercial motor cycles operators disregard for traffic rules which bring about the rising incidents of accidents on our roads;

vi. That commercial motor cycle operators [Achaba] was borne out of unemployment as the operators are mostly teenagers and middle aged men who do not have any means of subsistence and worsened by bans in other states which pushed them straight into Kano.

vii. Near or total absence of comfortable and decent means of public transport and influx of people into

the state contributes the chaotic nature of our roads; viii Petty road side trading is another factor responsible for chaos on our roads;

ix. Lack of vita equipment [e.g. Towing van on the part of agencies responsible for maintenance of law and order on our roads;

x. Motor cycle gifts by politicians to their supporters is another factor responsible for the continuing decay

40

in non observance of traffic rules and regulations; and

xi. Segregation on traffic offenders by law enforcers;

It was observed that the laws and facilities of prosecution in courts are in place but the problem lies in the enforcement of such rules which rely often on other personnel in order to be enforced (e.g. Police, FRSC).

The session recognized that it is imperative to examine the problems existing in the agencies with enforcement of traffic rules and regulations in order to understand what makes them to under achieve.

It was further observed that controlling all forms of road abuses requires joint effort of Federal and State Agencies; and issues of security to be left with the police entire.

The session finally came up with the following recommendations as solutions to the problems earlier highlighted:

i.

That the Government should muster the political will to see that traffic rules and regulations are enforced to the latter;

ii.

The government should inject more funds into public transport system in order to make it decent and comfortable for users;

iii.

Inject money into public media enlightenment campaign for road users, most especially commercial users;

iv.

That the government should employ religious exhortations in public enlightenment in road users to impact a positive change in attitude;

v.

Government should create ample parking lot/spaces round all public facilities.

41

vi. Government should relocate major markets like Kwari and Singer to the outskirt of the metropolis;

vii. Government should employ more personnel working in all traffic control agencies in order to serve the teeming population;

viii. Government should re-devise road stops at appropriate intervals thereby creating proper stop terminals;

ix. Government should decongest and reclaim our roads from petty traders;

x. Government should give protection to road users and all enforcement agencies from the elite who believe they are above the law;

xi. Politicians should devise other things to give out as gifts and not motor cycles any more;

xii. Government should inaugurate a joint tasks force of all the Agencies and give them a clear target to be complimented by the services of mobile courts;

xiii. Prosecution of traffic offenders through the use of such mobile courts;

xiv. All roads users to be seen to be subject to uniform regulation;

xv. Government should regulate use of 100cc motorcycles to 50cc in order to reduce the incidents of accidents; and

xvi. Government should introduce routine checks every 6 months to ensure road worthiness of such motorcycle.

42

POLICY DIALOGUE ON TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM IN KANO STATE

Group 2 Working Session

Group II: Urban Public Transportation System, Modes of Transport and Modern Urban and Models From Other State and Countries

Lead Discussants: 1. Director-General, NITT Zaria 2. Alh. Tijjani Mohammed Abdullahi

Facilitator:

Arc. Umar Tofa

Participants:

Twenty-four (24)

Rapporteur :

Abubakar Aminu Ahmad

Introduction The session commenced with introducory remarks by the facilitator. Afterwards, each of the twenty-four participants introduced himself (copy of the attendance list attached)

The Director-General NITT, Zaria was represented by Mr. Femi Jemirin. The facilitator asked Tijjani Mohammed Abdullahi to first make his presentation. Alh. Tijjani Abdullahi oversaw the establishment of the Abuja Mass Transit Company and Abuja leasing company. He therefore shared Abuja‟s experience with the participants. He discussed extensively on the institutional and financial arrangement used in Abuja. The representative of the Director-General NITT, discussed on modes of transport particularly road and rail transport and how condusive atmosphere for their operations are provided in some states and countries.

43

Observations, Challenges and Recommendations Observations

1. Abuja and Lagos Public road transport systems are working favourably;

2. Abuja model is working well because the authorities ensure compliance with the city master plan and control public space usage;

have efficient public

transportation system for intra and inter states movement;

4. Abuja and Lagos State models may be adopted in Kano State subject to some modifications particularly as Lagos share some features with Kano;

5. The authorities concerned in Kano fail in ensuring compliance with town planning regulations and control of use of public space;

6. The authorities concerned in Kano State have arrangements for efficient public transport in the state but the public is not aware;

7. There is little or no involvement of the public by the authorities concerned in Kano in issues concerning with town planning and public transport;

8. If decent and efficient public transport system is put in place, unsafe and indecent means of public transport run mostly on individual‟s basis will give way;

9. Kano is ripe for rail transport system; and

10. Donations of motorcycles by the political class compound the problem of chaotic traffic in Kano;

3. Kano

State

used

to

44

Challenges

1. Kano used to have efficient public transport system. What went wrong?

2. There is the urgent need of moving away from the existing system of public transport in Kano to a more viable alternative.

3. There is the urgent need of the enforcement of the town planning regulations and control of the use of public space in Kano.

Recommendations

1. Mass transit system is needed in Kano as against the present system run mostly on individual basis;

2. Investment by private entrepreneurs is required for the establishment and sustenance of an efficient mass transit transport system in Kano;

3. Various modes of transport should be explored in designing a system for Kano;

4. As a short-term measure for controlling the present chaotic situation, streets in urban Kano should be cleared of traders and beggars;

5. As a short-term measure, some roads in urban Kano should be made one-way; and

6. Contributions from the public should be invited by the concerned authorities in town planning and public transport system issues.

45

GROUP 2 ATTENDANCE LIST

S/no

Name

Address

1.

Tijjani M. Abdullahi

Finder Consultant, Abuja FCT

2.

Muhammad Sani

Inuwar Jama‟ar Kano

Zango

3.

Engr. I.K. Inuwa, OFR

Technokonsult

4.

Engr. M.M. Dansarki

Director Transport MOWH&T

5.

Alkaseem Ahamad Trader

Lecturer (KSP)

6.

Engr. O.A.U. Uche

Civil Dept, BUK Rep NSE, Chairman

7.

Engr. H.M. Alhassan,

Civil Engineering Dept, BUK

8.

TDL: Muhammad

KNUPDA

Yahaya Kilishi

9.

Sgn Ldr A. T. Inuwa (Rtd)

Rep Director of Security, BUK

10.

Abubakar Aminu

Dikko & Mahmoud (Solicitors)

Ahmad

11.

Y.Z. Yau

CITAD, Kano

12.

Faruk Sani

Fleet Maintenance Manager, NNF Mills

13.

Garba Badamasi

Prime Urban Properties, Abuja

14.

Sa‟idu Ahmad Dukawa

DG, Hisbah Board, Kano

15.

A.B, Mahmoud

Dikko & Mahmoud

16.

A.G. Abdullahi

1&2 Beirut Road

17.

S.B. Namallam

Min. of Justice, Kano

18.

Abdullahi Sulaiman Ahmad

FCE Kano, Kano

19.

Jamil Shehu Shayi

FCE, Kano

20.

Abubakar Ismail

MSSN Kano

Sulaiman

21.

Femi Jemirin

Rep. DG/CE NITT, Zaria

22.

Arc Umar O. Tofa

Building Projects

Consultants

23.

Bala A. Muhammad

DG A Daidaita Sahu

24.

Mal. M.A. Liman

Geography Dept. BUK

46

Group III: Public Health, Public Safety and Environmental Issues in Public Transport

SANITATION OF THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

Problems

1. Roads/Pedestrians Congestions

2. Traffic Congestions

3. Market Congestions

4. Odour/Smells

5. Over Crowding

6. Accidents

Reasons for the Above

a. Illegal erecting of temporary zinc structures on roads.

b. Illegal erecting of temporary kiosk along the roads & on pavements.

c. Hawking on road & on pavements

d. Parking of vehicles on roads

e. Urinating & defecating inside public drainages

f. Dumping of wastes inside public drainages by

hawkers.

g. Hawking of goods in between stalls & paths in markets

Place Where Those Problems Occur Mostly in urban city and in major markets particularly Muhammad Abubakar Rimi Markets & its surroundings, Kwari market and its surroundings, Murtala Mohammed Hospital, Rimi Markets and its surroundings, Kurna-Rijiyar Lemo, Kabuga Gwarzo Road, Kofar Nassarawa - Emirs Palace, Tarauni- Hotoro, Ado Bayero Road/Singer, Mandawari, Jakara, Dorayi, Zoo Road, Gyadi-Gyadi, Unguwa Uku motor

47

park to Yan Lemo, those major markets from Wudil up to Kachako.

Recommendations

1. Government should create about 10 markets within the metropolis to decongest the major markets and to impose sanction on street hawking;

2. Government should create more bus stops/parking areas for commercial vehicles and private in market surroundings;

3. Government should impose proper utilizations of the parking areas in the existing markets;

4. Government should hastens the relocation of Singer Market far from the metropolis;

5. Government should relocate the woods/furniture‟s section of France (Abuja) Road, Sabon Gari Market;

6. Government should demolish all illegally erected temporary structures and kiosks on roads reservations, pavements, and path and market surroundings;

7. Government should stop any further parking vehicles on roads & on pavement or paths;

8. Government should remove bills boards and evacuate the refuse on over head bridges along Murtala Muhammad Way, Hausa/Ibo Road, Yankura & Murtala Muhammad Hospital, because they gave cover to people urinating, defecating & dumped wastes that becomes in accessible for people to make use of them;

9. All road side mechanics & welding workshop occupying pavements on major roads/streets to be relocated to a mechanic layout to be created by government like those at Kwakwachi, Dawanau,

48

Maikalwa Zaria Road. This is the practice in all big cities, Ato village as example in Abuja and also in Ilorin, Port Harcourt, Imo, Aba just to mention few;

any

person with good intention to establish public conveniences;

11. Government to relocate Yankura AGIP Filling Station now OANDO to convert the place for commercial vehicles, taxis and buses for loading/uploading passengers, to enable them stop parking on the major road, as well as Total Filling Station opposite Sabon Gari Market by Singer. This place is to be utilize by vehicles loading goods such as Canters and Akori Kuras, so that they vacate the main roads, I believe by so doing the government will generate more revenue to compliment its spending in the relocating the two (2) filling stations; and

10. Government

should

encourage

&

support

12. Government should stop any further occupying of roads and on movement for hawking and spread of goods.

Advantages of the Above Recommendations

a. Decongest the surrounding of our major markets

b. Ease pedestrians‟ hardships.

c. Reduce the spread of communicable diseases.

d. Reduce the sufferings of vehicles owners in traffic congestions.

e. Get market nearer to the public for easy shopping.

f. Remove fear from the mind of customers of theft, damages of vehicles due to parking along the major highways in markets.

g. Improve the appearance of our roads markets & its

environment.

h. Create more jobs opportunity.

i. Ensuring securing of more ventilation in market.

49

j. Improving the economy.

k. Safety of the pedestrians.

l. Prevention of accidents.

m. Prevention of fire outbreaks.

n. Ensuring clean and tidy environment.

50

POLICY DIALOGUE ON TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM IN KANO

Sub-Theme: (Group 4) Urban Planning, Population Explosion, Public Space and Issues of Public Transportation in Urban Kano

Date: Saturday May 24, 2008 In Attendance

S/

Name

Address

Phone No.

N

1.

Engr. M.H. Bichi (Facilitator)

BUK

08036353001

2.

Arc. M. Aminu Kani (Lead discussant)

08037077506

3.

Dayyabu Zubairu Gano

KNUPDA

08035899760

4.

M.B. Danazumi, Esq, (rapporteur)

Min. of Justice, Kano

08023627712

5.

Abubakar Sadiq Sani

Nig. Inst. of Town Planners

08033433165

6.

Arc. Sani Ali

BUK

0803740642

7.

Sani Hamza Bichi

Min. of Budget & Planning

0807406112

8.

Zakariya‟u Ado

SSG‟s Office, Kano

08036999245

9.

Musa Tanko Garko

SSG‟s Office Kano

10.

Yahaya Ado Umar

CAS, Kano

08062347270

11.

Zainab M.S. Minjibir

Min. of Higher Educ.

08023757994

12.

Gidado Mukhtar

KAPEDI

08037873699

13.

Sunusi Yakubu Ahmad

C.A.S./MHE

08039433241

14.

Garba Abdu Gaya

MOWH&T

08023930059

15.

Badayi M. Kurawa

BUK (Afribank)

08023083132

16.

Dr. Suleman Yusuf Mudi

Dept. of Chem. BUK

08037012978

17.

Habibu I. Yakasai

MANR

08023528845

Commencement: 12:55 Noon.

51

Lead Discussants: Arc. M. Aminu. Kani & D.Z. Gano Rapporteur: M. B. Dan‟azumi

A: KEY ISSUES (refer to themes)

The Discussant starts by giving a brief history and the significance of planning, development control, and regulations dealing with the urbanization of towns, Kano inclusive. The various laws, acts and related decrees address several issues ranging from urban planning, development boards and the planning authorities.

That is also a fact undisputed, that there has always been planning authority with basically the same function as those currently addressed by KNUPDA today.

It follows therefore that the Government has always been conscious in terms of legislation despite the fact that implementation has always been the problem.

The laws provided for sanctions, trouble etc to handle the issues relating to default and non-compliance with the laws governing town planning.

B: Challenges / Problems Identified

Last master plan was made to cover the period between 1963 and 1983 and has long been overtaken by events, hence the need to re-define the concept of structural development, and revamp the dwindling structures; green parks etc.

The planning guidelines and provisos have not been strictly followed thereby worsening the whole situation and causing an undue economic expense to the state.

52

Our cultural attitude relating to undue favouritism which causes a serious negative consequence to the society in general.

The need for men with sterner will power and goodwill to handle the disorderliness.

The work force of KNUPDA cannot cover 1/3 of the metropolitant Kano not to mention other 36 urban centres.

Enforcement of laid down rules and proper compliance appears grossly inadequate so also are the related sanctions. The laws also appear to have outlived their effectiveness due to several decades of non-review of the laws as penalties in some instances are as low as N20 (Twenty Naira).

Problem of gross under-staffing of various agencies saddled with enforcement and control which is proportionate with the growing population of Kano.

The sudden surge of various forms of transportation not taken in contemplation by the town planners of infra-structural facilities.

There is also no workable master plan that is all encompassing, thereby forming a network of well co-ordinated plans ranging from health or sanitary to transport issues.

Lack of demarcating line between an individual or group interest and that of the generally of the public, placing of the public interest below self.

Lack of proper co-ordination between similar sector and interrelated stake holders, everything seem to be in constant disarray.

53

Poverty and indolence in both mundane and spiritual issues. Greed in acquisition of any available space, wealth etc.

Those at the helm of affairs seem never willing to wake up from their seemingly endless administrative slumber

Individuals feel detached and separate from the community and do not seem to take any responsibility.

C:

Recomemndations

a.

Short Term

i.

Capacity building: adequate skilled manpower in manning the agencies responsible.

ii.

Sensitization/re-orientation of people and the need to be aware of collective responsibilities and the discharge of civil duties

b.

Medium

i.

Urban renewal programme: the need to harness resources in line with modern trends of development.

c. Long Term

i. The need to revisit the contents of 1963 1983 master plan, update and implement same.

ii. The need to implement and maintain the mass transit system so as to curb the ugly trend of achaba‟ and its disastrous consequences.

iii. The need for the state to strictly implement the provisions of the Kano State road traffic regulations. The operational hours and locations shall be defined and regulated.

54

On Population Control And Explosion

i. The need to curtail indiscriminate immigration into Kano and the need to integrate the traditional institution to monitor same so as to avert the calamitous recurrence of „Maitatsine „catastrophe, and of recent the „Panshekara‟ crises.

ii. There is also need to incorporate the traditional administration into land administration to synergize and harmonize all resources, towards effective control at the grassroots level of the society.

iii. The need for the government to be up and doing in asserting its authority in reclaiming its encroached lands (Pedestrian walks, leisure spaces, green parts etc).

iv. The need to integrate members of the public into community policing projects so as to make more individuals stake holders.

55

POLICY DIALOGUE ON TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM IN KANO STATE

Rukuni na 5

Topic: Attitudinal,

Behavioural,

Cultural

and

Religious Transport.

Issues

to

Public

Space

and

Lead Discussant Facilitator Rapporteur Venue

:Sheikh Ibrahim Khalil :Dr. Halil Ibrahim Sa’id :Murtala A. Ringim :Group 5 Room 6

Sufuri tare da hanya suna da muhimmanci a cikin addini da al‟ada, amma ba a la‟akari da doka wajen amfani da su. Matsalolin da ke faruwa wajen amfani da titi/hanya sun kasu kashi uku. Kuma dukkansu na faruwa saboda rashin abu guda xaya, watau, rashin bin doka. Na farko yin amfani da abin hawa na haya ko kuma na kai ta hanyar da aka ga dama. Mafi yawan waxanda abin ya shafa yara ne waxanda ba su san doka ba ballantana a bita. Kuma da yawa daga ciki „yan siyasa ne suka saya musu ko kuma suka tsaya musu. Kashi na biyu kuma su ne manyan mutane na qasa waxanda ba sa bayar da gudunmawa wajen kare doka. Waxannan sun haxa har da manyan jami‟an gwamnati da sarakai da masu kuxi. Irin waxannan shugabanni ba sa sukan varna ko yabon nagarta a lokacin da aka aikata. Na uku kuma rashin kishin qasa a zukatan jama‟a. Babu wani mutum da ke tunanin qasa ko jama‟a na da qima a wajensa. Rashin doka ya sanya an karya mana son qasarmu, ana aibata ko wulaqanta qasa wajen hira ko kuma a kan hanya.

56

Kalubale Saboda rashin bin doka wajen amfani da hanya ko sufuri a cikin Birnin Kano, a yau an wayi gari ana fuskantar matsaloli masu yawan gaske kamar haka:

Na farko kasa kayan sayarwa tare da yin talla ko kafa kasuwa a kan hanya barkatai a kan kowane babban titi da ke cikin Birnin Kano.

Gine-ginen xakunan ibada da gabatar da salla da shirya bikin maulid ko xaurin aure tare da ajiyar abin hawa a kan hanya ba tare da la‟akari da haqqin jama‟a ba.

Zubar da shara ko kwatami a kan titina ko hanyoyi barkatai da nufin wai tilas hukuma ta kwashe ba tare da la‟akari da hakan na kawo cikas ga jama‟a ba.

Rashin bin doka ya sanya an bar jama‟a na amfani da tsofaffin motoci da babura waxanda suke da haxari mai yawa ga lafiyar jama‟a da yanayi.

Rushe ma‟aikatar sufuri ta Jihar Kano ya jawo qara tavarvarewar al‟amuran sufuri a jihar Kano.

Ko da yake an hana „yan Achava xaukar mata wanda yake abu ne mai kyau cikin addini da al‟ada, to amma an bar mata na zama cikin motocin haya (tasi da bas-bas) na zaman wake da shinkafa ko masara.

Maganin Matsalolin da Aka Ambata a Sama

1. Faxakarwa mai zurfi daga malaman addini da shugabanni ga jama‟a musamamn matasa.

2. Kafa makarantun koya dokokin amfani da hanya domin koya wa matasa amfani da titi a kan tafarkin dokar bin hanya.

3. Quduri mai qarfi (Political will) daga hukumomin

ya shafa domin a tsayar da doka da ya

da abin

57

kamata wajen amfani da hanya a cikin birni da kewaye.

4. Samar da tsararren tsari na sufuri a jihar Kano (Transport policy).

5. A qara kula tare da tsara hanyoyin sufuri tare da samar da layuka na shiga da na fita daban-daban a cikin Birnin Kano.

6. Gabatar da hukunci a nan take ga duk wanda aka samu da laifin sava dokar hanya. Kuma a qarfafa kotunan tafi-da-gidanka domin yin hukunci a nan take. A qarfafa „yan sanda da jami‟an hanya da kayan sadarwa na zamani, domin tabbatar da doka a kan hanyoyin cikin birni da waje.

7. Hukuma ta tashi duk masu kasa kaya a kan hanyar da ba kasuwa ta nufa ba. Kuma a karve duk filin da aka yi ginin gidan mai a kan hanya.

8. Kara samar da abin hawa masu inganci da yalwa ga mata tare da tabbatar da cewa direbobi masu halin a daidaita sahu na jan su a cikin Birni da Kewaye.

9. A qididdige abubuwan hawa na „yan Achava a kuma yi wa „yan Achava na kowace qaramar hukuma da ke cikin birni da kewaye lambar shaida tare da rigar aiki mai launi daban da ta sauran qananan hukumomi.

10. Shugabannin jama‟a da sauran manyan mutane su fara nuna misali mai xorewa wajen amfani da hanyar sufuri domin koya wa na baya tare da matasa hali na gari.

11. Allah ya yi wa Birnin Kano albarka mai yawa, jama‟a daga ko‟ina na zuwa domin zama ko kasuwanci. Ana kiran gwamnati da ta yi la‟akari da haka tare da samar da sababbin tsararrun wuraren zama masu inganci.

58

12. A gane cewar bin doka bai tsaya ga masu tuqin sufuri ba; wajibi ne doka ta hau kan duka mai amfani da hanyoyin sufuri, musamman „yan kura da masu sayar da ruwa ko hawan keke.

13. Kuma a wadatar da hanyoyin sufuri da alamomin amfani da hanya a bisa doka a duk inda ya kamata. Kuma „yan sanda da sauran jami‟an hanya su tabbatar da bin doka tare da hana duk abin hawan da ya lalace ko kuma ya tsufa yawan amfani ko hawa kan hanyoyin sufuri.

59

APPENDIX IV : Attendance List

S/No

Name

Full Address

1.

Dr. M.M. Borodo

Department of Medicine BUK, AKTH, Kano

2.

Habibu I. Yakasai

Sharada Quarters, Kano

3.

Engr Musa M. Dansarki

Director, Ministry of Transport

4.

Sqr Ldr A.T. Inuwa (Rt)

Rep. of Director Security, BUK

5.

Musa Ibrahim Khaleel

No. 23 Tukuntawa Qtrs, Kano

6.

Arc. Umar O. Tofa

S. 268 Daurawa, Maiduguri Road, Kano

7.

Faruk Sani

Northern N igeria Flour Mills Plc, kano

8.

Ya‟u A. Adamu

Ministry of Justice, Kano

9.

Nura Muhd Fagge

Ministry of Justice, Kano

10.

Muhammad Nura

Kano State House of Assembly

11.

Yahuza Ahmad

Ministry of Justice, Kano

12.

Dr. Abubakar Sadiq Sani

Nigerian Institute of Town Planners

13.

A.I. Tanko

Dept of Geography, Bayero University, Kano

14.

Sayyadi Mohd Yola

Dala L.G.

15.

Musa Tanko Garko

Cabinet Office

16.

Engr. Hassan Musa Karry

REMASAB

17.

Muzammil Sani Hanga

HISBAH BOARD

18.

Dr. Khalil I. Said

Retired

19.

Comr. Musa Yahya

NATA, Kano Chapter

20.

Farida Rabi‟u Danbappa

Ministry of Justice, Kano

21.

Binta Balarabe Wudil

Ministry of Justice, Kano

22.

Alh. Abdullahi Din

Sarkin Baburawan Kano

23.

Zainab M.S. Minjibir

Ministry for High Education, Kano

24.

Tijjani Ibrahim Danfari

F.C.E. Kano

25.

Umar Makinta

BUK

26.

Abdulrashid Kabiru

S.K.P. Kano

27.

Rabi Ibrahim Waya

Ministry of Justice, Kano

28.

Sunusi Yakubu A.

C.A.S

29.

Engr. M. H. Bichi

BUK

30.

A.B. Mahmoud

Dikko & Mahmoud

31.

Dr. Sani Garba Diso

Director, Road Traffic

60

32.

Abdullahi S. Ahmad

Dept. of Geography, FCE

33.

Zahraddeen A.M.

Kano State House of Assembly

34.

Ibrahim Danpullo

Ministry of Justice, Kano

35.

Abdulrazak Ismaila B.

Dikko & Mahmoud

36.

Sulaiman A. Isa

MTD Kano

37.

John Ogbu

MTD Kano

38.

Dr. Suleiman Sani

HMB Kano

39.

Ibrahim G. Satatima

COEASU, FCE Kano

40.

Zakariya‟u Ado

SSG‟s Office, Kano

41.

Usman A. Fagge

B.I. Rev. Kano

42.

Dr. Sulaiman Y. Mudi

Dept of Chemistry BUK

43.

Badayi M. Kurawa

AFRIBANK, BUK

44.

Muhd Sani

I.J.K.

45.

Yusuf Garba

FRSC, Kano

46.

Abdullahi Galadi

FRSC, Kano

47.

Garba Abdu

FRSC, Kano

48.

Adegoke S.A

FRSC, Kano

49.

Bala Abdullahi

COBTAK, Kano

50.

Garba Abdu Gaya

MOW & Transport Dept

51.

Alh. Bako Umar

NURTW Kano

52.

Sarkin Tsabtar Kano

Kano Emirate Council

53.

Dr. Yusuf Adamu

Geography Dept. BUK

54.

Sa‟idu A. Dukawa

HISBAH Board

55.

Mansur Muhammad

Sustainable Kano Project

56.

Mrs Rota Aletos

MAN Kano Branch

57.

Abubakar Mahmud

State H/Q Bompai CIB Kano

58.

Tijjani Mohd. Sharif

Sustainable Kano Project (SKP)

59.

Hamisu Usman

Hudaibiyya Foundation, Kano

60.

Hamza A. Sulaiman

Dept. of Islamic Studies BUK

61.

Juwairiyya Badamasi

Faculty of Law, BUK

62.

Ogbaji Daniel Ikpel

APINETS Nig. Ltd, BUK Road, Kano

63.

Bar. Tayyib Muktar

Muslim Lawyers

64.

Danyaro Yakasai

No. 7A Zaria Road, Kano

65.

Umar D. Sambo

Hudaibiyya Foundation, Kano

66.

Rabiu I. Ibrahim

MAI SAEEDA NIG. LTD.

67.

Garba Badamasi

Prime Urban Pr.

68.

Arc. M. Aminu Kani

2, Hamza Abdullahi Rd.

69.

Engr. O.A.K. Uche

Rep. NSE Chairman, Civil

61

   

Engineering BUK

70.

S.B. Namallan

Min. of Justice, Kano

71.

Aminu D. Ahmad

NSCDC Kano Command

72.

Adamu Habibu

ACOMORAN, Kano

Tukuntawa

73.

Ali S. Madugu

MAN, Kano

74.

Saleh Abubakar

MAN, Kano

Muhammad

75.

Yusif Adamu

MAN, Kano

76.

Jameel Balarabe

Directorate of Youth Development

77.

Mukhtar Usman Maidu

Kano State Hisbah Board

78.

Farouq M. Hassan

Rep. of Deputy Governor

79.

Muhd Yarima Shellang

C/o Ali Faruk Hassan

80.

Yahaya Ado Umar

C.A.S. Kano

81.

Engr. I.K. Inuwa

Techn.

82.

Ado Suleiman

Civil Defence

83.

A.G. Abdullahi

No. 1 Beirut Road, Kano

84.

Inuwa Y. K/Mata

NLC, Kano

85.

Arc. Sani Ali

B.U.K

86.

Adamu Ismail Garki

Freedom Radio

87.

Sani Hamza Bichi

Min. of Budget and Planning

88.

Justice P. Mahmoud

High Court, Kano

89.

Gidado Mukhtar

KAPEDI

90.

Abdulkarim Yusuf

Secretary Gen. ACOMORAN

91.

Y.Z. Ya‟u

CITAD

92.

Tijjani M. Abdullahi

Private Consultant

93.

Arc. Haruna Yahaya

Sustainable Kano Project

94.

Muhd Sani Abdullahi

Advocate for Environmental Sustainability

95.

Abubakar Ismail S.

No. 11 Sheshe Quarters, Kano

96.

H.

M. Alhassan

BUK

97.

N.M. Habibu

BUK

98.

Bala A. Muhammad

D.G. A Daidaita Sahu

99.

M.

Bashir Bala

BUK

100.

Alh. Surajo Ibrahim

NTA, Kano

101.

Kabir Saidu Funtua

Daily Trust

102.

Buhari Adamu

Fagge, Kano

103.

Zubairu Shehu

 

104.

Muhammad Yahaya K.

KNUPDA (KASEPPA)

105.

Femi Jemirin

Rep. DG/CE NITT, Zaria

106.

M.M. Mahboub

Law Reform Commission

62

107.

Malam Ibrahim Khalil

Kano Council of Ulama

108.

Mustapha H. Ismail

Centre for Human Rights in Islam

109.

Hafizu Sani Abdullahi

Dept. of Arabic, FCE Kano

110.

Bilkisu H. Shetima

Pyramid Radio, Magwan

111.

Alhassan Ahmad T.

No. 51/54, Gwammaja, Kano

112.

Haruna Wakili

CDRT, Mambayya House, Kano

113.

Haruna Salihi

CDRT, Mambayya House, Kano

114.

Murtala A. Ringim

CDRT, Mambayya House, Kano

115.

Bashir Garba

Ministry of Justice, Kano State, Kano

63

APPENDIX V: Program of Events

Opening Ceremony/First Plenary Session

8.30

-9.30 am Arrival of Invited Participants

9.30

am

Arrival of Special Guest of Honour, the Deputy Governor of Kano State, His Excellency, Engr. Abdullahi Tijjani Mohammed Gwarzo

9.30-9.35 am

National Anthem

9.35-9.40 am

Opening prayer

9.40-9.50 am

Introductory Remarks by A.B. Mahmoud, SAN, Dikko Mahmoud Law Firm and Member, Mambayya House Governing Board.

9.50-10.00 am Remarks by Chairman of the Occasion, the Attorney General and Hon. Commissioner for Justice, Kano State, Barr. Malam Aliyu Umar

10.00 -10.35 am Key Note Address by Mal. M.A. Liman, Head of Department, Geography Department, Bayero University, Kano

10.35-10.45

Remarks by the Special Guest of Honour, the Deputy Governor of Kano State

10.45 -11.15am Tea/Coffee Break

64

11.15-1.15 pm Second Session: Working Sessions

Group 1: Topic/Sub-theme: Road Usage, Enforcement of Traffic Rules and Regulations, Licencing and Revenue Generation and the Role of Federal, State and Local Government Agencies

Lead Discussant: Alhaji Danyaro Yakasai Facilitator: Mala. Muzzammil S. Hanga Venue: Room 1

Group 2: Topic/Sub-theme: Urban Public Transportation Systems, Modes of Transportation and Modern Urban Traffic Management in Kano: Strategies and Models From Other States and Countries. Lead Discussants: Director-General, NITT, Zaria and Alh. Tijjnai Muhammad Abdullahi Facilitator: Arch Umar Tofa Venue: Room 2

Group 3: Topic/Sub-theme: Public Health, Public Safety and Environmental Issues in Public Transportation Lead Discussant: Engr. Hussam Musa Karry Facilitator: Dr. Musa Borodo Venue: Room 3

Group 4: Topic/Sub-theme: Urban Planning, Population Explosion, Public Space and Issues of Public Transportation in Urban Kano. Lead Discussants: Arc. Aminu Kani and Dayyabu Z. Gano Facilitator: Engr. M.H. Bichi Venue: Room 4

Group 5: Topic/Sub-theme: Attitudinal, Behavioural, Cultural and Religious Issues to Public Space and Transportation.

65

Lead Discussant: Sheikh Ibrahim Khalil Facilitator: Dr. Halil Ibrahim Sa‟id Venue: Room 5

1.15-2.15 pm

Lunch/Zuhr Prayer

2.15 3.45 pm

Second Plenary Session Reports from the Working Groups and Discussion

3.45 4.15 pm Asr Prayer

4.15-4.50 pm

Wrap up session and communiqué.

4.50-4.55 pm

Vote of Thanks by Dr. Haruna Wakili,

4.55-5.00 pm

Director, Mambayya House Closing prayer

66

APPENDIX VI: Members of the Organising Committee

Dr. Haruna Wakili

CDRT

Chairman

Dr. Haruna Salihi

CDRT

Member

Alh. Garba Bashir

Ministry of Justice

Member

Alh. Abubakar Aminu Dikko & Mahmoud Member

Member

Alh. Ibrahim Danpullo Ministry of Justice

Murtala Abubakar Ringim

CDRT Member/Secretary

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