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The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate the operation of a diode clamper. Like the
diode clipper, the clamper is a wave-shaping circuit but it adds a dc level to the input waveform.
Thus the clamper is often referred to as a dc restorer. However, unlike that of the clipper, the
shape of the input signal of a clamper is not changed.

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The practical consisted of:

1.Ê Silicon rectifier diodes


2.Ê 10Kё Resistor
3.Ê Dual trace oscilloscope
4.Ê 10µF electrolytic capacitor
5.Ê Signal generator
6.Ê Bread boarding socket
7.Ê 25V dc power supply

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1.Ê Wire the clamper circuit shown in the schematic diagram as show in figure 1 above. Set
your oscilloscope in the following approximate settings.

Channels 1 and 2: 2.0 V/division, dc coupling


Time base: 0.2 ms/division

2.Ê Now connect the signal generator to the breadboard. Adjust the signal generator͛s
output level at 5V peak at a frequency of 1 KHz. You should see two sine waves. Note
that the clamper͛s output signal level is above the inputs. This affect is the same as that
obtained by adding a dc voltage onto the input waveform.

3.Ê Note that the clamping action is not perfect. The negative peaks of the output
waveform are clamped not at zero volts, but at a small negative voltage. When the input
waveform goes negative at a level greater than the barrier potential of the diode, the
diode is forward biased, the equivalent of a short circuit in series with a small dc voltage
source. Thus, approximately 0.5 to 0.7 is dropped across the diode, while the remainder
of the peak negative voltage(Vp- Vd) charges the 10µF capacitor. On the next positive
going half-cycle, the diode is reverse biased, looking like an open circuit and the voltage
stored on the capacitor is then added to the time-varying input voltage. The result is
that the peak output voltage is now approximately equal to the peak to peak input
voltage, less the voltage drop of the diode.

4.Ê Although the peak to peak output voltage increases, its negative peak remains clamped
at the same negative voltage level measured. You should find that the positive peak
output voltage is again approximately equal to the peak to peak input voltage.

5.Ê Now reverse the polarity of the diode in the circuit, and repeat step 2,3 and 4. The
behavior is opposite that of the positive clamper. Note that the clamper͛s output signal
level is below the inputs. This action is that of a negative clamper, so the input
waveform is shifted downward. This effect is the same as that obtained by adding a
negative dc voltage onto the input waveform.

6.Ê Again you should notice that the clamper action is not perfect. The positive peaks of the
output waveforms are clamped not at zero volts, but at a small positive voltage.
7.Ê Increase the peak to peak input voltage. You should see that although the peak to peak
output voltage increases, its positive peak remains clamped at the same positive voltage
level measured in step 6 above. You should find that the negative peak output voltage is
again approximately equal to the peak to peak voltage.
5.Ê  
This experiment demonstrated the operation of a diode clamper. This circuit does not
change the wave shape of the input signal but merely adds a dc level to the input
waveform.

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Electronics device 8th edition Thomas FLOYD.

2-4, Diode Limiting and Clamping Circuits