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PICT FOR TOC

RES ,EAC

'PV

ERS

Andrew W'rilght

J

How to draw

faces

Th,e secre (:.. of Joo1t;i,:J yovtn ,er- arlo( YOu.n.9€r/ Praw ,thefeatLtres SM,Q HeY" an,d, lower.

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14

How to draw

faces

determtned

blissful

confident

d.isa.pprun~ed

bored

cold

disapproving

I arrogant

_L__

How to draw

dismayed

frllstr.al ted

drunt

hangover

,

........

horrified

indifferent

-

enraged

frWghtened

hot

umocen t

hurt

,..1
]1
...
J
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00011
J
- tio!
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hysterical

J

]1

How to draw

faces

interesred

lonely

lovestruck

rnischievous

kind

mistrustful

prudish

rude

sly

thoughtful

._1-

]7

Settings

Street

l1lDD

13:,.-- .. '!a$>

37

Settings

Park and garden

Settings

Beach and mountain's,

~

0'·

- -

" .

40

Settings

Bus station and bu IS

-- - ~

'5 '

_j

I

. I

41

Settings

Train and aeroplane

Settings

Kitchen and bathroom

I I

'"" - - --

t,=.

" ,. , ,

t • ,



~

\

I =-- ! I

~~

o

43

Settings

Dining room

~----------------~~--~~~~=====-~~===========---~=---~--------

Settings

Sitting room and bedroom

~ .~

45

Settings

Dining room

-

J

' .......

Settings

Baker and supermarket

----------~~----~~~====~==~===--~:

Settings

Restaurant and cafe

47

Settings

Travel agent and hotel

·~.,-~.,~.·-.'~.M .. · •.•. · .. WllitlU f11iV

M ·.f ,CoAST t:d

..

4:8,

liII

Settings

Post office and telephone booth



~ I ,

.

I I

I

I

, ,I I

49

!II!

Settings

Hospital and doctor's waiting room

'RECEPTJON

Settings

Classroom and police station

c_~

51



Settings

Library and museum

52

- -~

Settings

Art gallery and cinema

53



Topics r behaviour! notions

Personal identification

(appearance)

feCl.rures h9~t CU1D1. lowe: r a:O~ltt

young (child)

f~ari.tn~:) sh'Vnq and: ~j ,.her j rn ore. nO! ~r

young (adult)

.j<i !B'ht 1T-o,(..)1¥l r :PWhl P CJ"H:"I res:," ~a t(

middle a.ged.

old

tan

fat

-

thin

strong

weak

4,)broad-faced moustache'

thin-faced beard

5t:.m:aighl

fringe/ponytail

stooped

I

dar k- haired straight

fair-haJ1 red wavy

dark":haired C1.B'ly

'Topics; behaviour, notions

Personal identification

( appearance)

, fear.!.-\ff:S low OIQ~n On it.he head ~. nea.~ ~ar9 e r"e i 0 Fett tb the. boa.'1, bodys.ndL

o

-

very young

~a'!1l"r~ Chi" SJiM.

young

very young

heads loftoleri bowed 1e.'9~,

56

old

oM

fat cYIl.1j hrf""...st:b~l:,~~ I ,thickeral'\d I

Sil9hNif

I bo~&t' ~e;9S.

middleaged

middleaged

hetld

~ P" '9hl~ I~n~ ~M im,Jard 01"11 tN; .~ot.)eol che3t.

, i'

,

old

Topics, behaviour.motions

Personal identification

(family relationships)

JO~~N BROWN MARY BROWN

{19.l0L..19i'0I) (b" ].912-5)

g:rilndmotbi.er

@

,

-

,~ W

I

GEORGE B.ROWN BARBARA BROWN·· HAROLD GREEN ,

l(b.1950)iANl)REW BROWN (b. 1900) RACHEl BROWN (19Sn·1990} j'ANETG.REEN

® (b .. ']t{g'9'52). l® (D.l®965) G:J (~b']%O)

. . ,:".' '--". " """"~ -~","", .. ': r ---'_"" ,-,~I

iI!Bii! L ,',_ "', 1_ -" ~"~,,

! " .... '.~ ..... =" .... '., ..•.. ~.t.Ii ... ,_. '." .• c •.. '_., 'I ... ~t~.· .. · ••.••..•. , ... ,' ' .•

"'. t: -,filii' _.,'. ',_ '. ," "-', ~,' ,_. Wi , "

W ... . ... .. .-

uncle

fathl2.r

aunt

jOH N BROWN PETER BROWN NANCY BROWN

(b. 1983) (t984.]9R5) (b. 19,8])

EUZABE"fH CREEN (b.1978}

PETER GREEN (b. 1983)

~, ~

57

..

Topics I behaviour I notions

Personal iden tification

(professions/ occupations)

g

()

architect

baker

chemist

butcher (d:mggist - US)

cook

driver

I farmer

! I fireman

fac tory worker

footballer (soccerp layer - US) green grocer

grocer

labourer

mechanic

milkman

rruner

iii

J

58

bus:iliJ.eSgma~1! woman

I

I

!

I

Ii

~

j



1

I

~ JI

doctor

joiner



]

Topics r behaviour r notions

Personal iden tification

(professions! occupations)

J "J \

musician

nurse

: pianist

pilot

postman (mailman - US)

-

shop assistant

teacher

waiter

writer

59

I

I • __

office worker

policeman

soldier

photographer

policewoman

seaman

typist

~ ••

yoga teacher

unemployed



Topics, behaviour, notions

House andhome

(rooms etc.)

detached. house

first filJoo.r [seennd floor - US)

ground 000:1' (first iloo.r - US)

D 0. em
n 101 0
.", LI O.
10 []
13 []I
C. - nat (apartment - US)

bungalow

semi-detached house

terraced house

caravan (trai]er- US)I

tent

Topics I behaviour, notions

House and hom,e

(furniture and amenities)

record p~.a yer

pillow

potted plan ts

~I

re frige rator

I

settee/couch

R. ,'I

e U til

switch

, II

I I i

I .: I

@ ---1-

sink

I ,

table

radiator (central heating)

toi~.et/W C

',lSI' e

I I

socket

table cloth

I,

1 '

I

sheet

stool

mmllJ. tllw,m smtiiil ~Uli.le'

I'

wardrobe

washirlg. machine

62

Topics, behaviour I notions

House andhome

(household articles and tools)

brush and pan

bowl

Iron

knife

cup and saucer

mixer

pan

spoon

plate

pliers

spanner (wrench - US)

screwdri ver

torch (flashlight ~. US)

63

-

Topics f behaviour f notions

Regions

I_~_-

factoryi industria] area {ann/farming area

cCD

seaside ~

town

Topics, behaviour, notions

Animals

bat

bird

bear

bee

cat

I butterfly

camel

cockterel)

cow

crocodile

deer

bird

dog

,&).

" C1' • 0

~.

fish

6.5

cat

crab

dog

, frog

Topics, behaviour, notions

A· 11

ruma s

giraffe

goat

hen/chick

1110l1Lkey

goose

kangaroo

owl

hedgehog

lion

shark

sheep

swan

tiger

~ortoise/rurtrne

Topics, behaviour, notions

Plants

cedar

poplar

branch,

cactus

corn (grain - US)

grass

palm

bush

chrvsanthemurn

le~J

daffodil

~/t/:f;_

i:

marsh

seed

tulip

acting

baseball

bas ket ball

Topics I behaviour! notions

Free time and entertainment

bird watching

camp]ng

car racing (watching)

cinema (going to)

I [movies (going to) - US]

l]), computer

collecti ng (stamps)

cricket (playing)

cycling

I dancing

disco- I dancing I driving

68

I -

Topics, behaviour, notions

Free time and entertainment

fishing

,r---~~--t-I. .footbaH P(soccer - US)

jogging i I jum pi »s

I

~ IlL Dil;1 ~I' I~I'I! ~ W ~

'~"[ovies (going to)) opera. (going to the) }

photography

pjcnics (going on/hav~ng)

poetry (wri.tiIllg)



Topics, behaviour, notions

Free time and entertainment

.t!fJ ~J m~ .. '

, records (listening to) riding

, __ .. ft" ..

sailmg

singing

skiing

sunbathing swimming

snorkelling

",U:I pDlGD!:]

O,I~O

D ,0

0''','

~,

o

~, I

~ I

~

television

(watching)

theatre (going to)

ta ble ten n is

touring



:'

I'''' .

video (making) video (watchirig) walking

water-skiing

yoga I

70

Topics! behaviour, notions

Travel and places

(types of trans port)

by boat

'by camel

by car

. by elephant

I •

on/by foot on horse back

by hovercraft

by lorry/wagon (by truck - II S)

by motorcycle by scooter

byplane

. by ship

by taxi

by train

by underground

van

by unicycle

L

,

71

Topics, behaviour! notions

Travel and places

(road features)

I roundabout

traffic lights (traffic signals - US)

- ,--

I

bridge

D

junction

.• .. ..

corner

~iO ,,1' ~ [ : I :1

-=-CI ] I ·~l[. iJ

one - wa y stree t

Topics, behaviour, nouns

Places in a town

. - r

/

grocer's

doctors surgery

o

school

soex:er stadium -,

73

74

Topics, behaviour, notions

Relations

(invitations and correspondence)

present/gift (gi ving a) writing a letter receiving a letter

--~~------------~------------~~----------~

lovers

telephorring

friends

Topics, behaviour, notions

Health and welfare

(p arts of the body)

body

leg

head

f:ace

,.::....moustache '!I:r.;!oo,_ tooth ~-'tongue

forehead eyebrow

eye cheek

nose

chin --~~-~ ........

neck -----12::=::]

75

Topics, behaviour, notions

Health and welfare

(ailmen ts I accidents 1 medical services)

a. coug;h

g(lt a cold

a sore throa t

stomach ache

toothache

sunburn

a broken arm

a bruise

I accident

ambulance

~,

I a headache

a temperature

a. sprain

stretcher

marse

dentist

Topics, behaviour, notions

Clothes

~ =r

bikini

cap

blouse

boots

dress

bra

hat

coat

Jumper (sweater - US)

~ ~

panties

jeans

pullover (sweater - US)

raincoat

sandals

shirt

pyjamas:

shoes

shorts

77

Topics, behaviour, nouns

Clothes

suit

slippers

swimming costume (swimsuit - US)

socks

suit

tights swimming trunks i (pantyhose - US)

tnJil!Jsers (pants- US)

T-shirt

I / -. c-J .•.. -.- .

Q)J '\_/.

underwear

waistcoat (vest - US)

belt

purse

brooch.

ring

earring

Topics I behaviour, notions

Food and drink

biscuit (cookie ~ US)

bread hun cake

o

,

.

chocolate

pIe

crisps

(potato chips - US) pancake pastry (Danish)

sandwich sweets (candy - US) tart

beer

coffee

~
, V D
,
I ~ milk

tea

cream

water

@

.

,

fj

.JUIce

wine

79

Topics, behaviour t notions

Food

o

egg

butter

cheese

meat (beef")

sauce

chicken

~ .... ~ ... :-:.:~ •. ' .••.•..........•... ' I

. '. - .. '

i .' '. , ~ _ . _-- ... ~

",' ~ -_ ..

!!,p. _ r. _

omelette

barbecue

cereal

chips (frencl:l hies - US)

!

rice

spaghetti

I

---

80

boil

fry

grill

roast

Topics, behaviour, notions

Food: vegetables

Brussel sprouts cabbage

courgette

(zucchini ~ US) cucumber

fJ (eel!"! ii!1Y" b .... D,un

blo.c.k

d

0]1 ve onion

potato

radish.

watercress

. " . ~rttrt" Whlb!..

a ubergine : or .b.~&o'V,fn

asparagus I (eggpla_~~~S) _I ~eans!i beans (French)

cauliflower

It. W

leuuc€

gadic

parsnip

peas

tomato

turrup

broccoli

9'

.

,

mushroom i

~ _.. I

r.e Q!i., ,00r 8r,~r'\

I

I

o

pepper

81

'Topics, behaviour, notions

Fo,od: fruit

apple

grapes

dark

avocado

yenOlA

__".-.-...._

grapefruit

bananas

broO...,1fI

.

.

- .

.

.

kiwi fruit

coconut

Iemon

:iii

~

1 1

II

Bree.,o· .

.

.

lime

~k .. ,..ea, bm~n

lychee

mango

yel/aoW

----

fI,(eeh 0" yetlow

pear

s tra wherry

pawpaw

I red) sreetlor ,!;dh)i\oV

!O

plum

peach



,

.

raspberry

orange

pineapple

me-lon

,

I

·

- • •

82

:

Topics I behaviour f notions

Weather

.

it's raifl~ng

irs very cold

if's sunny

it's very hot

spring

autumn [fall - US)

summer

83

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Prepositions

in front of

behind

after

down

II I

into

witIt (slilgar)

I without (sugar) .

~.~(),..!]

,~~/

from

to

r:;Jl1 ~'

outside

~~ r ~Ir'

off

onto

away from

towards

85

Illustrated vocabulary' and grammar

Prepositions

around

around

I ,

i I:

I 011

next to

near (to)

in

inside

~I

. away

past

86

OllJ.

across

against

o o

for

between

along

among

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

answer

I~.··.·· ... CJ> ..... '-.> .... "4

~r

.k

@

I

,

I blow

brake

87

buy

IU US trated vocabulary and ,grammar

Verbs

<iJ I

I carry

cook

copy

:.J

count

cry

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

cross

da.nc€

I demand

deny

descend

ill

d i sappear

I draw

eat

I

enter

I dance

4

~fI

divide

89

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verb,s

I fail

fight

float

fly

gather

on/put on

get;

get wet

on

90

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

give

guide

hang

grow

! help

hide

keep quiet

~OHl

Jump

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

kick

laugh

lean

I learn

leave

like

iHt

I I

~.i

I

I

live

listen

l7 I' .. J

I

lock

look after

I ~ook at

~I

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

- .

Verb,s

make

mend

meet

mlX

marry

pick up

pay

, pick

pass

I I

93

I'

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

~.

~./?!d

polish

point

pas

pour

94

I""-::!..

Illustra ted vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

return

rsse

ride

ride

run

I sH

sing

95

1'-

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

skate

~~'.' " .. '.' '.""'.'.' ....•...•. ' ~ .

'~

smell

spill

speak

splash

i BAKER,

stir

support

sweep

",

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

take

take

telephone

thank

think

throw

turn

turn on

turn off

walk

97

t

I ..]

weer

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Verbs

wash

I ~

~

_ ...

I WUl

- ....

worry

yaWl't

I write

-

IIiI..-

wrap

-

.-

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Passives

They're having;.

It's eleven o'clock. She wants to go, to bed: the cat has been put out The ~~~b........dI~~-"'l-4i.J,.i1!'""'lI_"-'" garage has been locked.

TIlI'e ] ~.gh tshave been s wl tched off The radiator has been turned off. The washing tip has been done.

DfME. I

being posted! (mailed ~ US}

VICTORlA

bei ng taken o ff

o

99

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Tenses

-- -

I r~ goi~n9 to ~. ~'Mb 'IOn,e day ~ 'W'liU

.ti, r5 m,ou,ntcun. I dilMb Eve res I.

,t(~

r~ ~

This .morn ing ~ Jll..lrnpedoil:Jl.t, of bEd Ii :90 e cAf'es.SI€d I

rOn up a mO;Y.nt!o~·n ISWO~'" 110 rnHe.s: ana pl:ayed te.rul is.

I

,I _,CltS olmaung!A Ad irs O~~ knl/ch rtM1 e ~

I' ~ .••.••••.•.. ®JA

l!OO

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Tenses

After h.€ had eaten the fish he began to feel ill.

- ----~

If , won i ~ ttl i Illo'l\ J II W0i.11 d £a "I I

OO.c! <11.

101

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Vowels and dipthongs

0:

sun

i:

I.

fish

In _" .. ' ..

~

ann

box

u:

boot

radio

mad

e

bed

curly

pie

]02

hat

foot

~I

d pan aa

owl

flower

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Consonants

pen

bed

t

tie

d

k

cat

91

girl

chick

f

juggler

frog

v

video

1

-..,

.

I

.

.

three

s

feather

.r;,' Sf;::.,/ .

socks

zebra

J

shark

treasure

1]

h

~ ~

hen

1

leg

mask

knee

j

yacht

wing

w

witch

103

-

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Adjectives

alone

beautiful

bloody

aggress]Ve

- I~

.1),

',ruf __ I

ancient

apart

:;0<,

blondje)

104

big

blind

-

-

-

-..

.....

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Adjectives

cautious.

clever

doudy

comfo rra b le

cool

costly

crooked

careful

cheerful

content

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Adjectives

dear

deep

~' ~

~."" m.···.-

, C)1LrUi

d. iHe:relll, t

empty

endless

enormous

equal

106

electric

[J[J

-

-

Illustra ted vocabulary and grammar

Adjectives

funny

greedy

gentle

generous

D

I

~I

- . I

helpful

,

hi ,ea"vy

hilppy

Hl7

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Adjectives

hoI::

'..._,_

/j .... ··t '\'"

.. " 0. (2)./.' - .. ' p

~ )~ ,

~ - -

1.0

intelligent

,

last

~-~ ~,

~

late

left

light

little

108

Illustrated vocabulary and gram.mar

Adjectives

~ &M11'I1 '

. poor

109

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Adjectives

rapid

I

I

/21

right

responsible

npe

round

rude

iUS

shallow

sharp

short

serious

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Adjectives

t I

smooth

111

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Adjectives

thirsty

useful

I

wet

, wicked

wtde

young

x

!~ ~

wise

wrong

1'12

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Nouns

band

baU

bomb

bracelet

brtck

bus

comb

camera

compass

113

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Nouns

cork

crowd

earring

fire

doU

envelope

fireplace

(;J.I

curtains (drapes - US)

I

I drum

family

fist

flame

freezer

114

dushllan

(garbage man - US)

feather

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Nouns

handbag

<U . . ~ lbd

ink

i handkerchief

jad

key

knot

king

]ift (elevator - US)

I

lipstick loaf

lock

luggage

matches (box of) I microphone

115

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Nouns

mosque

nest

peril

mosquito

@

- " ..... > ... , ......•..•.... \,&J

pencil

overcoat

I mouth

/""

y

plpe

I queen

pond

rat

pnson

razor

116

Illustrated vocabulary and grammar

Nouns

sack

spade

Ue

stick

toothbrush/paste

sword

sleeve

tap (faucet- US)

tractor

tyre

volcano

watch

violin

zip (zipper - US)

vase

windmill

].17

Pictures for com posi tion

Individual speculative pictures

I
o lD I
~ __ CJ.
C I) 10
I -- ',I
I I}
\
II I
I" .~ ~OP
I 1]9

Pictures for composition

Individual speculative pictures

~- ---

-J

,i-.oII

-_j

.......wI

--" I

-J

.......

120

Pictures for composition

Story sequences

~ ·0

I ~

- - --I i!j_,,_----liIIz

tEl'

~, .~

7

L)

__ ,8

,]]

Pictures for composition

Two story sequences

:2

I' 3 ,------III tIoW1lfM.

1

]22

Pictures for composition

Two story sequences

]

2

16

123

Pictures for composition

Story sequence Beauty and the Beast

.~~

. ' ... £ "l':"':". J ).~

n «»

. J

1

Pictures for composition

Story sequence

Little Red Riding Hood

127

6 Some basic ways of using pictures in language teaching

I hope that people wi th COL'1CernS vefY different fm!ITI ~hose of .~<lnguage teachers .. \1:i1l find th.]:> 'boo.k. useful <I~S <I. source of pictures .. However, Ianguageteechers <I[la,in particular, h."iId'L€'ts of Jore:ign OIJ.'i1d second languages win pmlJi'lMy be the chief usersaad it is fOil them thRt [ am adding rhls section-

The section is divided :into four pa.rts,:

Li5fl:'uing, remtinx (mil pi[l;r~n'$ Sllt't1King, wt"i,rhrg mut p,irtUn'5

EXrtlmpld'S vf WI'I,V5 of U~iJiS p,irtmn smge by Pilg€

Mt'l1in .

The ideas sugge~led h~ this secnon can be added to by referring to rrh@ books. to be found ill! Fr,~ rUre\!' nmditlg 01'1 pl1ge 139_

LiLs tening •. [lead im.g and pictures

- -

Som,e warfs ofus.ing pidures 1 To ]n~ff;5t the sttlden~

2. To help to 'u'<lt1lsk!te' the meanmg of the gist of tih.e ~ex:t or of il1ldhridu<li items of!a:_~gu<\g<e

3 T 0 gi vs 01 oont~:l1t rot' the lmgu®~ge ;,1 nd for the swdeflts' activity

II· To ghlC ,t;'l(]ltm~l int,ommltioll

5 To. contribute to the search [or specific information in the lex~ alI1d! to flEI.p the students demonstrate [1011- verbiill.y that s/he has found tha~iI'lformati[Jn and understcodit and has llper5{)iI1<11 response to nffe.r abeur it.

1',ead.ing n1Iean~llg

A siflgl.e piC~tlrl? may, oc<:asiomUy, 'be used to t&"Ich th.e meani'l'1~ of ill ~,\!'ord or phrase new to the student. HowC'v,er-,.pict'ul"eS are ~:su<)_Hy@jmbj;gu:o~s; people in~erpr~t thenl d:uffeN'nt~y.

The most useful crm:t:r.ibutioIil a pktu:r~ can make is to contrlbute to the student's understalI1diing o:ffll 1i11lorre gener",l context which mll)' be made up ofpktl1res, the t&ldter~s actions, the studene'sactions, souad ei.fects and words. ]t is in t:he u nderstandililg of tlitis overall >CO'l1l:text thflt the J,n\gua_g-e new to' the stuclie'flt wIll ha ve mC<lning-

h is ohenthe ~~y th~p'kture is used and ~efe;;red to which give'S (or doesn' I: give~) lUe;lnin!1l to tile 'new' langu<lge.

EXI'Illllll~ 1: ToInfroduce pesttense forms nil.eo te.u:::heJr cou]d ~eU a story iUustratil1!g i:~ with a series of pkture cams whkns! he props on ti'il.e ledge along the bottom of the board-

128

11 U-,'tIS (1 bml day for Tond First of all, '~efe1l vut (Jr~! Then he stood m~ tlk CJjlf! l"J~m Hr,r, ,rJr)fI~'It ~~lS IWf (U~d he !;1un1t his mo,rl th1 T:ile~l he ~l~[~J Jiis bJl~Sj' Then he tw's late fot W!O'lk! Wfu'ri Ii ail'y! e~c..

The cards aee turned around. afrte:r the $~orv has bemoo<hi. TheFt the class are asked VI,,'hnt l!npPl!fle,J If) Tom? ~'!lhat r~tI.rptm:rd jhsH He fen ,01. t of {),fa? (tllrniJ!g m~' first card armmd} ye.~, fil! foU vut .of bed. nen whtrt 1rflppfJ red?

E;tQ~~J'plc :2: Show H1e student.s a oompica~. pictu[,e,put it ~wlly and then chaUellge the students to remember it nllU an l~ol!Ji[ later, nub imlnedi.lIhdy calls for trle use of frh~ p<'l:st tense form, pmviding. you do not 'p~dt. up the pict1l]['e lmtlea.VE it hidden.

(e.g. Il shu/t'1l t, tfying to ren:r.fl~tller ,~hf pictilr;e) U <liaS (1 s~~.i,de llictwt'. TIrere l(oere t1'.j;\O OOM$ .... nO, there n~re m:ree bool$ _ .. e~.

ln these two ex<tnlples the past tensefcm'nl is mu stra!:ed, no~ by fl\~ p:k~t!re ,done, oUlth)' the way in wh~C'}\ U1e pktur-e is l!]~ and rofe1'1'ed to.

AU the 5uggestiOiIlJs, made in Sedjon 6 for activities .v:iU'l pictures concern wlilysin which picu.tres "i'lI'fL.'b,e usedto ]Iiltrooucem.ear[l][lg and to p~l'I!a]iSl!th±s fur the learner.

A most effuctlye w,<'!)' of he~ping students to become f3_n;'1j]~O!ir with the mean:ing o.f ]1lngu<l~e ne\\\l ~o them is ~o ask th" stude:rl.~s to pred uos <I. mare ,effective picture than the one used i I'l 1000 PtcrUI(ES POll. TEAGiB.RS '[0' COP'f~

"De-oJlstlfilrMn,g uTu'lierstiUlldulig

In order hi show th~i:r und ersk1.!ldjug and perhaps their personal response 'to what Ul~y Ililv,e I1e-Olrd Oil" read, the 5tt1.]dents can be asked to point to a- pkttt:lr~, to dnrw 3. picture Or to <IITim.ge several picmres in an order.

Demo\tjstrotifi,~ Im"'f:,'Standlng of vocabulary Most pa.g~ wj(hmUlt~ple, ~cliv~d:ual p~ctm,es.

.I!. wdl. kaown ;IiJctivity is Bingo {Lo,t~o}. for ~xample, plrn.otlliJopy a few ]lllg,es of the book w~~:iJch have Oil them ml'lny small. pichmes, ,rnt up the pag.es; disfribute the pictures iI:m.on,g the' students (Jive ead\t); can out the words l<titdo:lil'fLly; wfien <l studeFL~ hears a. word nam.lng ons ox his or her piernres he or she rums it OVet. W~lffiil srudcl'lt has· tumed over <11] HlI'e pictures s/he calls out BiNGO!'

AH:e:mathr,ely,r;1lti.ler U1l.'ln CllJmng Oild lJJWOl'd far e'@d~ picture you C1'I]II. describe the pictures" 'fh:isis d~a:r]y .. mere demandingi!lctivi.ty,

Demons,traiing m~dersltmdil~g of a dralague Masitf'.h;;i:l1In!5 in tbe book

J1 yO'lJi want to. test the StUd9~' t!]II.de·ffiMinding of pacts of a d iOllI(lg~.lte you C<lJ:'! ,OIs1 '~}'te:m to comp.lete- a piem.roe or 'tu dmw one. Indplc this lde<l a ppl~es to most plctures in the' :

E:mmp.!!": The srndents ~isten to Ol. di.]llog:u~ dcs.crihililg someone's appeilt<lrUcE! (o,n cassette or between two stu.dents in the dass), Dey draw Ute-information rhev he<lr' OJ'!~O .;1 sjmple drawing 01 <I box person, fa.r e;.:;ampl.e, ~OlrCt 'mO'l.ls~taehe,lon£: 11t<ljr, <L 'brown h.1t, ~<lcliet. shor~ ~rol!lsen;" etc. ~ page] S.

DemOfio'ltrtl,tjr.g u'utr:r5t(.mdft~g of (I. story Be'<!1u,t:y 3Jl!!d Ute Bea;s~ .p'a;ac U6

9bu:deflls cali!. 00 asked to I-"l!lJt mudd~ed pictures .mto the coned S~;Pl~liI~ for ifhe story you h<lVlC!U]d- You ~lI(lw.d have !o p]Juo~QPY the pagf'fir$~, cut up U~e p:i:c!:l,:ll"eS!lInd hand ~hem. OlLJJtin a mm:JId!!I?d .-;eque:ncc.

Gnppm ,exerdSI!S,I'IlUWpJe choice, Irntlfr.i1se, q~j:e$fh;i<US (mdtl,~r5

Most pidiU !lCS i~ U,.e book

Th.e i:ntonna lion needed. to do these ~raditio!"la'~ aCfiviities can betaken from <I v<IJrie~ of pa.omr;e,s,

Some ways ()If u$il1lg,piot~]!e5

1 !,o motivate the :student 'to spc.<lk orto WJlt~

2. To create <I. c-onte;d within which hisnWf respoese 'w.ill ha ve m.eani.ng

3. 1"0 provide the studeJi1l.~ with ][lImm:t.aUon to lUIs.e: i rI cO/I~mll'cljl pr<lC~i.ce work, Pictures .5Jlow~.ng objects, actions, evenl~ and !)e!atiO'!'hSlli.:ips c<ln cue ans ..... ers to questions, sllllbs,t.itut~D:ns, aJlld seub1':iln' rom:ple<tl.o!l'l.S

~ ']:0 sponsor, stimulaje and possibly 1IO gu ~k spoken ,<I WIG wf.i.t:tel'l cie5Criptions, ]1I.,jIJrraH0I1S or di."Ilogues.

5 To sponsor, stimulate and ofJelr informaHon fur frl,;,'i,;' " .. :rH11:l_g a:floC! speili~,'f'.ref' inthe sense of the: teacile'r offering 1l010l_I'Ig.ll<\ge guidance errestric ~.i:on5

MewaJrlicaJ alndi comnu.mic3i~w.ve use o'.rruangl!lJage Plctuees can be uS'ediLn acHvjties ".,,fruct! o.ffel! ]Htle more fhan mf'(fml!icli~ rJmr;1 ice in U\e use of t:llte .Language or may be used ][1 rnmillil~·"iiCRHD.e Ilcti[;litiCl; whieh "wuld be m.ea.ningrni. to n~.e students even if fh!!:!y did~hem ]I:'l therr own language.

n is lffipoft.a:nt '~ note that communlcatilre <Lcth'itics ruay demand Olli\ objective .e5pm:1S>e or a :mb~ectiv~ ~~sf0[lse. For example, if you W'I.<!ike a l;)jg silll'llp~.e drawing of <I r~rs.ol'l jurnpililg <I!:ld t:h~u slowly pun it outO( <In envelope, '~h~ sh:u:i~n't!;call be asked to guess what it is, lkcit guesses w:illlDe as objedive as ~heyc"ln rni!!ke th,em; ~here is ill. right olrwmng; answee, If you s<how~he pi.Cti1Jre ot the SEMISil!k' and <15k the students to say\",ln.cthflf' or not :itrcrni11lds. them of their holid,lYs by Ole sea U'IlellIllS\\!"CI"S m~s~ b~ sybj~ti""'e ,1J'Id Ci!in:I'LO~ be judged asrugM or w~ong lIS f@r @s Ule,C'On~nt ofwhilt they say is eoneerned. In lliTle ease of the pmdill~ly-hidden d~alwillg the 5tl.laerTIm5 <liN~ beingmoltivated by lJei[lgthlll~eugi!'tt. [1""1 tite (;O'!!!>e of the e);;c.ha~ oflie,ellirl~ and experierrces, the students OIl,e oomg j.fviloo and .e~'jic;ow'ilgd'fl"

Th~ ide;ll of dmUclIgC', hwiffllirm afldt'~irroilrilgf'mf"i.!1 C1Ill. be used by fhe ~~ c:her to help bun Oil her to minimiseth~ aJmount of pu~lyrIWCh,ant~iwm:k tRe~rud.el"lts aile asked to dID.

Some ways of chaUengrnng ,and 'encJ1lIu.nging stl!Dldernilts _

The id,e<! oJ dml,le'/!g~ .. nd i~!~1i'r.:r~io~! can 00 ad<lpted to the needs otstudeuts a~ tn.e high~starld a~ too most baste of prOficiency .leve.ls. The adiviUes .1I!'Ising include controiled, gu idoed. and free act:i'i.li~i'e!>, as w@]l as subjective or obje(till'e responses.

.Ichm tifYJing

Cha]lel~ge the studexu:s to identify <I picture whk.n i;s djfJicuJtto i,demi fy _ ·¥ou may sh.ow them the picltune <It gl\~a~ s(X'ed 0'1" g~o.W !tn~m only a smaU uU'iLcfiar<'lder.isti.c pl\'lft of]t ]n the alS@ o't these h"lo eXOlfl'lpIes the stud~ts call out and <ltltem!~pt to descdbe ",,11,1 t they s~e- Other types of challenge toideilittify depend on U'ne students ailing questtions. iFor ex:a:n;tple, you think of one pid1.l,[\e 1'IIndthey ask Y01!] questi.urnl;.s to find ou~ which olle i ~ is.

Dt'$crii!irlg

Cha'llel'!,gethe s.~dents to de-scr.i[je· a picture 50 well tha~ o~be!:" stude-nIlS can d,(I oo:m..ethln:g. Foil'" e_xam.ple,~he other students ni'ligll~ dra~ll a picture based 01'1 the desc[]ptio:llJ or liury' m~ght, ju~~ l1I2Jm@ wha~ has b~VI descrn,ed,

The studens C<ln deserfbe byspeakiing n:r by w~iti:rl,g ami.

depending on the- activity, til student can describe the picture objectively Dr subjectively. f-or example, if the student thinks about one of the scenes in the fimt part of the book (for example, the official and the waiting people on j)@ge 51) and recounts a personal experience relating ~o the picture so that the other- student can say winch picture it is. This would be a su bjective description,

Matd1iJ'lg

Challenge the students to find a relationshtp between two bits of information, for example, between two pictures or a picture and a text, Many of tb.e best-known language games belong to this kind .of challenge, for example, trua/ false games (in \~'hi.ch the student has to match what is said against what he or she knows to he true or false); BIngo (Lotto) games; picture/text mat(njl'1g O!cHvities.

OI1C~ mom.. the matching could be objective .or subjective. For example, " subjecti'i,~ematch could be between two pictures with no obvious ecnnecncn eX02'pt to an individual who feels there is one and ]S wiUing to tell the others ..... hat i.~ is.

Grouping

Challenge the students to find a I'elatiortsh.~p between three Or more bits of information. The bits of information might be all pictures or could be pic-tures, written texts, objects, tape recordings, etc. The grouping could be objective or subjective. For example, an objective grou pi,ngOO1,lld be 2111 those objects which are usually associated with a particular job,

Sequrmcillg

Cha lIellge the students to place various hi ts of information into a sequence. For example, 01 number of indi vidual pictures Or a number or pirtures and t xts, If you cut up one of the story sequences, for example, Helm!y arid fhe Herlsl it would be .m obj~ti.ve chaflenge to place them into the correct sequence, If you give the students one page of objects and ask them to write a story which involves at least ten of the objects it would be a subjective challenge, as there is no 'correct' sequence !\or this,

Ol'd,eril1g

Challenge the srudentsto place various bits of information into an order of vahie, For example, varjous pictures or pictures and texts. You could photocopy tile pages oJ foods and ask the studenes topu~ themimo their order of appropriacy for a school day outing by coach. A more subjective invitation would be to place the foods in a personal order of preference and then to find someone in the class with the same order of preference,

Relnembe.ring

Challenge- Hw students to remember what is shown in 01 picture or in a s€':CJ.uence of pictures, You rrughtmake tha t part of a preparation for dealmg wHh ev-cryday life situations C'tra:ining the visual memory") Copy the street scene (page 37) onto <I transparency, show it to the students for three minutes a nd then ask them who was in the street and what~hey \, .... ere doing, Anothe-r wen known pidure memory game ·is sometimes COIned, 'Pehnallism', in which about twenty small pictures are laid upside down and then stadents try to' remember which is which, If they are correct they ~.<Ik@ the picture and. have another go. Both these ex'Hrrple$ are draUe-rrges,

130

You might. on the other hand, invitethl/! lesmers to look at the pictures of young children on page 5-5 and remember their own chlldhood. Alternatively, the students could look at the pages of expressions, pick out one of them and tell their ndghbour.s when they last felt the same and what happened,

Pichil .... es 01!$ cues in m:~ni~dia.logues M0'S~: pages wHiIl. i.n.d~vidu] pictures .

Pictures have been us-ed for many years to cue substitutions within dialogues in which the basic sentence patterns ate determined by thete<tcher _ Such dialogue work, after an initial demonstration, would normally be done in pairs or group werk. Tile- pictures would either be printed on a ' ingle sheet and taken in turn or each picture would be on. a single piece of pap_er or card and ·then turned over or taken by a student. The advantage of the latter lies partly ln the element of surprise and Interest; more Importantly, however, the advantage i.iesin the creatioa of an 'jnfhrmOihofl gap' between the students, H only student B sees the picture there is some reason for student A asking the question, The idea of 'informatiOlJ gap'- and 'cpinion gap' ball been central to language teaching in the last twenty years, However, it is not enough; a. 'gap' Is no use if the student is net motivated to cross the gap - and that is where the idea of dlillli'!l1ge, irl"uitatioJl and ImanlmglrrTield come in. The following example of a mini-dialogue, prompted by pictures, hovers on the edge of being of 5uffident .interest to make the students want to know what the other is saying and want to respond.

Example: . phobDCOPY the two pag,e_s 'OJ jobs on pages 58 and 59 .. Cut them up and distribute approximately ten to each grou p of four students. Place the pictures upside down. Students take it in turns, to turn a Picture over and then, referring to that picture, they ask another student WorM YOIi .li1..'1f .to bea (/armf'f)? The other student replies truthfully Yes, I ttX)IIld./ No, I wOllld'I't If dOIl·'f fmm.o/ Definitely 110t!, etc

Many of the pages of obj~,cl's or of actions can be used as cues for mi_fli-dia lcgues, l suggest that you photocopy the page of plctures you need, stick the page onto card, cut 1,.1 p the earn into the individual pictures, put them ·in~ an envelope, write the instructions arid sample dialogue 0[1 the outside' of the envelope as follows;

Pictures: Jobs

How to play: 1'1..1.00 the ptcturcs upside down em the table. Take it inturns to pick up a. picture and to ask someone else a question,

Student A:. (picking up a picture of a farmer) Would you Uk.: 10 be il farmer?

Student B: (tdling .tlre trutl1) Yes, I would,/No, I ~vou{dld. Optlonal lenguage. Yes, H mould be greatrlNo, it ~O(Ju{d bt' lmr6b1dJCerlainly noOjU Wl)uld be very bol'inglhl1ml{umry/ ('f:r5_'1 .,'

Extension into unguided oral fluency:

Stu,dent A.: Why?

Student B: !lecmlse 1 hrot' lIm:rrmls mad i love working outside if I the clmn air, etc,

sles of ways of using the pietures page

Ex,a' page _

hll. U'te following section, due ~o lim:itation of [>pllce, ] have only been able to 5Ugg,est a few ways uf usJing UU~ many pictures in thebook. Fur more ideas an~l5JJ['IIg pictures, see Further .rt:'l1thng OI1L page 139',

How ~Q' draw (pages 3 In 35) Activity]

Uis :;,ectiolliis primarlly (or you", Howsver. a d:rawil'g lesson based on H1Lese pages wouLd be ]nt('lX;"SHngfo. the sn.tdet'tL~ and would CO!ltexwalisc, vel'Y 1'I(11'~II'lIUYi ~ lot of b..1sic \fo\'(lb~lafy for th~ body, piuscon1pamHve toems, Co:nskle:r givi ng 11 d r<lW'iI1lg~es5un .',. then the students can h~lp you draw pictures 11'11. the future!

Row W draw folce~ ~pages tt '1:00 11.4.) Act iv·ity 2.

The Shuients would proo..1bly enjoy le.1frril:lgtom<),~e these expffl'Ssions ,<lnd ~t 'would. be a goed way o~ be(lomh\g fil!umar w ~~h ithe wards fior~t1e '~motkm~_ Ttl€! compO'! rOl~i ve rO:<111£ are alsc weU con'l'CXtu~l]sedwHh 'fhas@ dmwings.,

H0W ,to dt:01rwfa(:e~ (pi1ge 14) AcUvUy3

5hm ... r the students how to draw younger <md younger people, G~~le each student several pieces of paper 00 th,U they am produce several facss 1!00dl, Ask goc~tlps of f{l~ r tlJ O'Im'lnge 'their faees ]1:\ terms 01 how old thq look and to use the p!UOlOOS: SP1~'.$ QJ.rl'C'l"f~w~gel' U~i'm ,1~ertJu·m., Haw ,01,d i~ fll'Ji:? SfJlels {lbmli (3).

ActivUy""

Som~ of the people l.'II'~ looki]llg at d iHer..ent allglEa, Shuw ~he studenjs how to do th.is and a<;;1i;: them tosu,gge.st 1;vh<lt th~y think thereop.~e <I:re~ooli;i:l'Ig<lt tVhich srucientc<'l!'l prOdUGE the most unexpect~cI 6uggestio!'!?

How to draw f,a~es (pages 15 t~ nl)' Activity 5

Whidl oJ t~.le6e dr,i'lWlngJS is a" dear, U !lOll mb]gl!J,~;l'l,lS Hlw,tr<ltio!'l of the word? Which isrhc mostambiguous? Copy the on~ yem W.1.I.lt the students to learn 1I1ld ask fl1lC'rn ~omnk~h~mi'li'l. order of ~he!i:[ am.biguity,

Activity 6

Ask the s:tIJ]dl2ll'~~ to imagine wh y the peTSf1llJ Jeeis as he Or she does, ~d111t has [ust happened and what wiU happen next,

Acti11i.ty i

'Ihestudents, working in pairs, lm<lgii~e ,[I ecnversancn between any two 01 U~~e people. They <lC~ out the conversation, The Oo['h~r srudents ml!;lS~ guess which wel'e' thet1. .... o :faces and woro.s pmv:id i:ng the s~i1rting paint for ~hl!! d~.akJ<gl!JJe_

ActwU:yB

Each student chooses one of the expressions and triesto

make n,,~ same facial ell:pn::ssion, His or her pllrtner tries. tn guess how s the feels,

How t@ draw races (page 18) Giilricat:ur,e'S (pages 19 t(!l24)

A cfi:oity 9'

The pictures on these pages provide the basis of 11 whole 'soop tlpera' 5.e~ O'E chara.ct.effi which (a:n be used ~ a small e1e:llle'nt ~I'I a ]3:r'1.ijua.goe programme or as. the chief verude of it.

'[',e<l(;hers who hll\l'e mi'!!d,e SQ<:I.p opera characters a cei.1traJ part of their t~ching have told me th a t student age and plJOficj)~ncy~ev~l make llO d iH~"~I.lC~; e"'~I'ycme enjoys th~ experience, buslness peop~)~ il~ w>e~] as d1i.~dj;!211!

The OIdV'anta;g;e opera characters is that tlhe students create every fr ng about: them and they Ciln be mad'e to do an}I~.hil'lg .H Oill, .1.llfu:nl"l_i'ltion about the characters can grow <IS tIle students' proficiency grows. In the ea fly stages the eharaerers c,m be £1 van uaraes, ages aad hobbies. ln the lonJer stagrn. ~h~y c<ln discuss wh~t they \ ... ~outd do if U~ey ,'lIOn il rniMion dollars lInd they can \"'rU~ 'to each otther <I.ol:mt n,.

The studen~s are respensfble fur establ:ishing the informatim:ll. since it is their ,c:rea.tion.. Dialogues, letters, ntl'Wspi'lpers, radio <llil.d videesean be made,

Row ~o draw fa:n~asy ,creatures (page 2:6) Activity n~

l t.is oneil murh easler 10 use th~ 1I,tifici.~lity of ~ ""ery limited amount of~1!n,guo1lgc .1ihrmt 11 fantasy creature th..'1n abmI~ lmifmal, realpeeple w hmn one knows to be i[l.fim,te.~y wmp]ex! 1111.e :stude:nts CiSlliiI. be <I5kedito 5UGGl?St (ir<Jzyfirlme5, ages, hdbhue5r~i:ke5 ,00I1Ld dislikes :for tlhese oe.nUl'e5.

M<lh a character profile of one or '~hese erea tures_ [ute;rv:icw him 0[1" her fo~ one or ~h~ jobs. iUustr.1lted Oil plllges 58 k:l59-

Activity 11

]moll.gin~ one of these c!reatl!:lr~s arriv:ingil'1l one of the scenes on pages 36 to 52" Wh~ilt would happen ?Write 011 swry or a. d.i.a.log:ue about H.

SetH~g~ l(p:a~S 37 to 53)

Tlh.e complexity of thesepsctures Is (me of their strength5,

ACtit1Uy 12 (Ar~y setting)

Ask [he 5:h.tdents ~ C<l]~. out or to h.t;t clown as marlY words as. tillLey ('<1['11 O'loout the plcture in three mi i"lutes- if ~his ]S done ]]'i[ groupa there can 00 a grotlp cO!npe~Hioll. F'oHow]ug this the ..... ords ell 1'1 be pl!:l~ mro as many gM[lp~ as tile shlderlls·c."I1l (k,risc 01' iutoalphabetical miler, Word trees can bemade {e.g" for Sining .rtWm en pl'lge 45}~

ACf i:vity 13 (Any selUng)-

P,1I.inNork One studem, pretends tu be b]ind, The u~he[ describes the scene to him or her. The first student guesses where it is.

Activity 14 (A P~y setting)

P<lirwork EadfL pair writes toGfIi S'enlences \''>lil:h gil J'SThese fire give'll to another' ]pair of s!ud.~nts w}\o musl comp]ete th~ sentenoss by ref",rf[ng ~n the picture. {YULI 111US't decide whether In allow the questions to be passed

to the othe:r pair before you correct them.

Activity 15 (Most settings)

. Pairwork, Eadi palr writes ten sentences which are true or false. These are given~o another pe:iT who must read them. and decide which are true and which are false,

A.ctivify 16 (Mast settings)

The teacher remains silent but gesluresat a projeetsd image or W(I.1l chart of the pktu.~, The gestures ind.icate what the students should describe and S<I)' about the picture,

Example: (Street page, 37) A. street.

A br,lsy stmet.

TIle-re (lre (.l tat ()f C'llrS,

.A woman is comirlg out of Ii silOp'. She's wmil1:g o;I.t1'O! the Intke-r's.

Activity 17 (Mas t seUings)

The students Jcok at the picture and decide w here the place is, who the people might be, wh~t the~ migl~t be do]ng/thin.kingl~eeling, why they nught be dmng! thinking/feeling this wa}', how weUther know each other,

Activity 18 {MoM seUiI115.S)

The students choose where they would like to he in the picture. They say why and wl~<It they would be dOling, saying. thinking and f,ee!:lng. They could add what they can see, hear, smell, touch, taste,

Acl:ivUy 19 (Beach page 40)

fiol"h student says what s/he sa't\' this afternoon and tries

to. repeat ve h<lt everybody else saw, trying to remember it all in the OOfN.(;t order:

This lIflen!OO1i I 5.I1i'V a gM 51l11bi.l,t/fing tIna a ship sa£ling Ql'ta II helicopter {lying,etc .

AHemative:~y; This Ilftemoon J saw Iii gfr.l. She was swrbilllring, J saw a ship, It WIllS saiUng. I ,$ilW a helicopter. It was fiyil1g,

AcUvi!y .20 (Most settings>

Ask the- studentsto look at a setting forth['ee minutes and then to turn the: picture ove.!" and to describe the picture from memory. After :fj,ft~n miu~tes (or whatever time }'OU judge to be approprlate) ask the students to 00111pa.re their descriptions with their neighbouJ"S andto wri te togethe.r as good a descriptior, as they can. Alternatively, you or a student stand with your back to the projected scene and h:r to describe it t:otbe class . AUernativ.e1y; each studen! studies one of four pictures. S/hethen leaves the picture Oil the' desk and circulates trying to flnd which other students had the same picture,

Activity 21 (Any sdtingJ

In pairs" the studentstake it Ln turns to describe someone or something in the picture &0 well t.hat their partner can identify him/her lit

ACUllity 22 (Any sdtirrg)

A student pretends that sl he is a mouse and is hiding in the pichue. The other students must try to find where file mouse is by asking questions: Are Y(I!I in tire man's lrnFf ek,

Activity 23 (Any Sr.Uill,g)

In pairs the students write ten sentences albout the

~
132- ..
-
"-
~ , -

pj!l;;~l)lIre which n1ay be m.:te or fa~se, Tbe studenjs give thd r sentences to other palrswhe must read them. and decide w helher Q]' not they are true or false,

Activity U (ArlY setNI~8)

The studeI1Ltl; write 8J l:iffi;~ of nveoty things whkh nght have just 11t.1pre~.oo l:Jefore the situation der~c~edl in the p~cture, Ahermlti'l'e:1y, they write ~n~y tb:illg~ whkh might happen nex!t'. Display the sru(k~nts'id~:ils and ask l'hem tiel decide who has Hli~ most interesting ideas. You l!l\ght like to help them to ge~ the idea. by pr<ldising ordy \"f.ith 11 d.ifre:rent pkrnre.

EX;1lmp~e: (T~rm(jr page 39')

WflM mr,~l1t 'iil'll¥ jx~sl J'ulppene.d 1*'Iore Uw picttlro?

Tht! lu,rm wlw is: nmdhlg mjgl~l JrJ1!!t: gtmq J'p~ 1'0 ,I'lre l~ousc m~d aslnnf {or a drink-

Act;~itll' 25 (Aj~y tieN.{ug)

Students W!:'~~~ a letter or a pos:ocard as if they w~.re ~ perro'l'l ln the pkilulle_ Theyc.m:nhlldude several things which ~m 'llIl.l'trblf~, Another studentreads the letter ,and de.ckles if any o:ff H is untrue,

AcUvily 26 (A~~y sl!th"~g)

Gmupwork" Give &i.cn groop <I copy of the same pic~me. EaCH groop writes ten q~ue-St~orls about the p.icture, Take title picrntes from tbt>li:wt. Ei1;ch gmup then t<!lkes ~t in 1t\l_WS to ask a que-stiO!i'!. of t'1\~ othe'r grou~ who I'm,lst write down~hej ral'lswfl'rfr'O[I1l memory. When every group has .1l5hd[iv~ qUestiUl1cfl .fi~dI mlltwhkh g;nmps have Ule mes] correct <I0S\"I'ers,

Activity '27 of Any ,5eml~;g l'

Glveeaeh pair one photocopy of a scene. (En]arge the picture to .fi.ll<1t1. A4 sbeet if possible.) Ask tlh.en1i. to hold ~he P.1peT to '~:he hght but to vtew the scene frOfl'tthe back of the !Jape:;, They will see H~£ pktllllte thro'l"l,gh tbepap~r_ Ask them .~ write on ~he hack of the sI1ed ;:II! the word:s they can which describe the piettm~' on n~e o~her $ide. They s,hgu klw:rH~ each word exactly where the objt?cU peFSO!rt shows Un:ootJIgh from the ether side. This is mOl'eeasi]y done if the pi.cW re i:il h.eM <lg:<Jil'ilst ~ wim;!_ow,

Th:is, rllp~r can then be used as a.vocsbularytest by the students. Stl:JIdenit A scits li\f:ith. his or her back w th~ ligM and looks <'It the picture, Sine pail'!~ to each part of the picture n.<l:f.I''ti]1J;g wh.l'lteve-r s/~e can, Stude<nt B, 011 t.h~ otller side of tbe p<lper, all!'! see ~h~ pkt~re sl1iJ(lwi!'lE! rhro~gil:\ and tl1..e writt~[1 vocabulary, asw~U as ~],e shadow of th~ oHll!r studear's finfjer. S't1JJld.el'lt B can thfll1. confirm ,or ~jed wha~ Studenf A is ~<lyil1g"

,AcMvliy 28 (Mosl s.e.ttiI1gS)

P1llJOt:ocopy a scene onto a t-ranspaI'El:lcy. PI<K'e 11 piece ef a paper Wm.l a holein H un the OHP gl<1ss. P<I!55 the scene

over the hole and cMUe:nge the stud enfs to ~de'ntify wlhlt they Can see frem these tiny gllnapses and to pred.ict what oth.e:r tmliLgS they might-see and tto rem.errtlber whil.t the)' have seen- ll1{t]'l" show them the whole pict:u[',e ratber H\<J11 the how picture! This is known as the holistic me+hodl' btr.lllllgeEI'Iglts:h humour " __ )

Adivi,y 29 (MO$f setfings)

Photooopy w rieus scenes, Cut tmmin 11,111£_ GiVl;f each student 11 half pi.ctun~. S! he writes fou r sentences describing UlJJei:rpictul'e. Disp~lIY these descriptions_ Srudf'l'It5, re .. d the d.esc.rjptio:ns<lnd decide who has the other haU of tbek p~rtt!re.

Ac.tipity 30 (Most settingfi)

Photocopy some scenes, Cut fhem into six or eight pieces- Gi ve each &lUdel11~ (fil1e p'ieQ~_ The students must .shldy 'their piece oJpict[lre and ~h(!ll It'alk ~'O othe-r stL1dents and find ou ~who h:ls pieoesof the SOl me pictureiFini.'lHy they should put l3JU their pueoes of picrur~' ~o~etbc'l" to make the whole pi£tu[\~.

'fop~('S, belila.viortllrand notwen:s (pages 5410 83) Activity 31 (Most pages)

Ma]"l;Y 01 these pages ca f! be used as picture cues for d\e miw"cii1i!logU(!,5 described {m page no, P a r~icu:la r.ly uaeful: pro{.cssirms P"'lges SB fuel ~9i t,mimn'$ p~g~s, 65 to 66; fi'i~ tim~ l'mges fiB ~D 70, tMl.l£.~ page 7]; lrtllUI:i page 75 to 76; dOl Tn's :pages '77 te 78; fiwd pages 79 to 82; weathe-r pag;e 83.

Extlmpte~ MlIlmc-r

Stl.l"d"f!.t k Whot's Hlr? H~'aUler IHce ~rMI1l!J?

S;llI"ldellJt Eli: (stl!lIael1i1', picking upa Cilrd} U'"~ mi1!h~~_ Srudent A: VilIi~f ar,!? you MCiirrg to dO'r tfie'l!?

St:ud.ent 13: I thi,~k I'll ". (~'r() fishiNg}.

Student A: Good id,fl;ajfY.ou mw:f br madrn wiU I!!s .udl! I Dh, :l wr:m' HI Rfdic.u~O'l;5!. e"~.

Activity 32 (Most pag,l:SJ'

Pairs ]@O~ aJ a pOlge for t:hre(l :n;i'Llt1utes and therL'l write d,owl1Ii!U ~lw pidY res ~h~yrem;emb~r_

A~~ll!rnat~ve]y: cuj up the page into 'twen ty ph: rofes. Tem them over and try toremember which ls whkJ'L Point at the I:J1I!Ck of E.'<LC':h pktul"e and ttl)' to name it. Tuen Hover .. If you are right you (<1:1'1 keep it

Ach'm'~'J 33 (MDS.~ pages)

Gwupwotk, One student d'ti:l'lks of one picture shown (JiE'I one page and th.e others ask questions to find out whkh i~ is.

Activity 34 (Mosfpngcs)

Pajrs ~aud y 'Olle 14lge <l]1ld try W fund ten diffen!ll~ ways of grolLlping the object's_

Activity 35 (Mo$1 ptlges)

Gi V!1; OIny!:wo of the pictures to a s;mldent and. ask him or h£f 'lro 'say\"" h~t th~re]an(lFtsb.tp between them might he. EXilmp~e~ Tfi~ p'ililStm,fln sho.ul,d Mt tillS beef .hl· mflk~ his legs sf;r;cmgel',

V)lhei',r r~1J iJ'O! If .km',~ wa~d h~ 1't.'t'Ilr ~ J':rmJvy S:1~it.

13.3

Activity 36 (Mi.)St pictures of Obif.~cts)

Students are given a picture of .'III. objed and have to try 00 persuad!2 other students to 'buy' H.

Alternatively, the student has to comp]alH about the object sJhe has 'bought'. The class consider the complaint and decide if it Is convincing.

Alternatively I the student has to think of five: different things that s! he could do , .... ith the object he Of she has been given,

Grou ps could compete to see how' many dine:l'ent~hj ngs could be done with the object:

Altemativety, H\e students try to say why one of the people repr~sen ted: on pages 14 to 22 would Jove to have it!

Ac.tivify 37 (Most pictures of objects.)

Give each group pictures of twenty objects and ask them to decide which five objects they would take iJf theywere: on 11. desert isl.andjs.ioaying in hospitat/camping On holiday / on a train journey

A.ctj·vify 38 (Mast pages_)

Give the student one of the pictures and ask: him or her to say why it cou ld be a metaphor for somethmgelse, for example, tllei:r friend.' a student/a teacher /a ~eerI,OIigerl it prime minister/love,

Activity 39 (Pmfessiol1s pag(~ 58 and 59')

Students choose one of the jobs,wFite four good things about j,~and four bad things about it. Read their eign ~ Ii nes to another student and see if sl he canIdentify the jeb referred to.

Actir.~ity 40 (Hofl.se and home pages 60 to 63)

Give s.dec~ed individual pictures to each strident S/lw writes throe lines describing its use, S/he snows the descrlptions to five other students 'who tr.y to identify the object referred ~CI. If most of the students identiiy the object correctly then s/he has communicated successfull y!

m ustrated VO(<I bulary and gram.mar (pages 84 t'O 117)

lllustratio:n.s of gr·ammaHcal ~~atur·~s and vocabulary do not teach the concepts represented. his only by 'handling' the grammar and expe'Yieru:1l1g its IDe41,nings thlll t the student can learn, With this in mind" lt L5 a most useful activity to ask the students to think of alternative ways of drawing pictures to ilhistrate the c-oncepts ill this section .. In the act of doing this work the student's feeiiIllg for the grammar will take a step forward.

The ma:py activities which tocus on grammaticalpoints or specific areas, of lexis which are possible wnh the other pictares in the book are jus t as likely to he~p Hhe students to Intemalise and gmsp the grammar as a specific section on grammar.

011 pages ]00 and 10] there are eight strips oJ pictures illustrating various tense forms, Give the students a selection often verbs from pages 87 to 98, Either write the verbs on ~he board. orphoeocopy the pictures and give each pat:ir of studle-:n~s ,m identical set- Sele(t the strips of tenses which you wish the students to practise, Each peril" attempts to make as many alternative examples as possible using the ten verbs. After five minu tes ask each pair to join another pair a nd to add their sentences together. Give them another five minutes

to find <IS, many examples, as possible, See which group of four has made the most examples, Exam.:ine each example of the winning group with the class ,as a whole to checkt::l1at they rea]! y have won~ This enables you. to do som!1 intensive grammar practice!

Pkt:u_.[~s fDir Compositioliil. (Pages 11:9 to 127l There are four types ofpicture in this section:

1 Iridividual speculative pictures which are illtended for use as slngle pictures. Pages 119 W 120,

:2 Ambiguous story sequencesin which there is no final 'correct' story. Pages 121 to 123,

3· A flowchart of random pictures, abstract marks, words, symbols" numbers which ad as cuss fur a story. Pages ]24 and 12:5.

4 Picture strips of wen known stories. Page 126 <lnd 127,

Individual speculative pictures. (Pages 1'19' to 12:0)

Adivity 41 {Any speculative pidm't's)

Using one: of these pictures a possible sequence of activities is as follows:

Description

f'irs'~ of a.IL the srndents describe in \'~ry simple terms wh<Jllhey com see, How Itti"my people aI"f there] MlIlfs Ulis? etc,

In te-rpI't'tation

Conf id~ ng: h'tdi vtd ual interpreta tions of wha t is represented become apparent very qeickly, and should be encouraged • s tlley lead 'to genuine exchanges. of views. it isadvisable fOT the t. acher him/herself not to atlow anyone's interpretation to 'crush' another's.

Here are some useful questions:

Mml is happenillg? Do you Ilgrf.'IJ?

What hilS IIt1ppe,u:d? Willi! will happen !lex!?

Why .dll YOJJ think this is a room h1 a fWlJseJhutlft:1rtorylsr::hool, etc.?

wrlY 1,10 ~1fOr.~ thiHk if is a wcil; door ami not {j frcmf door?

Personal experiences

Sometimes discussion of what mig;ht be happening in the picture leeds ~o personal experiences, for example, accidents oJ various kinds. Let students ~~I] each other these associa ted experiences .," possoNy some com be shared wi~h the class as a whole.

Bmfldel' issues

Sometimes a. broader issue might emerge and. be highlighted. by the teacher, fbr example, the question of punishment for peoplew ho are seen as responsfbla for the 'acctdent', How should all! pf'I'SO/i !Iof' ~'rlnishe.d? vVhal is the role of rnmisllmi!'rlt ill SflCiel1j? Hor.~ .. haoe you bi!'eH pwrished?

Wdtfell mid acted conm.wsatiow>

Ask the students ·~o j magine a conversation between the people (or other people not depicted. e.g. a neighbour) before, during or after the incident depicted. They shouldwrit:e the conversation down. perhaps with another student, and then. act or read it out

M(lking me pict~~ n.' J'cs.~ m~~,~;gW)US

Agllee (l1~ an ill'~~,rpr~tilHcm of ~h€! pktl,lt'CS. Ask Hw &turlants to suggest how 'to make the picture 1}~5~ a:mh:iguous by nlTLooifYl[lg the dr<rl,v:ing: by adding to H or by changing pmJrts of itl-;, This <lJdivity i~ '\1"t."1)' useful for (][]Ir1J~eKru]a1bi:rl~ Ute. .ffo~~[Jwing language:

Etam,11t> {POif.<e ] 2.0 bottom right pitt tire)

If !/{Nf WllJ'rWfl if) rJmkt> tlw pictlm' i ~~ to 11 ,~Uti~rg foom mthN Ihm! IJ dl115.~room jlollo' ~"",rA)!lld you do?

Yo,l'r ~lrm~/d /mf ~IHJ'I~ cr,~rtahJ$' 1m 1f]"I! wiruimo.

How o;ru you ~tJ\lJr;;t' mat if is a Ivhrdou'~ Wlrll'l sl'mu{d .l/ilU draw?

Yo,r1 wuld ani'll.' t;! HliJrldml' ,1f!,dp;~ mul Smi'Jt' ,f:fP,BClilJ'J'!s o'n mf' g.11'r5$,

Yw~ ,wrj,ld j·lrmv semli!'t/ling lttrough l/t{' l{l'ilutow, etc.

AmMguous s~ory :sequences (pa8e-s 121 to 122) Adi'l'Uy42

These stories may be cupie.tt as they me O[ cut up into the:l[ differeut frames, 'fhe.reo ~SIl.O one 'COrrect story! f.1irs of students inventa '>tory. Em::h makes sure tha~ s/he ~!W\M$ ~heir story and ~heJ,' goes to othe'l" stude:tlt!> to taks it jn t~Lrns tc t:en~he s~oryr referring to ~he pi(t:u res,

Activity 43

H the studentshave never seen sud~ 11 thingiJ.,thciv lives before it wou~d b~ b~tttter to irlven~ a story ~e~her, o:rony, based Oil this page. You could ask the s.tudents to ~;,Ike Ol soap Q'pe'r,lI character ~hnmgh fhls, maze o~ i]~ fDITI~~~iO'n~ Onc!2 they .h,:;we theidea they can be asked to make f.hei [ own fiowd.l1I:rt and then to write theiJ[ W,llY Ul[,o[lght it. Essentlally, thestudents are asked to write <l storyin which ev .... ry pie-ce of i:nformahon is taken mto 11JC(Oui'lt. The re<l@~[ of the story shm,dd be <lbh~ to follow the rou toe til.Klugh the i nfonn"holl which ~h.(! story w rlter took.

No~e: thr,~e ~y~s of hne and ~helr po~rblehHcrpr!2~a~km have ~n drawn ;li U~C bottom of pllge 125. These emotions can add 'fl.!Ivour' ro thestory.

Sl~lY seqllWeme:.8e, .. u~y ~nd 'lmr.,eGei'!st (Page 1:216) ANivity 44

'flhc st'l.ldents C0I111 be asked to study ~h~ :sib-.jps, hn.;!.gi.ne Lllle ~kny i1nd to ~dlit or wr.ite i.~ be.fore you tell H, Alterrmtlvely, cupy the ~,tdp.~, mt them up and give them to 11 gmup of students. Then askthe students to put the strips into the eorreet ~uettce ,<15 }'tm ~I] them t.l\~~ story.

The. gist of Bt··(w t.iI IlJ'rd tf~t i:lerrst l~<lS follo!ws;

'I A ridi ~tjt'rdrmu rmd tilt:t'C S(~~jS m~.J Ihn?(' ,riou8Irte~. 2: Tir,r ytl'lWg{'St daugMer r~'llS ,CllJ{{<dBrlmly.

.3 Vr,e mr~ICI'II11~,r{ ~~'11~ ImvrHg I~ diffkuU ~fmC' and Imiil rWfmm~~,!/ kfl.

4 Hi'S chiMrl'.n w('n~ <H.'.FI/ worried.

.5 O~re ,dlil~f Ihr wf'J<:r/wJ ri s\!',f of.f to n diMm,rt miiI'J'r ~(J' do ${JUfe ,"Hsifl~~S~, 'Tl.re (~Id~·r .~iSlfT5 WrJlJ tM hij'J'[ If! [wing lhl.:'m ttr{'S~r~ fmm Uu.' rity; Ihi' t1J'"Otfit'ts ~jNJm!>d $j'imrl hal~; :Bt~~~/y jll~1 Ilskt'lit for Ij tltSf.

6 n'w /athrf ,"mm h) ~'I~~ t'llM Ii:.

7 Hwf'1)' Wil~ n() OJ"'~ tllrou' $!O fj(! Wi!'ut inSNf{~ IIJ.nn f~lJmt.1" a J'Ht'aJ waiting. He' ale fl ..

B TI'~('"J\i!' wa~ no mne' a{)o!1 t ~r~ hl' 5le-pt em mn." ('f thr b('rl~.

9 Next JJ'wlniuX' hi! Si!li(' I'J roSe lind n.'me-jJtllfring BeWtl"!1 he

f'k~I'IJ U for r~r,l'.

10 Suddcul'y a h~IN:~ mOrls!1'r /jrJI,lCtl n'l1 (md ~(,!id., ·You '~(,we enrteu my f-oo.rllmd ~l,~pl in J~.ry t~£iI, Il(]O:W you IN'lw t~~t"j my .mse r Th~ rm'.rclmn~ told the' mlJmler tllll1f th~ rose> 1LVlS for his: dliTlg1-rfel'.

11 'Gii'l!' J'IJe yrmr dm~,ghler otheJ'io['lis{;'l ~~'fn ,M I .I!W'~~ [' said n~"I! mOU5t,(T.

12 prCllii!fdmnt wt'n~ fwmf'so lfml he muld fmy gIJodliyr to hi.s drj/dtf!n bl:'{on> rrtrj rniu.:? t(1 tfu:, mOnst,er ru hI':' rntn.r. He11·d1.!."v.el·., l:ktmi~ in~istNJ (m rl:'~l. r11 ing wi~~~ ~rim.

n s.v Bl1tudy J">!;'~lJrYJr,M' u'Uh Irerforl/rl."t if) UN' (~sUr,

1'1 Ellery ~['eHirlg IlJ"I! mlmsk]' came !o ~!OI-dl l3~'fmt'~f eat m'ld

~he'lj ~tlUQ>d tQgetheJ'. •

15 Thi:s nmtifl!j("ll for'~<lf"mJ uWnllt5 W!/U &'li~~/.r,I said l~~rJI much 5.111:' l"J'li5~ffi frtf' {li'~hel'" The mOliS/C.r gt1V1! her a ~'if!g and W.ld fh~r thnt it IOOUlti rnJT.1I f~e'.r fJ~m,r,e mulll{1ck 118,(j in i IL~I~mny. HI.' j"t,rmle hl't ngret' to n'lurn in om!' R'U'k,

l 6 Her If!lhr~' tUfrf ~Jt'ry pl&lSi>U tv S« 'it.>r land sfif! MayM for moOre 1'h.a11 .0 ~c.:t'ek.

17 SUdljlC'I~y, Im~ 'Jig/d, sJ!C ,Qj;kup. SIre frU so"wlhing krYiW!;' fmd hIl1J)~fC.ri~-d.

] 8 5hl' look th~rhJg ami t mne,d i,fmJ her fhrgeJ\

19 l.nstanlly, sill:' was II{1CKwill,r t~r,e monst,e~'. S~,te fiD:rmd hi~jJ l.iJi ri.g in ffR' grrrrl'e-n as if fil! wUe d~'m/. SJr£ It.'n5 .50 sorry that she kis-sed him,

2D tte op!.'m'il 'jL~ '-'!it'S (j r~ti SIll.' Wold hili~ lhM '>he Im;Ii'd him.

:2: 1 <n~js 1'tW,~ N~I! magi," hI:' lJet'deat fie ~'u n~elJ bnck iJ'!/o fl iterl,j Hfitl pri'l:ce.

22 TfJ~'y JIrtlrrioC'lJ m~d all Iffe fomlily (11m!? to their u)1;.0ding.

ChalkhoOlJli.'\danJd whHebo,ard.

VVlhel'le"'er poss.ible do your drawings on paper, ca:rd or Or! OHI' tranaparencles SO that yuu Ctl1'II. use them. again, (1l'reparil;i'lg pktures ,O'lt homealse meafls~:hrlt YOilll ~iln d r~w ill pe<loo ~,Ild produce them the ins.t{lrIlt you need thern.)

]f YOLl do ""is,1-! to d r,(IW on lhe bOil rd, it i~ of b"eme:ndous, he.~pif you have a'~ kmst ~ried. out the d rm.ving beforehand, perhaps wpying it f1'011(1 this book orfrom a photograph,

Many t&1C.he~ s<liy tFt<lt U-U~ very i:nadeqjuac\~ u.ff ~hei[ d rawings c n tehes the 5tlId'~nt5' attentim\, ~~]o .... ~wr., even ~ goc1(loI;t joh he£:~l1!S to lose its attraction \..rhel1 relentlessly mpe1llred~ E\'ell proi~SlO!"lal U]usnilt'OliS would ffil'll.d [~ dHfkuH ,~o draw lIm;y act~on,. lIni"m<l1 or obje~t (m the board if they had not previously studied it.So, if you find Ut dlfficul t to draw em the board , .... Hhout some prep.li[.atiml yOll <Ire quite normall

One way of retaininginterest and class disciplinewhile you draw ts to ask the students ~o guess wba.~ yuu are drawing.

M alk~l1g Ithe p~cture develop or moduyi ri,g . thepkture IS ppssibte nil the boo"d; ~hi.s is l mpQS!.siblc If ~lw piICt1.lI1I;t is prcplll'ed befmehm IlG. This factor ,pl:u:;; H~einte[le~t o~ seeing s.umething being m<lde if> ~he hrmrd's g:re~t <lUmchon.

M:agnd bO<IJrd,f~ann!e~ board an.d 'EI tHack,'

Soli.d peuplerathe:r tl'L<1n sticl people are essential fur the5el1fle<ha, People, anim<lis and objects cail be stuck on the boa,dmtd l1~O'Ved OI.:f01i.1mO (m a 5euing,pw'l.fid ing reft2rence for the p!'lIctin> of s:p~ciHc bl\gu~g~ or fo(l" l~ss c'Onh'(lHed orn! a.nd lwrit~n '~"(W!~po~Hi(lin. They ClIrt lIh;o b~ Ill.sedi. as a S[llPpo:rt for~istel1.ing oo:mprehensim'l.

'B.IU·tilck' i:s II bmnd name fo:r a subs~,aI.lC-e mfher mQe p.h'lsUdne. SmaU iJans o~ it clIn be stuck onto the back oJ p.ic~urffi a lid. then stw:~ to most .hard surfaces. Ucan be:'

used marry times and doesn't usually damage the picture Or the wall, although H does sometlmesl '""Blu-It..'lck' or equivalent prod ucts wre very much more convenient than magnet board or fl<l:n:nel graph and offer mote or less t:hc sa (!'It! versatllity_

Wan pi(;mi1i!'S

The scenes ]J:, flus book will prove mva LU<J ble Jnmakmg wall pktures, As wlt'h ",I] pkt:ure$ 'ut is e-sse'n.~iOlI th;)J~he ~·.ital details ",,!'eo big enoug.b and ~]e!lr enough, Solid figLlfEswould normally be cl.earer tho'll'! stick figu.m~(> ~ [I l:'I w;;d~. picture,

Picbne c a rdsfor class use: Hashcards

Such cards nl:t1!>t be one of the m05~ flexible oJ the media, padicu]a:rly now that 'B.lu-ti'lck;' a nd im. equivalents llUOW the reacher to stick ~J\e COiJI:'dS onto~he b~ard Or Onh;l eupboards, ere, Their chief role is tn im ~el~oo oral wmk both controJled tll'ld open_ The ea&e with which a p]ctll:re C01ln be produced, shown to the ,1<156 or to 'iIl indivjdual m~rl then pu t: llWlIY he~ps the' teacher to create a sense o'.f urgency <Ind drama,

Apicrure card can, of course 511mply cue ,<I FeSpml5ellS, d~5c§jbed alxw~, Howe,,'~' there ,~[e m.Ore (n..1Ue'll:giIilg or i!1!vHing O1.ctjv±h~s possible with picture cards which m~hl the ~tude:ntswan~ to !'lpeOlk~

fl(}'I" eX,<lmp~e, a s.eriCf' o.~ ;:ICN~Ul Cilrds a:re shok!li'I~:o the students. When they are f""milill.r with the ones in ym.a r hand (;jJ.OOll]t S1X or seven of them) show (lJ.~C card ~ l~llI U t:EiLe class ~GroUip A)" Then ~~U 'E\'e~}'o[le ~o cencentraje and feel thetlelepOIth:ic waves! GroUip B then 11<15 three guesses: 'l.~ fIe: ~wilJm~ ins? Is he j~j mpin;f:? is he pJnyi rll? !OOt!NIW'SCI;l H tdep.1thy works: try the experiment ~'''~~Ilty hmes andrec(fird each time a group gue6~ correctly within three g1,:l:esws" Tilts si.l:npLe ~fltel:loe patternlis an int~~nsk P[lrit of the activ:ity. Furthemlore, it is 11,]5.1:.'0 as a geltllim~ qtue5ti(ln, The sh:lCi!E!n't\s reallv want

to l,mow, Even <1. arm \COll'l be cmtlltlL1nic.a.Uve! '

Hem is <l!1!@tile:r e-;':;Olmple oj ~he use of a pk'ture card, in this case fow ope'l'14~mguided_ CO!l'UnOil1icilt~on. Take <Lny picM.:i I\~ card showing a fe~'" objocts or !="-"()iple on it. ttold i~' so tha t the class ~~ the m~(~rse side of the CO'!M, th~fl Spill H very rapid~y' They wm. on!y s~e .<1 fi<1.sh of the picture and win protest! HOWEyer, experience CJif playing ~hUs g:<Im€' 5Jl!JIWs~lla.t. people do see some thing_ GF<lduaUy, as you sptn the earn. agaill a nd encourage d]scussion the coflteJ]l[t of ~h~ pl.ct;u,r,ei5est,a.b.lis.l!1.ed.,

Pic~ul\e' cards .~(!I11' group use

The COil rdscan obviously 'be smaller than for cLass use. Theil" Inillll p~rpose is 'W< cue l.1Jnguage in wntwlle-d prroctke- A single sentence pattern 011 a IJ'ljni·d~'<I~lOgue j;s set hy I:h~' !:e<lch~r and ~ ... ri~n on the board or ,m a ptece o.ff cardwhlch .1IU the group C<lI,l see. Tih~ pich.! ~ cardsare m;;[!aUy placed face down, 1ifVh~n it iss. student' snm:n 'to speak. s (he picks up .'I card and refers to it in. h:U5 or her sentence,

Example: pkiur-rs of foods

9tud~nt A: (picking up <I cani) 01) ym~ W;;c (chirr.;;J? Student: 8.: (answ~ri~lg tr.'1.nMu]1y} Yes, 1 do.jN,o, 1 don't.ty~s, [tDile mem_/No" I h{j~? ITJ'I!.rn,

Extensian h:~.~o unguided Gmi {lut?:Ju;:y Srtudent A: H~w ofte.n .do yo.u til,r them? DlP 'ytm coo~ fhf'm [lr b~ry ihi!'l.ri?

wrnm ,,(iii YO~j ltM' eat flliJ!!I?

Are chips lm'd for .!lym?

136

The oveehead prnj,e!:klr

Pictures can be s.how:n Oil (he o HI' wlth ease. They can be prepll:reclboefore.hllnd, eHbe:r by l1i1.'<!J;ld O~ copi,oo on a pnow~opyiJ[lgrrmcihin.e. They c-an be prOO:ucW. <l"l the right moment, moved around on the' S1:TWrI, ~:ve te-xl <I,dded to them and then be starM away lobe used again .. , .• md <!gilln, The gNat flex:ibibty off the OHP in terms. of th~ way un which ptcru res and text can be. used means thatall the slk.]Hs a.~ a]11@ve~ s can be catered fur.

Camp'l,!a!ter pfflg[am~es

S:ump~e dmw~ng packz\~~s are read:ily available. The technology to combine words, pictures, interactive screens, animation and voice simull1HOIl is here. The Shc.k.rilen '!];I.d sti.cikwu.me[l [[I tbis beek have no h~~u" of .00h~rl1il <lhvemediJa and arereiCldy~[I hop in~o any prog!Ol!mme )i'01ilI!l'L<!iy ]Hlie to write.

Furtherreading

Byrne D Tmdihrg Oml E!J:g:Usr~ Lol'1lgman P1ekh~r and Bir~ Newsjl{j'['11 Nelson

Gr<lnge.r C .. PlIilY Gnm1!'5 Willi E~;'gUslf Hch'l~m<l!nn HZldfieM. J Elt'ltl,euf~ry CoomliJmicliHo!~l GlltJ\l,(!'j Nelson Hadfteld J Inlermedintc CUJ'l,rmWliclllio.ri Gn11ie:;i Nelsol1l Had field J Adw "t'eli CvtmJ:nmiclllio1~ Gflmes N elson Hadftcld J and C W:riHrlg C""leS Nelson

Hm. D VlsimllmP'ld La

Maley and Duff DmPiJ6i (15 iu umguage LnirniJig

Cambridge University PI:!l:SS

Mil ley, Duff and Grellet ne MhuJ' 8 Eye C.u:ribridge Uni'li'ersitv Press

Pidim a rid rlOwer /fw~l)o,'~ Nelsan

Pa1im, Pnweraad V Oll1Ll'luffel TOrliUvf!!l Ne.lson

Morg;:n n and R~I1'!!'o~uclfi Oi1ce !1pl'ilr !\'I Time' Cambridge tJnivCffii!y Press

lJrllmd WrigM Fi've--Mhmlc Activilics Camlnidge UniversHy Pr'~55

W~nga~] FWI With .Pi,m~re:; The: Friend~y Press

W~rlga~ I Fm~WHJi faces :mgrims and U;e Friend]y f~s Wookuu I Toke Your Pit'k Nelson

Wright, B~Ue'ridg~OI!1d Bt:lclklry Cmlil!s{or U/IgUR8if' IA'{jynhJ8 C~ mbridge Univ,ersity Press

Wright and Haleem Vi8f;lals far Uri: LimSl1a,gf: CI4SSroO'li Longman

Wr.ight A pic,r Ii res foJr Mj'IXr,~ageLe{j1'1~ir1,g CiI!moridg,e U ni y,e[~ity Press

Wrig;tiiJt A. Storymnkhig twd Slory.tdli ng WitJI ChiMirC1!

OxJQnI Ul'Ii ress

Wrjgn ~,md D Soop Operas; Class Created Fidifmal

Cmmi'j f;1 nfl res Nelson