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The Impact of Time Management on the Performance of Lecturers at the University of Johannesburg.

Work-in-progress *Sambil Mukwakungu, Stanley Fore University of Johannesburg, Faculty of Management, Department of Quality and Operations Management *Corresponding Author: Phone No. 082 5163 755, E-mail address: sambilm@uj.ac.za

Key words: Time management, Goal setting, Individual performance, Education

The Impact of Time Management on the Performance of Lecturers at the University of Johannesburg.

Todays world calls for multi-task orientation within the confinement of time. Time management is key to positive productivity in any sector, industrial or service. Productivity is directly proportional to one's ability to handle tasks in a relaxed manner. Universities require lecturers to contribute outputs in terms of research, community service and teaching, and this calls for a delicate time balancing act. Time management is about working efficiently and effectively to ensure that both good productivity and desired results are achieved. The aim of this study is to investigate and highlight the impact of time management on the activities performed by academic staff, the objective being to identify the correlation between time management and output. The factors impacting on time management such as goal setting, time tabling, task scheduling amongst others are investigated and ways of improving time management in order to make their daily endeavours productive. The study is guided mostly by the critical theory approach using focus group and observations of participants. The critical theory approach will be based mostly on The Pickle Jar Theory. The research methodology involves a review of literature on time management and the impact on individual performance. Observation of lecturers is carried out over a set period, focusing mostly on the way they handle tasks. The research brings to the fore the direct link between goal setting and time management. Time management strategies are often associated with the recommendation to set goals. The need to align institutional goals and personal goals is highlighted. These goals should be recorded and may be broken down into a project, an action plan or a simple task list. For individual tasks or for goals, an importance rating may be established, deadlines may be set, and priorities assigned. Thus better time management will result in better productivity for academic staff in tertiary institutions.