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PHILIPPINE TEACHERS PROFESSIONALIZATION ACT 1994 "AN ACT TO STRENGTHEN THE REGULATION AND SUPERVISION OF THE PRACTICE OF TEACHING

IN THE PHILIPPINES AND PRESCRIBING A LICENSURE EXAMINATION FOR TEACHERS AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES" Also known as: Philippine Teachers Professionalization Act of 1994 Signed: December 16, 1994 In order to ensure a responsible and literate citizenry, this law was enacted to regulate the licensure examination and professionalization of the teaching profession.

CODE OF ETHICS FOR PROFESSIONAL TEACHERS Pursuant to the provisions of paragraph (e), Article 11, of R.A. No. 7836, otherwise known as the Philippine Teachers Professionalization Act of 1994 and paragraph (a), section 6, P.D. No. 223, as amended, the Board for Professional Teachers hereby adopt the Code of Ethics for Professional Teachers. Preamble Teachers are duly licensed professionals who possesses dignity and reputation with high moral values as well as technical and professional competence in the practice of their noble profession, and they strictly adhere to, observe, and practice this set of ethical and moral principles, standards, and values.

LABOR CODE IN THE PHILIPPINES (PRESIDENTIAL DECREE NO. 442, AS AMENDED ) A DECREE INSTITUTING A LABOR CODE THEREBY REVISING AND CONSOLIDATING LABOR AND SOCIAL LAWS TO AFFORD PROTECTION TO LABOR, PROMOTE EMPLOYMENT AND HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT AND INSURE INDUSTRIAL PEACE BASED ON SOCIAL JUSTICE PRELIMINARY TITLE Chapter I GENERAL PROVISIONS

Art. 1. Name of Decree. This Decree shall be known as the "Labor Code of the Philippines". Art. 2. Date of effectivity. This Code shall take effect six (6) months after its promulgation. Art. 3. Declaration of basic policy. The State shall afford protection to labor, promote full employment, ensure equal work opportunities regardless of sex, race or creed and regulate the relations between workers and employers. The State shall assure the rights of workers to selforganization, collective bargaining, security of tenure, and just and humane conditions of work. Art. 4. Construction in favor of labor. All doubts in the implementation and interpretation of the provisions of this Code, including its implementing rules and regulations, shall be resolved in favor of labor. Art. 5. Rules and regulations. The Department of Labor and other government agencies charged with the administration and enforcement of this Code or any of its parts shall promulgate the necessary implementing rules and regulations. Such rules and regulations shall become effective fifteen (15) days after announcement of their adoption in newspapers of general circulation. Art. 6. Applicability. All rights and benefits granted to workers under this Code shall, except as may otherwise be provided herein, apply alike to all workers, whether agricultural or nonagricultural. (As amended by Presidential Decree No. 570-A, November 1, 1974) Art. 7. Statement of objectives. Inasmuch as the old concept of land ownership by a few has spawned valid and legitimate grievances that gave rise to violent conflict and social tension and the redress of such legitimate grievances being one of the fundamental objectives of the New Society, it has become imperative to start reformation with the emancipation of the tiller of the soil from his bondage. Art. 8. Transfer of lands to tenant-workers. Being a vital part of the labor force, tenantfarmers on private agricultural lands primarily devoted to rice and corn under a system of share crop or lease tenancy whether classified as landed estate or not shall be deemed owner of a portion constituting a family-size farm of five (5) hectares, if not irrigated and three (3) hectares, if irrigated. Art. 9. Determination of land value. For the purpose of determining the cost of the land to be transferred to the tenant-farmer, the value of the land shall be equivalent to two and one-half (21/2) times the average harvest of three (3) normal crop years immediately preceding the promulgation of Presidential Decree No. 27 on October 21, 1972. Art. 10. Conditions of ownership. No title to the land acquired by the tenant-farmer under Presidential Decree No. 27 shall be actually issued to him unless and until he has become a fullfledged member of a duly recognized farmers cooperative. Art. 11. Implementing agency. The Department of Agrarian Reform shall promulgate the necessary rules and regulations to implement the provisions of this Chapter.

GLOBAL EDUCATION THE GLOBAL TEACHER Aug 14 2011 Surveys recently conducted by the National Geographic Society and the Asia Society shed light on a growing concern: the decline of multicultural awareness. Their studies show that U.S. students lack an understanding and knowledge of different people, places, and cultures around the world. The need has grown for the public to demand more rounded, higher-quality education for today's youth, and for teachers to understand the value and necessity of developing lessons based on global education. The United States government tried to introduce and incorporate multiculturalism and global education into the system repeatedly since the 1980s but was met with hostility and protests by many of its citizens. Many conservatives feel that global education introduces anti-Americanism, and that multiculturalism introduces and encourages "separatism and disunity" (Ho 1-2). Informing and introducing the general public to the benefits of global education, or cultural education in general, seems necessary in order to begin the process of raising better-informed and knowledgeable youth. If people's fears rest on the idea that learning about others' cultures will bring the downfall of the U.S., then it is of utmost importance to stress the true goal of global education: to raise a more knowledgeable generation that is better equipped to deal, communicate, understand, and help the rest of the world. Ashley G. Lucas, in an article distinguishing and teaching multicultural education and global education, remarks that many teachers have surprising ideas of what the purpose of multicultural education and global education is. Lucas states that many teachers who oversee primarily students of the ethnic majority do not see the need for cultural education because they view that type of education as primarily benefiting the minorities in a classroom-as a way to let them relate to or gain a sort of "hero" (Lucas 2). Lucas and many other scholars are extremely surprised by this line of thinking from educators and push for the concept that all races and cultures benefit from learning about less familiar ones. The mode of thinking that relates cultural education with only benefiting minorities draws attention to the misconception of minorities not "fitting in" to the mainstream, U.S. schools, and only being able to associate with someone just like them. When we stop both methods of ignoring and treating minorities differently with teaching, and start teaching every student with the same standard of global education, we will produce a more unified and accepting society. Peter Stearn discusses U.S. students and how they, whether behind the world standard in cultural and geographic understanding or not, will need to be increasingly aware and knowledgeable of up and coming world super powers within the next several years. He comments on the need for U.S. citizens to get used to the idea that their country will not be the only world economic superpower anymore, and that a better understanding of other countries, especially those on the rise, will lead to a more prosperous economy and financial stability (Stearn 1). It is important to stress the importance though, of not only learning about the cultures or countries that could benefit you directly or financially. When teaching students global education, they should understand that the best motivation should come from learning and knowledge itself, not just personal gain. http://geography.about.com/od/teachgeography/a/Teaching-Global-Education-InThe-Classroom.htm