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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1 Name || DSouza Pritam Henry 571017160 Halo

o Technologies, Thane, Mumbai 1976 Master of Business Administration - HR Fourth Semester Talent Management 1 23rd March 2012

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Registration Number || Learning Center Name || Learning Center Code || Course || Semester || Subject || SET No. ||

Date of Submission at Learning Center || Marks Awarded ||

Directorate of Distance Learning, Sikkim Manipal University, II Floor, Syndicate Building, Manipal 576 104

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Signature of the LC

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Halo Technologies and Training Pvt. Ltd. || 65260303 || 9870050750 || academics@halo.co.in


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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1

Q1. India as nation stands out for it entrepreneurial and well educated talent base. Justify Ans. India is as nation stands out for it entrepreneurial and well educated talent base. India has a large pool of scientists, engineers and technicians. Currently a lot of importance is given to the development of intellectual and managerial talent in order to surge ahead internationally. India boasts of centuries old history of entrepreneurship across every industry sector. The foundation of Indian entrepreneurs is based on their sound business ethics and their passionate commitment to success. The growth and development of entrepreneurship in India over the ages can be traced under: Metal handicrafts have existed in society even since pre-Christian Era obviously being traded for profit. In the post-Christian era, caste based business men created kharkhanas while craftsmen formed associations called guilds to produce and sell handicrafts and other goods. Since ages, Indian handicrafts have enjoyed world wide reputation such as Corah from Bengal, dupattas and dhotis from Ahmedabad, Chintez from Lucknow, shawls from Kashmir, metalware from Varanasi and so on. In the modern era, the first trace of entrepreneurship was seen during the domination of British East India Company. A few Parsi entrepreneurs like Lowjee Nushirwan and Manjee Dhanjee built ships and produced gun powder for the company. Ranchod Lal Chotlal, a Nagar Brahmin, was the first Indian to think of setting up a textile manufacturing unit, in 1847, but failed in his attempt. He however succeeded in his second attempt in 1861. But before this credit for successfully starting a textile mill goes to another Parsi Cowasjee Nanabhoy Davar in Bombay in 1854. This was followed by Nawrosjee Wadia, who opened his textile mill in Bombay in 1880. Jamshedjee Tata established the first steel industry in Jamshedpur in1911. This was followed by the entry of Birla family which set up a jute mill in 1919. The Swadeshi Campaign, called by Mahatma Gandhi, calling for use of only Indian goods, gave the first wave of entrepreneurial activity in India. During this period, the traditional business communities like the Jains and Vaishyas, gave up their conservative attitude, and joined Parsis, to become industrial entrepreneurs. Post-independence, the socialist practices of the Nehru government actually helped Indian entrepreneurs by giving them protection from multinational companies. But this also prevented the Indian goods from being sold abroad. Licences, quotas, red tapes, high taxes, low productivity, black market, monopolies and so on, marked the first 40 years of Indian Independence. Despite all these, India saw the emergence of two well-known entrepreneurs of those times, Dirubhai Ambani and Kaesanbhai Patel who overcame many obstacles to sow the seeds of their empires. When the companys economy finally opened up in 1991, entrepreneurs of the likes of Azim Premji, N.R. Narayan Murthy, and Subhash Chandra came up on the scene. And as we move on to the 21st century, there is no stopping of the Indian Entrepreneur from taking the world! 14.6.1 Profile of successful entrepreneurs Identifying the true talent and communicating a compelling vision to potential candidates is highly essential for start-ups. It is critical to understand the technical and managerial skills that relate to an executives mindset. Characteristics that are mission critical need to be revealed for start-ups when compared to established companies. Winter Drive November 2011 Sikkim Manipal University Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 2

Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


A successful entrepreneur should possess the following traits High level of creativity and innovation. Total commitment, time management, tactical, team player. Resourceful, responsible. Leader, inspire others Emotional stability, ethical. Patience, passion, perseverance. Realistic, result oriented. These traits are highly important for executives in start-up environments. The job of HR managers doesnt end in finding people but they need to assess them for the long term strategy of the company. Profile of JRD Tata He was Indias first pilot, held the post of chairman of Tata & Sons for 50 years, Indias first international airline air India was launched by him, received Bharat Ratna. JRD Tata was one of the most innovative Indian entrepreneurs. He was a the one who paved the way for the aviation industry and built the largest industrial house in India. JRD Tata was born on July 29, 1904 in Paris. His mother was French, while his father was Parsi. JRD's full name was Jehangir Ratanji Dadabhoy Tata and he was popularly known as Jeh to his friends. JRD Tata was educated in France, Japan and England and then joined the French army and served for a period of one year. He joined JRD Tata & Sons as an apprentice in 1925. He had a great interest in flying. JRD Tata became the first Indian to pass the pilots examination. Tata airlines is now known as Air India is a result of his efforts. Tata aviation services were formed in 1932. At the age of 34, JRD was elected as the chairman of Tata & Sons, and thereby heading the largest industrial group in India. When he started off there were 14 enterprises under his leadership and 50 years later when he left, Tata & Sons consisted of 95 enterprises. Sir Dorabji Tata Trust had JRD as its trustee from its inception in 1932, and which remained under his wings for over half a century. It was under his guidance that the Tata Memorial Center for Cancer Research and Treatment. He also founded the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) and the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR). Air India International was launched by JRD in 1948, as Indias first international airline. JRD was appointed as the director for Indian airlines and served for a period of 25 years. JRD was bestowed with the title of Honorary Air Commodore of India. Employee association with management was an initiative started by JRD Tata to give the employees a stronger voice in the affairs of the company. Employee welfare schemes such as eight hour working day, free medical aid, workers provident scheme, and workmens accident compensation were adopted by him. Workers were of great importance to JRD Tata. A new practice was instituted in 1979, a worker is deemed to be "at work" from the moment he leaves home for work till he returns home from work. Thus the company is financially liable to the worker if any mishap takes place on the way to or from work. UN Global Compact City selected Tata Steel Township because of the quality of life, conditions of sanitation, roads and welfare that were offered by Tata Steel. During his lifetime JRD Tata received a number of awards. In 1957, he received the Padma Bhushan, on the very eve of the silver jubilee of Air India. The Guggenheim Medal for aviation was also conferred on him in 1988. The highest civilian honour the Bharat Ratna was awarded to him for his selfless humanitarian efforts. The United Nations also bestowed upon him the United Nations Winter Drive November 2011 Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Sikkim Manipal University Registration No. : 571017160 3

Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


Population award for his efforts to initiate and successfully implement family planning movement in India. At the age of 89, on November 29, 1993 JRD Tata died in Geneva, Switzerland. The Indian parliament was adjourned in his memory- an honour usually given only to members of parliament. Attracting and keeping the best people The most common and erroneous belief among start-ups is that they are competing with wellestablished companies for the best people. From the above description of the profile of people who wish to join start-ups, it is evident that it is vastly different from those who wish to join established firms. In reality competition is from other start-ups that are able to attract and retain talent. People with a strong desire to take risks, perform and be rewarded are the ones that join start-ups. They are looking for rewards that are appropriate for the risk taken by them. Along with a fixed level of compensation and base pay, they also expect performance bonus and stocks. People joining start-up firms also have a strong desire to feel involved in the decision making process. They need to know clearly about their involvement and how they contribute to the success. A constant urge to create something new and challenge the existing business environment is a common trait among those who opt to work for start-ups. Listed below are the best practices used to attract and retain talent in successful start-ups: Being straightforward and truthful about the challenges. Identifying like-minded candidates through referrals. Founders need to be real role models. India will be able to sustain its tradition of entrepreneurship well into the future by such new and renewed approaches to talent management.

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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


Q2. What are the top 10 talent management challenges faced by an HR? Ans. Talent management is the systematic attraction, identification, development, engagement/retention and deployment of the employees. These employees are of particular value to an organisation, either in view of their high potential for the future or because they are fulfilling business/operation-critical roles[1]. The top 10 talent management challenges are: Retaining Talent: An organisation needs to attract and retain talent at all levels, in accordance to the organic and inorganic growth. The organisation needs to clearly identify the processes for attracting and retaining employees. This is associated with knowledge about the talent required for business now and in the future. Identifying sources of such talent, recognising this talent and deploying them for the benefit of the organisation. Develop a value proposition that appeals to all the generations: Organisations are struggling to create an employee experience that is valued by all employees because of the presence of four generations within todays workplace. Companies need to create an employee experience that appeals to individuals with varied needs and preferences. For example consider a company that consists of a number of retail store, having a workforce of about 1,53,000. The store has a high percentage of Gen Y employees, and the corporate and leadership roles are handled by Gen Xers and Boomers. It is the responsibility of the organisation to create a compelling employee value proposition. Developing a robust leadership pipeline: Corporations in general face the potential threat of not possessing a robust talent pool from which future leaders can be selected. This problem arises due to the fact that the number of people in the Gen X is less. Another interesting issue is that many members of Gen X are not interested to take up these roles. The critical challenge here is that individuals are not willing to move into senior client manager and leadership roles. Developing the abilities of employees to take up global leadership positions: Assessing expertise in specific functional or technical arenas is relatively straightforward. Determining if individuals have people skills, leadership abilities and global diversity sensibilities is difficult. It is the responsibility of the organisation to develop such skills in employees. For example corporations can set up their own academy to develop and groom its employees. Key knowledge and relationships transfer: The retirement of a significant portion of the work force challenges all companies. Organisations that depend on inferred knowledge like those in customer relationships need to have transfer of knowledge and relationships. The exodus of Gen Xers from corporate life: One of the greatest threats faced by organisations is the exodus of mid-career talent. These are the people on whom the company has pinned hope for future leadership and invested heavily in. Therefore it is necessary for organisations to develop talent management practices that create greater work/life balance. Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 5

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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


Redesigning talent management practices to attract and retain Gen Y's: The talent management practices should be such that it attracts both young and old talent. Opening avenues for boomers in their second careers: Organisations are biased towards hiring boomers, but smart companies look for ways to incorporate them into the workforce. In general a rethinking of roles and relationships are required. Overcome the rule of short term and frequent movement: Retail industry in general is known to have a disposable view of talent. Organisations need to change this view. Organisations need to consider external as well as internal influences. Retaining employees for long periods could contribute to the success of the organisation. Recruit executives who dont appreciate the challenge: The belief of business leaders that people are lined outside the door because of the company brand power is often the cause of complain among executives. Organisations need to build a talent that places emphasis on build rather than buy strategy.

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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1

Q3. What is the importance of talent management? Ans. Like human capital, talent management is gaining increased attention. Talent management (TM) brings together a number of important human resources (HR) and management initiatives. Organisations that officially decide to manage their own talent carry out a strategic analysis of their current HR processes. This is to make sure that a co-ordinated, performance oriented approach is adopted. Many organisations are adopting a TM approach which focuses on co-ordinating and integrating methods which are given as: o o o o o o o Recruitment: To ensure the right people are attracted to the organisation. Retention: To develop and implement practices that reward and support employees. Employee development: To ensure continuous informal and formal learning and development. Leadership and "high potential employee" development: Specific development programs for existing and future leaders. Performance management: Specific processes that nurture and support performance, including feedback/measurement. Workforce planning: To plan for business and general changes, which include the older workforce and current/future skills shortages. Culture: To develop of a positive, progressive and high performance way of operating.

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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1

Q4. Describe the five stage approach for building a competency model. Ans. The development of competency models depends on the goals and objectives of the organisation, and the business that the organisation is in. In a broader sense the competencies are categorised into two types: 1) Core competency. 2) Role specific competency. The core competencies are those that are required by all employees. For example, initiative and drive might be a core competency for each employee in the organisation. The key stakeholders are particularly invited to take part in brainstorming sessions while performing a competency modelling for an organisation. Typically the human resources department take the step to define competencies. The strategic marketing team and the delivery team provide inputs on the competencies and on the gaps they experience during project execution respectively that would provide the organisation a competitive edge. The brainstorming and debate session helps in enlightening the competencies that the stakeholders perceive to be important. The five stage approach for building a competency model is as follows: a) Assemble the focus team and create a list of processes: The first stage in building a Leadership Competency Model is to assemble a Focus Team composed of a cross-functional mix of first-line leaders, middle leaders, and senior leaders. Big organisations might want to build different competency models for the upper and lower line of leadership. These individuals are Expert Practitioners who are the best people in their fields. With the help of interviews, surveys, observations and other activities, a list is created of the major processes and the requirements needed by leaders to carry them out in an correct fashion. It needs to be ensured that any observations or interviews are performed on Expert Practitioners. Competencies depend on what an expert does to get his or her job done but not on what others think. b) Build behavioural indicators for each process: This is the second stage where in the major behavioural indicators for each competency are identified by the members of the HR team that needs to be performed to produce the desired outputs. The behavioural indicators (Skills, Knowledge, Attitudes) needed for greater performance must be listed after going through each competency. These behavioural indicators must be: o Future-oriented rather than problem-oriented as they are creating a powerful tool to guide the organisation. o A component of a strategic planning or organisational planning process model. The best results are often achieved when built in along with other processes.

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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1

c) Categorise the data: In this stage, categorisation of data takes place. The competency of leadership is divided into three classes which are Core, Leadership, and Professional. The core competencies are essential of all the people within the organisation. The leadership competencies are meant for managers and supervisors. And the professional competencies are position specific. Be careful when building professional competencies for leaders. Leaders from different field often bring new perspective and originality to the organisations. It has to be ensured that the selected behavioural indicators are really the required skills, knowledge, or attitudes. [1]For example, the late Seattle School Superintendent, John Stanford, was one of the best things that happened to the district; yet he was a former Army General and City Manager without experience or education in educational institutions. It would have been a great loss for the district if the professional competency list for his job had been so stringent, that he would never have got the job. d) Order each category: This stage is used to order each category. The team gives numbers to each competency in its order of magnitude for each category. One process for doing this is to categorise each competency on a Post-it note and then observing each category at a time. After which the competencies are arranged from the most significant competency to the least significant. Finally, it is required to find out if any of the competencies at the bottom of each category can be discarded. The cause behind all this is that the team might have listed too many competencies to be easily measured. Later, this will help them determine a convenient number for a cut-off point. At this point, it is fine for having too many competencies listed. The correct number will be determined during the field testing of the performance appraisal. e) Validate the competency model: This stage validates the competency model by order of importance. There are a number of ways of performing this: Duplication: reproduce the original research results. This is done by getting another sample of higher performers, conducting interviews, and deriving a competency model. This new model is then compared to the original one. Jury: Independent jury members, having expert knowledge, deliver their best professional judgment on the model. They must include both internal and external experts. This group presents their opinion of the model as part of a professional report. Survey: A survey is conducted for a selected number of individuals throughout the company and they are asked to number each competency by its order of importance. They are also required to add their own competencies. The competencies should not be listed by the order ranked by the Competency Team as too many respondents might go with the team instead of thinking for themselves. Departmental focus group: A collective ranking is done as by each department or a representative of departments. The advantage is that more people are involved simultaneously and giving less information to collect. This means that each member of the Winter Drive November 2011 Sikkim Manipal University Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 9

Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


department contributes and each department submits in one survey of their collected results. The disadvantages are the assistance given to each department and the time involved in bringing each department together as a group. Structured interviews/observation: Interviews and observations are performed randomly with a number of leaders throughout the organisation. This is used to determine their competencies and to get their opinions of which ones to select for the execution of their job. Benchmarking: Comparing the results of the organisation with another best-of-class organisation. Balanced scorecard: The competencies required to accomplish the desired organisational goals throughout the organisation are identified by the Expert Practitioners. For example, the scorecard might measure organisational performance across a number of perspectives, such as financial, customers, internal business processes, and learning and growth. This process works best for the higher ranks of leaders. Its objective is to rank performance on several indicators that measure the ability for long term growth, rather than short term financial success. Customer service standards: The only competencies measured here are those that help meet required customer service standards. It is used in organisations where performanceoriented budgets are adjusted for service standards, not line items. Interviews: Investigates the attributes of the superior and average performers through the use of critical behaviour interactions. In these interviews, individuals describe their work experiences in which they were effective and ineffective. The investigation produces two types of competencies: The minimum competencies applied to both average and superior. The major competencies applied only to superior performers. The employees rate the competencies in terms of their importance for superior job performance. Their responses are then used to develop a record that contains the "best estimate" characteristics of superior performers.

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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1

Q5. List the key elements of talent management system. Ans. The key elements of Talent Management System are explained as follows: Selection: Selection is the process of choosing a candidate amongst a number of probable candidates. Recruitment and Retention has become a big challenge for organisations due to the continuing global talent shortage, the changing worldview of work by new generation employees entering the workforce, and the ever increasing evidence that poor recruitment decisions have a direct impact on the bottom line. Recruitment process that is not merit-based and has poor reliability and validity are a burden to an organisation and can even expose the company to discrimination claims. Poor hiring choices can affect the organisation in additional recruitment costs, training and orientation costs, loss of time, lost opportunity, lost revenue, loss of competitive advantage, tarnish image and reputation. It is about recruiting the right people in the right place at the right time. Organisations need to filter their attraction, recruitment and selection approaches to ensure they have the right talent on board to enable them to remain competitive. A global view that includes a diverse workforce is critical. Induction and training: Induction is the formal entry of the selected candidates into the organisation and Training is to develop their knowledge, skills and competencies by teaching with respect to the organisational requirement. Employers should not assume that new hires can cover for themselves, and will only need brief introductions and a chunk of corporate information to get them started. Although lost profits due to the training of a new hire has been estimated as 1.0 2.5% of total revenue, it is clear that this induction period is vital given that 6.3% of people leave within the first 6 months of starting in a new role, which is typically due to their induction experience. A proper induction program helps to reduce employee discomfort, improve productivity and save money. After an effective, useful and timely training experience should be the progressing development chances that support the individual in the role, but also the organisation in achieving its broader objectives. Such training, where possible and practical, should be in-time rather than in-case to provide training environments and materials that change to meet individual or small group demands precisely at the time when new skills are needed. Capability development: Customised improvement opportunities for key talent are seen as an essential component for motivation and retention of these people. In the present scenario, developing the current employees is a more cost effective and efficient means of maintaining internal talent pools rather than recruiting new people and wasting vital resources on their training. Career growth also has a major impact on job satisfaction and commitment, to an organisation that relates directly to the retention of dynamic employees. Both high potentials and core contributors should be given enough opportunities to develop by the internal talent management in order to maintain operational effectiveness and output. Key performers and core contributors require different growth experiences that should be modified accordingly for maximum profit. Committed leaders are required to emphasise the idea on both groups given their competing business priorities. The Talent Development structure adopted by an organisation needs to support the talent capabilities required for the future and needs to be able to blend with ongoing changes. Good leadership quality in a global and increasingly diverse workplace is a highly sort after competence, Winter Drive November 2011 Sikkim Manipal University Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 11

Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


and this must be embedded into any comprehensive development program. Other elements will be established by the business strategy. Performance: A performance management system increases the productivity and confidence in an organisation, if planned and implemented effectively. An example of the problems in performance management is that, 34% of surveyed Australian organisations using appraisals had no formal performance management policy in place. The increasing number of new generation employees in the workforce adds thrust to the importance of a transparent, objective performance management process as they perform best in a culture that encourages feedback. Performance management systems should be visibly related to training or development and recognition or compensation systems within the organisation in order to increase productivity and retention. Organisations can also defend themselves against legal action resulting from discrimination or unfair claims through use of a legitimate and fair performance management system. Retention and succession: Retention is the measure taken to encourage the employees to remain in the organisation for longer period of time. Succession helps an organisation to ensure that employees are hired and trained to fill each key position within the organisation. Employee retention is an important issue for top leaders in organisations all over the world. In todays world an abundance of jobs are available in the market for a job seeker and therefore employers must compete to attract and retain the talent they need to fulfil their organisational objectives. Talent retention is necessary to good quality, customer satisfaction and operational efficiency. Typically, companies prefer to induct 85% of their leaders through internal placement. For example, [4]Hewitts Top 10 Companies in the Asia Pacific develop 76% of their leaders internally while a global survey found a 30% failure rate when placing highly sought after external talent. It is evident that organisations with high quality strategic improvement programs and succession management programs have greater business results. In addition, increasingly rigid labour markets make succession management a business necessity and force organisations to identify and accelerate the development of future leaders from within. The stable organisations under such pressure need to have an effective succession management policy in place, with a particular focus on the continuity of key specialists and leaders. Other key elements of talent management Besides the four above elements of talent management, some other elements are also available that help to characterise the relationship between talent management and conventional recruiting. They include: A focus on high impact positions: A talent management policy requires managers and HR to determine an organisations success by filling top talent in the appropriate jobs. Accountability: Talent management assigns accountability to the chief talent executive for managing the talent pool, who is responsible for results, not effort. Rewards and metrics: Talent management builds support and relationship between earlier independent efforts through its common objectives, metrics and rewards. Thus, no independent effort can be considered successful unless the overall talent management effort is also successful. Winter Drive November 2011 Sikkim Manipal University Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 12

Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


Balanced metrics: Talent management attracts managers attention by instituting a system of methods and rewards that ensures every executive is acknowledged and rewarded for excellence in human resource management. It simultaneously evaluates employee commitment to ensure that managers reach their productivity goals while using the appropriate organisation behaviours. Business approach: The talent management approach is not taken from an overhead or administration model. It is created from and replicates other successful business process models, like supply chain management, finance, and lean manufacturing. Recognition of the business cycle: The talent management strategy involves identifying the different types of talent required with respect to changing business situations. Consequently, talent management requires the constant internal movement of talent in and out of jobs and business units based on current business needs and where the company is in its business cycle. Truly global: Talent management encourages attracting, retaining, and developing the best talent no matter where it is. Focus on service: Flawless service is the expectation of talent management. Customer satisfaction, process speed, quality, and commitment are continually measured. Anticipation: While conventional recruiting and retention tend to be reactive, talent management is forward looking. It predicts and alerts managers about upcoming problems and opportunities. It indicates managers to act before the need arises in talent management issues. The overall objective of this unit helps you to understand the Talent Management System and how it is implemented in an organisation. It also explains the critical success factors used to ensure the organisations have the right people in the right jobs. This unit provides a list of primary and applicable merit principles to state the responsibility and role of an organisation and workforce productivity. You also came to know about the key elements which are required for an effective Talent Management System.

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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1

Q6. What is the role of an HR in talent management? Ans. Talent Management involves identifying the right talents and developing those talents into personnel competencies, which is required by the organisation to have highly efficient and high performance human capital. In the recent years, as the demographics of workforces have changed, organisations of all size consider talent management as a crucial activity. The importance laid on talent management has increased the pressure on HR department in an organisation. The HR acts as a backbone for Talent Management. The HR is responsible for the training and development activities of an employee in an organisation. When it comes to talent management the HRs role is concerned with enhancing the development, attraction, and retention of their employees. The HR is responsible to establish talent management initiatives. In an organisation, apart from transactions and administrations, the HR is burdened to take more responsibility to become a talent expert. The important areas of talent management that forms a part of HR planning are: Providing value for individuals by creating and maintaining an organisational culture. Identify the needs of an organisation. Training and developing employees to meet the organisational needs. Recruiting talented people, who are capable of providing further job needs, Conducting and managing HR activities to support talent the development of talent in an organisation. It is the responsibility of the HR to view talent assets of an employee at an individual level. This helps the HR to know what skills, experience, and training each employee brings to the table or needs to acquire. For HR to evaluate the existing skill sets in the industry, they first need to understand how to go about filling current and future skill gaps. This is possible if talent is viewed enterprise-wide at an aggregate level The crucial role of an HR is to attract talented personnel. These days the improvement in the economy and retirement of Baby Boomer creates competition for newer talented personnel. As majority of the employees in an organisation look out for new and better employment opportunities, the HR is responsible for retaining the employees. This can be done by following successful employee retention strategies. The HR are responsible for providing opportunities for employees who prefer to develop their skills and talent and accept challenging work along with compensation. The employees prefer to grow in their career. This can be done by the HR by organising programs for professional and entry- to mid-level managers.

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Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1

Roles of HR in Talent Management

Getting the Best Employees

Paying employees and Providing Benefits

Training Employees

Ensuring Compliance to Regulations

Ensuring Safe Work Environment

Sustaining High Performing Employees

Getting the best employee The HR is responsible for implementing the planned workforce in an organisation. Workforce planning is getting "the right number of people with the right skills, experiences, and competencies in the right jobs at the right time." The HR is responsible to attract the employee with the right talent by considering the organisations goals, strategic plan, budget, resources, and a set of desired workforce competencies. Getting the best employee is nothing but hiring the right talent. Here Right talent means candidates with relevant skill sets and qualifications. Hiring the right employee creates a foundation for more effective performance by the employees, teams, and the company on the whole. Hiring an employee with irrelevant skill sets and qualifications reduces the quality of work and increases the cost of rework. It also reduces the performance of the team and in turn the company. Before hiring, the best employee the HR must have knowledge of the following: The HR must know what he is hiring for. The HR must also determine the skill and the personnel attribute required by a candidate that matches with the requirement of the job. The HR must know the tasks and the responsibilities involved in the job. This is necessary because, the HR will have to give the summary of the job tasks, responsibilities, and objectives of the job to the employee. The HR must also have knowledge of the educational qualification and experience required for doing the job. This is because the education and experience are considered as the two most important characteristics while evaluating a candidate for a job. HR must understand the characteristics required by the personal to grown in the organisation. For example, the interpersonal skill that is required by an individual to be a team leader. HR must have knowledge of the organisations culture. For example giving the hired employee team-orientation, explaining the process followed in the company, the reward system, mission, needs, and goals of the company. The best employee is the person with: The right education + the right experience + a compactable personality. Winter Drive November 2011 Sikkim Manipal University Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 15

Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


Paying employees and providing benefits The HR is responsible for administrating the pay and benefits of the employees. The employees pay and the benefits provided to them play an important role in motivating them. The HR calculates and summarises the salary structure to the employee, explaining the employee the pay offered apart from the bonuses, commissions, and other performance related pay. The HR keeps track of each employees earnings and benefits. The HR maintains an extensive record for this purpose and shares the same with the management, government, employees and others in the organisation. The HR also provides employee benefits like health insurance, dental insurance, life insurance and so on. The HR also keeps a track of the vacations pay, holiday pay and the maternity leave of the employee. Training employees These days we see that many companies offer some sort of introductory training or orientation for their new employees. The training programs are an integral part of the HR department to achieve the objectives of the organisation. The HR organises and conducts training programs for the employees. This helps them develop the required capabilities and skills to perform the tasks assigned to them in a consistent manner. Successful implementation of the training programs increases the performance and the overall productivity of the organisation. Training programs help the employees to develop a greater sense of self-worth, dignity, and wellbeing. Through training they become more valuable to the firm and to the society. As training increases the productivity of the employee, they can obtain pay benefits, appraisals and obtain better share of material gains. Employee training is important for the following reasons. It: Updates the skills and knowledge of employees on the recent development in tools and technologies. Updates the knowledge of employees in on other fields and areas apart from their area of specialisation. This is required in a multidimensional work place. Exposes new employees passed out from college to practical implementation of what they have studied. Provides career advancement for employees. Motivates the employees to perform well. Helps the organisation to bridge the gap between the requirement of skills and the availability of skills. Helps in employee retention. Ensuring compliance to regulations HR compliance is important for any business in the present days legal environment. Effective HR compliance programs need to be integrated into any business strategies. It is a process of telling the proper behaviours of an individual or a group in an organisation. The process also assures that the employees properly understand and follow all the laws and processes set by the organisation. The HR must know all the laws and the appropriate policies developed by the organisation. The HR is responsible to communicate all the policies to every level of employees in the organisation. They must also explain them the consequences for non adherence of the policies. The non adherence of policies results in investigation and punishment procedures. The HR must not only communicate the policies but also make sure that the policies are properly implemented and followed by the employees.

Winter Drive November 2011 Sikkim Manipal University

Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 16

Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


To ensure compliance to regulations, the HR must: Have the right skills and experience to support the compliance process. Be up dated with all the laws as the laws change constantly, and communicate the same to all the employees. Create manuals on HR policy, regularly update it, and get it reviewed by the lawyer before implementing it. Train managers and review the policy with each manager, as they interact regularly with the employees. They must also ensure that the managers adhere to the policies and be role models for other employees. Train employees, bring awareness among the employees on the issues like sexual harassment, and update employees about the new policies. Listen to all the employees when they come with an issue. This helps the HR to know the cause for the compliance risk, mange those risks, and bring it to the notice of other employees of the organisation. Provide feedback to ensure employees meet the expectation. HR must also provide employees an opportunity to correct their mistakes. Document all the policies, key decisions, and employee evaluation. A copy of the policy must be given to every employee. The failure to document can leave the HR prone to noncompliance claims. The policies developed by an organisation depend on the nature and needs of the organisation. An organisation may possess the following policies: Policies on work schedule like working hours per day, lunch breaks, holidays, sick leaves, personal leaves, loss of pay (LOP) leaves and so on. Compensation policies like overtime compensation, increase in salary due to promotional, reduction in salary increase due to poor performance, and so on. An organisation adopts laws to govern matters like employee job security, pay, health and safety, opportunities, benefits, and so on. Ensuring safe work environments Every employee in an organisation that is, from supervisor to workers has a right for safe and healthy workplace. The HR managers must develop safety programs, policies, and a clear workable plan for having a safe workplace. The safety programs like seasonal vaccinations and training the employee in handling emergency situations must be carried out. The management must be train employees on safety issues with the help of safety programs. This helps in bringing in accountability and compliance. The best way to make employees excited with safety issues is to involve them in safety committees, make the part of safety inspection, set goals and so on. Doing this helps the employee feel free to communicate these safety issues to their colleagues and others in the organisation. Ensuring safety at workplace also involves: o Diversity management: this involves managing diversity issues like gender, nationality, racism, physical appearance, and so on. The HR is responsible to develop and implement diversity plan as the employees approach the HR directly if they face any such issues. Dealing with drugs in the workplace: some employees get into the habit of taking drugs or alcohol due to the constant work pressure as well as some personal issues. It is the responsibility of the HR to ensure drug-free work place by implementing drug free policy or Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 17

Winter Drive November 2011 Sikkim Manipal University

Master of Business Administration-MBA Semester 4 Assignment - MU0017 Talent Management - Set 1


conducting drug tests for employees. o o o Ergonomics for employee safety: the employees can be trained to use ergonomics in order to overcome work pressure and work safely. Dealing with HIV/AIDS in the workplace: This is to encourage people to support individuals suffering from HIV/AIDS. It also involves fighting and prevention against HIV/AIDS. Preventing violence in the workplace: The HR is responsible to prevent violence at work place such as threatening or employees killing their colleagues by implementing policies and procedures. Supporting spirituality in the workplace: Realising that every employee has his/her own belief, respecting their beliefs, and allowing them to hold on to their beliefs is the responsibility of the HR. this helps in creating a friendly environment.

Sustaining high-performing employees In todays market it is not only difficult to hire an employee but it is also difficult to sustain high performing employee. These days employees working for an organisation look forward for opportunities apart from benefits and compensation. The HR believe that most of the employees look out for other companies which can offer them better environment for growth, compensation and benefits. They believe that some look out for other companies which offer better friendly environment, where they can involve in decision process and be a part of the team. The amount of job stress and the disability to balance between work and home also forces the employees to leave their jobs. Employee retention is difficult to handle because there are many factors that affects it. The HR conducts surveys to know the reason why employees leave the job. They also conduct exit interviews to get a feed back from the relieving employees on the areas of improvement. The HR improves retention by improving the communication between the management and the employees. The also conduct training and provide development opportunities to retain the employees. The HR must make sure the candidate hired fits the job and the work culture. The HR must recognise and understand the important retention drivers, but often many HR fail to realise these factors more than they understand them. The HR must make sure the employee values the work they do, which is important for retention. The HR must possess strong leadership and strong leadership and sound management practices to convince and retain the employee.

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Winter Drive November 2011 Sikkim Manipal University

Submitted By: Pritam DSouza Registration No. : 571017160 18