Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 490

This document is exclusive property of Cisco Systems, Inc.

Permission is granted to print and copy this document for noncommercial distribution and exclusive use by instructors in the CCNA 4: WAN Technologies course as part of an official Cisco Networking Academy Program.

Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a router to use network address translation (NAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into outside public addresses.

Background/Preparation
An ISP has allocated a company the public classless interdomain routing (CIDR) IP address 199.99.9.32/27. This is equivalent to 30 public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to implement NAT. The addresses 199.99.9.33 199.99.9.39 for static allocation and 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 for dynamic allocation. Routing will be done between the ISP and the gateway router used by the company. A static route will be used between the ISP and gateway routers and a default route will be used between the gateway router and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations:
1 - 489

800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers


Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to the configuration reference sheet at the end of this lab for help.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Ping again until they are both successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/27 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route. ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c.
2 - 489

What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route


Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? Interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. From the Gateway router to the ISP router, create a static route to network 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0, using the ip route command. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP by setting a Gateway of Last Resort on the Gateway router. Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

3 - 489

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway#show ip nat translations Pro Inside global Inside local --- 199.99.9.40 10.10.10.10 Outside local --Outside global ---

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. Configure one of the PCs on the LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway address of 10.10.10.1. From the PC, ping 172.16.1.1. If successful, look at the NAT translation on the Gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses? 10.10.10.10 = 199.99.9.40 c. The inside global address is assigned by? The router from the nat pool d. The inside local address is assigned by? The administrator for the workstation Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

4 - 489

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter] Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

5 - 489

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

6 - 489

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

7 - 489

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.4b Configuring PAT Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a router to use Port Address Translation (PAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into an outside public address.

Background/Preparation
Aidan McDonald has just received a DSL line Internet connection to a local ISP in his home. The ISP has allocated only one IP address to be used on the serial port of his remote access device. Thus all PCs on Aidans LAN, each with its own private IP address, will share one public IP address on the router using PAT. Routing from the home or gateway router to the ISP will be done by using a default route to Serial 0 of the Gateway router. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations:
8 - 489

800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in this lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a default route


a. Add a default route to the serial 0 interface of the gateway router. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP. Use the ip route command to create the default route: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 serial 0 b. Is the route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network

9 - 489

CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

f.

What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

Step 6 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 7 Define the PAT translation from inside list to outside address
To define the PAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command. This command, with the overload option, will create port address translation using the serial 0 IP address as the base: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 interface serial 0 overload

Step 8 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to PAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 9 Testing the configuration


a. Configure a PC on the internal LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway 10.10.10.1. From the PCs, ping the Internet address 172.16.1.1. If successful, Telnet to the same IP address. Then look at the PAT translation on the gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. Gateway#show ip nat translations Pro Inside global Inside local tcp 200.2.2.18:1086 10.10.10.10:1086 icmp 200.2.2.18:768 10.10.10.10:768 Outside local 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:768 Outside global 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:768

10 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses? 10.10.10.10:1086 or 10.10.10.10:768 (Answers will vary) c. What does the number after the colon represent? The port that NAT used

d. Why do all of the commands for PAT say NAT? PAT is an extension of NAT Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

11 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

12 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

13 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

14 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.4c Configuring Static NAT Addresses Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a router to use network address translation (NAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into outside public addresses. Configure static IP mapping to allow outside access to an internal PC.

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public classless interdomain routing (CIDR) IP address 199.99.9.32/27. This is equivalent to 30 public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT. Addresses 199.99.9.33 199.99.9.39 will be reserved for static allocation and 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 for dynamic allocation. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router will be done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

15 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in this lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to the configuration reference sheet at the end of this lab for help.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/27 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: a. ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 b. Is the route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route

16 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route from the Gateway router to the ISP router using the ip route command. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

17 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public_access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public_access

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be identified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command. Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 11 Configuring Static Mapping


a. Workstation #1, 10.10.10.10/24, will be designated as the public WWW server. Thus, it needs a permanent public IP address. This mapping is defined using a static NAT mapping. b. Configure one of the PCs on the LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway address of 10.10.10.1. To configure a static IP NAT mapping, use the ip nat inside source static command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source static 10.10.10.10 199.99.9.33 This permanently maps 199.99.9.33 to the inside address 10.10.10.10. c. Look at the translation table: Gateway#show ip nat translations Does the mapping appear in the output of the show command? Yes

Step 12 Testing the configuration


a. From the 10.10.10.10 workstation, verify it can ping 172.16.1.1 b. Is the ping successful? Yes
18 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Why? NAT properly setup

d. From the ISP router, ping the host with the static NAT translation by typing ping 10.10.10.10. e. What were the results of the ping, was it successful? No f. Why? No route to 10.10.10.10 ISP#ping 10.10.10.10 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.10.10.10, timeout is 2 seconds: Success rate is 0 percent (0/5) g. From the ISP router, ping 199.99.9.33. If successful, look at the NAT translation on the Gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. ISP#ping 199.99.9.33 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 199.99.9.33, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms ISP# Gateway#show ip nat translations Pro Inside global Inside local global --- 199.99.9.33 10.10.10.10 = 199.99.9.33 Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter 10.10.10.10 Outside local --Outside ---

h. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses?

19 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

20 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

21 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

22 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.5 Verifying NAT and PAT Configuration Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a router for Network Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address Translation (PAT) Test the configuration and verify NAT/PAT statistics

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public CIDR IP address 199.99.9.32/30. This is equivalent to four public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT with PAT. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router is done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

23 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/30 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route. ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route

24 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? interface down
ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route from the Gateway router to the ISP router using the ip route command. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload

25 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be identified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. From the workstations, ping 172.16.1.1. Open multiple DOS windows on each workstation and Telnet to the 172.16.1.1 address. Next, view the NAT translations on the Gateway router, with the command show ip nat translations. b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses? Gateway#show ip nat trans Pro Inside global Inside local tcp 199.99.9.33:1091 10.10.10.10:1091 tcp 199.99.9.33:1092 10.10.10.10:1092 icmp 199.99.9.33:512 10.10.10.10:512 Outside local 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:512 Outside global 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:512

Step 12 Verify NAT and PAT Statistics


a. To view the NAT and PAT statistics type the show ip nat statistics command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. How many active translations have taken place? 2 c. How many addresses are in the pool? 4 Gateway#show ip nat statistics Total active translations: 2 (0 static, 2 dynamic; 2 extended) Outside interfaces: Serial0 Inside interfaces: FastEthernet0 Hits: 14 Misses: 2 Expired translations: 0 Dynamic mappings: -- Inside Source [Id: 1] access-list 1 pool public_access refcount 2 pool public_access: netmask 255.255.255.252 start 199.99.9.32 end 199.99.9.35 type generic, total addresses 4, allocated 1 (25%), misses 0 Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter d. How many addresses have been allocated so far? 1

26 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

27 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

28 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

29 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.6 Troubleshooting NAT and PAT Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a router for Network Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address Translation (PAT) Troubleshoot NAT and PAT using debug

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public CIDR IP address 199.99.9.32/30. This is equivalent to four public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT with PAT. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router is done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

30 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/30 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route

31 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route, using the ip route command, from the Gateway router to the ISP router. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

32 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


On the active interfaces on the router, it needs to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. Turn on debugging for the NAT process by typing debug ip nat at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. Does the debug command show any output? No c. If translation were taking place there would be output from the debug command. While reviewing the running configuration of the gateway router, it is seen that the ip nat outside statement has not been entered on the serial 0 interface. To configure this enter the following: Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside From the workstations, ping 172.16.1.1 If the ip nat outside statement was entered correctly, there should be output from the debug ip nat command. d. What does the line NAT*: S=10.10.10.? -> 199.99.9.33 mean? Source and destination hosts e. To stop the debug output, type undebug all at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. Gateway#debug ip nat IP NAT debugging is on Gateway#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
33 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)# 00:07:53: ip_ifnat_modified: old_if 2, new_if 1 00:08:04: NAT: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11391] 00:08:04: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11391] 00:08:05: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11392] 00:08:05: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11392] 00:08:06: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11393] 00:08:06: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11393] 00:08:07: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11394] 00:08:07: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11394] Gateway(config-if)# Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway#undebug all 00:08:50: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console all All possible debugging has been turned off Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

34 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter] Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

35 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

36 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

37 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.2.6 Configuring DHCP Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a router for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to dynamically assign addresses to attached hosts.

Background/Preparation
Routing between the ISP and the campus router uses a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet is identified by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721

38 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Create a static route


a. Addresses 172.16.12.0/24 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: ISP(config)#ip route 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.1.6 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes ISP#show ip route 00:02:08: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by consoleute Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 [1/0] via 172.16.1.6 172.16.13.0/24 is directly connected, Loopback0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0

Step 4 Create a default route


a. Use the ip route command to add a default route from the campus router to the ISP router. This will provide the mechanism to forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: campus(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.5
39 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes campus#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 172.16.1.5 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 172.16.1.5

Step 5 Create the DHCP address pool


To configure the campus LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.1.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.1.10

Step 6 Excluding addresses from pool


To exclude addresses from the pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.11

40 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Verifying DHCP Operation

a. At each workstation on the directly connected subnet configure the TCP/IP properties so the workstation will obtain an IP address and Domain Name System (DNS) server address from the DHCP server. After changing and saving the configuration, reboot the workstation. b. To confirm the TCP/IP configuration information on each host use Start > Run > winipcfg /all. If running Windows 2000, check using ipconfig /all in a DOS window. c. What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 172.16.12.11 d. What other information was automatically assigned? domain name, dns, netbios, subnet mask, gateway e. When was the lease obtained? Student should have listed time and date f. When will the lease expire? Student should have listed time and date

Step 8 View DHCP bindings


a. From the campus router, the bindings for the hosts can be seen. To see the bindings, use the command show ip dhcp binding at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. campus#show ip dhcp binding IP address Hardware address 172.16.12.11 0100.10a4.188f.c9 Lease expiration Mar 02 1993 01:25 AM Type Automatic

b. What were the IP addresses assigned? 172.16.12.11

c. What are the three other fields listed in the output? mac address, lease expiration and type
41 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

42 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Campus Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname campus campus(config)#enable password cisco campus(config)#enable secret class campus(config)#line console 0 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#line vty 0 4 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#interface fastethernet 0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#interface serial 0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.6 255.255.255.252 campus(config-if)#clock rate 64000 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.5 campus(config)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config Campus DHCP configuration campus#configure terminal campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.1.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.1.10 campus(dhcp-config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit campus(config)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config ISP Router#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0
43 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.5 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config)#ip route 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.1.6 ISP(config)#exit ISP#copy running-config startup-config

44 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

45 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

46 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.2.8 Configuring DHCP Relay Instructor Version 1700

Objective
A router will be configured for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). The ability for workstations to remotely obtain DHCP addresses will be added. Addresses will be dynamically assigned to the attached hosts.

Background/Preparation
A DHCP client uses IP broadcasts to find the DHCP server. However, these broadcasts are not forwarded by routers, so in the case of the remote LAN, the workstations will not be able to locate the DHCP server. The router must be configured with the ip helper-address command to enable forwarding of these broadcasts, as unicast packets, to the specific server. Routing between the remote router and the campus router is done using a static route between the remote router and gateway router, and a default route between the gateway router and remote router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

47 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

Step 2 Configure routing on the remote router


Use Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) as the routing protocol. Set up the network as area 0 and the process ID as 1: remote(config)#router ospf 1 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

Step 3 Configure routing on the campus router


a. Use OSPF as the routing protocol. Set up the network as area 0 and the process ID as 1: campus(config)#router ospf 1 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0 b. Are there OSPF routes in the routing table? Yes remote#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks
48 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

O C C

172.16.12.0/24 [110/65] via 172.16.1.6, 00:00:12, Serial0 172.16.13.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0

campus#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set C O C 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0 172.16.13.0/24 [110/65] via 172.16.1.5, 00:00:14, Serial0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0

Step 4 Save the configurations


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 5 Create the campus DHCP address pool on the campus router
To configure the campus LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10

Step 6 Create the remote DHCP address pool on the campus router
To configure the remote LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(dhcp-config)#ip dhcp pool remote campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.13.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.13.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10

Step 7 Exclude addresses from pool


a. To exclude addresses from the pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.11 campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.13.1 172.16.13.11 This defines the address range to be excluded from dynamic issue by the DHCP server.
49 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Why would addresses be excluded? Servers, routers, and so on.

Step 8 Verify DHCP operation on the campus router

a. From the workstation directly connected to the campus router configure the TCP/IP properties for the workstation to obtain its IP properties automatically from DHCP. These properties include the IP address and the Domain Name System (DNS) server address. b. After changing the configuration, reboot the workstation. View the TCP/IP configuration information on each host. If running Windows 98, go to Start > Run > winipcfg /all. With Windows 2000 or higher, use ipconfig /all in a DOS command prompt window. c. What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 172.16.12.11

Step 9 Configuring DHCP relay


Configure the remote router with the ip helper-address command to enable forwarding of broadcasts, as unicast packets, to the specific server. This command must to be configured on the LAN interface of the remote router for DHCP to function: remote(config)#interface fastethernet 0 remote(config-if)#ip helper-address 172.16.12.1

Step 10 Verify DHCP operation on the remote router


a. Reboot the workstation attached to the remote router. b. Is there a valid address assigned from the DHCP pool? Yes
50 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 172.16.13.11

d. If there is no IP address, troubleshoot the workstation and router configurations and repeat Step 11.

Step 11 View DHCP bindings


a. From the campus router, the bindings for the hosts can be seen. To see the bindings, use the command show ip dhcp binding at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. What are the IP addresses assigned to the hosts? 172.16.12.11 172.16.13.11 campus#show ip dhcp binding IP address Client-ID/ Hardware address 172.16.12.11 0108.0046.06fb.b6 172.16.13.11 0542.0010.0a21.cb Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter Lease expiration Mar 02 2003 04:41 PM Mar 02 2003 04:45 PM Type Automatic Automatic

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following:

51 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Remote router configuration Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname remote remote(config)#enable password cisco remote(config)#enable secret class remote(config)#line console 0 remote(config-line)#password cisco remote(config-line)#login remote(config-line)#exit remote(config)#line vty 0 4 remote(config-line)#password cisco remote(config-line)#login remote(config-line)#exit remote(config)#interface fastethernet 0 remote(config-if)#ip address 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0 remote(config-if)#no shutdown remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#interface serial 0 remote(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.5 255.255.255.252 remote(config-if)#no shutdown remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#router ospf 1 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.13.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 remote(config-router)#end remote#copy running-config startup-config Campus router configuration Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname campus campus(config)#enable password cisco campus(config)#enable secret class campus(config)#line console 0 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#line vty 0 4 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#interface fastethernet 0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#interface serial 0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.6 255.255.255.252 campus(config-if)#clock rate 56000 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#router ospf 1 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 campus(config-router)#end campus#copy running-config startup-config

52 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

DHCP pool configurations Campus pool campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit Remote pool campus(config)#ip dhcp pool remote campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.13.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.13.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.10 campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.13.1 172.16.13.10 campus(config)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config Remote helper address configuration remote#configure terminal remote(config)#interface fa0 remote(config-if)#ip helper-address 172.16.12.1 remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#exit remote#copy running-config startup-config

53 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor) . Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

54 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

55 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.7 Troubleshooting a Serial Interface Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a serial interface on two routers. Use show commands to troubleshoot connectivity issues.

Background/Preparation
Configure the appropriate serial interfaces to allow connectivity between the two routers. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

56 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Paris interface as shown


Configure the Paris router serial interface as follows: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the London interface as shown


Configure the London router serial interface as follows: London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


London#copy running-config startup-config Paris#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on London
London#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. London#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 128 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:06, output 00:00:00, output hang never
57 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Last clearing of "show interface" counters 03:02:45 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/32 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 96 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 1039 packets input, 67974 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 753 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 1047 packets output, 77227 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 4 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up Answer the following questions: a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. b. What type of problem is indicated in the last statement? Data link (layer 2) related c. Internet address is 192.168.15.1..

d. Encapsulation HDLC

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Paris
Paris#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. Answer the following questions: a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down.. b. Internet address is 192.168.15.2. c. Encapsulation HDLC d. To what OSI layer is the Encapsulation referring? Layer 2 e. Why is the interface down? Clock rate not set on DCE Interface Paris#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:04:44 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec
58 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 15 packets output, 869 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 10 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 16 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 7 Correct the clock location


The clock rate statement has been placed on the wrong interface. It is currently placed on the Paris router, but the London router is the Data Communications Equipment (DCE). Remove the clock rate statement from the Paris router using the no version of the command and then add it to the London router configuration.

Step 8 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Paris


Paris#show interface serial 0 a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. b. What is the difference in the Line and Protocol status recorded on Paris earlier? Why? Now both are UP due to the correct clock rate setting. Paris#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:07, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:07:47 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 31 packets input, 2864 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 21 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 1 input errors, 0 CRC, 1 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 43 packets output, 3231 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 11 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 20 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

59 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 9 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
London#ping 192.168.15.2 Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 a. Can the serial interface on the Paris router be pinged from London? Yes b. Can the serial interface on the London router be pinged from Paris? Yes c. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. London#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/40 ms London# Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/32 ms Paris# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

60 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#line con 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config Removing the clock from Paris Serial DTE interface Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#no clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config London Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname London London(config)#enable password cisco London(config)#enable secret class London(config)#line vty 0 4 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#line con 0 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config Configuring the clock on London Serial DCE interface London#configure terminal London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config

61 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

62 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

63 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.2 Configuring PPP Encapsulation Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure the serial interfaces on two routers with the PPP protocol. Test the link for connectivity.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions sheet. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

64 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Dublin interface as shown


Configure the Dublin router serial interface as follows: Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Washington interface as shown


Configure the Washington router serial interface as follows: Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Washington
Washington#show interface serial 0 a. This will show the details of interface serial 0. b. Serial 0 is up line protocol is up. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.1.

d. Encapsulation HDLC

65 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington#show interface 0serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:04, output 00:00:03, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:06:09 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 16 packets input, 902 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 16 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 35 packets output, 2939 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 2 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Dublin
Dublin#show interface serial 0 a. This will show the details of interface serial 0. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.2. Dublin#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:02, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:05:19 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 11 packets input, 1068 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 11 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 25 packets output, 1603 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 3 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 14 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up
66 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. Encapsulation HDLC

Step 7 Change the encapsulation type


Change the encapsulation type to PPP by typing encapsulation ppp at the interface serial 0 configuration mode prompt on both routers. Washington(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation ppp

Step 8 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Washington


Washington#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Washington#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:13, output 00:00:10, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:17 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 11 packets input, 1220 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 7 packets output, 366 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 9 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Dublin


Dublin#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Dublin#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP
67 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:02, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:28 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 10 packets input, 412 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 15 packets output, 1280 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 4 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 10 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
Washington#ping 192.168.15.2 Dublin#ping 192.168.15.1 a. Can the serial interface on the Dublin router be pinged from Washington? Yes b. Can the serial interface on the Washington router be pinged from Dublin? Yes c. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Washington#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/32 ms Washington# Dublin#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/28 ms Dublin# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

68 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Washington Washington(config)#enable password cisco Washington(config)#enable secret class Washington(config)#line vty 0 4 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#line con 0 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Configuring PPP on Washington Washington#configure terminal Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Dublin Dublin(config)#enable password cisco Dublin(config)#enable secret class Dublin(config)#line vty 0 4 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#line con 0 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#exit Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config Configuring PPP on Dublin Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

69 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

70 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface

71 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.3 Configuring PPP Authentication Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure PPP authentication using CHAP on two routers.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

72 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Tokyo interface as shown


Configure the Tokyo router serial interface as follows: Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Madrid interface as shown


Configure the Madrid router serial interface as follows: Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Madrid(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Madrid(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Madrid(config-if)#no shutdown Madrid(config-if)#exit Madrid(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Madrid#copy running-config startup-config Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Madrid


Madrid#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Madrid#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set
73 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:09, output 00:00:09, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:35 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 10 packets input, 136 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 10 packets output, 136 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Tokyo


Tokyo#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Tokyo#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:02, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:29 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 12 packets input, 168 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 12 packets output, 168 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

74 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1 If the pings are unsuccessful, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until both pings are successful.

Step 8 Configure PPP authentication


Configure the username and password on the Madrid router. The passwords must be the same on both routers. The username must reflect the other routers hostname exactly. The password and user names are case sensitive: Madrid(config)#username Tokyo password cisco Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

Step 9 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router: Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 b. Is the ping successful? No c. Why? CHAP not setup on Tokyo Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: ..... Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)

Step 10 Configure PPP authentication


Configure the username and password on the Tokyo router. The passwords must be the same on both routers. The username must reflect the other routers hostname exactly. The password and user names are case sensitive: Tokyo(config)#username Madrid password cisco Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

Step 11 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router: Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1 b. Is the ping successful? Yes

75 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Why? Username was setup on Tokyo. Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

76 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable password cisco Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#line vty 0 4 Tokyo(config-line)#password cisco Tokyo(config-line)#login Tokyo(config-line)#line con 0 Tokyo(config-line)#password cisco Tokyo(config-line)#login Tokyo(config-line)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdowndown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Tokyo chap configuration Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#username Madrid password cisco Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Madrid Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Madrid Madrid(config)#enable password cisco Madrid(config)#enable secret class Madrid(config)#line vty 0 4 Madrid(config-line)#password cisco Madrid(config-line)#login Madrid(config-line)#line con 0 Madrid(config-line)#password cisco Madrid(config-line)#login Madrid(config-line)#exit Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Madrid(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Madrid(config-if)#encapulation ppp Madrid(config-if)#no shutdown Madrid(config-if)#exit Madrid(config)#exit Madrid chap configuration Madrid#configure terminal Madrid(config)#username Tokyo password cisco Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Madrid(config-if)#exit

77 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

78 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

79 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.4 Verifying PPP Configuration Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a serial interface on two routers with the PPP protocol. Verify and test the link for connectivity.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

80 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Warsaw interface as shown


Configure the Warsaw router serial interface as follows: Warsaw(config)#interface serial 0 Warsaw(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Warsaw(config-if)#no shutdown Warsaw(config-if)#exit Warsaw(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Brasilia interface as shown


Configure the Brasilia router serial interface as follows: Brasilia(config)#interface serial 0 Brasilia(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Brasilia(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Brasilia(config-if)#no shutdown Brasilia(config-if)#exit Brasilia(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Brasilia#copy running-config startup-config Warsaw#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Brasilia
Brasilia#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. Encapsulation HDLC

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Warsaw
Warsaw#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0.

81 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Encapsulation HDLC

Step 7 Turn on PPP debugging


Turn on the PPP debug function on both routers by typing debug ppp tasks at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. Note: For the 2600 router, use the command debug ppp tasks.

Step 8 Change the encapsulation type


a. Change the encapsulation type to PPP by typing encapsulation ppp at the interface serial 0 configuration mode prompt on both routers. Brasilia(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Warsaw(config-if)#encapsulation ppp b. What did the debug function report when the PPP encapsulation was applied to each router? 00:03:07: Se0 AUTH: Started 00:03:07: Se0: AAA_PER_USER 00:03:07: Se0: AAA_PER_USER started 1/1/1 00:03:07: Se0: AAA_PER_USER in 0 s. 0/0/1 c. Turn off the debug function by typing undebug all at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. process 0 pid 4 LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 (0s.) queued 1/1/1 LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 (0s.) busy/0 LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 (0s.) busy/0 done

Step 9 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Brasilia


Brasilia#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Brasilia#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:01, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:04 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 7 packets input, 945 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 7 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 4 packets output, 362 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets
82 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 10 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Warsaw


Warsaw#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Warsaw#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:03, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:11 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 packets input, 386 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 5 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 8 packets output, 1228 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 11 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Ping the other router to verify that there is connectivity between the two routers. Brasilia#ping 192.168.15.2 Warsaw#ping 192.168.15.1 b. Can the serial interface on the Warsaw router be pinged from Brasilia? Yes c. Can the serial interface on the Brasilia router be pinged from Warsaw? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Brasilia#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms
83 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Brasilia# Warsaw#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms Warsaw# Warsaw# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

84 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Brasilia Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Brasilia Brasilia(config)#enable password cisco Brasilia(config)#enable secret class Brasilia(config)#line vty 0 4 Brasilia(config-line)#password cisco Brasilia(config-line)#login Brasilia(config-line)#line con 0 Brasilia(config-line)#password cisco Brasilia(config-line)#login Brasilia(config-line)#interface serial 0 Brasilia(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Brasilia(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Brasilia(config-if)#no shutdown Brasilia(config-if)#exit Brasilia(config)#exit Brasilia#copy running-config startup-config Warsaw Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Warsaw Warsaw(config)#enable password cisco Warsaw(config)#enable secret class Warsaw(config)#line vty 0 4 Warsaw(config-line)#password cisco Warsaw(config-line)#login Warsaw(config-line)#line console 0 Warsaw(config-line)#password cisco Warsaw(config-line)#login Warsaw(config-line)# Warsaw(config-line)# Warsaw(config-line)#interface serial 0 Warsaw(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Warsaw(config-if)#encapulation ppp Warsaw(config-if)#no shutdown Warsaw(config-if)#exit Warsaw(config)#exit Warsaw#copy running-config startup-config

85 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

86 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in IOS command to represent the interface.

87 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.5 Troubleshooting PPP Configuration Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure PPP on the serial interfaces of two routers. Use show and debug commands to troubleshoot connectivity issues.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

88 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Paris interface as shown


Configure the Paris router serial interface as follows: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the London interface as shown


Configure the London router serial interface as follows: London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#encapsulation ppp London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


London#copy running-config startup-config Paris#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on London
London#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. a. List the following information discovered from issuing this command. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. c. What type of problem is indicated in the last statement? Encapsulation d. Internet address is 192.168.15.1. e. Encapsulation PPP

89 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

London#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Listen Closed: IPCP, CDPCP Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:27 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 2 packets output, 28 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 2 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Paris
Paris#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. a. List the following information discovered from issuing this command. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.2.

d. Encapsulation HDLC e. To what OSI layer is the Encapsulation referring? Layer 2 f. If the Serial interface was configured, why did the show interface serial 0 output show that the interface is down? Clock rate is not set on the London DCE and the encapsulation is HDLC. Paris#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:04:02
90 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 19 packets output, 1230 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 14 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 7 Correct the clock location


The clock rate statement has been placed on the wrong interface. It is currently placed on the Paris router, but the London router is the Data Communications Equipment (DCE). Remove the clock rate statement from the Paris router using the no version of the command and then add it to the London routers configuration. London#configure terminal London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#exit

Step 8 Enter the command show cdp neighbors on London


a. Is there any output from the command? No b. Should there be output? No London#show cdp neighbors Capability Codes: R - Router, T - Trans Bridge, B - Source Route Bridge S - Switch, H - Host, I - IGMP, r - Repeater Device ID Local Intrfce Holdtme Capability Platform Port ID

Step 9 Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on London


a. It may take 60 seconds or more before output occurs. b. Is there output? Yes c. What is the output saying? Request Timeout d. Is there a problem with PPP encapsulation on the London router or the Paris router? Paris e. Why? PPP Encapsulation is not set f. What were the encapsulations listed for the interfaces? London? PPP Paris? HDLC

g. Is there an issue with the above statement? Yes h. What is the issue? The router encapsulations do not match each other. London# 00:07:48: Se0 LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent
91 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

00:07:48: 00:07:48: 00:07:50: 00:07:50: 00:07:50: 00:07:52: 00:07:52: 00:07:52: 00:07:54: 00:07:54: 00:07:54: 00:07:56: 00:07:56: 00:08:26: 00:08:26: 00:08:26: 00:08:28: 00:08:28:

Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0

LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP:

O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 77 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 78 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 79 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 80 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent State is Listen TIMEout: State Listen O CONFREQ [Listen] id 81 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BFAF37 (0x050609BFAF37) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 82 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BFAF37 (0x050609BFAF37)

00:08:28: Se0 LCP:

Step 10 Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on the Paris router
a. Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on the Paris router at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. Is there any output from the debug command? ? No Paris#debug ppp negotiation PPP protocol negotiation debugging is on

Step 11 Correct the encapsulation type


a. Convert the encapsulation to PPP on the Paris router. b. Is there any output from the debug command? Yes c. Does it confirm link establishment? Yes Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Paris(config-if)# 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Using default call direction 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Phase is ESTABLISHING, Active Open [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09F12828 (0x050609F12828) 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 101 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09C0E151 (0x050609C0E151) 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 101 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09C0E151 (0x050609C0E151) 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09F12828 (0x050609F12828) 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: State is Open 00:09:48: Se0 AUTH: Started process 0 pid 23 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Phase is UP [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.2 (0x0306C0A80F02) 00:09:48: Se0 CDPCP: O CONFREQ [eClosed] id 1 len 4 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 1 len 10
92 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48:

Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0

IPCP: Address 192.168.15.1 (0x0306C0A80F01) IPCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 1 len 10 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.1 (0x0306C0A80F01) CDPCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 1 len 4 CDPCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 1 len 4 IPCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 10 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.2 (0x0306C0A80F02) IPCP: State is Open CDPCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 4 CDPCP: State is Open

00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: Install route to 192.168.15.1nd

Step 12 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Paris


Paris#show interface serial 0 a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. b. Encapsulation PPP c. What is the difference in the Line and Protocol status recorded on Paris earlier? Why? Both are UP. Proper configuration of the serial interfaces Paris#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:00, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:19 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 10 packets input, 408 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 9 packets output, 388 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

93 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 13 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
London#ping 192.168.15.1 Paris#ping 192.168.15.2 a. From London, can the serial interface ping the Paris router? Yes b. From Paris, can the serial interface ping the London router? Yes c. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms London#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

94 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris Router#configure terminal Paris(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#line con 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config-line)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config London Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname London London(config)#enable password cisco London(config)#enable secret class London(config)#line vty 0 4 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#line console 0 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#exit London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#encapsulation ppp London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config

95 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

96 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

97 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.2.1 Configuring ISDN BRI (U-Interface) Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure an ISDN router to make a successful connection to a local ISDN switch.

Background/Preparation
This lab assumes that a router with an ISDN BRI U interface is available. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the ISDN switch and cloud. If an ISDN router is not available, review the lab and perform as many noninterface commands as possible. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

98 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

Step 2 Verifying the ISDN BRI switch type


a. Not all ISDN switch types are the same worldwide and the first step is to configure the following: The ISDN TE1 device The router What ISDN switch type is in use

This information will be provided by the ISDN telco provider. In this case, the ISDN Switch type, supported by the Adtran simulator, is National ISDN-1, North America. It is configured, on the router, using the keyword basic-ni. To check the ISDN BRI status, issue the following command before issuing any configuration commands: Ottawa#show isdn status b. What is the Layer 1 status? Deactivated c. What is the ISDN switch type? None Ottawa#show isdn status **** No Global ISDN Switchtype currently defined **** ISDN BRI0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = none Layer 1 Status: DEACTIVATED Layer 2 Status: Layer 2 NOT Activated Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x0 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 3 Specifying the switch type


a. To specify the ISDN switch type use the isdn switch-type command at the global configuration mode prompt. The different switch types available may be reviewed using the isdn switch-type ? command: Ottawa#configure terminal Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type ? Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type ? basic-1tr6 1TR6 switch type for Germany basic-5ess AT&T 5ESS switch type for the U.S. basic-dms100 Northern DMS-100 switch type basic-net3 NET3 switch type for UK and Europe basic-ni National ISDN switch type
99 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

basic-qsig basic-ts013 ntt vn3

QSIG switch type TS013 switch type for Australia NTT switch type for Japan VN3 and VN4 switch types for France

b. How many different switch types are available? 9 c. To configure the router to communicate with a National ISDN-1 switch type: Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni

Step 4 Verifying switch status


a. Check the state of the ISDN Interface again. Ottawa#show isdn status b. What is the Layer 1 status? Deactivated c. What is the ISDN switch type? basic-ni Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: DEACTIVATED Layer 2 Status: Layer 2 NOT Activated Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x0 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 5 Activate the BRI connection


Activate the ISDN BRI using the no shutdown command at the interface configuration prompt. Ottawa#configure terminal Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0 Ottawa(config-if)#no shutdown

Step 6 Review switch status


a. At this stage the ISDN BRI should be physically active and one TEI should have been negotiated. Ottawa#show isdn status a. What is the Layer 1 status? Active b. What is the ISDN switch type? basic-ni c. Has the Layer 2 status changed? Yes
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

100 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: ACTIVE Layer 2 Status: TEI = 64, Ces = 1, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x80000003 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 7 Configuring ISDN SPIDs


Depending on region, ISDN service profile identifiers (SPIDs) may have to be specified for the ISDN Switch to respond to the ISDN TE1 correctly. The SPIDs, supported by the Adtran simulator, are specified as isdn spid1 and isdn spid2. To configure the SPIDs issue the following commands: Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001

Step 8 Review switch status


a. Check the state of the ISDN Interface again: Ottawa#show isdn status b. What does the output specify about spid1? TEI 64, ces = 1, state = 8(established) spid1 configured, spid1 NOT sent, spid1 NOT valid c. What does the output specify about spid2? TEI Not Assigned, ces = 2, state = 1(terminal down) spid2 configured, spid2 NOT sent, spid2 NOT valid d. Careful examination of this output shows that the assigned SPID values have not been sent to the ISDN switch and verified. The reason for this is that they were specified after the ISDN interface was enabled. To send the SPID values the interface must be reset.

Step 9 Resetting the interface


a. To manually reset the ISDN BRI interface issue the command clear interface bri 0. This will cause all ISDN parameters to be renegotiated. Issue the clear command on the router and then check the ISDN interface status. SPID1 and SPID2 will now be sent and validated: Ottawa#clear interface bri 0 Ottawa#show isdn status

101 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Have SPID1 and SPID2 been sent and verified? Yes Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: ACTIVE Layer 2 Status: TEI = 64, Ces = 1, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED TEI = 65, Ces = 2, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED TEI 64, ces = 1, state = 5(init) spid1 configured, spid1 sent, spid1 valid Endpoint ID Info: epsf = 0, usid = 70, tid = 1 TEI 65, ces = 2, state = 5(init) spid2 configured, spid2 sent, spid2 valid Endpoint ID Info: epsf = 0, usid = 70, tid = 2 Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x80000003 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 1 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 10 Save the configuration and reboot


a. Save the configuration and reboot the router. This time, verify that the ISDN Interface has correctly negotiated with the ISDN switch. Review activity on the ISDN Interface using the show isdn active command: Ottawa#copy running-config startup-config Ottawa#reload Ottawa#show isdn active Ottawa#show isdn active ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ISDN ACTIVE CALLS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Call Calling Called Remote Seconds Seconds Seconds Charges Type Number Number Name Used Left Idle Units/Currency ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Out 6120 Ottawa 165 74 45 0 Note to instructor: This is sample output and may not be identical to that produced locally. b. The history table has a maximum of how many entries? History table has a maximum of 100 entries. c. History table data is retained for how long? History table data is retained for a maximum of 15 Minutes.
102 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

103 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router>enable Router#configure terminal Router(config)# Router(config)#hostname Ottawa Ottawa(config)#enable password cisco Ottawa(config)#enable secret class Ottawa(config)#line console 0 Ottawa(config-line)#password cisco Ottawa(config-line)#login Ottawa(config-line)#exit Ottawa(config)#line vty 0 4 Ottawa(config-line)#password cisco Ottawa(config-line)#login Ottawa(config-line)#exit Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Ottawa(config-if)#no shutdown Ottawa(config-if)#exit Ottawa(config)#exit Ottawa#copy running-config startup-config

104 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

105 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

106 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.3.2 Configuring Legacy DDR Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure an ISDN router to make a legacy dial-on-demand routing (DDR) call to another ISDN capable router. When the DDR connection is successfully made, augment the configuration to specify that only http traffic will bring up the link.

Background/Preparation
In this lab, 2 ISDN routers are required. If ISDN routers are not available, review the lab to become familiar with the process. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the switch/ISDN cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

107 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Define switch type and spid numbers


The switch type and spid numbers need to be specified on the routers. Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown

108 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Defining static routes for DDR


a. Use static and default routes instead of dynamic routing, in order to reduce the cost of the dialup connection. To configure a static route, the network address of the network to be reached must be known. The IP address of the next router on the path to this destination must be known as well. Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 b. Perform a show IP route to verify routes exist.

Step 4 Specifying interesting traffic for DDR


Specify the traffic that will cause the DDR interface to dialup the remote router. For the moment, declare that all IP traffic is interesting. This is done using the dialer-list command: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#end

Step 5 Configuring DDR dialer information


a. Configure the correct dialer information so that the dialer profile and dialer interface function correctly. This includes all of the following: IP address information PPP configuration Name Passwords Dial number

Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 b. Configure the PPP information: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

109 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Configure the dial information: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 120 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000

Step 6 Configuring DDR Dialer Information


Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 120 Moscow(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.1 name Tokyo 5551000

Step 7 Configure dialer information


a. The dial information must specify the remote name of the remote router in the dialer profile. It must also specify the dial string, or phone number, to use to contact the remote device. b. To configure the dial information on Tokyo, use the following: Tokyo(config)#interface Tokyo(config-if)#dialer Tokyo(config-if)#dialer Tokyo(config-if)#dialer c. dialer 1 remote-name Moscow string 5552000 string 5552001

To configure the dial information on Moscow, use the following: Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001

Step 8 Associate dialer profiles


a. To associate the dialer profiles with real dialer interfaces create a dialer pool putting the interfaces and the associated profiles in a common pool. b. On Tokyo, the commands syntax is as follows: Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1

110 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

On Moscow, the commands syntax is the following: Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1

Step 9 Configure dialer timeouts


a. Configure a dialer idle-timeout of 60 seconds for each of the dialer interfaces: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 b. Repeat these commands on Moscow.

Step 10 View the Tokyo router configuration


a. To view the configuration, use the show running-config command: Tokyo#show running-config b. What authentication is being used? CHAP c. What are the dialer strings on the Tokyo router? 5551000 and 5551001 Tokyo#show running-config Building configuration... Current configuration : 1069 bytes ! version 12.2 service timestamps debug uptime service timestamps log uptime no service password-encryption ! hostname tokyo ! enable secret 5 $1$aa79$uoSAji.3JcowvprK0RHnW. ! username moscow password 0 class memory-size iomem 15 ip subnet-zero ! ! isdn switch-type basic-ni call rsvp-sync ! interface fastethernet0 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 speed auto duplex auto interface Serial0 no ip address shutdown no fair-queue !
111 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

interface BRI0 ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp ppp authentication chap dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000 dialer-group 1 isdn switch-type basic-ni isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 interface Serial1 no ip address shutdown ! interface Dialer0 no ip address dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Moscow dialer string 5552000 dialer string 5552001 no cdp enable ! ip classless ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 ip http server ! dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit ! dial-peer cor custom ! line con 0 password cisco login line aux 0 line vty 0 4 password cisco login ! end

Step 11 Verifying the DDR Configuration


a. Now, generate some interesting traffic across the DDR link from both remote routers, Moscow and Tokyo, to verify that connections are made correctly and the dialer profiles are functioning: Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If not troubleshoot the router configuration. Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: 01:51:35: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0:1, changed state to up..
112 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

01:51:38: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0:1, changed stat e to up 01:51:167503724608: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0:2, changed state to up.!! Success rate is 40 percent (2/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/32 ms tokyo# 01:51:40: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0:2, changed stat e to up 01:51:41: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0:1 is now connected to 5552000 moscow 01:51:45: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0:2 is now connected to Moscow

Note: If the Moscow router is pinged again quickly before the dialer idle timeout (60 seconds) is reached the ISDN connection does not have to be dialed again and all 5 pings reach the destination quickly. Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms tokyo# d. Use the show dialer command to show us the reason for the call. This information is shown for each channel. Tokyo#show dialer e. Which dialer strings are associated with Dialer1? 5552000 and 5552001 f. What is the last status for dial string 5552000 in the Dialer0 readout? Tokyo#show dialer BRI0 - dialer type = ISDN Dial String Successes 5552000 2 Failures 0 Last DNIS 00:29:16 Last status successful

0 incoming call(s) have been screened. 0 incoming call(s) rejected for callback. BRI0:1 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle BRI0:2 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Di0 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

113 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Number of active calls = 0 Dial String 5552000 5552001 Successes 0 0 Failures 0 0 Last DNIS never never Last status Default Default

g. Use the show interface command and note that the output shows that the interface is spoofing. This provides a mechanism for the interface to simulate an active state for internal processes, such as routing, on the router. The show interface command can also be used to display information about the B channel: Tokyo#show interface bri 0 Tokyo#show interface bri 0 BRI0 is up, line protocol is up (spoofing) Hardware is PQUICC BRI with U interface Internet address is 192.168.3.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Last input 00:00:00, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:46:37 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/16 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 48 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 1140 packets input, 4672 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 1138 packets output, 4658 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 4 carrier transitions Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

114 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Moscow Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1 Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Moscow(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.1 name Tokyo 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001
115 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#exit Moscow#copy running-config startup-config

116 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

117 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

118 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.3.7 Configuring Dialer Profiles Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure ISDN Dialer Profiles on the routers enabling a dial-on-demand routing (DDR) call to be made from two remote routers simultaneously into a central ISDN BRI router.

Background/Preparation
In this lab, 3 ISDN routers are required. If ISDN routers are not available, review the lab to become familiar with the process. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the switch/ISDN cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

119 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the router


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Define switch type and spid numbers


To configure the switch type and spid numbers use the following commands. Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Sydney Sydney(config)#enable secret class Sydney(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Sydney(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055530000001 5553000 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055530010001 5553001 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown
120 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Defining static routes for DDR


Use static and default routes instead of dynamic routing, in order to reduce the cost of the dialup connection. To configure a static route, the network address of the network that is going to be reached must be known. The IP address of the next router on the path to this destination must be known as well. Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.253.1 Sydney#configure terminal Sydney(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.254.1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2

Step 4 Specifying interesting traffic for DDR


Traffic must be defined as interesting to cause the DDR interface to dialup the remote router. For the moment, declare that all IP traffic is interesting using the dialer-list command. Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Sydney(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Moscow router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Sydney router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1

Step 5 Configuring DDR dialer information


Configure the correct dialer information so that the dialer profile and dialer interface function correctly. This includes all of the following: IP address information PPP configuration Name Passwords Dial number

121 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#username Sydney password class Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.2 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#username Tokyo password class

Step 6 Configure dialer information


a. Next, the dial information must be configured to specify the remote name of the remote router in the Dialer Profile. The dial string, or phone number to use to contact this remote device must also be specified. Use the following commands to do this: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Sydney Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553001

122 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. To configure the dial information on Moscow, use the following: Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001 c. To configure the dial information on Sydney, use the following: Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551001

Step 7 Associate dialer profiles


a. Finally, associate the Dialer Profiles with the Dialer Interfaces that will be used, when needed. Create a Dialer Pool, and put the interfaces and the associated Dialer Profiles in a common pool. The commands for doing this are as follows: Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 b. On Moscow, the commands issued would be as follows: Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 c. Use the same commands to configure the Sydney router.

Step 8 Configure dialer timeouts


a. Configure a dialer idle-timeout of 60 seconds for each of the dialer interfaces: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 b. Repeat these commands on Moscow and Sydney.

123 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 9 View the Tokyo router configuration


a. To view the configuration, use the show running-config command: Tokyo#show running-config b. How many username statements are there? 2 c. What authentication type is being used for PPP? CHAP d. Which sections of the configuration list the authentication type? Interface Dialer e. What are the dialer strings on the Tokyo router? interface Dialer1 dialer string dialer string interface Dialer2 dialer string dialer string 5552000 5552001 5553000 5553001

Tokyo# Tokyo#show running-config Building configuration... Current configuration : 1535 bytes ! version 12.2 service timestamps debug uptime service timestamps log uptime no service password-encryption ! hostname "Tokyo" ! enable secret 5 $1$.Tf2$ph3oCXloaQGXpguejZTIJ0 ! username Moscow password 0 class username Sydney password 0 class ip subnet-zero ! ! ! isdn switch-type basic-ni ! ! ! interface FastEthernet0 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 duplex auto speed auto ! interface Serial0 no ip address shutdown no fair-queue ! interface BRI0 no ip address encapsulation ppp dialer pool-member 1
124 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

isdn switch-type basic-ni isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 ppp authentication chap ! interface FastEthernet1 no ip address shutdown duplex auto speed auto ! interface Serial1 no ip address shutdown ! interface Dialer1 description The Profile for the Moscow router ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Moscow dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer string 5552000 dialer string 5552001 dialer-group 1 ppp authentication chap ! interface Dialer2 description The Profile for the Sydney router ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Sydney dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer string 5553000 dialer string 5553001 dialer-group 1 ppp authentication chap ! ip classless ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2 ip http server ! dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit ! line con 0 password cisco login line aux 0 line vty 0 4 password cisco login ! end

125 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 10 Verifying the DDR Configuration


a. Now, generate some interesting traffic across the DDR link from Moscow and Sydney to verify that connections are made correctly and the dialer profiles are functioning: Moscow#ping 192.168.1.1 b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If not troubleshoot the router configurations. 00:25:01: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0:1, changed state to up 00:25:01: %DIALER-6-BIND: Interface BRI0:1 bound to profile Di0 00:25:04: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0:1, changed state to up Sydney#ping 192.168.1.1
e.

d. What other information was displayed when the ping was issued?

Were the pings successful? Yes Sydney#ping 192.168.1.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms Sydney# 00:32:32: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0:1 is now connected to 5551000 Tokyo

f.

If the pings were not successful troubleshoot the router configurations.

g. Use the show dialer command to see the reason for the call. This information is shown for each channel: Tokyo#show dialer h. Which dialer strings are associated with Dialer1555-2000, 555-2001 i. What is the last status for dial string 5553000 in the Dialer2 readout? None Tokyo#show dialer BRI0 - dialer type = ISDN Dial String Successes Failures Last DNIS 0 incoming call(s) have been screened. 0 incoming call(s) rejected for callback. BRI0:1 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (120 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle BRI0:2 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (120 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle
126 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Last status

Di1 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Number of active calls = 0

Dial String 5552000 5552001

Successes 0 0

Failures 0 0

Last DNIS never never

Last status

Default Default

Di2 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Number of active calls = 0 Dial String 5553000 5553001 Tokyo# j. Successes 0 0 Failures 0 0 Last DNIS never never Last status Default Default

Use the show interface command and note that the output shows that the interface is spoofing. This provides a mechanism for the interface to simulate an active state for internal processes, such as routing, on the router. The show interface command can also be used to display information about the B channel: Tokyo#show interface bri 0 Tokyo#show interface bri 0 BRI0 is up, line protocol is up (spoofing) Hardware is PQUICC BRI with U interface MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Last input 00:00:01, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:28:42 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/16 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 48 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 365 packets input, 1549 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 362 packets output, 1522 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 8 carrier transitions

127 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

128 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config-if)#ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2 Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Moscow router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Sydney router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#username Sydney password class Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Sydney Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553001 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#exit
129 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Moscow Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config-if)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.253.1 Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#exit Moscow#copy running-config startup-config Sydney Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Sydney Sydney(config)#enable secret class Sydney(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Sydney(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055530000001 5553000 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055530010001 5553001
130 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config-if)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.254.1 Sydney(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.2 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#username Tokyo password class Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551001 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#exit Sydney#copy running-config startup-config

131 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

132 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

133 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.1 Configuring Frame Relay Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure a router to establish a connection to a local Frame Relay switch/cloud.

Background/Preparation
An Adtran Atlas550 Frame Relay emulator is used to simulate the Frame Relay switch/cloud. The Cork Wholesale Food Company has just had a Frame Relay circuit installed to its local central office (CO) by the telco carrier. The network administrator must confirm that the router and Frame Relay switch are able to successfully communicate. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

134 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configuring the serial interface


a. In Frame Relay, the customer router is considered the DTE device. In order to configure the serial interface, the Layer 2 Frame Relay frame type must be defined. To configure the frame type, use the following commands: Cork#configure terminal Cork(config)#interface serial 0 Cork(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf b. Next the format of the Frame Relay management protocol must be configured. To configure the Local Management Interface (LMI) type, use the following commands: Cork(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Cork(config-if)#no shutdown Cork(config-if)#end

Step 3 Verifying the Frame Relay configuration


a. To verify the configuration, use the show interface commands, related to Frame Relay. To view the serial interface configuration use the following command: Cork#show interface serial 0 b. What is the state of the interface? Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. c. What is the encapsulation type? frame-relay ietf d. What state is the DTE LMI in? Up

e. What is the LMI type? LMI type is ANSI Annex D


Cork#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation FRAME-RELAY IETF, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LMI enq sent 7, LMI stat recvd 7, LMI upd recvd 0, DTE LMI up LMI enq recvd 0, LMI stat sent 0, LMI upd sent 0 LMI DLCI 0 LMI type is ANSI Annex D frame relay DTE Broadcast queue 0/64, broadcasts sent/dropped 0/0, interface broadcasts 0 Last input 00:00:04, output 00:00:04, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:34 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
135 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue: 0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 7 packets input, 128 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 7 packets output, 98 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 4 Reviewing switch assignments


a. To verify that the data-link connection identifiers (DLCIs) are defined on the switch use show frame-relay pvc. The DLCIs are learned by the router via LMI, and can be viewed with the following command: Cork#show frame-relay pvc b. What DLCI numbers are available on the switch? 102, 103, 104 c. What is the PVC status of the first DLCI? Inactive Cork#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 0 0 0 Inactive 0 0 3 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 0 0 0

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 0 output pkts 0 in bytes 0 out bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:30, last time pvc status changed 00:02:30 DLCI = 103, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 0 out bytes 0 out pkts dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0
136 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

output pkts 0 in bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:31, last time pvc status changed 00:02:31 DLCI = 104, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 0 output pkts 0 in bytes 0 out bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:32, last time pvc status changed 00:02:32

Step 5 Check the Frame Relay map


Cork#show frame-relay map This output shows that none of the DLCIs, defined on the switch, are in use. The permanent virtual circuit (PVC) is inactive and there is no current mapping between the Layer 2 DLCI and Layer 3 IP address as seen in the show frame-relay map command. No output since there is no mapping between DCLI and IP. Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

137 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Cork Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Cork Cork(config)#enable password cisco Cork(config)#enable secret class Cork(config)#line con 0 Cork(config-line)#password cisco Cork(config-line)#login Cork(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Cork(config-line)#password cisco Cork(config-line)#login Cork(config-line)#exit Cork(config)#exit Cork#copy running-config startup-config Cork Frame Relay Configuration Cork#configure terminal Cork(config)#interface serial 0 Cork(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Cork(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Cork(config-if)#no shutdown Cork(config-if)#exit Cork(config)#exit Cork#copy running-config startup-config

138 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

139 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

140 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.2 Configuring Frame Relay PVC Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure two routers back-to-back as a Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC). This will be done manually, in the absence of a Frame Relay switch, and therefore there will be no Local Management Interface (LMI).

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

141 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The Fast Ethernet interface

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configuring the Washington serial interface


First, define the Frame Relay frame type to be used on this link. To configure the encapsulation type, use the command encapsulation frame-relay ietf. Disable keepalive messages since there is no Frame Relay switch in this configuration and consequently no Frame Relay DCE: Washington#configure terminal Washington(config-if)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Washington(config-if)#no keepalive Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown

Step 3 Configure the Frame Relay map on Washington


a. When sending an Ethernet frame to a remote IP address, the remote MAC address must be discovered, so that the correct frame type can be constructed. Frame Relay needs a similar mapping. b. The remote IP address needs to be mapped to the local DLCI (Layer 2 address), so the correctly addressed frame can be created locally for this PVC. Since there is no way of mapping the DLCI automatically with LMI disabled, this map must be created manually, using the frame-relay map command. The broadcast parameter also allows for IP broadcasts to use the same mapping for crossing this PVC: Washington(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.2 201 ietf broadcast

Step 4 Configure the DCE on Washington


In this configuration, when DCE cables are used, a clock signal is necessary. The bandwidth command is optional, but wise to use to verify bandwidth transmission. Another option is to title the connection using the description command. It is very useful to record information in the description about the PVC, such as remote contact person and the leased line circuit identifier: Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Washington(config-if)#description PVC to Dublin, DLCI 201, Circuit #DASS465875, Contact John Tobin (061-8886745)

142 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 5 Configure Dublin router


Configure the Dublin router using the following commands. Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config-if)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Dublin(config-if)#no keepalive Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.1 201 ietf broadcast Dublin(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Dublin(config-if)#description PVC to Washington, DLCI 201, Circuit #DASS465866 Contact Pat White (091-6543211)

Step 6 Verifying Frame Relay PVC


a. On the Washington router, type the command show frame-relay pvc: Washington#show frame-relay pvc b. What is the DLCI number reported? 102 c. What is the PVC status? Static Washington#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 0 0 0 Inactive 0 0 0 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 1 0 0 d. What is the value of the DLCI USAGE? Local

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = STATIC, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 5 output pkts 5 in bytes 520 out bytes 520 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 pvc create time 00:07:26, last time pvc status changed 00:03:18

Step 7 Showing Frame Relay map


a. To view the Layer 2 to Layer 3 mapping, use the show frame-relay map command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Washington#show frame-relay map b. What is the IP address shown? 192.168.1.2

c. What state is interface serial 0 in? UP


143 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington#show frame-relay map Serial0 (up): ip 192.168.1.2 dlci 102(0x66,0x1860), static, broadcast, IETF

Step 8 Verify Frame Relay connectivity


a. From the Washington router, ping the Dublin router serial interface. b. Was the ping successful? Yes c. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the router configurations. Washington#ping 192.168.1.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/32 ms Washington# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

144 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Washington Washington(config)#enable password cisco Washington(config)#enable secret class Washington(config)#line con 0 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#interface fastethernet 0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Washington Frame Relay Configuration Washington#configure terminal Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Washington(config-if)#no keepalive Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.2 102 ietf broadcast Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Washington(config-if)#description PVC to Dublin, DLCI 102, Circuit #DASS465875, Contact John Tobin (061-8886745) Washington(config-if)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Dublin Dublin(config)#enable password cisco Dublin(config)#enable secret class Dublin(config)#line console 0 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#interface fastethernet 0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

145 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Dublin Frame Relay Configuration Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Dublin(config-if)#no keepalive Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.1 102 ietf broadcast Dublin(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Dublin(config-if)#$description PVC to Washington, DLCI 102,Circuit #DASS465866 Contact Pat White (091-6543211) Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

146 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

147 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

148 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.5 Configuring Frame Relay Subinterfaces Instructor Version 1700

Objective
Configure three routers in a full-mesh Frame Relay network.

Background/Preparation
An Adtran Atlas550 Frame Relay emulator is used to simulate the Frame Relay switch/cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise.
149 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The Fast Ethernet interface according to the chart

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Serial 0 Interfaces


a. First, the Frame Relay encapsulation type to be used on this link must be defined using the following commands: Amsterdam#configure terminal Amsterdam(config)#interface serial 0 Amsterdam(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi b. Use a description field to store relevant information, such as the circuit number in case a line fault has to be reported: Amsterdam(config-if)#description Circuit #KPN465555 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown c. The same commands are used to configure the Berlin and Paris routers: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Paris(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Paris(config-if)#description Circuit #FRT372826 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Berlin(config)#interface serial 0 Berlin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Berlin(config-if)#description Circuit #DTK465866 Berlin(config-if)#no shutdown

150 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Create subinterfaces on the Amsterdam router


For each of the permanent virtual circuits (PVCs), create a subinterface on the serial port. This subinterface will be a point-to-point configuration. For consistency and future troubleshooting, use the data-link connection identifier (DLCI) number as the subinterface number. The commands to create a subinterface are as follows: Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0.102 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-if)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 102, Contact Rick Voight(+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 102 Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0.103 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-if)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 103, Contact P Wills(+49- 61 03 / 7 65 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 103

Step 4 Create subinterfaces on the Paris router


To configure the subinterfaces on the Paris router, use the following commands: Paris(config-if)#interface Serial 0.201 point-to-point Paris(config-if)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 201, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.4.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 201 Paris(config-if)#interface Serial 0.203 point-to-point Paris(config-if)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 203, Contact Peter Willis (+49- 61 03 / 7 66 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 203

Step 5 Create subinterfaces on the Berlin router


To configure the subinterfaces on the Berlin router, use the following commands: Berlin(config-if)#interface Serial 0.301 point-to-point Berlin(config-if)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 301, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.5.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 301 Berlin(config-if)#interface Serial 0.302 point-to-point Berlin(config-if)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 302, Contact Rick Voight (+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.6.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 302

151 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Configure IGRP routing


To configure the routing protocol Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) 100, use the following configuration syntax: Amsterdam(config-if)#router igrp Amsterdam(config-router)#network Amsterdam(config-router)#network Amsterdam(config-router)#network Paris(config-if)#router igrp Paris(config-router)#network Paris(config-router)#network Paris(config-router)#network 100 192.168.1.0 192.168.4.0 192.168.5.0

100 192.168.2.0 192.168.4.0 192.168.6.0 100 192.168.3.0 192.168.5.0 192.168.6.0

Berlin(config-if)#router igrp Berlin(config-router)#network Berlin(config-router)#network Berlin(config-router)#network

Note to instructor: The user should be in the global configuration mode when issuing the router igrp 100 command. In the online curricuclum, the prompt shows the interface mode, which is incorrect.

Step 7 Verifying Frame Relay PVC


a. On the Amsterdam router, issue the command show frame-relay pvc: Amsterdam#show frame-relay pvc b. How many active local PVCs are there? 2 c. What is the interface value? Serial0.102, Serial0.103 d. What is the PVC status? Active e. Which DLCI # is inactive? 104 f. From this it can be seen that there are three DLCIs defined on this Frame Relay circuit, and only two of them are in use. This is the way the Adtran 550 emulator has been configured. It is useful output, as it shows what would be seen if a DLCI is defined on the Frame Relay switch, but not configured on the router. The other DLCIs, 102 and 103, are ACTIVE and associated with their respective subinterfaces. It also shows that some packets have actually passed across the PVC. Amsterdam#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 2 0 0 Inactive 1 0 0 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 0 0 0

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = ACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0.102 input pkts 13 out bytes 2254 out pkts dropped 0
152 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

output pkts 14 in bytes 2180 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 14 out bcast bytes 2254 pvc create time 00:14:27, last time pvc status changed 00:02:59 DLCI = 103, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = ACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0.103 input pkts 16 output pkts 14 in bytes 2258 out bytes 2307 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 9 out bcast bytes 1787 pvc create time 00:14:29, last time pvc status changed 00:02:02 DLCI = 104, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 0 output pkts 0 in bytes 0 out bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 pvc create time 00:14:30, last time pvc status changed 00:06:13

Step 8 Show the Frame Relay maps


a. Look at the frame relay maps by typing the command show frame-relay map at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Amsterdam#show frame-relay map b. What is the status of the links? Up c. The DLCIs are defined as what type? Point-to-Point Amsterdam#show frame-relay map Serial0.103 (up): point-to-point dlci, dlci 103(0x67,0x1870), broadcast status defined, active Serial0.102 (up): point-to-point dlci, dlci 102(0x66,0x1860), broadcast status defined, active d. Are the DLCIs the same on the Paris router? No

Step 9 Show LMIs


a. Look at the Local Management Interface (LMI) statistics using the show frame-relay lmi command: Amsterdam#show frame-relay lmi b. Which fields have non-zero counter values? Num Status Enq. Sent, Num Status msgs Rcvd c. What is the LMI type? ANSI Amsterdam#show frame-relay lmi LMI Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DTE) LMI TYPE = ANSI
153 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Invalid Unnumbered info 0 Invalid dummy Call Ref 0 Invalid Status Message 0 Invalid Information ID 0 Invalid Report Request 0 Num Status Enq. Sent 55 Num Update Status Rcvd 0

Invalid Prot Disc 0 Invalid Msg Type 0 Invalid Lock Shift 0 Invalid Report IE Len 0 Invalid Keep IE Len 0 Num Status msgs Rcvd 56 Num Status Timeouts 0

Step 10 Check routing protocol


a. Use the show ip route command to verify that the PVCs are up and active: Amsterdam#show ip route b. Is the routing protocol working? Yes c. If not, troubleshoot the routers configurations.

List the IGRP routes


I I I 192.168.6.0/24 [100/10476] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0.102 [100/10476] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0.103 192.168.2.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0.102 192.168.3.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0.103

Amsterdam#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set C C I C I I 192.168.4.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0.102 192.168.5.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0.103 192.168.6.0/24 [100/10476] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0.102 [100/10476] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0.103 192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0 192.168.2.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0.102 192.168.3.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0.103

Step 11 Verify connectivity


a. Ping the fastethernet interfaces. b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If the pings were not successful, troubleshoot the router configurations and repeat this step. Amsterdam#ping 192.168.1.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/4 ms Amsterdam#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort.
154 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 36/39/40 ms Amsterdam#ping 192.168.3.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.3.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 40/40/40 ms Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

155 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Amsterdam Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Amsterdam Amsterdam(config)#enable password cisco Amsterdam(config)#enable secret class Amsterdam(config)#line con 0 Amsterdam(config-line)#password cisco Amsterdam(config-line)#login Amsterdam(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Amsterdam(config-line)#password cisco Amsterdam(config-line)#login Amsterdam(config-line)#interface fastethernet 0 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown Amsterdam(config-if)#exit Amsterdam(config)#exit Amsterdam#copy running-config startup-config Amsterdam Frame Relay and IGRP Configuration Amsterdam#configure terminal Amsterdam(config)#interface serial 0 Amsterdam(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Amsterdam(config-if)#description Circuit #KPN465555 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0.102 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-subif)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 102, contact Rick Voight(+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Amsterdam(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 102 Amsterdam(config-fr-dlci)#interface serial 0.103 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-subif)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 103, Contact P Wills (+49- 61 03 / 7 65 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Amsterdam(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 103 Amsterdam(config-fr-dlci)#router igrp 100 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.4.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.5.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#exit Amsterdam(config)#exit Amsterdam#copy running-config startup-config Paris Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line con 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#interface fastethernet 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit
156 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config

Paris Frame Relay and IGRP Configuration Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Paris(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Paris(config-if)#description Circuit #FRT372826 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#interface Serial 0.201 point-to-point Paris(config-subif)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 201, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Paris(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.4.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 201 Paris(config-fr-dlci)#interface Serial 0.203 point-to-point Paris(config-subif)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 203, Contact Peter Willis (+49- 61 03 / 7 66 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Paris(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 203 Paris(config-fr-dlci)#router igrp 100 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.2.0 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.4.0 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.6.0 Paris(config-router)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config Berlin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Berlin Berlin(config)#enable password cisco Berlin(config)#enable secret class Berlin(config)#line con 0 Berlin(config-line)#password cisco Berlin(config-line)#login Berlin(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Berlin(config-line)#password cisco Berlin(config-line)#login Berlin(config-line)#interface fastethernet 0 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#no shutdown Berlin(config-if)#exit Berlin(config)#exit Berlin#copy running-config startup-config Berlin Frame Relay and IGRP Configuration Berlin#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Berlin(config)#interface serial 0 Berlin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Berlin(config-if)#description Circuit #DTK465866 Berlin(config-if)#no shutdown Berlin(config-if)#interface Serial 0.301 point-to-point
157 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Berlin(config-subif)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 301, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Berlin(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.5.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 301 Berlin(config-fr-dlci)#interface Serial 0.302 point-to-point Berlin(config-subif)#$ description PVC to Paris, DLCI 302, Contact Rick Voight (+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Berlin(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.6.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 302 Berlin(config-subif)#exit Berlin(config-if)#exit Berlin(config)#router igrp 100 Berlin(config-router)#network 192.168.3.0 Berlin(config-router)#network 192.168.5.0 Berlin(config-router)#network 192.168.6.0 Berlin(config-router)#exit Berlin(config)#exit Berlin#copy running-config startup-config

158 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

159 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

160 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a router to use network address translation (NAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into outside public addresses.

Background/Preparation
An ISP has allocated a company the public classless interdomain routing (CIDR) IP address 199.99.9.32/27. This is equivalent to 30 public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to implement NAT. The addresses 199.99.9.33 199.99.9.39 for static allocation and 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 for dynamic allocation. Routing will be done between the ISP and the gateway router used by the company. A static route will be used between the ISP and gateway routers and a default route will be used between the gateway router and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

161 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to the configuration reference sheet at the end of this lab for help.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Ping again until they are both successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/27 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route. ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

162 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

a. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? Interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. From the Gateway router to the ISP router, create a static route to network 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0, using the ip route command. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP by setting a Gateway of Last Resort on the Gateway router. Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. a. Was the ping successful? No b. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, Ethernet0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command:
163 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. Configure one of the PCs on the LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway address of 10.10.10.1. From the PC, ping 172.16.1.1. If successful, look at the NAT translation on the Gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. Gateway#show ip nat trans Pro Inside global Inside local --- 199.99.9.40 10.10.10.10 10.10.10.10 = 199.99.9.40 c. The inside global address is assigned by? The router from the nat pool d. The inside local address is assigned by? The administrator for the workstation Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter Outside local --Outside global ---

b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses?

164 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter] Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

165 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway NAT configuration Gateway#configure terminal Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224 Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access Gateway(config)#interface e0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#exit

166 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

167 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

168 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.4b Configuring PAT Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a router to use Port Address Translation (PAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into an outside public address.

Background/Preparation
Aidan McDonald has just received a DSL line Internet connection to a local ISP in his home. The ISP has allocated only one IP address to be used on the serial port of his remote access device. Thus all PCs on Aidans LAN, each with its own private IP address, will share one public IP address on the router using PAT. Routing from the home or gateway router to the ISP will be done by using a default route to Serial 0 of the Gateway router. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

169 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in this lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a default route


a. Add a default route to the serial 0 interface of the gateway router. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP. Use the ip route command to create the default route: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 serial 0 b. Is the route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network

170 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

f.

What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, Ethernet0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

Step 6 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 7 Define the PAT translation from inside list to outside address
To define the PAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command. This command, with the overload option, will create port address translation using the serial 0 IP address as the base: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 interface serial 0 overload

Step 8 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to PAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 9 Testing the configuration


a. Configure a PC on the internal LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway 10.10.10.1. From the PCs, ping the Internet address 172.16.1.1. If successful, Telnet to the same IP address. Then look at the PAT translation on the gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. Gateway#show ip nat trans Pro Inside global Inside local tcp 200.2.2.18:1086 10.10.10.10:1086 icmp 200.2.2.18:768 10.10.10.10:768 Outside local 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:768 Outside global 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:768

171 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses? 10.10.10.10:1086 or 10.10.10.10:768 (Answers will vary) c. What does the number after the colon represent? The port NAT used. d. Why do all of the commands for PAT say NAT? PAT is an extension of NAT. Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

172 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

173 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway PAT configuration Gateway#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 interface serial 0 overload Gateway(config)#interface e0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#exit Gateway#copy running-config startup-config

174 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

175 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

176 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.4c Configuring Static NAT Addresses Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a router to use network address translation (NAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into outside public addresses. Configure static IP mapping to allow outside access to an internal PC.

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public classless interdomain routing (CIDR) IP address 199.99.9.32/27. This is equivalent to 30 public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT. Addresses 199.99.9.33 199.99.9.39 will be reserved for static allocation and 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 for dynamic allocation. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router will be done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

177 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in this lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to the configuration reference sheet at the end of this lab for help.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/27 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 b. Is the route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route

178 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route from the Gateway router to the ISP router using the ip route command. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 a. Is the route in the routing table? Yes b. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. c. Was the ping successful? No Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, Ethernet0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17 d. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network

179 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public_access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public_access

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be identified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command. Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 11 Configuring Static Mapping


d. Workstation #1, 10.10.10.10/24, will be designated as the public WWW server. Thus, it needs a permanent public IP address. This mapping is defined using a static NAT mapping. e. Configure one of the PCs on the LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway address of 10.10.10.1. To configure a static IP NAT mapping, use the ip nat inside source static command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source static 10.10.10.10 199.99.9.33 This permanently maps 199.99.9.33 to the inside address 10.10.10.10. f. Look at the translation table: Gateway#show ip nat translations Does the mapping appear in the output of the show command? Yes

Step 12 Testing the configuration


a. From the 10.10.10.10 workstation, verify it can ping 172.16.1.1 b. Is the ping successful? Yes

180 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c. e. f.

Why? NAT properly setup What were the results of the ping, was it successful? No Why? No route to 10.10.10.10 ISP#ping 10.10.10.10 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.10.10.10, timeout is 2 seconds: ..... Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)

d. From the ISP router, ping the host with the static NAT translation by typing ping 10.10.10.10.

g.

From the ISP router, ping 199.99.9.33. If successful, look at the NAT translation on the Gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. ISP#ping 199.99.9.33 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 199.99.9.33, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms ISP# Gateway#show ip nat translations Pro Inside global Inside local --- 199.99.9.33 10.10.10.10 10.10.10.10 = 199.99.9.33 Outside local --Outside global ---

h. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses?

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

181 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

182 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway NAT Configuration Gateway#configure terminal Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public_access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224 Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public_access Gateway(config)#interface e0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source static 10.10.10.10 199.99.9.33 Gateway(config)#exit Gateway#copy running-config startup-config

183 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

184 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

185 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.5 Verifying NAT and PAT Configuration Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a router for Network Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address Translation (PAT) Test the configuration and verify NAT/PAT statistics

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public CIDR IP address 199.99.9.32/30. This is equivalent to four public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT with PAT. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router is done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

186 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/30 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route. ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route

187 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? interface down

ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route from the Gateway router to the ISP router using the ip route command. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No route back

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

188 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be identified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. From the workstations, ping 172.16.1.1. Open multiple DOS windows on each workstation and Telnet to the 172.16.1.1 address. Next, view the NAT translations on the Gateway router, with the command show ip nat translations. b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses? 10.10.10.10:512 = 199.99.9.33:512 Gateway#show ip nat trans Pro Inside global Inside local tcp 199.99.9.33:1091 10.10.10.10:1091 tcp 199.99.9.33:1092 10.10.10.10:1092 icmp 199.99.9.33:512 10.10.10.10:512 Outside local 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:512 Outside global 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:512

Step 12 Verify NAT and PAT Statistics


a. To view the NAT and PAT statistics type the show ip nat statistics command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. How many active translations have taken place? 2 c. How many addresses are in the pool? 4 Gateway#show ip nat statistics Total active translations: 2 (0 static, 2 dynamic; 2 extended) Outside interfaces: Serial0 Inside interfaces: Ethernet0 Hits: 14 Misses: 4 Expired translations: 0 Dynamic mappings: -- Inside Source [Id: 1] access-list 1 pool public_access refcount 2 pool public_access: netmask 255.255.255.252 start 199.99.9.32 end 199.99.9.35 type generic, total addresses 4, allocated 1 (25%), misses 0 d. How many addresses have been allocated so far? 1

189 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

190 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

191 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway NAT Configuration Gateway#configure terminal Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload Gateway(config)#interface e0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#exit Gateway#copy running-config startup-config

192 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

193 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

194 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.6 Troubleshooting NAT and PAT Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a router for Network Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address Translation (PAT) Troubleshoot NAT and PAT using debug

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public CIDR IP address 199.99.9.32/30. This is equivalent to four public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT with PAT. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router is done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

195 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/30 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route interface down d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so?

196 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route, using the ip route command, from the Gateway router to the ISP router. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, Ethernet0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252
197 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


On the active interfaces on the router, it needs to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. Turn on debugging for the NAT process by typing debug ip nat at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. Does the debug command show any output? No c. If translation were taking place there would be output from the debug command. While reviewing the running configuration of the gateway router, it is seen that the ip nat outside statement has not been entered on the serial 0 interface. To configure this enter the following: Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside From the workstations, ping 172.16.1.1 If the ip nat outside statement was entered correctly there should be output from the debug ip nat command. d. What does the NAT*: S=10.10.10.? -> 199.99.9.33 mean? Source and destination hosts e. To stop the debug output, type undebug all at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. Gateway#debug ip nat IP NAT debugging is on Gateway#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)# 00:07:53: ip_ifnat_modified: old_if 2, new_if 1 00:08:04: NAT: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11391] 00:08:04: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11391]
198 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

00:08:05: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11392] 00:08:05: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11392] 00:08:06: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11393] 00:08:06: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11393] 00:08:07: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11394] 00:08:07: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11394] Gateway(config-if)# Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway#undebug all 00:08:50: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console all All possible debugging has been turned off Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

199 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter] Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

200 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

201 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

202 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.2.6 Configuring DHCP Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a router for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to dynamically assign addresses to attached hosts.

Background/Preparation
Routing between the ISP and the campus router uses a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet is identified by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721

203 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Create a static route


a. Addresses 172.16.12.0/24 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: ISP(config)#ip route 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.1.6 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes ISP#show ip route 00:02:08: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by consoleute Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 [1/0] via 172.16.1.6 172.16.13.0/24 is directly connected, Loopback0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0

Step 4 Create a default route


a. Use the ip route command to add a default route from the campus router to the ISP router. This will provide the mechanism to forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: campus(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.5
204 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes campus#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 172.16.1.5 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 is directly connected, Ethernet0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 172.16.1.5

Step 5 Create the DHCP address pool


To configure the campus LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.1.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.1.10

Step 6 Excluding addresses from pool


To exclude addresses from the pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.11

205 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Verifying DHCP Operation

a. At each workstation on the directly connected subnet configure the TCP/IP properties so the workstation will obtain an IP address and Domain Name System (DNS) server address from the DHCP server. After changing and saving the configuration, reboot the workstation. b. To confirm the TCP/IP configuration information on each host use Start > Run > winipcfg /all. If running Windows 2000, check using ipconfig /all in a DOS window. c. What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 172.16.12.11 domain name, dns, netbios, subnet mask, gateway e. When was the lease obtained? 10:00 AM 4/28/03 f. When will the lease expire? 10:00 AM 4/29/03 d. What other information was automatically assigned?

206 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 8 View DHCP bindings


d. From the campus router, the bindings for the hosts can be seen. To see the bindings, use the command show ip dhcp binding at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. campus#show ip dhcp binding IP address Hardware address 172.16.12.11 0100.10a4.188f.c9 Lease expiration Mar 02 1993 01:25 AM Type Automatic

e. What were the IP addresses assigned? 172.16.12.11 a. What are the three other fields listed in the output? mac address, lease expiration and type campus#show ip dhcp binding IP address Client-ID/ Hardware address 172.16.12.2 0063.6973.636f.2d30. 3030.342e.6330.3735. 2e31.3530.302d.564c. 31 172.16.12.11 0108.0046.06fb.b6 Lease expiration Mar 02 1993 12:03 AM Type Automatic

Mar 02 1993 12:04 AM

Automatic

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

207 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Campus Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname campus campus(config)#enable password cisco campus(config)#enable secret class campus(config)#line console 0 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#line vty 0 4 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#interface ethernet 0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#interface serial 0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.6 255.255.255.252 campus(config-if)#clock rate 64000 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.5 campus(config-if)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config Campus DHCP configuration campus#configure terminal campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.1.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.1.10 campus(dhcp-config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit campus(config)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config ISP Router#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0
208 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.5 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#ip route 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.1.6 ISP(config)#exit ISP#copy running-config startup-config

209 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

210 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

211 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.2.8 Configuring DHCP Relay Instructor Version 2500

Objective
A router will be configured for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). The ability for workstations to remotely obtain DHCP addresses will be added. Addresses will be dynamically assigned to the attached hosts.

Background/Preparation
A DHCP client uses IP broadcasts to find the DHCP server. However, these broadcasts are not forwarded by routers, so in the case of the remote LAN, the workstations will not be able to locate the DHCP server. The router must be configured with the ip helper-address command to enable forwarding of these broadcasts, as unicast packets, to the specific server. Routing between the remote router and the campus router is done using a static route between the remote router and gateway router, and a default route between the gateway router and remote router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

212 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

Step 2 Configure routing on the remote router


Use Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) as the routing protocol. Set up the network as area 0 and the process ID as 1: remote(config)#router ospf 1 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

Step 3 Configure routing on the campus router


a. Use OSPF as the routing protocol. Set up the network as area 0 and the process ID as 1: campus(config)#router ospf 1 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.3 area 0 b. Are there OSPF routes in the routing table? Yes remote#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks
213 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

O C C

172.16.12.0/24 [110/65] via 172.16.1.6, 00:00:12, Serial0 172.16.13.0/24 is directly connected, Ethernet0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0

campus#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set C O C 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 is directly connected, Ethernet0 172.16.13.0/24 [110/65] via 172.16.1.5, 00:00:14, Serial0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0

Step 4 Save the configurations


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 5 Create the campus DHCP address pool on the campus router
To configure the campus LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10

Step 6 Create the remote DHCP address pool on the campus router
To configure the remote LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(dhcp-config)#ip dhcp pool remote campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.13.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.13.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10

Step 7 Exclude addresses from pool


a. To exclude addresses from the pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.11 campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.13.1 172.16.13.11

214 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

This defines the address range to be excluded from dynamic issue by the DHCP server. b. Why would addresses be excluded? Servers, routers, and so on.

Step 8 Verify DHCP operation on the campus router

a. From the workstation directly connected to the campus router configure the TCP/IP properties for the workstation to obtain its IP properties automatically from DHCP. These properties include the IP address and the Domain Name System (DNS) server address. b. After changing the configuration, reboot the workstation. View the TCP/IP configuration information on each host. If running Windows 98, go to Start > Run > winipcfg /all. With Windows 2000 or higher, use ipconfig /all in a DOS command prompt window. c. What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 172.16.12.11

Step 9 Configuring DHCP relay


Configure the remote router with the ip helper-address command to enable forwarding of broadcasts, as unicast packets, to the specific server. This command must to be configured on the LAN interface of the remote router for DHCP to function: remote(config)#interface fastethernet 0 remote(config-if)#ip helper-address 172.16.12.1

215 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 10 Verify DHCP operation on the remote router


a. Reboot the workstation attached to the remote router. b. Is there a valid address assigned from the DHCP pool? Yes c. What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 172.16.13.11 d. If there is no IP address, troubleshoot the workstation and router configurations and repeat Step 11.

Step 11 View DHCP bindings


a. From the campus router, the bindings for the hosts can be seen. To see the bindings, use the command show ip dhcp binding at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. What are the IP addresses assigned to the hosts? 172.16.12.11 172.16.13.11 campus#show ip dhcp binding IP address Client-ID/ Hardware address 172.16.12.11 0108.0046.06fb.b6 172.16.13.11 0542.0010.0a21.cb Lease expiration Sep 02 2003 04:41 PM Sep 02 2003 04:45 PM Type Automatic Automatic

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

216 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Remote router configuration Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname remote remote(config)#enable password cisco remote(config)#enable secret class remote(config)#line console 0 remote(config-line)#password cisco remote(config-line)#login remote(config-line)#exit remote(config)#line vty 0 4 remote(config-line)#password cisco remote(config-line)#login remote(config-line)#exit remote(config)#interface ethernet 0 remote(config-if)#ip address 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0 remote(config-if)#no shutdown remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#interface serial 0 remote(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.5 255.255.255.252 remote(config-if)#no shutdown remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#router ospf 1 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.13.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 remote(config-router)#end remote#copy running-config startup-config Campus router configuration Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname campus campus(config)#enable password cisco campus(config)#enable secret class campus(config)#line console 0 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#line vty 0 4 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#interface ethernet 0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#interface serial 0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.6 255.255.255.252 campus(config-if)#clock rate 56000 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#router ospf 1 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 campus(config-router)#end campus#copy running-config startup-config

217 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

DHCP pool configuration Campus pool campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit Remote pool campus(config)#ip dhcp pool remote campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.13.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.13.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.10 campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.13.1 172.16.13.10 campus(config)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config Remote helper address remote#configure terminal remote(config)#interface e0 remote(config-if)#ip helper-address 172.16.12.1 remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#exit remote#copy running-config startup-config

218 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor) . Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

219 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

220 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.7 Troubleshooting a Serial Interface Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a serial interface on two routers. Use show commands to troubleshoot connectivity issues.

Background/Preparation
Configure the appropriate serial interfaces to allow connectivity between the two routers. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

221 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Paris interface as shown


Configure the Paris router serial interface as follows: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the London interface as shown


Configure the London router serial interface as follows: London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


London#copy running-config startup-config Paris#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on London
London#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. London#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 128 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:06, output 00:00:00, output hang never
222 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Last clearing of "show interface" counters 03:02:45 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/32 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 96 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 1039 packets input, 67974 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 753 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 1047 packets output, 77227 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 4 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up Answer the following questions: a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. b. What type of problem is indicated in the last statement? Data link (layer 2) related c. Internet address is 192.168.15.1.

d. Encapsulation HDLC

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Paris
Paris#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. Answer the following questions: a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. b. Internet address is 192.168.15.2. c. Encapsulation HDLC d. To what OSI layer is the Encapsulation referring? Layer 2 e. Why is the interface down? Clock rate not set on DCE Interface Paris#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is HD64570 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters never Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort
223 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 17 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=down DSR=down DTR=down RTS=down CTS=down

Step 7 Correct the clock location


The clock rate statement has been placed on the wrong interface. It is currently placed on the Paris router, but the London router is the Data Communications Equipment (DCE). Remove the clock rate statement from the Paris router using the no version of the command and then add it to the London router configuration.

Step 8 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Paris


Paris#show interface serial 0 a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. b. What is the difference in the Line and Protocol status recorded on Paris earlier? Why? Now both are UP due to the correct clock rate setting. Paris#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters never Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 17 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=down DSR=down DTR=down RTS=down CTS=down

Step 9 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
London#ping 192.168.15.2 Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 a. Can the serial interface on the Paris router be pinged from London? Yes b. Can the serial interface on the London router be pinged from Paris? Yes c. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes.

224 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

London#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/40 ms London# Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/32 ms Paris# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

225 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#line con 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config Removing the clock from Paris Serial DTE interface Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#no clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config London Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname London London(config)#enable password cisco London(config)#enable secret class London(config)#line vty 0 4 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#exit London(config)#line console 0 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#exit London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config Configuring the clock on London Serial DCE interface London#configure terminal London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config

226 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

227 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

228 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.2 Configuring PPP Encapsulation Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure the serial interfaces on two routers with the PPP protocol. Test the link for connectivity.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions sheet. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

229 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Dublin interface as shown


Configure the Dublin router serial interface as follows: Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Washington interface as shown


Configure the Washington router serial interface as follows: Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Washington
Washington#show interface serial 0 a. This will show the details of interface serial 0. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.1.

d. Encapsulation HDLC

230 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters never Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 17 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=down DSR=down DTR=down RTS=down CTS=down

231 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Dublin
Dublin#show interface serial 0 a. This will show the details of interface serial 0. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.2. Dublin#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters never Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 17 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=down DSR=down DTR=down RTS=down CTS=down d. Encapsulation HDLC

Step 7 Change the encapsulation type


Change the encapsulation type to PPP by typing encapsulation ppp at the interface serial 0 configuration mode prompt on both routers. Washington(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation ppp

Step 8 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Washington


Washington#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Washington#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters never Queueing strategy: fifo
232 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 17 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=down DSR=down DTR=down RTS=down CTS=down

Step 9 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Dublin


Dublin#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Dublin#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set, keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters never Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue 0/40, 0 drops; input queue 0/75, 0 drops 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 17 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=down DSR=down DTR=down RTS=down CTS=down

Step 10 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
Washington#ping 192.168.15.2 Dublin#ping 192.168.15.1 a. Can the serial interface on the Dublin router be pinged from Washington? Yes b. Can the serial interface on the Washington router be pinged from Dublin? Yes c. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Washington#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
233 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

!!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/32 ms Washington# Dublin#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/28 ms Dublin# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

234 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Washington Washington(config)#enable password cisco Washington(config)#enable secret class Washington(config)#line vty 0 4 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config)#line con 0 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Configuring PPP on Washington Washington#configure terminal Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Dublin Dublin(config)#enable password cisco Dublin(config)#enable secret class Dublin(config)#line vty 0 4 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#line con 0 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#exit Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config Configuring PPP on Dublin Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config
235 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

236 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface

237 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.3 Configuring PPP Authentication Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure PPP authentication using CHAP on two routers.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

238 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Tokyo interface as shown


Configure the Tokyo router serial interface as follows: Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Madrid interface as shown


Configure the Madrid router serial interface as follows: Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Madrid(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Madrid(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Madrid(config-if)#no shutdown Madrid(config-if)#exit Madrid(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Madrid#copy running-config startup-config Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Madrid


Madrid#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Madrid#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, Rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set
239 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:09, output 00:00:09, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:35 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 10 packets input, 136 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 10 packets output, 136 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Tokyo


Tokyo#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Tokyo#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, Rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:02, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:29 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 12 packets input, 168 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 12 packets output, 168 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 7 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1

240 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

If the pings are unsuccessful, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until both pings are successful.

Step 8 Configure PPP authentication


Configure the username and password on the Madrid router. The passwords must be the same on both routers. The username must reflect the other routers hostname exactly. The password and user names are case sensitive: Madrid(config)#username Tokyo password cisco Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

Step 9 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router: Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 b. Is the ping successful? No c. Why? CHAP not setup on Tokyo Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: ..... Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)

Step 10 Configure PPP authentication


Configure the username and password on the Tokyo router. The passwords must be the same on both routers. The username must reflect the other routers hostname exactly. The password and user names are case sensitive: Tokyo(config)#username Madrid password cisco Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

Step 11 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router: Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1 b. Is the ping successful? Yes c. Why? Username was setup on Tokyo. Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms

241 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: a. Logoff by typing exit b. Turn the router off c. Remove and store the cables and adapter

242 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable password cisco Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#line vty 0 4 Tokyo(config-line)#password cisco Tokyo(config-line)#login Tokyo(config-line)#line console 0 Tokyo(config-line)#password cisco Tokyo(config-line)#login Tokyo(config-line)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Tokyo chap configuration Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#username Madrid password cisco Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#ctrl-z Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Madrid Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Madrid Madrid(config)#enable password cisco Madrid(config)#enable secret class Madrid(config)#line vty 0 4 Madrid(config-line)#password cisco Madrid(config-line)#login Madrid(config-line)#line console 0 Madrid(config-line)#password cisco Madrid(config-line)#login Madrid(config-line)#exit Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Madrid(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Madrid(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Madrid(config-if)#no shutdown Madrid(config-if)#exit Madrid(config)#exit Madrid chap configuration Madrid#configure terminal Madrid(config)#username Tokyo password cisco Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Madrid(config-if)#exit

243 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

244 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

245 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.4 Verifying PPP Configuration Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a serial interface on two routers with the PPP protocol. Verify and test the link for connectivity.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

246 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Warsaw interface as shown


Configure the Warsaw router serial interface as follows: Warsaw(config)#interface serial 0 Warsaw(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Warsaw(config-if)#no shutdown Warsaw(config-if)#exit Warsaw(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Brasilia interface as shown


Configure the Brasilia router serial interface as follows: Brasilia(config)#interface serial 0 Brasilia(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Brasilia(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Brasilia(config-if)#no shutdown Brasilia(config-if)#exit Brasilia(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Brasilia#copy running-config startup-config Warsaw#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Brasilia
Brasilia#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. Encapsulation HDLC

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Warsaw
Warsaw#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0.

247 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Encapsulation HDLC

Step 7 Turn on PPP debugging


Turn on the PPP debug function on both routers by typing debug ppp tasks at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. Note: For the 2600 router, use the command debug ppp tasks.

Step 8 Change the encapsulation type


a. Change the encapsulation type to PPP by typing encapsulation ppp at the interface serial 0 configuration mode prompt on both routers. Brasilia(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Warsaw(config-if)#encapsulation ppp b. What did the debug function report when the PPP encapsulation was applied to each router? 00:03:07:Se0:AAA_PER_USER 00:03:07:Se0:AAA_PER_USER started 1/1/1 00:03:07:Se0:AAA_PER_USER in 0 s. 0/0/1 LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 (0s.) queued 1/1/1 (0s.) busy/0 (0s.) busy/0 done

c. Turn off the debug function by typing undebug all at the privileged EXEC mode prompt.

Step 9 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Brasilia


Brasilia#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Brasilia#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:01, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:04 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 7 packets input, 945 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 7 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 4 packets output, 362 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out
248 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up

RTS=up

CTS=up

Step 10 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Warsaw


Warsaw#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Warsaw#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:03, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:11 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 packets input, 386 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 5 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 8 packets output, 1228 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 11 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Ping the other router to verify that there is connectivity between the two routers. Brasilia#ping 192.168.15.2 Warsaw#ping 192.168.15.1 b. Can the serial interface on the Warsaw router be pinged from Brasilia? Yes c. Can the serial interface on the Brasilia router be pinged from Warsaw? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Brasilia#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms Brasilia#
249 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Warsaw#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms Warsaw# Warsaw# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

250 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Brasilia Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Brasilia Brasilia(config)#enable password cisco Brasilia(config)#enable secret class Brasilia(config)#line vty 0 4 Brasilia(config-line)#password cisco Brasilia(config-line)#login Brasilia(config-line)#line console 0 Brasilia(config-line)#password cisco Brasilia(config-line)#login Brasilia(config-line)#exit Brasilia(config)#interface serial 0/0 Brasilia(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Brasilia(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Brasilia(config-if)#no shutdown Brasilia(config-if)#exit Brasilia(config)#exit Brasilia#copy running-config startup-config Warsaw Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Warsaw Warsaw(config)#enable password cisco Warsaw(config)#enable secret class Warsaw(config)#line vty 0 4 Warsaw(config-line)#password cisco Warsaw(config-line)#login Warsaw(config-line)#line console 0 Warsaw(config-line)#password cisco Warsaw(config-line)#login Warsaw(config-line)#exit Warsaw(config)#interface serial 0/0 Warsaw(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Warsaw(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Warsaw(config-if)#no shutdown Warsaw(config-if)#exit Warsaw(config)#exit Warsaw#copy running-config startup-config

251 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

252 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in IOS command to represent the interface.

253 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.5 Troubleshooting PPP Configuration Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure PPP on the serial interfaces of two routers. Use show and debug commands to troubleshoot connectivity issues.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

254 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Paris interface as shown


Configure the Paris router serial interface as follows: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the London interface as shown


Configure the London router serial interface as follows: London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#encapsulation ppp London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


London#copy running-config startup-config Paris#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on London
London#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. a. List the following information discovered from issuing this command. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. c. What type of problem is indicated in the last statement? Encapsulation d. Internet address is 192.168.15.1. e. Encapsulation PPP

255 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

London#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is HD64570 Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Listen Closed: IPCP, CDPCP Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:27 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 2 packets output, 28 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 2 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Paris
Paris#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. a. List the following information discovered from issuing this command. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.2.

d. Encapsulation HDLC e. To what OSI layer is the Encapsulation referring? Layer 2 f. If the Serial interface was configured, why did the show interface serial 0 output show that the interface is down? Clock rate is not set on the London DCE and the encapsulation is HDLC. Paris#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is HD64570 Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:04:02 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
256 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 19 packets output, 1230 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 14 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 7 Correct the clock location


The clock rate statement has been placed on the wrong interface. It is currently placed on the Paris router, but the London router is the Data Communications Equipment (DCE). Remove the clock rate statement from the Paris router using the no version of the command and then add it to the London routers configuration. London#configure terminal London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#exit

Step 8 Enter the command show cdp neighbors on London


a. Is there any output from the command? No b. Should there be output? No London#show cdp nei Capability Codes: R - Router, T - Trans Bridge, B - Source Route Bridge S - Switch, H - Host, I - IGMP, r - Repeater Device ID Local Intrfce Holdtme Capability Platform Port ID

Step 9 Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on London


a. It may take 60 seconds or more before output occurs. b. Is there output? Yes c. What is the output saying? Request Timeout d. Is there a problem with PPP encapsulation on the London router or the Paris router? Paris e. Why? PPP encapsulation is not set. f. What were the encapsulations listed for the interfaces? London? PPP Paris? HDLC

g. Is there an issue with the above statement? Yes h. What is the issue? The router encapsulations do not match each other. London# 00:07:48: 00:07:48: 00:07:48: 00:07:50: 00:07:50: Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 77 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 78 len 10
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

257 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

00:07:50: 00:07:52: 00:07:52: 00:07:52: 00:07:54: 00:07:54: 00:07:54: 00:07:56: 00:07:56: 00:08:26: 00:08:26: 00:08:26: 00:08:28: 00:08:28:

Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0

LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP:

MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 79 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 80 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent State is Listen TIMEout: State Listen O CONFREQ [Listen] id 81 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BFAF37 (0x050609BFAF37) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 82 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BFAF37 (0x050609BFAF37)

00:08:28: Se0 LCP:

Step 10 Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on the Paris router
a. Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on the Paris router at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. Is there any output from the debug command? No Paris#debug ppp negotiation PPP protocol negotiation debugging is on

Step 11 Correct the encapsulation type


a. Convert the encapsulation to PPP on the Paris router. b. Is there any output from the debug command? Yes c. Does it confirm link establishment? Yes Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Paris(config-if)# 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Using default call direction 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Phase is ESTABLISHING, Active Open [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09F12828 (0x050609F12828) 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 101 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09C0E151 (0x050609C0E151) 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 101 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09C0E151 (0x050609C0E151) 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09F12828 (0x050609F12828) 00:09:48: Se0 LCP: State is Open 00:09:48: Se0 AUTH: Started process 0 pid 23 00:09:48: Se0 PPP: Phase is UP [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.2 (0x0306C0A80F02) 00:09:48: Se0 CDPCP: O CONFREQ [eClosed] id 1 len 4 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.1 (0x0306C0A80F01) 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.1 (0x0306C0A80F01) 00:09:48: Se0 CDPCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 1 len 4
258 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48:

Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0 Se0

CDPCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 1 len 4 IPCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 10 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.2 (0x0306C0A80F02) IPCP: State is Open CDPCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 4 CDPCP: State is Open

00:09:48: Se0 IPCP: Install route to 192.168.15.1nd

Step 12 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Paris


Paris#show interface serial 0 a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. b. Encapsulation PPP c. What is the difference in the Line and Protocol status recorded on Paris earlier? Why? Both are UP. Proper configuration of the serial interfaces Paris#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:00, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:19 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 10 packets input, 408 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 9 packets output, 388 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 13 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
London#ping 192.168.15.1 Paris#ping 192.168.15.2 a. From London, can the serial interface ping the Paris router? Yes b. From Paris, can the serial interface ping the London router? Yes
259 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms London#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms

260 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris Router#configure terminal Paris(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#line con 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config London Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname London London(config)#enable password cisco London(config)#enable secret class London(config)#line vty 0 4 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#line console 0 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#exit London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#encapsulation ppp London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config

261 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

262 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

263 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.2.1 Configuring ISDN BRI (U-Interface) Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure an ISDN router to make a successful connection to a local ISDN switch.

Background/Preparation
This lab assumes that a router with an ISDN BRI U interface is available. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the ISDN switch and cloud. If an ISDN router is not available, review the lab and perform as many noninterface commands as possible. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

264 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

Step 2 Verifying the ISDN BRI switch type


a. Not all ISDN switch types are the same worldwide and the first step is to configure the following: The ISDN TE1 device The router What ISDN switch type is in use

This information will be provided by the ISDN telco provider. In this case, the ISDN Switch type, supported by the Adtran simulator, is National ISDN-1, North America. It is configured, on the router, using the keyword basic-ni. To check the ISDN BRI status, issue the following command before issuing any configuration commands: Ottawa#show isdn status b. c. Deactivated What is the ISDN switch type? None Ottawa#show isdn status **** No Global ISDN Switchtype currently defined **** ISDN BRI0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = none Layer 1 Status: DEACTIVATED Layer 2 Status: Layer 2 NOT Activated Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x0 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 3 Specifying the switch type


a. To specify the ISDN switch type use the isdn switch-type command at the global configuration mode prompt. The different switch types available may be reviewed using the isdn switch-type ? command: Ottawa#configure terminal Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type ? Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type ? basic-1tr6 1TR6 switch type for Germany basic-5ess AT&T 5ESS switch type for the U.S. basic-dms100 Northern DMS-100 switch type
265 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

basic-net3 basic-ni basic-qsig basic-ts013 ntt vn3

NET3 switch type for UK and Europe National ISDN switch type QSIG switch type TS013 switch type for Australia NTT switch type for Japan VN3 and VN4 switch types for France

b. How many different switch types are available? 9 c. To configure the router to communicate with a National ISDN-1 switch type Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni

Step 4 Verifying switch status


a. Check the state of the ISDN Interface again. Ottawa#show isdn status b. What is the Layer 1 status? Deactivated c. What is the ISDN switch type? basic-ni Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: DEACTIVATED Layer 2 Status: Layer 2 NOT Activated Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x0 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 5 Activate the BRI connection


Activate the ISDN BRI using the no shutdown command at the interface configuration prompt. Ottawa#configure terminal Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0 Ottawa(config-if)#no shutdown

Step 6 Review switch status


a. At this stage the ISDN BRI should be physically active and one TEI should have been negotiated. Ottawa#show isdn status b. What is the Layer 1 status? Active c. What is the ISDN switch type? basic-ni
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

266 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

d. Has the Layer 2 status changed? Yes Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: ACTIVE Layer 2 Status: TEI = 64, Ces = 1, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x80000003 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 7 Configuring ISDN SPIDs


Depending on region, ISDN service profile identifiers (SPIDs) may have to be specified for the ISDN Switch to respond to the ISDN TE1 correctly. The SPIDs, supported by the Adtran simulator, are specified as isdn spid1 and isdn spid2. To configure the SPIDs issue the following commands: Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001

Step 8 Review switch status


a. Check the state of the ISDN Interface again: Ottawa#show isdn status b. What does the output specify about spid1? TEI 64, ces = 1, state = 8(established) spid1 configured, spid1 NOT sent, spid1 NOT valid c. What does the output specify about spid2? TEI Not Assigned, ces = 2, state = 1(terminal down) spid2 configured, spid2 NOT sent, spid2 NOT valid d. Careful examination of this output shows that the assigned SPID values have not been sent to the ISDN switch and verified. The reason for this is that they were specified after the ISDN interface was enabled. To send the SPID values the interface must be reset.

Step 9 Resetting the interface


a. To manually reset the ISDN BRI interface issue the command clear interface bri 0. This will cause all ISDN parameters to be renegotiated. Issue the clear command on the router and then check the ISDN interface status. SPID1 and SPID2 will now be sent and validated: Ottawa#clear interface bri 0 Ottawa#show isdn status

267 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Have SPID1 and SPID2 been sent and verified? Yes Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: ACTIVE Layer 2 Status: TEI = 64, Ces = 1, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED TEI = 65, Ces = 2, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED TEI 64, ces = 1, state = 5(init) spid1 configured, spid1 sent, spid1 valid Endpoint ID Info: epsf = 0, usid = 70, tid = 1 TEI 65, ces = 2, state = 5(init) spid2 configured, spid2 sent, spid2 valid Endpoint ID Info: epsf = 0, usid = 70, tid = 2 Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x80000003 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 1 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 10 Save the configuration and reboot


a. Save the configuration and reboot the router. This time, verify that the ISDN Interface has correctly negotiated with the ISDN switch. Review activity on the ISDN Interface using the show isdn active command: Ottawa#copy running-config startup-config Ottawa#reload Ottawa#show isdn active Ottawa#show isdn active ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ISDN ACTIVE CALLS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Call Calling Called Remote Seconds Seconds Seconds Charges Type Number Number Name Used Left Idle Units/Currency ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Out 6120 Ottawa 165 74 45 0 Note to instructor: This is sample output and may not be identical to that produced locally. b. The history table has a maximum of how many entries? History table has a maximum of 100 entries. c. History table data is retained for how long? History table data is retained for a maximum of 15 Minutes.

268 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: a. Logoff by typing exit b. Turn the router off c. Remove and store the cables and adapter

269 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Ottawa Ottawa(config)#enable password cisco Ottawa(config)#enable secret class Ottawa(config)#line console 0 Ottawa(config-line)#password cisco Ottawa(config-line)#login Ottawa(config-line)#exit Ottawa(config)#line vty 0 4 Ottawa(config-line)#password cisco Ottawa(config-line)#login Ottawa(config-line)#exit Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Ottawa(config-if)#no shutdown Ottawa(config-if)#exit Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Ottawa(config)#exit Ottawa#copy running-config startup-config

270 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

271 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

272 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.3.2 Configuring Legacy DDR Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure an ISDN router to make a legacy dial-on-demand routing (DDR) call to another ISDN capable router. When the DDR connection is successfully made, augment the configuration to specify that only http traffic will bring up the link.

Background/Preparation
In this lab, 2 ISDN routers are required. If ISDN routers are not available, review the lab to become familiar with the process. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the switch/ISDN cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

273 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Define switch type and spid numbers


The switch type and spid numbers need to be specified on the routers. Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown

274 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Defining static routes for DDR


a. Use static and default routes instead of dynamic routing, in order to reduce the cost of the dialup connection. To configure a static route, the network address of the network to be reached must be known. The IP address of the next router on the path to this destination must be known as well. Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 b. Perform a show IP route to verify routes exist.

Step 4 Specifying interesting traffic for DDR


Specify the traffic that will cause the DDR interface to dialup the remote router. For the moment, declare that all IP traffic is interesting. This is done using the dialer-list command: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#end Note to instructor: Please have students use the exit command here, not the end command.

Step 5 Configuring DDR dialer information


a. Configure the correct dialer information so that the dialer profile and dialer interface function correctly. This includes all of the following: IP address information PPP configuration Name Passwords Dial number Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 b. Configure the PPP information: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

275 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Configure the dial information: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 120 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000

Step 6 Configuring DDR Dialer Information


Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 120 Moscow(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.1 name Tokyo 5551000

Step 7 Configure dialer information


a. The dial information must specify the remote name of the remote router in the dialer profile. It must also specify the dial string, or phone number, to use to contact the remote device. b. To configure the dial information on Tokyo, use the following: Tokyo(config)#interface Tokyo(config-if)#dialer Tokyo(config-if)#dialer Tokyo(config-if)#dialer c. dialer 1 remote-name Moscow string 5552000 string 5552001

To configure the dial information on Moscow, use the following: Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001

Step 8 Associate dialer profiles


a. To associate the dialer profiles with real dialer interfaces create a dialer pool putting the interfaces and the associated profiles in a common pool. b. On Tokyo, the commands syntax is as follows: Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1

276 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

On Moscow, the commands syntax is the following: Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1

Step 9 Configure dialer timeouts


a. Configure a dialer idle-timeout of 60 seconds for each of the dialer interfaces: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 b. Repeat these commands on Moscow.

Step 10 View the Tokyo router configuration


a. To view the configuration, use the show running-config command: Tokyo#show running-config b. What authentication is being used? CHAP c. What are the dialer strings on the Tokyo router? 5551000 and 5551001 Tokyo#show running-config Building configuration... Current configuration : 1069 bytes ! version 12.2 service timestamps debug uptime service timestamps log uptime no service password-encryption ! hostname tokyo ! enable secret 5 $1$aa79$uoSAji.3JcowvprK0RHnW. ! username moscow password 0 class memory-size iomem 15 ip subnet-zero ! ! isdn switch-type basic-ni call rsvp-sync ! interface Ethernet0 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 half-duplex interface Serial0 no ip address shutdown no fair-queue ! interface BRI0
277 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp ppp authentication chap dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000 dialer-group 1 isdn switch-type basic-ni isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 interface Serial1 no ip address shutdown ! interface Dialer0 no ip address dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Moscow dialer string 5552000 dialer string 5552001 no cdp enable ! ip classless ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 ip http server ! dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit ! dial-peer cor custom ! line con 0 password cisco login line aux 0 line vty 0 4 password cisco login ! end

Step 11 Verifying the DDR Configuration


a. Now, generate some interesting traffic across the DDR link from both remote routers, Moscow and Tokyo, to verify that connections are made correctly and the dialer profiles are functioning: Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If not troubleshoot the router configuration. Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: 01:51:35: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0:1, changed state to up..

278 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

01:51:38: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0:1, changed stat e to up 01:51:167503724608: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0:2, changed state to up.!! Success rate is 40 percent (2/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/32 ms tokyo# 01:51:40: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0:2, changed stat e to up 01:51:41: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0:1 is now connected to 5552000 moscow 01:51:45: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0:2 is now connected to Moscow

Note:If the Moscow router is pinged again quickly before the dialer idle timeout (60 seconds) is reached the ISDN connection does not have to be dialed again and all 5 pings reach the destination quickly. Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms tokyo# d. Use the show dialer command to show us the reason for the call. This information is shown for each channel. Tokyo#show dialer e. Which dialer strings are associated with Dialer0? 5552000 and 5552001 f. What is the last status for dial string 5552000 in the Dialer0 readout? Tokyo#show dialer BRI0 - dialer type = ISDN Dial String Successes 5552000 2 Failures 0 Last DNIS 00:29:16 Last status successful

0 incoming call(s) have been screened. 0 incoming call(s) rejected for callback. BRI0:1 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle BRI0:2 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Di0 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle

279 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Number of active calls = 0 Dial String 5552000 5552001 Successes 0 0 Failures 0 0 Last DNIS never never Last status Default Default

g. Use the show interface command and note that the output shows that the interface is spoofing. This provides a mechanism for the interface to simulate an active state for internal processes, such as routing, on the router. The show interface command can also be used to display information about the B channel: Tokyo#show interface bri 0 Tokyo#show interface bri 0 BRI0 is up, line protocol is up (spoofing) Hardware is BRI Internet address is 192.168.3.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Last input 00:00:00, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:46:37 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/16 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 1140 packets input, 4672 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 1138 packets output, 4658 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 4 carrier transitions Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: d. Logoff by typing exit e. Turn the router off f. Remove and store the cables and adapter

280 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface ethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Moscow Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1 Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface ethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Moscow(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.1 name Tokyo 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001
281 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#exit Moscow#copy running-config startup-config

282 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

283 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

284 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.3.7 Configuring Dialer Profiles Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure ISDN Dialer Profiles on the routers enabling a dial-on-demand routing (DDR) call to be made from two remote routers simultaneously into a central ISDN BRI router.

Background/Preparation
In this lab, 3 ISDN routers are required. If ISDN routers are not available, review the lab to become familiar with the process. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the switch/ISDN cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

285 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the router


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Define switch type and spid numbers


To configure the switch type and spid numbers use the following commands. Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Sydney Sydney(config)#enable secret class Sydney(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Sydney(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055530000001 5553000 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055530010001 5553001 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown
286 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Defining static routes for DDR


Use static and default routes instead of dynamic routing, in order to reduce the cost of the dialup connection. To configure a static route, the network address of the network that is going to be reached must be known. The IP address of the next router on the path to this destination must be known as well. Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.253.1 Sydney#configure terminal Sydney(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.254.1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2

Step 4 Specifying interesting traffic for DDR


Traffic must be defined as interesting to cause the DDR interface to dialup the remote router. For the moment, declare that all IP traffic is interesting using the dialer-list command. Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Sydney(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Moscow router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Sydney router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1

Step 5 Configuring DDR dialer information


Configure the correct dialer information so that the dialer profile and dialer interface function correctly. This includes all of the following: IP address information PPP configuration Name Passwords Dial number

287 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#username Sydney password class Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.2 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#username Tokyo password class

Step 6 Configure dialer information


a. Next, the dial information must be configured to specify the remote name of the remote router in the Dialer Profile. The dial string, or phone number to use to contact this remote device must also be specified. Use the following commands to do this: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Sydney Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553001

288 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. To configure the dial information on Moscow, use the following: a. b. c. d. c. Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001

To configure the dial information on Sydney, use the following: Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551001

Step 7 Associate dialer profiles


a. Finally, associate the Dialer Profiles with the Dialer Interfaces that will be used, when needed. Create a Dialer Pool, and put the interfaces and the associated Dialer Profiles in a common pool. The commands for doing this are as follows: Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 b. On Moscow, the commands issued would be as follows: Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 c. Use the same commands to configure the Sydney router.

Step 8 Configure dialer timeouts


a. Configure a dialer idle-timeout of 60 seconds for each of the dialer interfaces: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 b. Repeat these commands on Moscow and Sydney.

289 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 9 View the Tokyo router configuration


a. To view the configuration, use the show running-config command: Tokyo#show running-config b. How many username statements are there? 2 c. What authentication type is being used for PPP? CHAP d. Which sections of the configuration list the authentication type? Interface dialer e. What are the dialer strings on the Tokyo router? interface Dialer1 dialer string dialer string interface Dialer2 dialer string dialer string 5552000 5552001 5553000 5553001

Tokyo# Tokyo#show running-config Building configuration... Current configuration : 1535 bytes ! version 12.1 service timestamps debug uptime service timestamps log uptime no service password-encryption ! hostname "Tokyo" ! enable secret 5 $1$.Tf2$ph3oCXloaQGXpguejZTIJ0 ! username Moscow password 0 class username Sydney password 0 class ip subnet-zero ! isdn switch-type basic-ni ! interface Ethernet0 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 ! interface Serial0 no ip address shutdown no fair-queue ! interface BRI0 no ip address encapsulation ppp dialer pool-member 1 isdn switch-type basic-ni isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 ppp authentication chap ! interface Ethernet1
290 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

no ip address shutdown ! interface Serial1 no ip address shutdown ! interface Dialer1 description The Profile for the Moscow router ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Moscow dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer string 5552000 dialer string 5552001 dialer-group 1 ppp authentication chap ! interface Dialer2 description The Profile for the Sydney router ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Sydney dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer string 5553000 dialer string 5553001 dialer-group 1 ppp authentication chap ! ip classless ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2 ip http server ! dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit ! line con 0 password cisco login line aux 0 line vty 0 4 password cisco login ! end

Step 10 Verifying the DDR Configuration


a. Now, generate some interesting traffic across the DDR link from Moscow and Sydney to verify that connections are made correctly and the dialer profiles are functioning: Moscow#ping 192.168.1.1 b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If not troubleshoot the router configurations.

291 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. What other information was displayed when the ping was issued? 00:25:01: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0:1, changed state to up 00:25:01: %DIALER-6-BIND: Interface BRI0:1 bound to profile Di0 00:25:04: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0:1, changed state to up Sydney#ping 192.168.1.1 e. Were the pings successful? Yes Sydney#ping 192.168.1.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms Sydney# 00:32:32: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0:1 is now connected to 5551000 Tokyo f. If the pings were not successful troubleshoot the router configurations. g. Use the show dialer command to see the reason for the call. This information is shown for each channel: Tokyo#show dialer h. Which dialer strings are associated with Dialer1? 555-2000, 555-2001 i. What is the last status for dial string 5553000 in the Dialer2 readout? None Tokyo#show dialer BRI0 - dialer type = ISDN Dial String Successes Failures Last DNIS 0 incoming call(s) have been screened. 0 incoming call(s) rejected for callback. BRI0:1 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (120 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle BRI0:2 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (120 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Di1 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Number of active calls = 0 Dial String 5552000 5552001 Successes 0 0 Failures 0 0 Last DNIS never never Last status Default Default Last status

292 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Di2 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Number of active calls = 0 Dial String 5553000 5553001 Tokyo# j. Successes 0 0 Failures 0 0 Last DNIS never never Last status Default Default

Use the show interface command and note that the output shows that the interface is spoofing. This provides a mechanism for the interface to simulate an active state for internal processes, such as routing, on the router. The show interface command can also be used to display information about the B channel: Tokyo#show interface bri 0 Tokyo#show interface bri 0 BRI0 is up, line protocol is up (spoofing) Hardware is BRI MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Last input 00:00:01, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:28:42 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/16 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 48 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 365 packets input, 1549 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 362 packets output, 1522 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 8 carrier transitions

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

293 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface ethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2 Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Moscow router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Sydney router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#username Sydney password class Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Sydney Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553001 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit
294 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Moscow Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface ethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.253.1 Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config)#exit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#exit Moscow#copy running-config startup-config

295 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Sydney Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Sydney Sydney(config)#enable secret class Sydney(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Sydney(config)#interface ethernet 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055530000001 5553000 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055530010001 5553001 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.254.1 Sydney(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.2 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#username Tokyo password class Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551001 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#exit Sydney#copy running-config startup-config

296 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

297 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

298 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.1 Configuring Frame Relay Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure a router to establish a connection to a local Frame Relay switch/cloud.

Background/Preparation
An Adtran Atlas550 Frame Relay emulator is used to simulate the Frame Relay switch/cloud. The Cork Wholesale Food Company has just had a Frame Relay circuit installed to its local central office (CO) by the telco carrier. The network administrator must confirm that the router and Frame Relay switch are able to successfully communicate. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

299 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configuring the serial interface


a. In Frame Relay, the customer router is considered the DTE device. In order to configure the serial interface, the Layer 2 Frame Relay frame type must be defined. To configure the frame type, use the following commands: Cork#configure terminal Cork(config)#interface serial 0 Cork(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf b. Next the format of the Frame Relay management protocol must be configured. To configure the Local Management Interface (LMI) type, use the following commands: Cork(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Cork(config-if)#no shutdown Cork(config-if)#end Note to instructor: Please have students use the exit command here, not the end command.

Step 3 Verifying the Frame Relay configuration


a. To verify the configuration, use the show interface commands, related to Frame Relay. To view the serial interface configuration use the following command: Cork#show interface serial 0 b. What is the state of the interface? Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. c. What is the encapsulation type? frame-relay ieft d. What state is the DTE LMI in? Up e. What is the LMI type? LMI type is ANSI Annex D Cork#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is HD64570 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, rely 255/255, load 1/255 Encapsulation FRAME-RELAY IETF, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LMI enq sent 7, LMI stat recvd 7, LMI upd recvd 0, DTE LMI up LMI enq recvd 0, LMI stat sent 0, LMI upd sent 0 LMI DLCI 0 LMI type is ANSI Annex D frame relay DTE Broadcast queue 0/64, broadcasts sent/dropped 0/0, interface broadcasts 0 Last input 00:00:04, output 00:00:04, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:34
300 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue: 0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 7 packets input, 128 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 7 packets output, 98 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 4 Reviewing switch assignments


a. To verify that the data-link connection identifiers (DLCIs) are defined on the switch use show frame-relay pvc. The DLCIs are learned by the router via LMI, and can be viewed with the following command: Cork#show frame-relay pvc a. What DLCI numbers are available on the switch? ? 102, 103, 104 b. What is the PVC status of the first DLCI? Inactive Cork#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 0 0 0 Inactive 0 0 3 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 0 0 0

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 0 output pkts 0 in bytes 0 out bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:30, last time pvc status changed 00:02:30 DLCI = 103, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 0 out bytes 0 out pkts dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0
301 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

output pkts 0 in bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:31, last time pvc status changed 00:02:31 DLCI = 104, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 0 output pkts 0 in bytes 0 out bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:32, last time pvc status changed 00:02:32

Step 5 Check the Frame Relay map


Cork#show frame-relay map This output shows that none of the DLCIs, defined on the switch, are in use. The permanent virtual circuit (PVC) is inactive and there is no current mapping between the Layer 2 DLCI and Layer 3 IP address as seen in the show frame-relay map command. No output since there is no mapping between DCLI and IP. Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

302 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Cork Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Cork Cork(config)#enable password cisco Cork(config)#enable secret class Cork(config)#line console 0 Cork(config-line)#password cisco Cork(config-line)#login Cork(config-if)#exit Cork(config)#line vty 0 4 Cork(config-line)#password cisco Cork(config-line)#login Cork(config-line)#exit Cork(config)#exit Cork#copy running-config startup-config Cork Frame Relay Configuration Cork#configure terminal Cork(config)#interface serial 0 Cork(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Cork(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Cork(config-if)#no shutdown Cork(config-if)#exit Cork(config)#exit Cork#copy running-config startup-config

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be:

303 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

304 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

305 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.2 Configuring Frame Relay PVC Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure two routers back-to-back as a Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC). This will be done manually, in the absence of a Frame Relay switch, and therefore there will be no Local Management Interface (LMI).

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

306 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The Fast Ethernet interface

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configuring the Washington serial interface


First, define the Frame Relay frame type to be used on this link. To configure the encapsulation type, use the command encapsulation frame-relay ietf. Disable keepalive messages since there is no Frame Relay switch in this configuration and consequently no Frame Relay DCE: Washington#configure terminal Washington(config-if)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Washington(config-if)#no keepalive Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown

Step 3 Configure the Frame Relay map on Washington


a. When sending an Ethernet frame to a remote IP address, the remote MAC address must be discovered, so that the correct frame type can be constructed. Frame Relay needs a similar mapping. b. The remote IP address needs to be mapped to the local DLCI (Layer 2 address), so the correctly addressed frame can be created locally for this PVC. Since there is no way of mapping the DLCI automatically with LMI disabled, this map must be created manually, using the frame-relay map command. The broadcast parameter also allows for IP broadcasts to use the same mapping for crossing this PVC: Washington(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.2 201 ietf broadcast

Step 4 Configure the DCE on Washington


In this configuration, when DCE cables are used, a clock signal is necessary. The bandwidth command is optional, but wise to use to verify bandwidth transmission. Another option is to title the connection using the description command. It is very useful to record information in the description about the PVC, such as remote contact person and the leased line circuit identifier: Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Washington(config-if)#description PVC to Dublin, DLCI 201, Circuit #DASS465875, Contact John Tobin (061-8886745)

307 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 5 Configure Dublin router


Configure the Dublin router using the following commands. Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config-if)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Dublin(config-if)#no keepalive Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.1 201 ietf broadcast Dublin(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Dublin(config-if)#description PVC to Washington, DLCI 201, Circuit #DASS465866 Contact Pat White (091-6543211)

Step 6 Verifying Frame Relay PVC


a. On the Washington router, type the command show frame-relay pvc: Washington#show frame-relay pvc b. What is the DLCI number reported? 102 c. What is the PVC status? Static Washington#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 0 0 0 Inactive 0 0 0 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 1 0 0 d. What is the value of the DLCI USAGE? Local

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = STATIC, INTERFACE = Serial0 input pkts 5 out bytes 520 out pkts dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 output pkts 5 in bytes 520 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0

pvc create time 00:07:26, last time pvc status changed 00:03:18

Step 7 Showing Frame Relay map


a. To view the Layer 2 to Layer 3 mapping, use the show frame-relay map command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Washington#show frame-relay map b. What is the IP address shown? 192.168.1.2

c. What state is interface serial 0 in? Up


308 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington#show frame-relay map Serial0 (up): ip 192.168.1.2 dlci 102(0x66,0x1860), static, broadcast, IETF

Step 8 Verify Frame Relay connectivity


a. From the Washington router, ping the Dublin router serial interface. b. Was the ping successful? Yes c. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the router configurations. Washington#ping 192.168.1.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/32 ms Washington# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: g. Logoff by typing exit h. Turn the router off i. Remove and store the cables and adapter

309 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Washington Washington(config)#enable password cisco Washington(config)#enable secret class Washington(config)#line console 0 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config)#line vty 0 4 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config)#interface ethernet 0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Washington Frame Relay Configuration Washington#configure terminal Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Washington(config-if)#no keepalive Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.2 102 ietf broadcast Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Washington(config-if)#description PVC to Dublin, DLCI 102, Circuit #DASS465875, Contact John Tobin (061-8886745) Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Dublin Dublin(config)#enable password cisco Dublin(config)#enable secret class Dublin(config)#line console 0 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#exit Dublin(config)#interface ethernet 0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

310 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Dublin Frame Relay Configuration Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Dublin(config-if)#no keepalive Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.1 102 ietf broadcast Dublin(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Dublin(config-if)#$description PVC to Washington, DLCI 102,Circuit #DASS465866 Contact Pat White (091-6543211) Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

311 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

312 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

313 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.5 Configuring Frame Relay Subinterfaces Instructor Version 2500

Objective
Configure three routers in a full-mesh Frame Relay network.

Background/Preparation
An Adtran Atlas550 Frame Relay emulator is used to simulate the Frame Relay switch/cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise.
314 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The Fast Ethernet interface according to the chart

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Serial 0 Interfaces


a. First, the Frame Relay encapsulation type to be used on this link must be defined using the following commands: Amsterdam#configure terminal Amsterdam(config)#interface serial 0 Amsterdam(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi b. Use a description field to store relevant information, such as the circuit number in case a line fault has to be reported: Amsterdam(config-if)#description Circuit #KPN465555 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown c. The same commands are used to configure the Berlin and Paris routers: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Paris(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Paris(config-if)#description Circuit #FRT372826 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Berlin(config)#interface serial 0 Berlin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Berlin(config-if)#description Circuit #DTK465866 Berlin(config-if)#no shutdown

315 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Create subinterfaces on the Amsterdam router


For each of the permanent virtual circuits (PVCs), create a subinterface on the serial port. This subinterface will be a point-to-point configuration. For consistency and future troubleshooting, use the data-link connection identifier (DLCI) number as the subinterface number. The commands to create a subinterface are as follows: Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0.102 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-if)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 102, Contact Rick Voight(+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 102 Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0.103 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-if)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 103, Contact P Wills(+49- 61 03 / 7 65 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 103

Step 4 Create subinterfaces on the Paris router


To configure the subinterfaces on the Paris router, use the following commands: Paris(config-if)#interface Serial 0.201 point-to-point Paris(config-if)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 201, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.4.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 201 Paris(config-if)#interface Serial 0.203 point-to-point Paris(config-if)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 203, Contact Peter Willis (+49- 61 03 / 7 66 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 203

Step 5 Create subinterfaces on the Berlin router


To configure the subinterfaces on the Berlin router, use the following commands: Berlin(config-if)#interface Serial 0.301 point-to-point Berlin(config-if)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 301, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.5.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 301 Berlin(config-if)#interface Serial 0.302 point-to-point Berlin(config-if)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 302, Contact Rick Voight (+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.6.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 302

316 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Configure IGRP routing


To configure the routing protocol Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) 100, use the following configuration syntax: Amsterdam(config-if)#router igrp Amsterdam(config-router)#network Amsterdam(config-router)#network Amsterdam(config-router)#network Paris(config-if)#router igrp Paris(config-router)#network Paris(config-router)#network Paris(config-router)#network 100 192.168.1.0 192.168.4.0 192.168.5.0

100 192.168.2.0 192.168.4.0 192.168.6.0 100 192.168.3.0 192.168.5.0 192.168.6.0

Berlin(config-if)#router igrp Berlin(config-router)#network Berlin(config-router)#network Berlin(config-router)#network

Step 7 Verifying Frame Relay PVC


a. On the Amsterdam router, issue the command show frame-relay pvc: Amsterdam#show frame-relay pvc b. How many active local PVCs are there? 2 c. What is the interface value? Serial0.102, Serial0.103 d. What is the PVC status? Active e. Which DLCI # is inactive? 104 f. From this it can be seen that there are three DLCIs defined on this Frame Relay circuit, and only two of them are in use. This is the way the Adtran 550 emulator has been configured. It is useful output, as it shows what would be seen if a DLCI is defined on the Frame Relay switch, but not configured on the router. The other DLCIs, 102 and 103, are ACTIVE and associated with their respective subinterfaces. It also shows that some packets have actually passed across the PVC. Amsterdam#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 2 0 0 Inactive 1 0 0 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 0 0 0

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = ACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0.102 input pkts 13 output pkts 14 in bytes 2180 out bytes 2254 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 14 out bcast bytes 2254 pvc create time 00:14:27, last time pvc status changed 00:02:59
317 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

DLCI = 103, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = ACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0.103 input pkts 16 output pkts 14 in bytes 2258 out bytes 2307 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 9 out bcast bytes 1787 pvc create time 00:14:29, last time pvc status changed 00:02:02

Step 8 Show the Frame Relay maps


a. Look at the frame relay maps by typing the command show frame-relay map at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Amsterdam#show frame-relay map b. What is the status of the links? Up c. The DLCIs are defined as what type? Point-to-Point Amsterdam#show frame-relay map Serial0.103 (up): point-to-point dlci, dlci 103(0x67,0x1870), broadcast status defined, active Serial0.102 (up): point-to-point dlci, dlci 102(0x66,0x1860), broadcast status defined, active d. Are the DLCIs the same on the Paris router? No

Step 9 Show LMIs


a. Look at the Local Management Interface (LMI) statistics using the show frame-relay lmi command: Amsterdam#show frame-relay lmi b. Which fields have non-zero counter values? Num Status Enq. Sent, Num Status msgs Rcvd c. What is the LMI type? ANSI Amsterdam#show frame-relay lmi LMI Statistics for interface Serial0 (Frame Relay DTE) LMI TYPE = ANSI Invalid Unnumbered info 0 Invalid Prot Disc 0 Invalid dummy Call Ref 0 Invalid Msg Type 0 Invalid Status Message 0 Invalid Lock Shift 0 Invalid Information ID 0 Invalid Report IE Len 0 Invalid Report Request 0 Invalid Keep IE Len 0 Num Status Enq. Sent 55 Num Status msgs Rcvd 56 Num Update Status Rcvd 0 Num Status Timeouts 0

Step 10 Check routing protocol


a. Use the show ip route command to verify that the PVCs are up and active: Amsterdam#show ip route

318 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Is the routing protocol working? Yes c. If not, troubleshoot the routers configurations. I I I 192.168.6.0/24 [100/10476] [100/10476] 192.168.2.0/24 [100/8486] 192.168.3.0/24 [100/8486] via via via via 192.168.4.2, 192.168.5.2, 192.168.4.2, 192.168.5.2, 00:01:06, 00:01:20, 00:01:06, 00:01:20, Serial0.102 Serial0.103 Serial0.102 Serial0.103 d. List the IGRP routes

Amsterdam#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set C C I C I I 192.168.4.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0.102 192.168.5.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0.103 192.168.6.0/24 [100/10476] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0.102 [100/10476] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0.103 192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, Ethernet0 192.168.2.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0.102 192.168.3.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0.103

Step 11 Verify connectivity


a. Ping the fastethernet interfaces. b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If the pings were not successful, troubleshoot the router configurations and repeat this step. Amsterdam#ping 192.168.1.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/4 ms Amsterdam#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 36/39/40 ms Amsterdam#ping 192.168.3.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.3.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 40/40/40 ms Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

319 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

320 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Amsterdam Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Amsterdam Amsterdam(config)#enable password cisco Amsterdam(config)#enable secret class Amsterdam(config)#line console 0 Amsterdam(config-line)#password cisco Amsterdam(config-line)#login Amsterdam(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Amsterdam(config-line)#password cisco Amsterdam(config-line)#login Amsterdam(config-line)#exit Amsterdam(config-line)#interface ethernet 0 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown Amsterdam(config-if)#exit Amsterdam(config)#exit Amsterdam#copy running-config startup-config Amsterdam Frame Relay and IGRP Configuration Amsterdam#configure terminal Amsterdam(config)#interface serial 0 Amsterdam(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Amsterdam(config-if)#description Circuit #KPN465555 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0.102 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-subif)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 102, contact Rick Voight(+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Amsterdam(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 102 Amsterdam(config-fr-dlci)#interface serial 0.103 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-subif)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 103, Contact P Wills (+49- 61 03 / 7 65 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Amsterdam(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 103 Amsterdam(config-fr-dlci)#router igrp 100 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.4.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.5.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#exit Amsterdam(config)#exit Amsterdam#copy running-config startup-config Paris Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line console 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config)#interface ethernet 0
321 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config Paris Frame Relay and IGRP Configuration Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Paris(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Paris(config-if)#description Circuit #FRT372826 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#interface Serial 0.201 point-to-point Paris(config-subif)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 201, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Paris(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.4.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 201 Paris(config-fr-dlci)#interface Serial 0.203 point-to-point Paris(config-subif)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 203, Contact Peter Willis (+49- 61 03 / 7 66 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Paris(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 203 Paris(config-subif)#exit Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris(config)#router igrp 100 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.2.0 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.4.0 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.6.0 Paris(config-router)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config Berlin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Berlin Berlin(config)#enable password cisco Berlin(config)#enable secret class Berlin(config)#line console 0 Berlin(config-line)#password cisco Berlin(config-line)#login Berlin(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Berlin(config-line)#password cisco Berlin(config-line)#login Berlin(config-line)#exit Berlin(config-line)#interface ethernet 0 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#no shutdown Berlin(config-if)#exit Berlin(config)#exit Berlin#copy running-config startup-config

322 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

323 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

324 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a router to use network address translation (NAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into outside public addresses.

Background/Preparation
An ISP has allocated a company the public classless interdomain routing (CIDR) IP address 199.99.9.32/27. This is equivalent to 30 public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to implement NAT. The addresses 199.99.9.33 199.99.9.39 for static allocation and 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 for dynamic allocation. Routing will be done between the ISP and the gateway router used by the company. A static route will be used between the ISP and gateway routers and a default route will be used between the gateway router and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

325 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to the configuration reference sheet at the end of this lab for help.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Ping again until they are both successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/27 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route. ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

326 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? Interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0/0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


f. From the Gateway router to the ISP router, create a static route to network 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0, using the ip route command. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP by setting a Gateway of Last Resort on the Gateway router. Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 g. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes h. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. i. Was the ping successful? No Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0/0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17 a. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network

327 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. Configure one of the PCs on the LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway address of 10.10.10.1. From the PC, ping 172.16.1.1. If successful, look at the NAT translation on the Gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. Gateway#show ip nat trans Pro Inside global Inside local --- 199.99.9.40 10.10.10.10 = 199.99.9.40 c. The inside global address is assigned by? The router from the nat pool d. The inside local address is assigned by? The administrator for the workstation Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter 10.10.10.10 Outside local --Outside global ---

b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses?

328 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter] Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

329 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway NAT configuration Gateway#configure terminal Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224 Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#exit Gateway#

330 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

331 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

332 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4a

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.4b Configuring PAT Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a router to use Port Address Translation (PAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into an outside public address.

Background/Preparation
Aidan McDonald has just received a DSL line Internet connection to a local ISP in his home. The ISP has allocated only one IP address to be used on the serial port of his remote access device. Thus all PCs on Aidans LAN, each with its own private IP address, will share one public IP address on the router using PAT. Routing from the home or gateway router to the ISP will be done by using a default route to Serial 0 of the Gateway router. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

333 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in this lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a default route


a. Add a default route to the serial 0 interface of the gateway router. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP. Use the ip route command to create the default route: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 serial 0 b. Is the route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network

334 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

f.

What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0/0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

Step 6 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 7 Define the PAT translation from inside list to outside address
To define the PAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command. This command, with the overload option, will create port address translation using the serial 0 IP address as the base: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 interface serial 0 overload

Step 8 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to PAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 9 Testing the configuration


a. Configure a PC on the internal LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway 10.10.10.1. From the PCs, ping the Internet address 172.16.1.1. If successful, Telnet to the same IP address. Then look at the PAT translation on the gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. Gateway#show ip nat translations Pro Inside global Inside local tcp 200.2.2.18:1086 10.10.10.10:1086 icmp 200.2.2.18:768 10.10.10.10:768 Outside local 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:768 Outside global 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:768

335 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses? 10.10.10.10:1086 or 10.10.10.10:768 (Answers will vary) c. What does the number after the colon represent? The port NAT used d. Why do all of the commands for PAT say NAT? PAT is an extension of NAT. Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

336 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

337 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway PAT configuration Gateway#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 interface serial 0/0 overload Gateway(config)#interface fa0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#exit Gateway#copy running-config startup-config

338 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

339 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

340 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4b

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.4c Configuring Static NAT Addresses Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a router to use network address translation (NAT) to convert internal IP addresses, typically private addresses, into outside public addresses. Configure static IP mapping to allow outside access to an internal PC.

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public classless interdomain routing (CIDR) IP address 199.99.9.32/27. This is equivalent to 30 public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT. Addresses 199.99.9.33 199.99.9.39 will be reserved for static allocation and 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 for dynamic allocation. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router will be done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

341 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in this lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to the configuration reference sheet at the end of this lab for help.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the fastethernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/27 have been allocated for internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 b. Is the route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route

342 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0/0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route, using the ip route command, from the Gateway router to the ISP router. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0/0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

343 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public_access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public_access

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be identified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command. Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 11 Configuring Static Mapping


a. Workstation #1, 10.10.10.10/24, will be designated as the public WWW server. Thus, it needs a permanent public IP address. This mapping is defined using a static NAT mapping. b. Configure one of the PCs on the LAN with the IP address 10.10.10.10/24 and a default gateway address of 10.10.10.1. To configure a static IP NAT mapping, use the ip nat inside source static command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source static 10.10.10.10 199.99.9.33 This permanently maps 199.99.9.33 to the inside address 10.10.10.10. c. Look at the translation table: Gateway#show ip nat translations Does the mapping appear in the output of the show command? Yes

Step 12 Testing the configuration


a. From the 10.10.10.10 workstation, verify it can ping 172.16.1.1 b. Is the ping successful? Yes
344 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Why? NAT properly setup

d. From the ISP router ping the host with the static NAT translation, by typing ping 10.10.10.10. e. What were the results of the ping, was it successful? No f. Why? No route to 10.10.10.10 ISP#ping 10.10.10.10 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.10.10.10, timeout is 2 seconds: ..... Success rate is 0 percent (0/5) g. From the ISP router, ping 199.99.9.33. If successful, look at the NAT translation on the Gateway router, using the command show ip nat translations. ISP#ping 199.99.9.33 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 199.99.9.33, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms ISP# Gateway#show ip nat translations Pro Inside global Inside local --- 199.99.9.33 10.10.10.10 10.10.10.10 = 199.99.9.33 Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter Outside local --Outside global ---

h. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses?

345 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.224 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

346 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway NAT Configuration Gateway#configure terminal Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public_access 199.99.9.40 199.99.9.62 netmask 255.255.255.224 Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public_access Gateway(config)#interface fa0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source static 10.10.10.10 199.99.9.33 Gateway(config)#exit

347 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

348 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

349 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.4c

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.5 Verifying NAT and PAT Configuration Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a router for Network Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address Translation (PAT) Test the configuration and verify NAT/PAT statistics

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public CIDR IP address 199.99.9.32/30. This is equivalent to four public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT with PAT. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router is done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

350 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/30 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route. ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route

351 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0/0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route, using the ip route command, from the Gateway router to the ISP router. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No route back

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

352 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


The active interfaces on the router need to be identified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside or ip nat outside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. From the workstations, ping 172.16.1.1. Open multiple DOS windows on each workstation and Telnet to the 172.16.1.1 address. Next, view the NAT translations on the Gateway router, with the command show ip nat translations. b. What is the translation of the inside local host addresses? Gateway#show ip nat translations Pro Inside global Inside local tcp 199.99.9.33:1091 10.10.10.10:1091 tcp 199.99.9.33:1092 10.10.10.10:1092 icmp 199.99.9.33:512 10.10.10.10:512 Outside local 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:512 Outside global 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:23 172.16.1.1:512

Step 12 Verify NAT and PAT Statistics


a. To view the NAT and PAT statistics type the show ip nat statistics command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. How many active translations have taken place? 2 c. How many addresses are in the pool? 4 Gateway#show ip nat statistics Total active translations: 2 (0 static, 2 dynamic; 2 extended) Outside interfaces: Serial0/0 Inside interfaces: FastEthernet0/0 Hits: 14 Misses: 2 Expired translations: 0 Dynamic mappings: -- Inside Source [Id: 1] access-list 1 pool public_access refcount 2 pool public_access: netmask 255.255.255.252 start 199.99.9.32 end 199.99.9.35 type generic, total addresses 4, allocated 1 (25%), misses 0 d. How many addresses have been allocated so far? 1

353 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

354 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip address 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

355 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway NAT Configuration Gateway#configure terminal Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#exit Gateway#copy running-config startup-config

356 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

357 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

358 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.1.6 Troubleshooting NAT and PAT Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a router for Network Address Translation (NAT) and Port Address Translation (PAT) Troubleshoot NAT and PAT using debug

Background/Preparation
The ISP has allocated a company the public CIDR IP address 199.99.9.32/30. This is equivalent to four public IP addresses. Since the company has an internal requirement for more than 30 addresses, the IT manager has decided to use NAT with PAT. Routing between the ISP and the gateway router is done using a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet will be represented by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

359 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Configure the hosts with the proper IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway
Each workstation should be able to ping the attached router. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot as necessary. Check and verify that the workstation has been assigned a specific IP address and default gateway. If running Windows 98, check using Start > Run > winipcfg. If running Windows 2000 or higher, check using ipconfig in a DOS window.

Step 4 Verify that the network is functioning


a. From the attached hosts, ping the FastEthernet interface of the default gateway router. b. Was the ping from the first host successful? Yes c. Was the ping from the second host successful? Yes d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router and host configurations to find the error. Then ping again until they both are successful.

Step 5 Create a static route


a. Create a static route from the ISP to the Gateway router. Addresses 199.99.9.32/30 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. What command checks the routing table contents? show ip route

360 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. If the route was not in the routing table, give one reason why this might be so? interface down ISP#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 199.99.9.0/27 is subnetted, 1 subnets 199.99.9.32 [1/0] via 200.2.2.18 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0/0 172.16.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets 172.16.1.1 is directly connected, Loopback0

Step 6 Create a default route


a. Add a default route, using the ip route command, from the Gateway router to the ISP router. This will forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes c. Try to ping from one of the workstations to the ISP serial interface IP address. d. Was the ping successful? No e. Why? No return route back to 10.10.10.0 network Gateway#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 200.2.2.17 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 200.2.2.0/30 is subnetted, 1 subnets 200.2.2.16 is directly connected, Serial0/0 10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets 10.10.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 200.2.2.17

361 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Define the pool of usable public IP addresses


To define the pool of public addresses, use the ip nat pool command: Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252

Step 8 Define an access list that will match the inside private IP addresses
To define the access list to match the inside private addresses, use the access list command: Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255

Step 9 Define the NAT translation from inside list to outside pool
To define the NAT translation, use the ip nat inside source command: Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload

Step 10 Specify the interfaces


On the active interfaces on the router, it needs to be specified as either inside or outside interfaces with respect to NAT. To do this, use the ip nat inside command: Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside

Step 11 Testing the configuration


a. Turn on debugging for the NAT process by typing debug ip nat at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. Does the debug command show any output? No c. If translation were taking place there would be output from the debug command. While reviewing the running configuration of the gateway router, it is seen that the ip nat outside statement has not been entered on the serial 0 interface. To configure this enter the following: Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside From the workstations, ping 172.16.1.1 If the ip nat outside statement was entered correctly, there should be output from the debug ip nat command. d. What does the line NAT*: S=10.10.10.? -> 199.99.9.33 mean? Source and destination hosts e. To stop the debug output, type undebug all at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. Gateway#debug ip nat IP NAT debugging is on Gateway#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
362 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway(config)#interface serial 0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)# 00:07:53: ip_ifnat_modified: old_if 2, new_if 1 00:08:04: NAT: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11391] 00:08:04: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11391] 00:08:05: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11392] 00:08:05: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11392] 00:08:06: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11393] 00:08:06: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11393] 00:08:07: NAT*: s=10.10.10.10->199.99.9.33, d=172.16.1.1 [11394] 00:08:07: NAT*: s=172.16.1.1, d=199.99.9.33->10.10.10.10 [11394] Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#exit Gateway#undebug all 00:08:50: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by console all All possible debugging has been turned off Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

363 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Configuration reference sheet


This sheet contains the basic configuration commands for the ISP and Gateway routers: ISP Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 172.16.1.1 255.255.255.255 ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0 ISP(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.17 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#clock rate 64000 ISP(config)#ip route 199.99.9.32 255.255.255.252 200.2.2.18 ISP(config)#end ISP#copy running-config startup-config Destination filename [startup-config]?[Enter] Gateway Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Gateway Gateway(config)#enable password cisco Gateway(config)#enable secret class Gateway(config)#line console 0 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#line vty 0 4 Gateway(config-line)#password cisco Gateway(config-line)#login Gateway(config-line)#exit Gateway(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 10.10.10.1 255.255.255.0 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#interface serial 0 Gateway(config-if)#ip add 200.2.2.18 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config-if)#no shutdown Gateway(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 200.2.2.17

364 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Gateway NAT configuration Gateway#configure terminal Gateway(config)#ip nat pool public-access 199.99.9.32 199.99.9.35 netmask 255.255.255.252 Gateway(config)#access-list 1 permit 10.10.10.0 0.0.0.255 Gateway(config)#ip nat inside source list 1 pool public-access overload Gateway(config)#interface fa0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat inside Gateway(config-if)#interface serial 0/0 Gateway(config-if)#ip nat outside Gateway(config-if)#exit Gateway(config)#exit Gateway#copy running-config startup-config

365 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

366 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

367 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.1.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.2.6 Configuring DHCP Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a router for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) to dynamically assign addresses to attached hosts.

Background/Preparation
Routing between the ISP and the campus router uses a static route between the ISP and the gateway, and a default route between the gateway and the ISP. The ISP connection to the Internet is identified by a loopback address on the ISP router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721

368 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Save the configuration


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt, on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 3 Create a static route


a. Addresses 172.16.12.0/24 have been allocated for Internet access outside of the company. Use the ip route command to create the static route: ISP(config)#ip route 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.1.6 b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes ISP#show ip route 00:02:08: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by consoleute Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set S C C 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 [1/0] via 172.16.1.6 172.16.13.0/24 is directly connected, Loopback0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0

Step 4 Create a default route


a. Use the ip route command to add a default route from the campus router to the ISP router. This will provide the mechanism to forward any unknown destination address traffic to the ISP: campus(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.5
369 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Is the static route in the routing table? Yes campus#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 172.16.1.5 to network 0.0.0.0 C C S* 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0 0.0.0.0/0 [1/0] via 172.16.1.5

Step 5 Create the DHCP address pool


To configure the campus LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.1.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.1.10

Step 6 Excluding addresses from pool


To exclude addresses from the pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.11

370 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Verifying DHCP Operation

a. At each workstation on the directly connected subnet configure the TCP/IP properties so the workstation will obtain an IP address and Domain Name System (DNS) server address from the DHCP server. After changing and saving the configuration, reboot the workstation. b. To confirm the TCP/IP configuration information on each host use Start > Run > winipcfg /all. If running Windows 2000, check using ipconfig /all in a DOS window. c. What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 172.16.12.11 d. What other information was automatically assigned? domain name, dns, netbios, subnet mask, gateway e. When was the lease obtained? Student should list time and date f. When will the lease expire? Student should list time and date

371 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 8 View DHCP bindings


a. From the campus router, the bindings for the hosts can be seen. To see the bindings, use the command show ip dhcp binding at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. campus#show ip dhcp binding IP address Hardware address 172.16.12.11 0100.10a4.188f.c9 Lease expiration Mar 02 1993 01:25 AM Type Automatic

b. What were the IP addresses assigned? 172.16.12.11

c. What are the three other fields listed in the output? mac address, lease expiration and type
Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

372 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Campus Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname campus campus(config)#enable password cisco campus(config)#enable secret class campus(config)#line console 0 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#line vty 0 4 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#interface serial 0/0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.6 255.255.255.252 campus(config-if)#clock rate 64000 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.16.1.5 campus(config-if)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config Campus DHCP configuration campus#configure terminal campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.1.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.1.10 campus(dhcp-config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit campus(config)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config ISP Router#configure terminal Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z. Router(config)#hostname ISP ISP(config)#enable password cisco ISP(config)#enable secret class ISP(config)#line console 0 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#line vty 0 4 ISP(config-line)#password cisco ISP(config-line)#login ISP(config-line)#exit ISP(config)#interface loopback 0 ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#interface serial 0/0
373 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

ISP(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.5 255.255.255.252 ISP(config-if)#no shutdown ISP(config-if)#exit ISP(config)#ip route 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.1.6 ISP(config)#exit ISP#copy running-config startup-config

374 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

375 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

376 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.6

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 1.2.8 Configuring DHCP Relay Instructor Version 2600

Objective
A router will be configured for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). The ability for workstations to remotely obtain DHCP addresses will be added. Addresses will be dynamically assigned to the attached hosts.

Background/Preparation
A DHCP client uses IP broadcasts to find the DHCP server. However, these broadcasts are not forwarded by routers, so in the case of the remote LAN, the workstations will not be able to locate the DHCP server. The router must be configured with the ip helper-address command to enable forwarding of these broadcasts, as unicast packets, to the specific server. Routing between the remote router and the campus router is done using a static route between the remote router and gateway router, and a default route between the gateway router and remote router. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

377 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The interfaces

Step 2 Configure routing on the remote router


Use Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) as the routing protocol. Set up the network as area 0 and the process ID as 1: remote(config)#router ospf 1 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.3 area 0 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.13.0 0.0.0.3 area 0

Step 3 Configure routing on the campus router


a. Use OSPF as the routing protocol. Set up the network as area 0 and the process ID as 1: campus(config)#router ospf 1 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 b. Are there OSPF routes in the routing table? Yes remote#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks
378 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

O C C

172.16.12.0/24 [110/65] via 172.16.1.6, 00:00:12, Serial0/0 172.16.13.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0

campus#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set C O C 172.16.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 3 subnets, 2 masks 172.16.12.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0 172.16.13.0/24 [110/65] via 172.16.1.5, 00:00:14, Serial0/0 172.16.1.4/30 is directly connected, Serial0/0

Step 4 Save the configurations


At the privileged EXEC mode prompt on both routers, type the command copy running-config startup-config.

Step 5 Create the campus DHCP address pool on the campus router
To configure the campus LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10

Step 6 Create the remote DHCP address pool on the campus router
To configure the remote LAN pool, use the following commands: campus(dhcp-config)#ip dhcp pool remote campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.13.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.13.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10

Step 7 Exclude addresses from pool


a. To exclude addresses from the pool, use the following commands: campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.11 campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.13.1 172.16.13.11 This defines the address range to be excluded from dynamic issue by the DHCP server.
379 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Why would addresses be excluded? Servers, routers, and so on.

Step 8 Verify DHCP operation on the campus router

a. From the workstation directly connected to the campus router configure the TCP/IP properties for the workstation to obtain its IP properties automatically from DHCP. These properties include the IP address and the Domain Name System (DNS) server address. b. After changing the configuration, reboot the workstation. View the TCP/IP configuration information on each host. If running Windows 98, go to Start > Run > winipcfg /all. With Windows 2000 or higher, use ipconfig /all in a DOS command prompt window. c. What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 172.16.12.11

Step 9 Configuring DHCP relay


Configure the remote router with the ip helper-address command to enable forwarding of broadcasts, as unicast packets, to the specific server. This command must to be configured on the LAN interface of the remote router for DHCP to function: remote(config)#interface fastethernet 0 remote(config-if)#ip helper-address 172.16.12.1

Step 10 Verify DHCP operation on the remote router


a. Reboot the workstation attached to the remote router. b. Is there a valid address assigned from the DHCP pool? No
380 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

What IP address was assigned to the workstation? 169.254.106.176

d. If there is no IP address, troubleshoot the workstation and router configurations and repeat Step 11.

Step 11 View DHCP bindings


a. From the campus router, the bindings for the hosts can be seen. To see the bindings, use the command show ip dhcp binding at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. What are the IP addresses assigned to the hosts? 172.16.12.11 172.16.13.11 campus#show ip dhcp binding IP address Client-ID/ Hardware address 172.16.12.11 0108.0046.06fb.b6 172.16.13.11 0542.0010.0a21.cb Lease expiration Mar 02 2003 04:41 PM Mar 02 2003 04:45 PM Type Automatic Automatic

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

381 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Remote router configuration Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname remote remote(config)#enable password cisco remote(config)#enable secret class remote(config)#line console 0 remote(config-line)#password cisco remote(config-line)#login remote(config-line)#exit remote(config)#line vty 0 4 remote(config-line)#password cisco remote(config-line)#login remote(config-line)#exit remote(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 remote(config-if)#ip address 172.16.13.1 255.255.255.0 remote(config-if)#no shutdown remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#interface serial 0/0 remote(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.5 255.255.255.252 remote(config-if)#no shutdown remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#router ospf 1 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 remote(config-router)#network 172.16.13.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 remote(config-router)#end remote#copy running-config startup-config Campus router configuration Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname campus campus(config)#enable password cisco campus(config)#enable secret class campus(config)#line console 0 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#line vty 0 4 campus(config-line)#password cisco campus(config-line)#login campus(config-line)#exit campus(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.12.1 255.255.255.0 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#interface serial 0/0 campus(config-if)#ip address 172.16.1.6 255.255.255.252 campus(config-if)#clock rate 56000 campus(config-if)#no shutdown campus(config-if)#exit campus(config)#router ospf 1 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 campus(config-router)#network 172.16.12.0 0.0.0.255 area 0 campus(config-router)#end campus#copy running-config startup-config

382 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

DHCP pool configurations Campus pool campus(config)#ip dhcp pool campus campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.12.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.12.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit Remote pool campus(config)#ip dhcp pool remote campus(dhcp-config)#network 172.16.13.0 255.255.255.0 campus(dhcp-config)#default-router 172.16.13.1 campus(dhcp-config)#dns-server 172.16.12.2 campus(dhcp-config)#domain-name foo.com campus(dhcp-config)#netbios-name-server 172.16.12.10 campus(dhcp-config)#exit campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.12.1 172.16.12.10 campus(config)#ip dhcp excluded-address 172.16.13.1 172.16.13.10 campus(config)#exit campus#copy running-config startup-config Remote helper address configuration remote#configure terminal remote(config)#interface fa0/0 remote(config-if)#ip helper-address 172.16.12.1 remote(config-if)#exit remote(config)#exit remote#copy running-config startup-config

383 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor) . Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

384 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

385 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 1.2.8

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.1.7 Troubleshooting a Serial Interface Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a serial interface on two routers. Use show commands to troubleshoot connectivity issues.

Background/Preparation
Configure the appropriate serial interfaces to allow connectivity between the two routers. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

386 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Paris interface as shown


Configure the Paris router serial interface as follows: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the London interface as shown


Configure the London router serial interface as follows: London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


London#copy running-config startup-config Paris#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on London
London#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. London#show interface serial 0 Serial0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 128 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:06, output 00:00:00, output hang never
387 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Last clearing of "show interface" counters 03:02:45 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/32 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 96 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 1039 packets input, 67974 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 753 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 1047 packets output, 77227 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 4 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up Answer the following questions: a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. b. What type of problem is indicated in the last statement? Datalink (Layer 2) related c. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.1. Encapsulation HDLC

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Paris
Paris#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. Answer the following questions: a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. b. Internet address is 192.168.15.2. c. Encapsulation HDLC d. To what OSI layer is the Encapsulation referring? Layer 2 e. Why is the interface down? Clock rate not set on DCE Interface Paris#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:04:44 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec
388 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 15 packets output, 869 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 10 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 16 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 7 Correct the clock location


The clock rate statement has been placed on the wrong interface. It is currently placed on the Paris router, but the London router is the Data Communications Equipment (DCE). Remove the clock rate statement from the Paris router using the no version of the command and then add it to the London router configuration.

Step 8 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Paris


Paris#show interface serial 0 a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. b. What is the difference in the Line and Protocol status recorded on Paris earlier? Why? Now both are UP due to the correct clock rate setting. Paris#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:07, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:07:47 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 31 packets input, 2864 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 21 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 1 input errors, 0 CRC, 1 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 43 packets output, 3231 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 11 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 20 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

389 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 9 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
London#ping 192.168.15.2 Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 a. Can the serial interface on the Paris router be pinged from London? Yes b. Can the serial interface on the London router be pinged from Paris? Yes c. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. London#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/40 ms London# Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/32 ms Paris# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

390 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config)#line console 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config)#interface serial 0/0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config Removing the clock from Paris Serial DTE interface Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0/0 Paris(config-if)#no clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config London Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname London London(config)#enable password cisco London(config)#enable secret class London(config)#line vty 0 4 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#exit London(config)#line con 0 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#exit London(config)#interface serial 0/0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config Configuring the clock on London Serial DCE interface London#configure terminal London(config)#interface serial 0/0 London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config
391 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

392 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

393 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.1.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.2 Configuring PPP Encapsulation Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure the serial interfaces on two routers with the PPP protocol. Test the link for connectivity.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions sheet. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

394 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Dublin interface as shown


Configure the Dublin router serial interface as follows: Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Washington interface as shown


Configure the Washington router serial interface as follows: Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Washington
Washington#show interface serial 0 a. This will show the details of interface serial 0. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.1.

d. Encapsulation HDLC

395 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:04, output 00:00:03, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:06:09 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 16 packets input, 902 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 16 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 35 packets output, 2939 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 2 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Dublin
Dublin#show interface serial 0 a. This will show the details of interface serial 0. a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. b. Internet address is 192.168.15.2. c. Encapsulation HDLC Dublin#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:02, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:05:19 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 11 packets input, 1068 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 11 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 25 packets output, 1603 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 3 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 14 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

396 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Step 7 Change the encapsulation type


Change the encapsulation type to PPP by typing encapsulation ppp at the interface serial 0 configuration mode prompt on both routers. Washington(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation ppp

Step 8 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Washington


Washington#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Washington#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:13, output 00:00:10, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:17 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 11 packets input, 1220 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 7 packets output, 366 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 9 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Dublin


Dublin#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Dublin#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open
397 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:02, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:28 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 10 packets input, 412 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 15 packets output, 1280 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 4 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 10 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
Washington#ping 192.168.15.2 Dublin#ping 192.168.15.1 a. Can the serial interface on the Dublin router be pinged from Washington? Yes b. Can the serial interface on the Washington router be pinged from Dublin? Yes c. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Washington#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/32 ms Washington# Dublin#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/28 ms Dublin# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

398 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Washington Washington(config)#enable password cisco Washington(config)#enable secret class Washington(config)#line vty 0 4 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config)#line console 0 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Configuring PPP on Washington Washington#configure terminal Washington(config)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Dublin Dublin(config)#enable password cisco Dublin(config)#enable secret class Dublin(config)#line vty 0 4 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#exit Dublin(config)#line console 0 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#exit Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shut Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config Configuring PPP on Dublin Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config
399 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter. Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

400 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface

401 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.3 Configuring PPP Authentication Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure PPP authentication using CHAP on two routers.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

402 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Tokyo interface as shown


Configure the Tokyo router serial interface as follows: Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Madrid interface as shown


Configure the Madrid router serial interface as follows: Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Madrid(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Madrid(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Madrid(config-if)#no shutdown Madrid(config-if)#exit Madrid(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Madrid#copy running-config startup-config Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Madrid


Madrid#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Madrid#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set
403 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:09, output 00:00:09, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:35 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 10 packets input, 136 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 10 packets output, 136 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Tokyo


Tokyo#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Tokyo#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:02, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:29 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue :0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 12 packets input, 168 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 12 packets output, 168 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 7 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2

404 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1 If the pings are unsuccessful, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until both pings are successful.

Step 8 Configure PPP authentication


Configure the username and password on the Madrid router. The passwords must be the same on both routers. The username must reflect the other routers hostname exactly. The password and user names are case sensitive: Madrid(config)#username Tokyo password cisco Madrid(config)#interface serial 0 Madrid(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

Step 9 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router: Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 b. Is the ping successful? No c. Why? CHAP not setup on Tokyo Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: ..... Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)

Step 10 Configure PPP authentication


Configure the username and password on the Tokyo router. The passwords must be the same on both routers. The username must reflect the other routers hostname exactly. The password and user names are case sensitive: Tokyo(config)#username Madrid password cisco Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

Step 11 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router: Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1 b. Is the ping successful? Yes c. Why? Username was setup on Tokyo. Tokyo#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms
405 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Madrid#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

406 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable password cisco Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#line vty 0 4 Tokyo(config-line)#password cisco Tokyo(config-line)#login Tokyo(config-line)#line console 0 Tokyo(config-line)#password cisco Tokyo(config-line)#login Tokyo(config-line)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Tokyo chap configuration Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#username Madrid password cisco Tokyo(config)#interface serial 0/0 Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Madrid Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Madrid Madrid(config)#enable password cisco Madrid(config)#enable secret class Madrid(config)#line vty 0 4 Madrid(config-line)#password cisco Madrid(config-line)#login Madrid(config-line)#line console 0 Madrid(config-line)#password cisco Madrid(config-line)#login Madrid(config-line)#exit Madrid(config)#interface serial 0/0 Madrid(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Madrid(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Madrid(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Madrid(config-if)#no shutdown Madrid(config-if)#exit Madrid(config)#exit Madrid chap configuration Madrid#configure terminal Madrid(config)#username Tokyo password cisco Madrid(config)#interface serial 0/0 Madrid(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Madrid(config-if)#exit
407 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

408 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

409 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.3

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.4 Verifying PPP Configuration Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a serial interface on two routers with the PPP protocol. Verify and test the link for connectivity.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

410 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Warsaw interface as shown


Configure the Warsaw router serial interface as follows: Warsaw(config)#interface serial 0 Warsaw(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Warsaw(config-if)#no shutdown Warsaw(config-if)#exit Warsaw(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the Brasilia interface as shown


Configure the Brasilia router serial interface as follows: Brasilia(config)#interface serial 0 Brasilia(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Brasilia(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Brasilia(config-if)#no shutdown Brasilia(config-if)#exit Brasilia(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


Brasilia#copy running-config startup-config Warsaw#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Brasilia
Brasilia#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. Encapsulation HDLC

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Warsaw
Warsaw#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0.

411 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Encapsulation HDLC

Step 7 Turn on PPP debugging


Turn on the PPP debug function on both routers by typing debug ppp tasks at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. Note: For the 2600 router, use the command debug ppp tasks.

Step 8 Change the encapsulation type


a. Change the encapsulation type to PPP by typing encapsulation ppp at the interface serial 0 configuration mode prompt on both routers. Brasilia(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Warsaw(config-if)#encapsulation ppp b. What did the debug function report when the PPP encapsulation was applied to each router? 00:03:07: Se0/0 AUTH: Started process 0 pid 4 00:03:07: Se0/0: AAA_PER_USER LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 queued 1/1/1 00:03:07: Se0/0: AAA_PER_USER LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 busy/0 started 1/1/1 00:03:07: Se0/0: AAA_PER_USER busy/0 done in 0 s. 0/0/1 c. LCP_UP (0x826DC7DC) id 0 (0s.) (0s.) (0s.)

Turn off the debug function by typing undebug all at the privileged EXEC mode prompt.

Step 9 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Brasilia


Brasilia#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Brasilia#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:01, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:04 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 7 packets input, 945 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 7 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 4 packets output, 362 bytes, 0 underruns
412 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 10 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Warsaw


Warsaw#show interface serial 0 Encapsulation PPP Warsaw#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:01, output 00:00:03, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:11 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 packets input, 386 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 5 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 8 packets output, 1228 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 11 Verify that the serial connection is functioning


a. Ping the other router to verify that there is connectivity between the two routers. Brasilia#ping 192.168.15.2 Warsaw#ping 192.168.15.1 b. Can the serial interface on the Warsaw router be pinged from Brasilia? __________________ c. Can the serial interface on the Brasilia router be pinged from Warsaw? __________________

d. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Brasilia#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!!
413 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms Brasilia# Warsaw#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/29/32 ms Warsaw# Warsaw# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

414 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Brasilia Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Brasilia Brasilia(config)#enable password cisco Brasilia(config)#enable secret class Brasilia(config)#line vty 0 4 Brasilia(config-line)#password cisco Brasilia(config-line)#login Brasilia(config-line)#exit Brasilia(config)#line con 0 Brasilia(config-line)#password cisco Brasilia(config-line)#login Brasilia(config-if)#exit Brasilia(config)#interface serial 0/0 Brasilia(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 Brasilia(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Brasilia(config-if)#no shutdown Brasilia(config-if)#exit Brasilia(config)#exit Brasilia#copy running-config startup-config Warsaw Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Warsaw Warsaw(config)#enable password cisco Warsaw(config)#enable secret class Warsaw(config)#line vty 0 4 Warsaw(config-line)#password cisco Warsaw(config-line)#login Warsaw(config-line)#exit Warsaw(config-line)#line con 0 Warsaw(config-line)#password cisco Warsaw(config-line)#login Warsaw(config-line)#exit Warsaw(config-line)#interface serial 0/0 Warsaw(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Warsaw(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Warsaw(config-if)#no shutdown Warsaw(config-if)#exit Warsaw(config)#exit Warsaw#copy running-config startup-config

415 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

416 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in IOS command to represent the interface.

417 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.4

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 3.3.5 Troubleshooting PPP Configuration Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure PPP on the serial interfaces of two routers. Use show and debug commands to troubleshoot connectivity issues.

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

418 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Paris interface as shown


Configure the Paris router serial interface as follows: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#clock rate 56000 Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit

Step 3 Configure the London interface as shown


Configure the London router serial interface as follows: London(config)#interface serial 0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#encapsulation ppp London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit

Step 4 Save the configuration


London#copy running-config startup-config Paris#copy running-config startup-config

Step 5 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on London
London#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. a. List the following information discovered from issuing this command. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. c. What type of problem is indicated in the last statement? Encapsulation d. Internet address is 192.168.15.1. e. Encapsulation PPP

419 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

London#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Listen Closed: IPCP, CDPCP Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:27 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/2/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 2 packets output, 28 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 2 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 6 Enter the command show interface serial 0 (refer to interface chart) on Paris
Paris#show interface serial 0 This will show the details of interface serial 0. a. List the following information discovered from issuing this command. b. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is down. c. Internet address is 192.168.15.2.

d. Encapsulation HDLC e. To what OSI layer is the Encapsulation referring? Layer 2 f. If the Serial interface was configured, why did the show interface serial 0 output show that the interface is down? Clock rate is not set on the London DCE and the encapsulation is HDLC. Paris#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is down Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation HDLC, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) Last input never, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:04:02 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
420 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 19 packets output, 1230 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 14 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 7 Correct the clock location


The clock rate statement has been placed on the wrong interface. It is currently placed on the Paris router, but the London router is the Data Communications Equipment (DCE). Remove the clock rate statement from the Paris router using the no version of the command and then add it to the London routers configuration. London#configure terminal London(config)#interface serial 0/0 London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#exit

Step 8 Enter the command show cdp neighbors on London


a. Is there any output from the command? No b. Should there be output? No London#show cdp neighbors Capability Codes: R - Router, T - Trans Bridge, B - Source Route Bridge S - Switch, H - Host, I - IGMP, r - Repeater Device ID Port ID Local Intrfce Holdtme Capability Platform

Step 9 Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on London


a. It may take 60 seconds or more before output occurs. b. Is there output? Yes c. What is the output saying? Request timeout d. Is there a problem with PPP encapsulation on the London router or the Paris router? Paris e. Why? PPP Encapsulation is not set f. What were the encapsulations listed for the interfaces? London? PPP Paris? HDLC

g. Is there an issue with the above statement? Yes h. What is the issue? The router encapsulations do not match each other. London# 00:07:48: Se0/0 LCP: TIMEout: State REQsent 00:07:48: Se0/0 LCP: O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 77 len 10 00:07:48: Se0/0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6)
421 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

00:07:50: 00:07:50: 00:07:50: 00:07:52: 00:07:52: 00:07:52: 00:07:54: 00:07:54: 00:07:54: 00:07:56: 00:07:56: 00:08:26: 00:08:26: 00:08:26: 00:08:28: 00:08:28:

Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0

LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP: LCP:

TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 78 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 79 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 80 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BEEBE6 (0x050609BEEBE6) TIMEout: State REQsent State is Listen TIMEout: State Listen O CONFREQ [Listen] id 81 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BFAF37 (0x050609BFAF37) TIMEout: State REQsent O CONFREQ [REQsent] id 82 len 10 MagicNumber 0x09BFAF37 (0x050609BFAF37)

00:08:28: Se0/0 LCP:

Step 10 Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on the Paris router
a. Enter the command debug ppp negotiation on the Paris router at the privileged EXEC mode prompt. b. Is there any output from the debug command? No Paris#debug ppp negotiation PPP protocol negotiation debugging is on

Step 11 Correct the encapsulation type


a. Convert the encapsulation to PPP on the Paris router. b. Is there any output from the debug command? Yes c. Does it confirm link establishment? Yes Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0/0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Paris(config-if)# 00:09:48: Se0/0 PPP: Phase is DOWN, Setup [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0/0 PPP: Using default call direction 00:09:48: Se0/0 PPP: Treating connection as a dedicated line 00:09:48: Se0/0 PPP: Phase is ESTABLISHING, Active Open [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09F12828 (0x050609F12828) 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 101 len 10 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09C0E151 (0x050609C0E151) 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 101 len 10 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09C0E151 (0x050609C0E151) 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: MagicNumber 0x09F12828 (0x050609F12828) 00:09:48: Se0/0 LCP: State is Open 00:09:48: Se0/0 AUTH: Started process 0 pid 23 00:09:48: Se0/0 PPP: Phase is UP [0 sess, 0 load] 00:09:48: Se0/0 IPCP: O CONFREQ [Closed] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0/0 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.2 (0x0306C0A80F02) 00:09:48: Se0/0 CDPCP: O CONFREQ [eClosed] id 1 len 4 00:09:48: Se0/0 IPCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 1 len 10 00:09:48: Se0/0 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.1 (0x0306C0A80F01)
422 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48: 00:09:48:

Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0 Se0/0

IPCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 1 len 10 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.1 (0x0306C0A80F01) CDPCP: I CONFREQ [REQsent] id 1 len 4 CDPCP: O CONFACK [REQsent] id 1 len 4 IPCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 10 IPCP: Address 192.168.15.2 (0x0306C0A80F02) IPCP: State is Open CDPCP: I CONFACK [ACKsent] id 1 len 4 CDPCP: State is Open

00:09:48: Se0/0 IPCP: Install route to 192.168.15.1nd

Step 12 Enter the command show interface serial 0 on Paris


Paris#show interface serial 0 a. Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. b. Encapsulation PPP c. What is the difference in the Line and Protocol status recorded on Paris earlier? Why? Both are UP. Proper configuration of the serial interfaces Paris#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial Internet address is 192.168.15.2/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LCP Open Open: IPCP, CDPCP Last input 00:00:00, output 00:00:00, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:00:19 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/256 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 1158 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 10 packets input, 408 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 9 packets output, 388 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 13 Verify that the serial connection is functioning by pinging the serial interface of the other router
London#ping 192.168.15.1 Paris#ping 192.168.15.2

423 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

a. From London, can the serial interface ping the Paris router? Yes b. From Paris, can the serial interface ping the London router? Yes c. If the answer is no for either question, troubleshoot the router configurations to find the error. Then do the pings again until the answer to both questions is yes. Paris#ping 192.168.15.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms London#ping 192.168.15.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.15.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/33/36 ms Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

424 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris Router#configure terminal Paris(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config)#line con 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config)#interface serial 0/0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config London Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname London London(config)#enable password cisco London(config)#enable secret class London(config)#line vty 0 4 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#exit London(config)#line con 0 London(config-line)#password cisco London(config-line)#login London(config-line)#exit London(config)#interface serial 0/0 London(config-if)#ip address 192.168.15.1 255.255.255.0 London(config-if)#encapsulation ppp London(config-if)#no shutdown London(config-if)#clock rate 56000 London(config-if)#exit London(config)#exit London#copy running-config startup-config

425 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

426 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

427 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 3.3.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.2.1 Configuring ISDN BRI (U-Interface) Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure an ISDN router to make a successful connection to a local ISDN switch.

Background/Preparation
This lab assumes that a router with an ISDN BRI U interface is available. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the ISDN switch and cloud. If an ISDN router is not available, review the lab and perform as many noninterface commands as possible. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

428 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

Step 2 Verifying the ISDN BRI switch type


a. Not all ISDN switch types are the same worldwide and the first step is to configure the following: The ISDN TE1 device The router What ISDN switch type is in use

This information will be provided by the ISDN telco provider. In this case, the ISDN Switch type, supported by the Adtran simulator, is National ISDN-1, North America. It is configured, on the router, using the keyword basic-ni. To check the ISDN BRI status, issue the following command before issuing any configuration commands: Ottawa#show isdn status b. What is the Layer 1 status? Deactivated c. What is the ISDN switch type? None Ottawa#show isdn status **** No Global ISDN Switchtype currently defined **** ISDN BRI0/0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = none Layer 1 Status: DEACTIVATED Layer 2 Status: Layer 2 NOT Activated Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x0 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 3 Specifying the switch type


a. To specify the ISDN switch type use the isdn switch-type command at the global configuration mode prompt. The different switch types available may be reviewed using the isdn switch-type ? command: Ottawa#configure terminal Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type ? Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type ? basic-1tr6 1TR6 switch type for Germany basic-5ess AT&T 5ESS switch type for the U.S. basic-dms100 Northern DMS-100 switch type basic-net3 NET3 switch type for UK and Europe
429 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

basic-ni basic-qsig basic-ts013 ntt vn3

National ISDN switch type QSIG switch type TS013 switch type for Australia NTT switch type for Japan VN3 and VN4 switch types for France

b. How many different switch types are available? 9 c. To configure the router to communicate with a National ISDN-1 switch type: Ottawa(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni

Step 4 Verifying switch status


a. Check the state of the ISDN Interface again. Ottawa#show isdn status b. What is the Layer 1 status? Deactivated c. What is the ISDN switch type? basic-ni Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0/0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: DEACTIVATED Layer 2 Status: Layer 2 NOT Activated Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x0 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 5 Activate the BRI connection


Activate the ISDN BRI using the no shutdown command at the interface configuration prompt. Ottawa#configure terminal Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0 Ottawa(config-if)#no shutdown

Step 6 Review switch status


a. At this stage the ISDN BRI should be physically active and one TEI should have been negotiated. Ottawa#show isdn status b. What is the Layer 1 status? Active c. What is the ISDN switch type? basic-ni
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

430 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

d. Has the Layer 2 status changed? Yes Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0/0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: ACTIVE Layer 2 Status: TEI = 64, Ces = 1, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x80000003 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 0 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 7 Configuring ISDN SPIDs


Depending on region, ISDN service profile identifiers (SPIDs) may have to be specified for the ISDN Switch to respond to the ISDN TE1 correctly. The SPIDs, supported by the Adtran simulator, are specified as isdn spid1 and isdn spid2. To configure the SPIDs issue the following commands: Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001

Step 8 Review switch status


a. Check the state of the ISDN Interface again: Ottawa#show isdn status b. What does the output specify about spid1? TEI 64, ces = 1, state = 8(established) spid1 configured, spid1 NOT sent, spid1 NOT valid c. What does the output specify about spid2? TEI Not Assigned, ces = 2, state = 1(terminal down) spid2 configured, spid2 NOT sent, spid2 NOT valid d. Careful examination of this output shows that the assigned SPID values have not been sent to the ISDN switch and verified. The reason for this is that they were specified after the ISDN interface was enabled. To send the SPID values the interface must be reset..

Step 9 Resetting the interface


a. To manually reset the ISDN BRI interface issue the command clear interface bri 0. This will cause all ISDN parameters to be renegotiated. Issue the clear command on the router and then check the ISDN interface status. SPID1 and SPID2 will now be sent and validated: Ottawa#clear interface bri 0 Ottawa#show isdn status

431 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. Have SPID1 and SPID2 been sent and verified? Yes Ottawa#show isdn status Global ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni ISDN BRI0/0 interface dsl 0, interface ISDN Switchtype = basic-ni Layer 1 Status: ACTIVE Layer 2 Status: TEI = 64, Ces = 1, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED TEI = 65, Ces = 2, SAPI = 0, State = MULTIPLE_FRAME_ESTABLISHED TEI 64, ces = 1, state = 5(init) spid1 configured, spid1 sent, spid1 valid Endpoint ID Info: epsf = 0, usid = 70, tid = 1 TEI 65, ces = 2, state = 5(init) spid2 configured, spid2 sent, spid2 valid Endpoint ID Info: epsf = 0, usid = 70, tid = 2 Layer 3 Status: 0 Active Layer 3 Call(s) Active dsl 0 CCBs = 0 The Free Channel Mask: 0x80000003 Number of L2 Discards = 0, L2 Session ID = 1 Total Allocated ISDN CCBs = 0

Step 10 Save the configuration and reboot


a. Save the configuration and reboot the router. This time, verify that the ISDN Interface has correctly negotiated with the ISDN switch. Review activity on the ISDN Interface using the show isdn active command: Ottawa#copy running-config startup-config Ottawa#reload Ottawa#show isdn active Ottawa#show isdn active ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ISDN ACTIVE CALLS ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Call Calling Called Remote Seconds Seconds Seconds Charges Type Number Number Name Used Left Idle Units/Currency ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Out 6120 Ottawa 165 74 45 0 Note to instructor: This is sample output and may not be identical to that produced locally. b. The history table has a maximum of how many entries? History table has a maximum of 100 entries. c. History table data is retained for how long? History table data is retained for a maximum of 15 Minutes.

432 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

433 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router>enable Router#configure terminal Router(config)# Router(config)#hostname Ottawa Ottawa(config)#enable password cisco Ottawa(config)#enable secret class Ottawa(config)#line console 0 Ottawa(config-line)#password cisco Ottawa(config-line)#login Ottawa(config-line)#exit Ottawa(config)#line vty 0 4 Ottawa(config-line)#password cisco Ottawa(config-line)#login Ottawa(config-line)#exit Ottawa(config)#interface bri 0/0 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Ottawa(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Ottawa(config-if)#no shutdown Ottawa(config-if)#exit Ottawa(config)#exit Ottawa#copy running-config startup-config

434 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

435 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

436 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.3.2 Configuring Legacy DDR Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure an ISDN router to make a legacy dial-on-demand routing (DDR) call to another ISDN capable router. When the DDR connection is successfully made, augment the configuration to specify that only http traffic will bring up the link.

Background/Preparation
In this lab, 2 ISDN routers are required. If ISDN routers are not available, review the lab to become familiar with the process. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the switch/ISDN cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

437 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure all of the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Define switch type and spid numbers


The switch type and spid numbers need to be specified on the routers. Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown

438 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Defining static routes for DDR


a. Use static and default routes instead of dynamic routing, in order to reduce the cost of the dialup connection. To configure a static route, the network address of the network to be reached must be known. The IP address of the next router on the path to this destination must be known as well. Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 b. Perform a show IP route to verify routes exist.

Step 4 Specifying interesting traffic for DDR


Specify the traffic that will cause the DDR interface to dialup the remote router. For the moment, declare that all IP traffic is interesting. This is done using the dialer-list command: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#end Note to instructor: Please have students use the exit command here, not the end command.

Step 5 Configuring DDR dialer information


a. Configure the correct dialer information so that the dialer profile and dialer interface function correctly. This includes all of the following: IP address information PPP configuration Name Passwords Dial number Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 b. Configure the PPP information: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap

439 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

Configure the dial information: Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 120 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000

Step 6 Configuring DDR Dialer Information


Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 120 Moscow(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.1 name Tokyo 5551000

Step 7 Configure dialer information


a. The dial information must specify the remote name of the remote router in the dialer profile. It must also specify the dial string, or phone number, to use to contact the remote device. b. To configure the dial information on Tokyo, use the following: Tokyo(config)#interface Tokyo(config-if)#dialer Tokyo(config-if)#dialer Tokyo(config-if)#dialer c. dialer 0 remote-name Moscow string 5552000 string 5552001

To configure the dial information on Moscow, use the following: Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001

Step 8 Associate dialer profiles


a. To associate the dialer profiles with real dialer interfaces create a dialer pool putting the interfaces and the associated profiles in a common pool. b. On Tokyo, the commands syntax is as follows: Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1

440 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

c.

On Moscow, the commands syntax is the following: Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1

Step 9 Configure dialer timeouts


a. Configure a dialer idle-timeout of 60 seconds for each of the dialer interfaces: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 b. Repeat these commands on Moscow.

Step 10 View the Tokyo router configuration


a. To view the configuration, use the show running-config command: Tokyo#show running-config b. What authentication is being used? CHAP

c. What are the dialer strings on the Tokyo router? 5551000 and 5551001
Tokyo#show running-config Building configuration... Current configuration : 1069 bytes ! version 12.2 service timestamps debug uptime service timestamps log uptime no service password-encryption ! hostname tokyo ! enable secret 5 $1$aa79$uoSAji.3JcowvprK0RHnW. ! username moscow password 0 class memory-size iomem 15 ip subnet-zero ! ! isdn switch-type basic-ni call rsvp-sync ! interface fastethernet0/0 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 half-duplex interface Serial0/0 no ip address shutdown no fair-queue ! interface BRI0/0
441 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp ppp authentication chap dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000 dialer-group 1 isdn switch-type basic-ni isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 interface Serial0/1 no ip address shutdown ! interface Dialer0 no ip address dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Moscow dialer string 5552000 dialer string 5552001 no cdp enable ! ip classless ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 ip http server ! dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit ! dial-peer cor custom ! line con 0 password cisco login line aux 0 line vty 0 4 password cisco login ! end

Step 11 Verifying the DDR Configuration


a. Now, generate some interesting traffic across the DDR link from both remote routers, Moscow and Tokyo, to verify that connections are made correctly and the dialer profiles are functioning: Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If not troubleshoot the router configuration. Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: 01:51:35: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0/0:1, changed state to up..

442 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

01:51:38: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0/0:1, changed stat e to up 01:51:167503724608: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0/0:2, changed state to up.!! Success rate is 40 percent (2/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/32 ms tokyo# 01:51:40: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0/0:2, changed stat e to up 01:51:41: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0/0:1 is now connected to 5552000 moscow 01:51:45: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0/0:2 is now connected to Moscow Note:If the Moscow router is pinged again quickly before the dialer idle timeout (60 seconds) is reached the ISDN connection does not have to be dialed again and all 5 pings reach the destination quickly. Tokyo#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms tokyo# d. Use the show dialer command to show us the reason for the call. This information is shown for each channel. Tokyo#show dialer e. Which dialer strings are associated with Dialer0? 5552000 and 5552001 f. What is the last status for dial string 5552000 in the Dialer0 readout? Tokyo#show dialer BRI0/0 - dialer type = ISDN Dial String Successes 5552000 2 Failures 0 Last DNIS 00:29:16 Last status successful

0 incoming call(s) have been screened. 0 incoming call(s) rejected for callback. BRI0/0:1 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle BRI0/0:2 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Di0 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle
443 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Number of active calls = 0 Dial String 5552000 5552001 Successes 0 0 Failures 0 0 Last DNIS never never Last status Default Default

g. Use the show interface command and note that the output shows that the interface is spoofing. This provides a mechanism for the interface to simulate an active state for internal processes, such as routing, on the router. The show interface command can also be used to display information about the B channel: Tokyo#show interface bri 0 Tokyo#show interface bri 0/0 BRI0/0 is up, line protocol is up (spoofing) Hardware is PQUICC BRI with U interface Internet address is 192.168.3.1/24 MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Last input 00:00:00, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:46:37 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/16 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 48 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 1140 packets input, 4672 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 1138 packets output, 4658 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 4 carrier transitions Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

444 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.3.2 Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0/0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.2 name Moscow 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Moscow Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#ip route 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.3.1 Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0/0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Moscow(config-if)#dialer map ip 192.168.3.1 name Tokyo 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001
445 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#exit Moscow#copy running-config startup-config

446 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

447 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

448 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 4.3.7 Configuring Dialer Profiles Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure ISDN Dialer Profiles on the routers enabling a dial-on-demand routing (DDR) call to be made from two remote routers simultaneously into a central ISDN BRI router.

Background/Preparation
In this lab, 3 ISDN routers are required. If ISDN routers are not available, review the lab to become familiar with the process. An Adtran Atlas550 ISDN emulator is used to simulate the switch/ISDN cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

449 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the router


a. Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Define switch type and spid numbers


To configure the switch type and spid numbers use the following commands. Router(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Router(config)#hostname Sydney Sydney(config)#enable secret class Sydney(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Sydney(config)#interface fastethernet 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055530000001 5553000 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055530010001 5553001 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown
450 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Defining static routes for DDR


Use static and default routes instead of dynamic routing, in order to reduce the cost of the dialup connection. To configure a static route, the network address of the network that is going to be reached must be known. The IP address of the next router on the path to this destination must be known as well. Moscow#configure terminal Moscow(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.253.1 Sydney#configure terminal Sydney(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.254.1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2

Step 4 Specifying interesting traffic for DDR


Traffic must be defined as interesting to cause the DDR interface to dialup the remote router. For the moment, declare that all IP traffic is interesting using the dialer-list command. Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Sydney(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Moscow router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Sydney router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1

Step 5 Configuring DDR dialer information


Configure the correct dialer information so that the dialer profile and dialer interface function correctly. This includes all of the following: IP address information PPP configuration Name Passwords Dial number

451 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#username Sydney password class Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.2 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#interface bri 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#username Tokyo password class

Step 6 Configure dialer information


a. Next, the dial information must be configured to specify the remote name of the remote router in the Dialer Profile. The dial string, or phone number to use to contact this remote device must also be specified. Use the following commands to do this: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Sydney Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553001

452 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

b. To configure the dial information on Moscow, use the following: Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001 c. To configure the dial information on Sydney, use the following: Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551001

Step 7 Associate dialer profiles


a. Finally, associate the Dialer Profiles with the Dialer Interfaces that will be used, when needed. Create a Dialer Pool, and put the interfaces and the associated Dialer Profiles in a common pool. The commands for doing this are as follows: Tokyo(config-if)#interface bri 0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 b. On Moscow, the commands issued would be as follows: Moscow(config-if)#interface bri 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 c. Use the same commands to configure the Sydney router.

Step 8 Configure dialer timeouts


a. Configure a dialer idle-timeout of 60 seconds for each of the dialer interfaces: Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 b. Repeat these commands on Moscow and Sydney

453 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 9 View the Tokyo router configuration


a. To view the configuration, use the show running-config command: Tokyo#show running-config b. How many username statements are there? 2 c. What authentication type is being used for PPP? CHAP d. Which sections of the configuration list the authentication type? Interface Dialer e. What are the dialer strings on the Tokyo router? interface Dialer1 dialer string dialer string interface Dialer2 dialer string dialer string 5552000 5552001 5553000 5553001

Tokyo# Tokyo#show running-config Building configuration... Current configuration : 1535 bytes ! version 12.2 service timestamps debug uptime service timestamps log uptime no service password-encryption ! hostname "Tokyo" ! enable secret 5 $1$.Tf2$ph3oCXloaQGXpguejZTIJ0 ! username Moscow password 0 class username Sydney password 0 class ip subnet-zero ! ! ! isdn switch-type basic-ni ! ! ! interface FastEthernet0/0 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 duplex auto speed auto ! interface Serial0/0 no ip address shutdown no fair-queue ! interface BRI0/0 no ip address encapsulation ppp dialer pool-member 1
454 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

isdn switch-type basic-ni isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 ppp authentication chap ! interface FastEthernet0/1 no ip address shutdown duplex auto speed auto ! interface Serial0/1 no ip address shutdown ! interface Dialer1 description The Profile for the Moscow router ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Moscow dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer string 5552000 dialer string 5552001 dialer-group 1 ppp authentication chap ! interface Dialer2 description The Profile for the Sydney router ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation ppp dialer pool 1 dialer remote-name Sydney dialer idle-timeout 60 dialer string 5553000 dialer string 5553001 dialer-group 1 ppp authentication chap ! ip classless ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2 ip http server ! dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit ! line con 0 password cisco login line aux 0 line vty 0 4 password cisco login ! end

455 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 10 Verifying the DDR Configuration


a. Now, generate some interesting traffic across the DDR link from Moscow and Sydney to verify that connections are made correctly and the dialer profiles are functioning: Moscow#ping 192.168.1.1 b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If not troubleshoot the router configurations. 00:25:01: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface BRI0/0:1, changed state to up 00:25:01: %DIALER-6-BIND: Interface BR0/0:1 bound to profile Di0 00:25:04: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface BRI0/0:1, changed state to up Sydney#ping 192.168.1.1 e. Were the pings successful? Yes Sydney#ping 192.168.1.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 32/32/36 ms Sydney# 00:32:32: %ISDN-6-CONNECT: Interface BRI0/0:1 is now connected to 5551000 Tokyo f. If the pings were not successful troubleshoot the router configurations. g. Use the show dialer command to see the reason for the call. This information is shown for each channel: Tokyo#show dialer h. Which dialer strings are associated with Dialer1? 555-2000, 555-2001 i. What is the last status for dial string 5553000 in the Dialer2 readout? None Tokyo#show dialer BRI0/0 - dialer type = ISDN Dial String Successes Failures Last DNIS 0 incoming call(s) have been screened. 0 incoming call(s) rejected for callback. BRI0/0:1 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (120 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle BRI0/0:2 - dialer type = ISDN Idle timer (120 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle
456 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

d. What other information was displayed when the ping was issued?

Last status

Di1 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Number of active calls = 0 Dial String 5552000 5552001 Successes 0 0 Failures 0 0 Last DNIS never never Last status Default Default

Di2 - dialer type = DIALER PROFILE Idle timer (60 secs), Fast idle timer (20 secs) Wait for carrier (30 secs), Re-enable (15 secs) Dialer state is idle Number of active calls = 0 Dial String 5553000 5553001 Tokyo# j. Successes 0 0 Failures 0 0 Last DNIS never never Last status Default Default

Use the show interface command and note that the output shows that the interface is spoofing. This provides a mechanism for the interface to simulate an active state for internal processes, such as routing, on the router. The show interface command can also be used to display information about the B channel: Tokyo#show interface bri 0 Tokyo#show interface bri 0/0 BRI0/0 is up, line protocol is up (spoofing) Hardware is PQUICC BRI with U interface MTU 1500 bytes, BW 64 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation PPP, loopback not set Last input 00:00:01, output never, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:28:42 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0 Queueing strategy: weighted fair Output queue: 0/1000/64/0 (size/max total/threshold/drops) Conversations 0/1/16 (active/max active/max total) Reserved Conversations 0/0 (allocated/max allocated) Available Bandwidth 48 kilobits/sec 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 365 packets input, 1549 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 362 packets output, 1522 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 2 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 8 carrier transitions

Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

457 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Tokyo Tokyo#configure terminal Tokyo(config)#hostname Tokyo Tokyo(config)#enable secret class Tokyo(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Tokyo(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0/0 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055510000001 5551000 Tokyo(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055510010001 5551001 Tokyo(config-if)#no shutdown Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.253.2 Tokyo(config)#ip route 192.168.3.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.254.2 Tokyo(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Moscow router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#description The Profile for the Sydney router Tokyo(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.1 255.255.255.0 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0/0 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Tokyo(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#username Moscow password class Tokyo(config)#username Sydney password class Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Moscow Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5552001 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer remote-name Sydney Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553000 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer string 5553001 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface bri 0/0 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1
458 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 1 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#interface dialer 2 Tokyo(config-if)#dialer idle-timeout 60 Tokyo(config-if)#exit Tokyo(config)#exit Tokyo#copy running-config startup-config Moscow Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Moscow Moscow(config)#enable secret class Moscow(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Moscow(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0/0 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055520000001 5552000 Moscow(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055520010001 5552001 Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.253.1 Moscow(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#ip address 192.168.253.2 255.255.255.0 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0/0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Moscow(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Moscow(config-if)#no shutdown Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#username Tokyo password class Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Moscow(config-if)#dialer string 5551001 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface bri 0/0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#interface dialer 0 Moscow(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Moscow(config-if)#exit Moscow(config)#exit Moscow#copy running-config startup-config
459 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Sydney Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Sydney Sydney(config)#enable secret class Sydney(config)#isdn switch-type basic-ni Sydney(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0/0 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid1 51055530000001 5553000 Sydney(config-if)#isdn spid2 51055530010001 5553001 Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config)#exit Sydney(config)#ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.254.1 Sydney(config)#dialer-list 1 protocol ip permit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer-group 1 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#ip address 192.168.254.2 255.255.255.0 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0/0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#encapsulation ppp Sydney(config-if)#ppp authentication chap Sydney(config-if)#no shutdown Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#username Tokyo password class Sydney(config)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer remote-name Tokyo Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551000 Sydney(config-if)#dialer string 5551001 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#interface bri 0/0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer pool-member 1 Sydney(config-if)#interface dialer 0 Sydney(config-if)#dialer pool 1 Sydney(config-if)#exit Sydney(config)#exit Sydney#copy running-config startup-config

460 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

461 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

462 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 4.3.7

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.1 Configuring Frame Relay Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure a router to establish a connection to a local Frame Relay switch/cloud.

Background/Preparation
An Adtran Atlas550 Frame Relay emulator is used to simulate the Frame Relay switch/cloud. The Cork Wholesale Food Company has just had a Frame Relay circuit installed to its local central office (CO) by the telco carrier. The network administrator must confirm that the router and Frame Relay switch are able to successfully communicate. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

463 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configuring the serial interface


a. In Frame Relay, the customer router is considered the DTE device. In order to configure the serial interface, the Layer 2 Frame Relay frame type must be defined. To configure the frame type, use the following commands: Cork#configure terminal Cork(config)#interface serial 0 Cork(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf b. Next the format of the Frame Relay management protocol must be configured. To configure the Local Management Interface (LMI) type, use the following commands: Cork(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Cork(config-if)#no shutdown Cork(config-if)#end

Step 3 Verifying the Frame Relay configuration


a. To verify the configuration, use the show interface commands, related to Frame Relay. To view the serial interface configuration use the following command: Cork#show interface serial 0 b. What is the state of the interface? Serial 0 is up, line protocol is up. c. What is the encapsulation type? frame-relay ietf d. What state is the DTE LMI in? Up e. What is the LMI type? LMI type is ANSI Annex D. Cork#show interface serial 0/0 Serial0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is PowerQUICC Serial MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1544 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec, reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation FRAME-RELAY IETF, loopback not set Keepalive set (10 sec) LMI enq sent 7, LMI stat recvd 7, LMI upd recvd 0, DTE LMI up LMI enq recvd 0, LMI stat sent 0, LMI upd sent 0 LMI DLCI 0 LMI type is ANSI Annex D frame relay DTE Broadcast queue 0/64, broadcasts sent/dropped 0/0, interface broadcasts 0 Last input 00:00:04, output 00:00:04, output hang never Last clearing of "show interface" counters 00:01:34 Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 0
464 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Queueing strategy: fifo Output queue: 0/40 (size/max) 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 7 packets input, 128 bytes, 0 no buffer Received 0 broadcasts, 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 7 packets output, 98 bytes, 0 underruns 0 output errors, 0 collisions, 1 interface resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions DCD=up DSR=up DTR=up RTS=up CTS=up

Step 4 Reviewing switch assignments


a. To verify that the data-link connection identifiers (DLCIs) are defined on the switch use show frame-relay pvc. The DLCIs are learned by the router via LMI, and can be viewed with the following command: Cork#show frame-relay pvc b. What DLCI numbers are available on the switch? 102, 103, 104 c. What is the PVC status of the first DLCI? Inactive Cork#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0/0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 0 0 0 Inactive 0 0 3 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 0 0 0

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0/0 input pkts 0 output pkts 0 in bytes 0 out bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:30, last time pvc status changed 00:02:30 DLCI = 103, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0/0 input pkts 0 out bytes 0 out pkts dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0
465 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

output pkts 0 in bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0
Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:31, last time pvc status changed 00:02:31 DLCI = 104, DLCI USAGE = UNUSED, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0/0 input pkts 0 output pkts 0 in bytes 0 out bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0 switched pkts 0 Detailed packet drop counters: no out intf 0 out intf down 0 no out PVC 0 in PVC down 0 out PVC down 0 pkt too big 0 shaping Q full 0 pkt above DE 0 policing drop 0 pvc create time 00:02:32, last time pvc status changed 00:02:32

Step 5 Check the Frame Relay map


Cork#show frame-relay map This output shows that none of the DLCIs, defined on the switch, are in use. The permanent virtual circuit (PVC) is inactive and there is no current mapping between the Layer 2 DLCI and Layer 3 IP address as seen in the show frame-relay map command. No output since there is no mapping between DCLI and IP. Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

466 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Cork Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Cork Cork(config)#enable password cisco Cork(config)#enable secret class Cork(config)#line console 0 Cork(config-line)#password cisco Cork(config-line)#login Cork(config-line)#exit Cork(config)#line vty 0 4 Cork(config-line)#password cisco Cork(config-line)#login Cork(config-line)#exit Cork(config)#exit Cork#copy running-config startup-config Cork Frame Relay Configuration Cork#configure terminal Cork(config)#interface serial 0/0 Cork(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Cork(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Cork(config-if)#no shutdown Cork(config-if)#exit Cork(config)#exit Cork#copy running-config startup-config

467 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

468 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

469 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.1

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.2 Configuring Frame Relay PVC Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure two routers back-to-back as a Frame Relay permanent virtual circuit (PVC). This will be done manually, in the absence of a Frame Relay switch, and therefore there will be no Local Management Interface (LMI).

Background/Preparation
Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise. Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

470 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The Fast Ethernet interface

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configuring the Washington serial interface


First, define the Frame Relay frame type to be used on this link. To configure the encapsulation type, use the command encapsulation frame-relay ietf. Disable keepalive messages since there is no Frame Relay switch in this configuration and consequently no Frame Relay DCE: Washington#configure terminal Washington(config-if)#interface serial 0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Washington(config-if)#no keepalive Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown

Step 3 Configure the Frame Relay map on Washington


a. When sending an Ethernet frame to a remote IP address, the remote MAC address must be discovered, so that the correct frame type can be constructed. Frame Relay needs a similar mapping. b. The remote IP address needs to be mapped to the local DLCI (Layer 2 address), so the correctly addressed frame can be created locally for this PVC. Since there is no way of mapping the DLCI automatically with LMI disabled, this map must be created manually, using the frame-relay map command. The broadcast parameter also allows for IP broadcasts to use the same mapping for crossing this PVC: Washington(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.2 102 ietf broadcast

Step 4 Configure the DCE on Washington


In this configuration, when DCE cables are used, a clock signal is necessary. The bandwidth command is optional, but wise to use to verify bandwidth transmission. Another option is to title the connection using the description command. It is very useful to record information in the description about the PVC, such as remote contact person and the leased line circuit identifier: Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Washington(config-if)#description PVC to Dublin, DLCI 201, Circuit #DASS465875, Contact John Tobin (061-8886745)

471 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 5 Configure Dublin router


Configure the Dublin router using the following commands. Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config-if)#interface serial 0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Dublin(config-if)#no keepalive Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.1 201 ietf broadcast Dublin(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Dublin(config-if)#description PVC to Washington, DLCI 201, Circuit #DASS465866 Contact Pat White (091-6543211)

Step 6 Verifying Frame Relay PVC


a. On the Washington router, type the command show frame-relay pvc: Washington#show frame-relay pvc b. What is the DLCI number reported? 102 c. What is the PVC status? Static Washington#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0/0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 0 0 0 Inactive 0 0 0 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 1 0 0 d. What is the value of the DLCI USAGE? Local

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = STATIC, INTERFACE = Serial0/0 input pkts 5 out bytes 520 out pkts dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 output pkts 5 in bytes 520 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0

pvc create time 00:07:26, last time pvc status changed 00:03:18

472 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 7 Showing Frame Relay map


a. To view the Layer 2 to Layer 3 mapping, use the show frame-relay map command at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Washington#show frame-relay map b. What is the IP address shown? 192.168.1.2

c. What state is interface serial 0 in? Up


Washington#show frame-relay map Serial0/0 (up): ip 192.168.1.2 dlci 102(0x66,0x1860), static, broadcast, IETF

Step 8 Verify Frame Relay connectivity


a. From the Washington router, ping the Dublin router serial interface. b. Was the ping successful? Yes c. If the ping was not successful, troubleshoot the router configurations. Washington#ping 192.168.1.2 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.2, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 28/28/32 ms Washington# Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

473 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Washington Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Washington Washington(config)#enable password cisco Washington(config)#enable secret class Washington(config)#line console 0 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Washington(config-line)#password cisco Washington(config-line)#login Washington(config-line)#exit Washington(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Washington Frame Relay Configuration Washington#configure terminal Washington(config)#interface serial 0/0 Washington(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Washington(config-if)#no keepalive Washington(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Washington(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.2 102 ietf broadcast Washington(config-if)#clock rate 64000 Washington(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Washington(config-if)#description PVC to Dublin, DLCI 102, Circuit #DASS465875, Contact John Tobin (061-8886745) Washington(config-if)#no shutdown Washington(config-if)#exit Washington(config)#exit Washington#copy running-config startup-config Dublin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Dublin Dublin(config)#enable password cisco Dublin(config)#enable secret class Dublin(config)#line console 0 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#exit Dublin(config)#line vty 0 4 Dublin(config-line)#password cisco Dublin(config-line)#login Dublin(config-line)#exit Dublin(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

474 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Dublin Frame Relay Configuration Dublin#configure terminal Dublin(config)#interface serial 0/0 Dublin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Dublin(config-if)#no keepalive Dublin(config-if)#no shutdown Dublin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.2 255.255.255.0 Dublin(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 192.168.1.1 102 ietf broadcast Dublin(config-if)#bandwidth 64 Dublin(config-if)#$description PVC to Washington, DLCI 102,Circuit #DASS465866 Contact Pat White (091-6543211) Dublin(config-if)#exit Dublin(config)#exit Dublin#copy running-config startup-config

475 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

476 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

477 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.2

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Lab 5.2.5 Configuring Frame Relay Subinterfaces Instructor Version 2600

Objective
Configure three routers in a full-mesh Frame Relay network.

Background/Preparation
An Adtran Atlas550 Frame Relay emulator is used to simulate the Frame Relay switch/cloud. Cable a network similar to the one in the diagram above. Any router that meets the interface requirements displayed on the above diagram may be used. This includes the following and any of their possible combinations: 800 series routers 1600 series routers 1700 series routers 2500 series routers 2600 series routers

Please refer to the chart at the end of the lab to correctly identify the interface identifiers to be used based on the equipment in the lab. The configuration output used in this lab is produced from 1721 series routers. Any other router used may produce slightly different output. Conduct the following steps on each router unless specifically instructed otherwise.
478 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Start a HyperTerminal session. Note: Refer to the erase and reload instructions at the end of this lab. Perform those steps on all routers in this lab assignment before continuing.

Step 1 Configure the routers


Configure the following according to the chart: The hostname The console password The virtual terminal password The enable secret password The Fast Ethernet interface according to the chart

If problems occur during this configuration, refer to Lab 1.1.4a Configuring NAT.

Step 2 Configure the Serial 0 Interfaces


a. First, the Frame Relay encapsulation type to be used on this link must be defined using the following commands: Amsterdam#configure terminal Amsterdam(config)#interface serial 0 Amsterdam(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi b. Use a description field to store relevant information, such as the circuit number in case a line fault has to be reported: Amsterdam(config-if)#description Circuit #KPN465555 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown c. The same commands are used to configure the Berlin and Paris routers: Paris(config)#interface serial 0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Paris(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Paris(config-if)#description Circuit #FRT372826 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Berlin(config)#interface serial 0 Berlin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Berlin(config-if)#description Circuit #DTK465866 Berlin(config-if)#no shutdown

479 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 3 Create subinterfaces on the Amsterdam router


For each of the permanent virtual circuits (PVCs), create a subinterface on the serial port. This subinterface will be a point-to-point configuration. For consistency and future troubleshooting, use the data-link connection identifier (DLCI) number as the subinterface number. The commands to create a subinterface are as follows: Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0.102 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-if)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 102, Contact Rick Voight(+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 102 Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0.103 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-if)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 103, Contact P Wills(+49- 61 03 / 7 65 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 103

Step 4 Create subinterfaces on the Paris router


To configure the subinterfaces on the Paris router, use the following commands: Paris(config-if)#interface Serial 0.201 point-to-point Paris(config-if)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 201, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.4.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 201 Paris(config-if)#interface Serial 0.203 point-to-point Paris(config-if)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 203, Contact Peter Willis (+49- 61 03 / 7 66 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 203

Step 5 Create subinterfaces on the Berlin router


To configure the subinterfaces on the Berlin router, use the following commands: Berlin(config-if)#interface Serial 0.301 point-to-point Berlin(config-if)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 301, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.5.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 301 Berlin(config-if)#interface Serial 0.302 point-to-point Berlin(config-if)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 302, Contact Rick Voight (+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.6.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay interface-dlci 302

480 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Step 6 Configure IGRP routing


To configure the routing protocol Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) 100, use the following configuration syntax: Amsterdam(config-if)#router igrp Amsterdam(config-router)#network Amsterdam(config-router)#network Amsterdam(config-router)#network Paris(config-if)#router igrp Paris(config-router)#network Paris(config-router)#network Paris(config-router)#network 100 192.168.1.0 192.168.4.0 192.168.5.0

100 192.168.2.0 192.168.4.0 192.168.6.0 100 192.168.3.0 192.168.5.0 192.168.6.0

Berlin(config-if)#router igrp Berlin(config-router)#network Berlin(config-router)#network Berlin(config-router)#network

Step 7 Verifying Frame Relay PVC


a. On the Amsterdam router, issue the command show frame-relay pvc: Amsterdam#show frame-relay pvc b. How many active local PVCs are there? 2 c. What is the interface value? Serial0/0.102, Serial0/0.103 d. What is the PVC status? Active e. Which DLCI # is inactive? 104 f. From this it can be seen that there are three DLCIs defined on this Frame Relay circuit, and only two of them are in use. This is the way the Adtran 550 emulator has been configured. It is useful output, as it shows what would be seen if a DLCI is defined on the Frame Relay switch, but not configured on the router. The other DLCIs, 102 and 103, are ACTIVE and associated with their respective subinterfaces. It also shows that some packets have actually passed across the PVC. Amsterdam#show frame-relay pvc PVC Statistics for interface Serial0/0 (Frame Relay DTE) Local Switched Unused Active 2 0 0 Inactive 1 0 0 Deleted 0 0 0 Static 0 0 0

DLCI = 102, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = ACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0/0.102 input pkts 13 output pkts 14 in bytes 2180 out bytes 2254 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 14 out bcast bytes 2254 pvc create time 00:14:27, last time pvc status changed 00:02:59
481 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

DLCI = 103, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = ACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0/0.103 input pkts 16 output pkts 14 in bytes 2258 out bytes 2307 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast pkts 9 out bcast bytes 1787 pvc create time 00:14:29, last time pvc status changed 00:02:02 DLCI = 104, DLCI USAGE = LOCAL, PVC STATUS = INACTIVE, INTERFACE = Serial0/0 input pkts 0 out bytes 0 out pkts dropped 0 in FECN pkts 0 out BECN pkts 0 out bcast pkts 0 output pkts 0 in bytes 0 dropped pkts 0 in pkts dropped 0 out bytes dropped 0 in BECN pkts 0 out FECN pkts 0 in DE pkts 0 out DE pkts 0 out bcast bytes 0

pvc create time 00:14:30, last time pvc status changed 00:06:13

Step 8 Show the Frame Relay maps


a. Look at the frame relay maps by typing the command show frame-relay map at the privileged EXEC mode prompt: Amsterdam#show frame-relay map b. What is the status of the links? Up c. The DLCIs are defined as what type? Point-to-Point Amsterdam#show frame-relay map Serial0/0.103 (up): point-to-point dlci, dlci 103(0x67,0x1870), broadcast status defined, active Serial0/0.102 (up): point-to-point dlci, dlci 102(0x66,0x1860), broadcast status defined, active d. Are the DLCIs the same on the Paris router? No

Step 9 Show LMIs


a. Look at the Local Management Interface (LMI) statistics using the show frame-relay lmi command: Amsterdam#show frame-relay lmi b. Which fields have non-zero counter values? Num Status Enq. Sent, Num Status msgs Rcvd c. What is the LMI type? ANSI Amsterdam#show frame-relay lmi LMI Statistics for interface Serial0/0 (Frame Relay DTE) LMI TYPE = ANSI Invalid Unnumbered info 0 Invalid Prot Disc 0 Invalid dummy Call Ref 0 Invalid Msg Type 0
482 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Invalid Status Message 0 Invalid Information ID 0 Invalid Report Request 0 Num Status Enq. Sent 55 Num Update Status Rcvd 0

Invalid Lock Shift 0 Invalid Report IE Len 0 Invalid Keep IE Len 0 Num Status msgs Rcvd 56 Num Status Timeouts 0

Step 10 Check routing protocol


a. Use the show ip route command to verify that the PVCs are up and active: Amsterdam#show ip route b. Is the routing protocol working? Yes c. If not, troubleshoot the routers configurations. I 192.168.6.0/24 [100/10476] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0/0.102 [100/10476] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0/0.103 I 192.168.2.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0/0.102 I 192.168.3.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0/0.103 Amsterdam#show ip route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is not set C 192.168.4.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0.102 C 192.168.5.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0.103 I 192.168.6.0/24 [100/10476] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0/0.102 [100/10476] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0/0.103 C 192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0 I 192.168.2.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.4.2, 00:01:06, Serial0/0.102 I 192.168.3.0/24 [100/8486] via 192.168.5.2, 00:01:20, Serial0/0.103 d. List the IGRP routes

Step 11 Verify connectivity


a. Ping the fastethernet interfaces. b. Were the pings successful? Yes c. If the pings were not successful, troubleshoot the router configurations and repeat this step. Amsterdam#ping 192.168.1.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/4 ms
483 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Amsterdam#ping 192.168.2.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 36/39/40 ms Amsterdam#ping 192.168.3.1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.3.1, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 40/40/40 ms Upon completion of the previous steps, finish the lab by doing the following: Logoff by typing exit Turn the router off Remove and store the cables and adapter

484 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Amsterdam Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Amsterdam Amsterdam(config)#enable password cisco Amsterdam(config)#enable secret class Amsterdam(config)#line console 0 Amsterdam(config-line)#password cisco Amsterdam(config-line)#login Amsterdam(config-line)#exit Amsterdam(config)#line vty 0 4 Amsterdam(config-line)#password cisco Amsterdam(config-line)#login Amsterdam(config-line)#exit Amsterdam(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Amsterdam(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown Amsterdam(config-if)#exit Amsterdam(config)#exit Amsterdam#copy running-config startup-config Amsterdam Frame Relay and IGRP Configuration Amsterdam#configure terminal Amsterdam(config)#interface serial 0/0 Amsterdam(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Amsterdam(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Amsterdam(config-if)#description Circuit #KPN465555 Amsterdam(config-if)#no shutdown Amsterdam(config-if)#exit Amsterdam(config-if)#interface serial 0/0.102 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-subif)#description PVC to Paris, DLCI 102, contact Rick Voight(+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Amsterdam(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.4.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 102 Amsterdam(config-fr-dlci)#interface serial 0/0.103 point-to-point Amsterdam(config-subif)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 103, Contact P Wills (+49- 61 03 / 7 65 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Amsterdam(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.5.1 255.255.255.0 Amsterdam(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 103 Amsterdam(config-subif)#exit Amsterdam(config-if)#exit Amsterdam(config)#router igrp 100 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.1.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.4.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#network 192.168.5.0 Amsterdam(config-router)#exit Amsterdam(config)#exit Amsterdam#copy running-config startup-config Paris Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Paris Paris(config)#enable password cisco Paris(config)#enable secret class Paris(config)#line console 0 Paris(config-line)#password cisco Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#line vty 0 4 Paris(config-line)#password cisco
485 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5 Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Paris(config-line)#login Paris(config-line)#exit Paris(config-line)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Paris(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config

Paris Frame Relay and IGRP Configuration Paris#configure terminal Paris(config)#interface serial 0/0 Paris(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Paris(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Paris(config-if)#description Circuit #FRT372826 Paris(config-if)#no shutdown Amsterdam(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#interface Serial 0/0.201 point-to-point Paris(config-subif)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 201, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Paris(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.4.2 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 201 Paris(config-fr-dlci)#interface Serial 0/0.203 point-to-point Paris(config-subif)#description PVC to Berlin, DLCI 203, Contact Peter Willis (+49- 61 03 / 7 66 72 00) Circuit #DTK465866 Paris(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.6.1 255.255.255.0 Paris(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 203 Paris(config-subif)#exit Paris(config-if)#exit Paris(config)#router igrp 100 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.2.0 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.4.0 Paris(config-router)#network 192.168.6.0 Paris(config-router)#exit Paris(config)#exit Paris#copy running-config startup-config Berlin Router#configure terminal Router(config)#hostname Berlin Berlin(config)#enable password cisco Berlin(config)#enable secret class Berlin(config)#line console 0 Berlin(config-line)#password cisco Berlin(config-line)#login Berlin(config-line)#exit Berlin(config)#line vty 0 4 Berlin(config-line)#password cisco Berlin(config-line)#login Berlin(config-line)#exit Berlin(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0 Berlin(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-if)#no shutdown Berlin(config-if)#exit Berlin#copy running-config startup-config

486 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Berlin Frame Relay and IGRP Configuration Berlin#configure terminal Berlin(config)#interface serial 0/0 Berlin(config-if)#encapsulation frame-relay ietf Berlin(config-if)#frame-relay lmi-type ansi Berlin(config-if)#description Circuit #DTK465866 Berlin(config-if)#no shutdown Berlin(config-if)#exit Berlin(config)#interface Serial 0/0.301 point-to-point Berlin(config-subif)#description PVC to Amsterdam, DLCI 301, Contact Peter Muller (+31 20 623 32 67) Circuit #KPN465555 Berlin(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.5.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 301 Berlin(config-fr-dlci)#interface Serial 0/0.302 point-to-point Berlin(config-subif)#$ description PVC to Paris, DLCI 302, Contact Rick Voight (+33-1-5534-2234) Circuit #FRT372826 Berlin(config-subif)#ip address 192.168.6.2 255.255.255.0 Berlin(config-subif)#frame-relay interface-dlci 302 Berlin(config-subif)#exit Berlin(config-if)#exit Berlin(config)#router igrp 100 Berlin(config-router)#network 192.168.3.0 Berlin(config-router)#network 192.168.5.0 Berlin(config-router)#network 192.168.6.0 Berlin(config-router)#exit Berlin(config)#exit Berlin#copy running-config startup-config

487 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Erasing and reloading the router


Enter into the privileged EXEC mode by typing enable. If prompted for a password, enter class (if that does not work, ask the instructor). Router>enable At the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command erase startup-config. Router#erase startup-config The responding line prompt will be: Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. The response should be: Erase of nvram: complete Now at the privileged EXEC mode, enter the command reload. Router(config)#reload The responding line prompt will be: System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Proceed with reload? [confirm] Press Enter to confirm. In the first line of the response will be: Reload requested by console. After the router has reloaded the line prompt will be: Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: Type n and then press Enter. The responding line prompt will be: Press RETURN to get started! Press Enter.

Now the router is ready for the assigned lab to be performed.

488 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.

Router Interface Summary Router Ethernet Ethernet Serial Serial Model Interface #1 Interface #2 Interface #1 Interface #2 800 (806) Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) 1600 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 1700 FastEthernet 0 (FA0) FastEthernet 1 (FA1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2500 Ethernet 0 (E0) Ethernet 1 (E1) Serial 0 (S0) Serial 1 (S1) 2600 FastEthernet 0/0 (FA0/0) FastEthernet 0/1 (FA0/1) Serial 0/0 (S0/0) Serial 0/1 (S0/1) In order to find out exactly how the router is configured, look at the interfaces. This will identify what type and how many interfaces the router has. There is no way to effectively list all of the combinations of configurations for each router class. What is provided are the identifiers for the possible combinations of interfaces in the device. This interface chart does not include any other type of interface even though a specific router may contain one. An example of this might be an ISDN BRI interface. The string in parenthesis is the legal abbreviation that can be used in an IOS command to represent the interface.

489 - 489 CCNA 4: WAN Technologies v 3.1 - Lab 5.2.5

Copyright 2003, Cisco Systems, Inc.