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SIRAS

STANDARDS FOR INSPECTION, REPORTING, SAMPLING ANALYSIS AND

26th November, 2007

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SECTION 1

(About Shell) INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE (p7) THE SHELL GROUP HSE POLICY (p8)

1.1 1.2

SECTION 2

(About Quality Management ) MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS (QMS & QHSEMS) (p9) QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL (p9) PROCEDURE BASED INSPECTIONS (p9) CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT (p9) CORRECTIVE ACTION REPORTS (p10) TRAINING AND COMPETENCY (p10) INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL AUDITS (p10) SUB-CONTRACTING POLICY (p10) HSE POLICY & HSE TRAINING (p11)

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9

2.10 LABORATORY PROFICIENCY TESTING SCHEME (p11)

SECTION 3

(About Information Exchange) RESPONSIBILITIES (p12) CONTACT LISTS (p12) APPOINTMENT PROCEDURES (p13) GENERAL COMMUNICATIONS PROCEDURES (p14) REPORTING PROCEDURES (p14) OIL LOSS CARGO SUMMARY SHEETS (p16) VERBAL COMMUNICATION PROCEDURES (p16) INFORMATION EXCHANGE WITH LOCATION AND VESSEL KEY MEETINGS (p17)

3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 (p17) 3.9

3.10 PROTEST LETTERS (p17) 3.11 ARCHIVING (p18)

SECTION 4

(About Cargo Quality Assurance) RESTRICTED ACCESS TO SHORE FACILITY (p19) SUITABILITY OF SHORE FACILITY (p19) WATER CHECKS ON PRODUCT STORAGE TANKS (p19) USE OF SHORE TANK LOW SUCTION (p19) SUITABILITY OF VESSEL (p20) INERT GAS QUALITY (p22)

4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6

4.7 HYDROCARBON CONTENT OF VESSEL TANK ATMOSPHERE (p23) 4.8 SAFEGUARDS AGAINST VAPOUR PHASE CONTAMINATION (p23) 4.9 SAMPLING REQUIREMENTS (p24)

4.10 SAMPLING OF SHORE TANKS (p25) 4.11 SAMPLING OF SHORE LINES (p25)

SECTION 4

(About Cargo Quality Assurance continued)

4.12 MANIFOLD SAMPLING (p26) 4.13 FIRST FOOT SAMPLING (p27) 4.14 SAMPLING OF LOADED VESSELS TANKS (p27) 4.15 SAMPLING WITH MMC TYPE DEVICES (p28) 4.16 COMPOSITE SAMPLES (p28) 4.17 VOLATILITY SAMPLING (p29) 4.18 H2S SAMPLING (p29) 4.19 APPEARANCE DETERMINATION IN THE FIELD (p29) 4.20 ON BOARD BLENDING (p29)

SECTION 5

(About Quality Determination) ACTIONS ON RECEIVING NOMINATION (p31) PRODUCT SPECIFICATION AND TEST METHODS (p31) QUALITY TESTING ON SHORE TANKS (p31) QUALITY TESTING ON MANIFOLD AND LINE SAMPLES (p32) QUALITY TESTING ON VESSEL TANK SAMPLES (p32) QUALITY TESTING ON IN-LINE BLENDED PARCELS (p32) QUALITY TESTING ON BLENDS (p33) TESTING FOR H2S (p33) WITNESSED ANALYSIS (p34)

5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9

5.10 QUALITY CERTIFICATES (p34) 5.11 CALIBRATION OF EQUIPMENT (p35) 5.12 LABORATORY REAGENTS, SOLUTIONS AND STANDARDS (P35) 5.13 NOTIFICATION AND REPORTING (p35)

SECTION 6

(About Quantity Determination) GENERAL REQUIREMENTS (p36) SHORE SYSTEM (p36) MANUAL MEASUREMENT OF SHORE STORAGE TANKS (p37) CUSTOMS APPROVED ATG SYSTEMS (p37) SHORE METERING FACILITY (p37) FULLNESS OF SHORE LINE (p38) LNG & LPG SHORE MEASUREMENT (p38) MEASUREMENT ON BOARD A LOADED VESSEL (p39) MEASUREMENT AT STS TRANSFERS (p40)

6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9

6.10 EXCESSIVE FREE WATER (p41) 6.11 TANK INSPECTIONS - ROB AND OBQ (p41) 6.12 VEF DETERMINATION (p41) 6.13 INVESTIGATION OF CARGO LOSS (p41) 6.14 CALIBRATION OF EQUIPMENT (p42)

SECTION 7 (About HSE Awareness and Requirements) 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 HSE REQUIREMENTS AT LOCATION (p43) HSE REQUIREMENTS ON BOARD VESSEL (p43) PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (p44) MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS (p44) HSE INCIDENT REPORTING (p44) HSE CONTRACTUAL REQUIREMENTS (p44)

APPENDICES I II III IV STVSS FORM (p45) EXAMPLES OF PROCEDURAL INSPECTIONS (p46 - p47) SHIP PRE CARGO MATRIX (p48 - p53) SAMPLING MATRIX (p54)

V REFERENCE MATRIX FOR FORMULATION OF PROCEDURES (p55) VI LNG CALCULATION METHOD (p56)

SECTION 1

(About Shell)

1.1

INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE

1.1.1 This document sets out the minimum requirements for inspection Companies, appointed by Shell pursuant to the Global Inspection Contract. 1.1.2 All inspection work conducted on behalf of Shell Companies must be performed in accordance with industry standards established by ASTM, API, IP and ISO. This document serves to convey how these standards shall be applied within a management system to meet Shell requirements for inspection, reporting, analysis and sampling. Nothing in this document shall absolve the inspector of the obligation to comply fully with minimum industry standards. 1.1.3 For oil companies it is of high importance to ensure that both the quality and quality of cargoes are known and meet requirements. To protect the interests of different parties it is the common practice in the marine oil industry to employ inspectors. The inspectors findings often become final and binding for the trade. This implies the importance of the inspectors role for cargo assurance. 1.1.4 It is fully expected that inspection personnel use due diligence in going about their duties, particularly when cargo operations differ from a normal activity. 1.1.5 These requirements are incorporated into any term contract between Shell and a contracting inspection company by express provision. The appointment and these requirements will form a contract between Shell and an inspection company for any survey conducted outside of a term arrangement. 1.1.6 These requirements must be employed at all times unless any overriding instructions are given by the appointing Shell party or indeed where personal safety would be adversely affected.

1.2

THE SHELL GROUP HSE POLICY 1.2.1 Please Refer to the provisions of the contract.

SECTION 2

(About Quality Management )

2.1

MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

2.1.1 Shell requires all inspection companies to have an implemented and documented Management System and to be certified by an external organization to a recognised international standard such as ISO 9001 and BS ISO/IEC 17025. 2.1.2 Shell does not require additional certification to an HSE standard; however, the management system must address HSE and the inspection company is expected to have an HSE policy and an HSE training programme; therefore, Shell requires a Quality, Health, Safety and Environmental Management System (QHSEMS).

2.2

QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL

2.2.1 Quality assurance is the activity of providing evidence to establish confidence that quality requirements will be met. 2.2.2 Quality control is about detecting whether quality has been achieved and also about correcting deficiencies. 2.2.3 Shell requires inspection companies to have effective procedures to achieve both quality assurance and quality control. The product of inspection companies is not just a laboratory report or an inspection report. The product in all cases is the standard of the work accomplished at the location or in the laboratory together with effective reporting.

2.3

PROCEDURE BASED INSPECTIONS

2.3.1 Work procedures and work instructions are the foundation of any management system and Shell requires that all laboratory and inspection functions are fully supported with detailed procedures and instructions targeting involved personnel. Examples of inspection procedures can be found in Appendices (II (a) and II (b)).

2.4

CONTINUAL IMPROVEMENT

2.4.1 Continual improvement comes about through a systems approach to management and this is a fundamental component of a Management System. Shell requires that inspection companies provide evidence of 9

continual improvement of Quality and HSE through measurement and evaluation of the effectiveness of procedural activities.

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2.5

CORRECTIVE ACTION REPORTS

2.5.1 Corrective Action Reports (CAR) are essential to continual improvement. In the event that any complaint is raised by Shell regarding an inspection nomination, the inspection company will issue a CAR, with copy to the Work Requester and to Shell Quality Assurance for the region, and notify both parties when the CAR has been properly closed out. 2.6 TRAINING AND COMPETENCY

2.6.1 The inspection company is required to determine the necessary competence for personnel performing work under the inspection contract and must provide training appropriate to the work undertaken on behalf of Shell. The inspection company will assess the effectiveness of training and identify competence gaps, providing retraining as necessary in order to ensure that individuals performing work for Shell have the required competence. Records must be available to Shell on request.

2.7

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL AUDITS

2.7.1 Inspection companies working on behalf of Shell must continually improve their management system and measure and control the effectiveness of their Quality, Health, Safety and Environmental procedures, work procedures and work instructions. The inspection company must demonstrate that those procedures are consistently effective. The inspection company must also demonstrate that they operate an effective internal audit programme. 2.7.2 To this purpose, Shell has reserved the right of audit in order to verify that the inspection company has effectively implemented a Management System that satisfies a relevant international standard and satisfies the requirements of this document. Please Refer to the provisions of the contract.

2.8

SUB-CONTRACTING POLICY

2.8.1 The inspection company is required to evaluate and select subcontractors based on the ability of the sub-contractor to perform work according to Shells requirements. The inspection company must have a system in place for establishing criteria for selection, evaluation and reevaluation of sub-contractors. Liability shall remain with the Shell appointed inspection company for any negligence or shortfall in service of sub-contracted suppliers.

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2.9

HSE POLICY & HSE TRAINING

2.9.1 Shell require that the contracting inspection company has an HSE programme in its management system, the programme shall: include an HSE policy and supporting programs, procedures and standards in place

comply with the applicable laws, regulations identify the hazards associated with its work activities implement appropriate procedures and controls to minimize any potential adverse HSE effects ensure review and compliance with any additional HSE requirements at the Work Site prior to performing services include maintenance of HSE records sufficient to demonstrate compliance with the relevant requirements set HSE objectives and targets measure, record, appraise and report its HSE performance ensure that sub-contractors comply with its HSE programme include an effective HSE training programme

2.10 LABORATORY PROFICIENCY TESTING SCHEME 2.10.1 All analytical laboratories shall operate a quality assurance system which includes internal quality control procedures, participation in proficiency testing schemes, use of reference standards and certification to a recognised standard such as BS ISO/IEC 9001 and ISO.

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SECTION 3

(About Information Exchange)

3.1

RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1.1 The inspection company is required to define and then communicate responsibility and authority so that company personnel have no doubt about the required commitment and accountability. 3.1.2 The names and contact details of responsible persons within the inspection company must be communicated to Shell in order that effective communication flow is assured. 3.1.3 The inspection company is appointed as an independent and impartial recorder of facts. Under all circumstance, the inspection company will refrain from making verbal or written statements of opinion as this is beyond the scope of the work instruction. 3.1.4 The inspection company is responsible for liaising with terminal and vessel operational staff at key meetings to discuss plans and procedures regarding the inspection nomination. All activities performed whilst in the terminal or on the vessel shall be with the consent and knowledge of the appropriate installation or vessel personnel.

3.2

CONTACT LISTS

3.2.1 The inspection company must maintain their contact lists, and these must be validated on a quarterly basis, including: Review and then distribute contact documentation for verification Compare to quarterly internal and Shell company listings Update documentation as required Update internally and to Shell

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3.3

APPOINTMENT PROCEDURES

3.3.1 The Shell Work Requester may give the initial appointment of the Independent Inspector by telephone but will always confirm either by the Internet based Shell Trading NAVARIK system or by e-mail, fax or telex. The following information will be provided by Shell irrespective of the media used: Vessel name and Shell reference number Vessel ETA and Location where Survey is required. Grade name and grade quantity The type of survey required - loading, discharge, transfer or quality. Details of other companies involved and cost split Documentary instructions Sampling requirements and any operational testing requirements Where appointed for Quality, then Product Specification, test methods and testing requirements shall also be advised 3.3.2 The Appointed Inspection Company shall without delay confirm their attendance or otherwise to the Work Requester in writing, including the following information in the communication; Any clarification requirements for the work nomination Advise of any circumstance that may prevent or hinder execution of the work nomination. Whether any part of the work will be subcontracted to a third party Whether any cargo analysis will be witnessed

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The inspection company must also; Contact any involved third parties to confirm reporting arrangements. Maintain communication with the location to ensure that the required inspection is carried out effectively. Circulate to the Work Requester any immediate changes to contact lists and be aware of the Shell duty arrangements outside office hours on each appointment.

3.4

GENERAL COMMUNICATIONS PROCEDURES

3.4.1 One of the major goals of any communication procedure is to achieve effective coordination between the sender and the recipient. This requires that important information is collated in an accurate and timely manner, and transmitted to operational personnel or key decision makers in a timely and accurate manner. 3.4.2 Shell requires that inspection companies maintain records of any communications relating to an inspection nomination whether verbal or electronic. The use of SMS to pass communications to inspectors in the field is not entirely satisfactory as there is no archival record once the SMS has been deleted from the mobile device. Both inspectors in the field and supervisory personnel shall maintain a written record of SMS communications for archival purposes. 3.4.3 The inspection company shall have a security policy for the protection of data and communications which shall include safeguards to prevent the transmission of confidential data to unauthorised recipients. 3.4.4 The use of Reply to All on email communications must be used with caution as, frequently, circulated communications gather fresh recipients who may not be authorised to receive confidential content.

3.5

REPORTING PROCEDURES

3.5.1 Written communications whether delivered by Navarik, email, facsimile or telex shall be consistent in format and content. 3.5.2 Shell Trading predominately utilises the Shell Trading Navarik Internet based system for administering its Inspection Appointments. Unless otherwise instructed by the Work Requester and only where the initial appointment was made using Navarik, then this system shall be the primary reporting tool used by the inspection company. All Inspection and Testing

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reports are required to be attached as scanned documents to the Navarik system. Hard copies of reports will not be required unless specifically requested. 3.5.3 Where the Work Requester makes the initial appointment by means other than Navarik, then the inspection company shall utilise e-mail, fax or telex and post or courier to report findings. All correspondence and reports submitted by the inspection company shall refer to the Vessel, Grade, Location and the Shell reference number as originally notified in the appointment. 3.5.4 Prior to Commencing Operations all quality reports for shore tanks used in a loading operation shall be sent to the Work Requester as soon as possible and, unless out of hours, to Mobile numbers of appointed Shell personnel or delegate, this must be done before the loading operations commence. Where any product does not meet the advised specification then the Work Requester must be notified immediately. 3.5.5 In the event that shore tanks loading or receiving a product, chemical or gas have not been prepared, including; mixing for homogeneity, water draining, back filling of connecting pipelines, purging or cleaning when changing grades, then the operation must be delayed until such time as the issue is resolved through the involvement of all interested parties. 3.5.6 Where the local inspection companys office is covering the quantity survey, but testing is at a central laboratory, all results shall be issued directly from the laboratory. 3.5.7 On Completing Operations, when cargo operations have ceased, and as soon as is practically possible, the inspection company shall send a summary of the cargo operation, including; Cargo quantity summary and reconciliation Ship, Shore or BL Differences between ship, shore or BL in percentage terms Bill of Lading Date Cargo quality details Timelog Details of discrepancies and operational delays

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3.5.8 A Full Inspection Report must be provided by the inspection company within 5 days of completion of the operation. The full report shall include the following; 3.6 Brief summary letter of the cargo operations highlighting any issues. Quantity summary, Gross and Net, including; Barrels 60oF, M3 15oC, Metric Tonnes air and vacuum Shore tank gauging and quantity report Vessels ullage and quantity report Report on shore line fullness checks Certificates of Quantity Certificates of Quality and test reports Vessel Tank inspection reports List of samples drawn, distribution and seal numbers Vessels VEF report Copies of all LOP issued and received Full time log of operational events OIL LOSS CARGO SUMMARY SHEETS

3.6.1 For all Crude Oil Cargoes, the inspection company shall submit the Shell Trading Crude Oil Voyage Summary Sheet (STVSS), within 2 days of cargo operations, to the STASCO Oil Loss department in London. A copy of the STVSS template is attached at the end of this document. Current copies in Excel format may be obtained from the Oil Loss and Claims team in STASCO. 3.6.2 Where the appointment was made using the Navarik on line system, then the STVSS shall be submitted within Navarik. For all other appointments the STVSS must be completed and e-mailed to the departments group e-mail address; stascoclaims@stasco.com.

3.7

VERBAL COMMUNICATION PROCEDURES

3.7.1 Verbal communications are the least satisfactory mode of relaying instructions or information, unless backed up with a written communication, as misunderstanding of a verbal communication can lead to errors in decision making. Shell requires that important information is always reprised to the recipient in a written form as soon as possible after the event. A telephone log shall in any event be maintained. 17

3.8

INFORMATION EXCHANGE WITH LOCATION AND VESSEL

3.8.1 The inspection company shall make timely contact with the location to be inspected and expedite an exchange of information so that the conduct of the inspection is not impeded and so that potential problems can be resolved in advance of the inspection. The inspection company shall make prearrival contact with the vessel or vessel operators in order to fulfil any information requirements.

3.9

KEY MEETINGS

3.9.1 On arrival at the location the inspector shall hold a Key Meeting with the terminal operators prior to boarding the vessel and, with vessel and shore staff once the vessel has been boarded. The purpose of the Key Meeting is threefold; To establish safety requirements To establish operating parameters To exchange and confirm information

3.9.2 In the event that information is retrieved that detrimentally affects the conduct of the inspection or in any way the integrity of Shells cargo then the Work Requester shall be immediately informed and the operation delayed until the matter is resolved. When delays are anticipated then the Work Requester shall also be informed at the earliest opportunity.

3.10 PROTEST LETTERS 3.10.1 Letters of Protest are an important document for any subsequent claim against the supplier and shipper and it is imperative that the contractor gives appropriate importance to this task. 3.10.2 Protest letters shall be issued for any circumstances where the inspection company is restricted by third parties from fulfilling the requirements of the inspection nomination or from following industry standard methods. 3.10.3 Protests shall also be issued for ship/shore quantity discrepancies, passage loss or gain, increase in free water, cargo remaining on board after discharge (ROB) - both liquid and non-liquid, contamination incidents, delays to operations or any other incident where common sense dictates that a failure has resulted in financial exposure for Shell or their customers.

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3.10.4 The LOP shall be issued on the Contractors headed note paper and shall contain the following minimum information; Contract no or Shell Ref Vessel name Location BL date - or other event date (discharge, ship to ship transfer etc.) Details of the deficiency identified Attending personnel name, signature, date and time issued.

3.11 ARCHIVING 3.11.1 All reports, documents, field notebooks, telephone logs, SMS logs, e-mails, faxes and telex information pertaining to the appointment shall be retained by the inspection company for a minimum of 7 years.

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SECTION 4

(About Cargo Quality Assurance)

4.1

RESTRICTED ACCESS TO SHORE FACILITY

4.1.1 In all circumstances the inspection company shall contact the shore terminal in a timely manner and schedule arrangements to conduct the inspection nomination. In the event that any combination of circumstances prohibits the full execution of the nomination, then the inspection company will immediately contact the Work Requester and relay the facts and issues. 4.2 SUITABILITY OF SHORE FACILITY

4.2.1 When taking receipt of product, chemical and gas shipments, the inspector must ascertain whether the terminal facility has been properly prepared for transfer of the designated cargo, including preparation of loading arms, jetty headers and pipelines, shore tanks and storage vessels. 4.2.2 Preparation activities may include draining, bottom flushing or cleaning of shore tanks and storage vessels; draining, pigging, refilling or displacing of shore pipelines. 4.2.3 To avoid potential contamination of a cargo, loading arms, jetty headers and associated lines must be drained of aged product immediately before loading to a vessel.

4.3

WATER CHECKS ON PRODUCT STORAGE TANKS

4.3.1 Prior to loading, the inspector shall ascertain whether the shore tanks have been water drawn and conduct checks for the presence of free water by gauging with water finding paste and or interface detectors and by taking dead bottom samples. 4.3.2 During a routine walk round inspection of the shore tank, the inspector shall check the water draw valves for the presence of un-drained water. In the event that free water is detected in the tank or at the water drains and when the matter cannot be rectified, the facts shall be immediately reported to the Work Requester.

4.4

USE OF SHORE TANK LOW SUCTION

4.4.1 If the shore tank is to be completely drained during the course of loading operations, or if the low suction of the storage tank is to be used at any time, then the Work Requester must be immediately informed.

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4.4.2 Having obtained inconclusive water checks, or where dead bottom samples have not been be obtained for any reason, or when the presence of water has been positively detected then unless the matter can be satisfactorily rectified through water draining or stripping, the use of the low tank suction must not be permitted and the Work Requester must be immediately informed. 4.5 SUITABILITY OF VESSEL

4.5.1 When conducting inspections in cargo tanks or other enclosed spaces , the inspector must first verify that the required checks have been carried out on the quality of the tank atmosphere and that the tank is safe to enter. The inspector must never enter a space unaccompanied; in all cases a responsible member of ship staff must be present during the conduct of inspections. Under no circumstances shall equipment be operated without the express permission of responsible ship staff. 4.5.2 The suitability of a vessel to carry a designated cargo is determined by previous cargo history, the extent of tank cleaning and by the results of inspection - either a visual internal inspection, sometimes referred to as a White Glove inspection, or by Closed or Open inspection from deck level. 4.5.3 Previous cargo history may be a reason for rejecting a vessel; the inspector must be alert to this and report to the work requester any concerns with the last 3 cargoes carried by the vessel.. 4.5.4 For deck inspections, whether White Glove, Closed or Open, as a minimum requirement Shells Tank Cleaning Guide applies (c.f. Appendices). 4.5.5 A Closed inspection may be an inspection conducted under inerted condition or, on those vessels which are not inerted, where safety requirements prevent the opening of tank hatches. 4.5.6 The tank cleaning programme must have been conducted at least to the standard of Shells Tank Cleaning Guide (c.f. Appendices). 4.5.7 The tank must be visually clean and free from water and previous cargo residues. In the case of chemical cargoes, odour is often a critical parameter. When odour is an acceptance parameter then the tank must have a sweet odour and no taint of previous cargo odour.

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4.5.8 The presence of odour in a tank is an indication that previous cargo is trapped either in the cargo lines or more likely, in the tank coating within blisters or imperfections. The condition of tank coatings is critical to many product and chemical cargoes and appropriate records and observations must be made in the inspection report; including, observed damage to coatings and a justification in the event vessel rejection is made by reason of tank coating condition. 4.5.9 The inspector must always be alert for the presence of water, even when the tank cleaning instruction specifies wash and well drain, i.e. no tank mopping. Very often, regardless of the required standard of tank cleaning, the end receiver may not be able to tolerate free or suspended water. The inspector must be alert to the fact that when a vessel has stern trim inspection, observations taken at the designated gauging position will probably not detect free water located at a position close to the after bulkhead or in the suction well of the tank. The inspector shall always conduct deck inspections from the aftermost dipping point, which may not necessarily be the designated gauging point. In all circumstances the inspector must take a guarded position when previous cargo residues or free water is found; when possible obtaining a sample of anything detected. A residual volume in excess of 0.05% of the individual tank capacity does not meet the well drained criteria [c.f. Ship Pre Cargo Matrix, Appendix iii (b)] 4.5.10 The inspector shall make all efforts to determine the status of cargo lines and pumps. This includes the crossover line at deck level between the port and starboard manifolds. Lines and pumps shall be either clean or well drained depending on the required tank cleaning. Wherever possible this shall be determined visually. 4.5.11 Bottom cargo lines can be inspected from within the tank, or a determination of the line status can be made at deck level. In both cases this is accomplished by opening all tank suction valves and allowing the main and branch lines time to drain. This shall be carried out prior to commencing the internal or deck inspection. 4.5.12 Very often it is not possible to check the condition of the main pumps, however a mud box can be opened and the drains on Separator or Automatic Unloading System (AUS) tanks can be checked. When there are no drains fitted, these tanks can be checked at the indicators in the cargo control room. Stripping pumps can be checked at the fitted drains. This will give the best indication as to whether the pumproom has been drained. For Framo type pumps the inspector must witness purging of the pump cofferdam and examine the purging records, alert to excessive hydraulic leakage at the pump seal or cargo leakage at the cargo seal.

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4.5.13 An often neglected item is the balance line between the slop tanks; the valves on this line shall be opened and the line allowed to drain, prior to checking the slop tanks.

4.5.14 The tank washing line must also be checked and must be blanked, where it branches to the individual cargo tanks, prior to loading the intended cargo. If information is received that the tank washing line has not been drained of water, and it is not blanked, then draining can be achieved by breaking the line at the aftermost flange. The presence of water in the tank cleaning line presents an unacceptable risk for many product and chemical cargoes. 4.5.15 If there are any doubts or reservations about the findings of a tank inspection then loading must be delayed until the appropriate persons have been informed.

4.6

INERT GAS QUALITY

4.6.1 Poor inert gas quality can have detrimental effects on the quality of products and chemical cargoes. This is generally restricted to inert gas systems employing flue gas technology but can also derive from diesel or gasoil fuelled inert gas generators. 4.6.2 Poor gas quality is related to maintenance of the inert gas scrubber. In general, the manufacturers recommendations are that inert gas scrubbers are maintained at 6 to 12 month intervals. Maintenance comprises draining down the scrubber and cleaning the water jets and demisters and removing any accumulated debris such as marine organisms, seashells and carbon deposits. Prior to loading, the inspector must check the frequency of scrubber maintenance by checking the ships records; relevant details must be included in the inspectors report. 4.6.3 In circumstances where the maintenance record of the scrubber is poor, the result can be an increase of sulphur compounds and soot in the inert gas delivered to the cargo tanks. Scrubbers are designed to remove these compounds. All sulphur compounds are undesirable; the compounds which have been identified as most troublesome are Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) and Trioxide (SO3). Apart from potentially raising the Total Sulphur content of the cargo, these sulphur compounds have the potential effect of reducing the effectiveness of cargo additives. Soot can be identified with a white rag held to the IG line drain.

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4.6.4 When instructed, or if the maintenance record is poor, checks on inert gas quality must be carried out. The presence of SO2 in the inert gas stream delivered to the tanks can be detected at a drain point on the inert gas line when the IG plant is running, or in cargo tanks having positive pressure, by employing standard Length-Stain SO2 detector tubes and a hand aspirator. The detection of SO3 is more specialised and requires gas detecting instruments which are not equipped on board a vessel. However, various manufacturers do provide Length-Stain tubes which detects the presence of Sulphuric acid aerosols; Sulphuric acid is formed by SO3 entering solution in the presence of atmospheric humidity. 4.6.5 If the high level presence of sulphur compounds is suspected or detected in the vessels IG system then the loading of products must not commence without the express permission of the Work Requester.

4.7

HYDROCARBON CONTENT OF VESSEL TANK ATMOSPHERE

4.7.1 For middle distillate cargoes, jet fuel and gasoil for example, the presence of hydrocarbon vapour in the tank atmosphere can result in the lowering of the Flash Point of the cargo and subsequent contamination incidents. 4.7.2 Shell requires that the hydrocarbon content of the cargo tank atmosphere is tested during the initial cargo tank inspection. This can be achieved using a gas multi-meter which is always available on board tankers. 4.7.3 Caution must be employed when using multi-meters in an inert atmosphere as they are often designed to be employed during gas free or near gas free conditions. However, the readings taken are a good guide to the amount of hydrocarbon vapour present, no matter what the status of the atmosphere. Some explosimeters can be used in both inert and non-inert conditions; however, the LEL method shall be generally employed in non-inert atmospheres and the volumetric method in inerted atmospheres. 4.7.4 Shells requirement is that the hydrocarbon content of the vessels tank atmosphere shall not exceed 40% of LEL in a non-inert atmosphere, else a maximum of 2% by volume in an inert atmosphere.

4.8

SAFEGUARDS AGAINST VAPOUR PHASE CONTAMINATION

4.8.1 Modern product tankers are properly equipped to prevent against vapour phase contamination, sometimes having dual inert gas systems, one for middle distillates and one for low flash cargoes. Alternatively, cargo tanks that have individual pressure sensors allow the vessel to manage IG during the course of loading, the sea passage and discharge operations. 24

4.8.2 Shell requires that inspectors verify that the vessel has vapour segregated volatile and non-volatile parcels from each other, such as Mogas and diesel, consistent with SOLAS requirements (SOLAS II-2, Regulation 11-6, Protection of cargo tank structure against pressure or vacuum in tankers). 4.8.3 Under no circumstances shall the inert gas valves be sealed by the inspector, as this might be construed as restricting the vessel from complying with international safety regulations. It is the vessels responsibility to manage the inert gas effectively throughout the voyage. 4.8.4 Checks on the inert gas system shall be conducted prior to commencement of loading.

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4.9

SAMPLING REQUIREMENTS

4.9.1 Sampling methods are well established in the industry and it is not the purpose of this document to train inspectors in sampling technique. However, all samples will be drawn according to industry standards and the instructions received from the Work Requester or, at a minimum, in accordance with the sampling matrix which can be found attached in appendices. 4.9.2 All equipment used in the course of sampling shall be properly earthed and provide proper protection against the hazard of static discharges. 4.9.3 Inspectors will follow the sampling standards established by regulatory bodies such as IP, API and ASTM. 4.9.4 The following standards apply to Shell inspection nominations; ASTM D5842 for volatility testing ASTM D4057 for general sampling of liquid petroleum ASTM D1265 sampling of LPG

4.9.5 The sampling equipment employed shall be fit for purpose and suitably clean and compatible with the type of product being sampled. 4.9.6 Sample containers for Crude or General Products must be of steel construction. Bottles shall be glass construction with screw caps note Vapour Pressure samples must have a suitable vapour seal within the bottle cap (such as a polycone insert) and never paper insert liners. Sample cans or bottles shall never be Plastic construction. 4.9.7 Sample containers for Aviation Fuels must be Lacquer or Epoxy lined Steel. Bottles must be new glass and contain a suitable vapour seal within the bottle cap (such as a polycone insert) and never paper insert liners. Sample cans or bottles shall never be Plastic construction. 4.9.8 Sample containers for LNG & LPG must be stainless steel, machined with internal pipe threads at each end to engage with valves or other fittings.

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4.9.9 All samples must be clearly labelled as to their source, operational status e.g. after loading, first foot etc., location, date and time. Samples must be stored in a suitable environment prior to analysis, such as ice chest or refrigerator for Vapour Pressure samples. All retain samples must be sealed without delay prior to storage and full details included in the report. Duplicate samples must never be sealed together in a single polyurethane bag. This obviates breaking a seal in order to distribute the samples. Each sample must be sealed separately. All samples must be retained in a suitable environment for at least 90 days unless otherwise instructed. 4.9.10 The inspection company shall avoid transferring sample contents from one container to another. 4.9.11 Shell minimum requirements as to the type and number of samples to be drawn per operation are set out in the matrix which is included in appendices. 4.10 SAMPLING OF SHORE TANKS 4.10.1 There are two acceptable methods by which representative samples may be drawn from shore tanks. 4.10.2 The first and preferable method is tank top sampling, by which the sample thief or grabber is lowered from the tank top to the required level. 4.10.3 The second less preferable method is side draw sampling were a mechanical sampling device has been installed on the tank expressly for the purpose of drawing samples at selected levels. 4.10.4 When both methods are available, tank top sampling shall always be employed. Otherwise side draw sampling is permitted. 4.10.5 The practice of drawing samples from water drains or other unofficial points on the tank or line system instead of taking the required tank samples, invariably results in unrepresentative samples. 4.10.6 ASTM D4057 is the standard which describes the correct method for both tank top and side draw sampling. 4.11 SAMPLING OF SHORE LINES 4.11.1 Automatic In-Line Sampling (AIS) devices comprise two types; portable and fixed. Both type of samplers are designed to take a representative sample of the material passing a given point during the course of a transfer operation.

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4.11.2 Inspectors will inspect AIS sample containers for cleanliness prior to use, monitor the effectiveness of the sampling process and, following the sampling operation, verify that the sample is representative by validating the performance factors. 4.11.3 Samples taken with AIS are to be homogenised using a mixing device for the recommended period of time before drawing sub samples for distribution. 4.11.4 Gas Sampling System The inspector must validate the gas sampling system, and line up, to ensure that it conforms with ISO 8943. The inspector must confirm that the calculation for grab frequency is appropriately set on each sampler. The inspector shall check, validate and record the serial numbers of gas sample cylinders used during operations and must prepare a schedule for changing out the sample cylinders in the case where one continuous sample is not possible. A labelling system must be employed recording 1) Date; 2) Vessel; 3) Time range; 4) Sample owner (i.e. Buyer, seller or for analysis) and 5) Inspectors name. The inspector must prepare the sampling system for use by means of ensuring the correct valve line-up and, by purging the associated lines. 4.11.5 Spot Line Samples are taken for verifying the content or quality of a lines content at any given point in time. A series of spot samples may be taken at fixed time intervals for the purpose of quality control or for formulating a line composite sample. If it is intended to employ line sampling for preparation of a composite sample then the sampling method described in ASTM D4057 shall be followed. Otherwise, the most important function of a line sample is to verify that the line is filled with the product that is about to be transferred and is free from water and particulates in the case of white products. 4.11.6 If Spot Line samples are required, the inspector will verify that each container used is clean and suitable for purpose and that the sample point is adequately flushed each time before drawing the spot sample. 4.11.7 Line Drip Samples in practice are obtained by placing a sample container below a sampling point and allowing the container to fill over a period of time by restricting the sample flow. Unless conducted in accordance with ASTM D4057 (Manual Pipeline Sampling) such samples may not be representative. 4.12 MANIFOLD SAMPLING

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4.12.1 These are spot samples taken at the interface between ship and shore. They represent cargo delivered to or from the ship, depending on whether the ship is loading or discharging.

4.12.2 Manifold samples may be taken for periodic quality control. Invariably they are taken at commencement of loading or discharge to verify that initial quality meets product specification. This may require analytical process or simple on site identification of appearance parameters. As for all samples, the inspector must verify that the containers used are clean and fit for purpose. Manifold samples must always be retained and never discarded. All samples are relevant in the instance where early detection of contamination is the issue.

4.13 FIRST FOOT SAMPLING 4.13.1 The purpose of First Foot or First Ins samples is quality control and they are primarily taken for early detection of, for example, colour or water contamination from cargo lines and cargo tanks, or indeed from shore when loading is in progress. First foot samples, Manifold samples and Spot Shore Line samples are a suite of quality control measures designed for early detection of quality problems and also to help determine the source of any contamination. 4.13.2 At the time that the First Foot samples are initially taken, the inspector shall check the appearance. In the event that the appearance of the samples is poor, due to deterioration of colour or because of the presence of water or particulates, the inspector shall immediately stop the loading and have the vessel shut the manifold valve. Thereafter, the inspector must inform the Work Requester and any other interested parties. Loading must not resume until a course of action has been agreed by all.

4.14 SAMPLING OF LOADED VESSELS TANKS 4.14.1 Samples of ships tanks after loading or before discharge are to be taken in accordance with the Work Requesters requirements or at a minimum, in accordance with the sample matrix which can be found attached in appendices. 4.14.2 Care must be observed when taking Upper, Middle and Lower spot (UML) samples to measure exactly the depth where the spot samples are taken. Samples taken at approximate levels are not fit for purpose.

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4.14.3 Care must be taken to ensure that running samples are obtained using the restricted flow method. Over-filled or under-filled samples must be discarded and the sampling exercise repeated after adjusting the orifice size of the sample grabber. The size of the orifice needs to be adjusted each time a tank is encountered with different product depth. The objective is to obtain representative samples from each tank using a consistently valid sampling technique.

4.15 SAMPLING WITH MMC TYPE DEVICES 4.15.1 Closed system sampling devices vary in design. These devices are zone samplers and designed for obtaining spot samples only. Running samples cannot be obtained with closed sampling devices; current technology does not provide a method for taking running samples from closed system tanker vessels. 4.15.2 Zone samplers are cylindrical and have an open ended top and a one way valve at the bottom. During lowering, flow is constant through the device. The valve closes when lowering is stopped thus trapping sample at that level. During raising, the valve remains closed and theoretically there is no further exchange of the sampler contents; the sample obtained is designated a spot sample. 4.15.3 Again care must be employed to ensure that the spot sample is obtained at the correct calculated depth for upper, middle and lower levels, in accordance with the standard sampling method. 4.15.4 If the method for closed system sampling devices is properly followed, there is every expectation that the samples so obtained will be representative. 4.15.5 The effectiveness of the seal provided by the one way valve on the zone sampler must be checked frequently, so that sample is not lost after withdrawal from the product. The correct method for pouring sample is to remove the sampler device from the housing and pour from the top. The practice of releasing the one way valve and draining from the bottom invariably results in sample spraying uncontrollably with resultant sample loss.

4.16 COMPOSITE SAMPLES 4.16.1 Composite samples must be composed volumetrically. Guess work results in non-representative samples. Where possible, compositing shall be

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done in the laboratory by qualified technicians on a volumetric or weight basis using tank volume data recorded at the time of sampling. 4.16.2 If this is not practicable because, for example, the sample has to be placed on board immediately after loading is completed, then the inspector must create the composite from individual tank samples, in proportion with the individual tank volumes and using a graduated cylinder for measurement accuracy.

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4.17 VOLATILITY SAMPLING 4.17.1 Samples taken for volatility tests require extra precaution. The samples must be transported to the laboratory for testing as quickly as possible. The samples must be transported in vapour sealed bottles, inverted and packed in ice. As always, standard sampling methods must be employed, the appropriate method is ASTM D 5842.

4.18 H2S SAMPLING 4.18.1 Samples taken for H2S analysis must be representative and drawn in accordance with Industry standard methods (MPMS Chapter 8). 4.18.2 For vapour phase analysis, gas bags may be employed to obtain a vapour sample.

4.19 APPEARANCE DETERMINATION IN THE FIELD 4.19.1 When determining the appearance of samples, the determination must be conducted in good lighting conditions. The sample is held up against both white and black backgrounds and checked for the presence of particulates, water droplets and colour degradation. This test applies to distillate products and chemicals. 4.19.2 If the appearance does not meet the quality parameters for the product to be loaded, then the loading operation must be immediately stopped and the Work Requester immediately informed. Poor appearance of samples taken from the vessel prior to discharge also requires action by the inspector, again delaying the discharge operation and immediately informing the Work Requester so that appropriate action can be taken. 4.19.3 Appearance determination is applicable to any sample, taken at any time. All samples must be checked for appearance as a matter of routine. However, checking of appearance parameters on the suite of spot samples taken at commencement of loading is of particular importance for quality control.

4.20 ON BOARD BLENDING 4.20.1 Note that the task of supervising on board blending requires advanced inspection abilities. 4.20.2 When blending on board under inspector supervision, the inspector may be required to calculate and control the blending of components in a vessels cargo tanks. This requires that the volume of each component added 32

to the blend is calculated by the inspector in the correct ratio as advised by the work requestor. The inspector then supervises the adding of the components and ensures that the correct amounts are attained according to the volumetric calculations. 4.20.3 Achieving homogeneity of the blended components is recognised as being difficult because vessels tanks do not have mixing devices installed. In the absence of mixers, the most effective method is to add the heaviest components first, progressing to the lightest components, using density as guide. It must be appreciated that the density used to determine the order of adding the components is density at observed temperature and not density at standard temperature. 4.20.4 Sampling must be conducted using standard methods, according to the instructions issued by the Work Requester. The best samples for assessing overall quality of blends are running samples, which can only be obtained if the vessel is operating open system. 4.20.5 Regardless of whether running samples have been obtained, spot samples are always required in order to achieve absolute assurance that the blending operation has been successful; these must be taken at upper, middle and lower levels and at additional intermediate levels. Density checks can be performed on site using a portable densimeter in order to confirm homogeneity.

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SECTION 5

(About Quality Determination)

5.1

ACTIONS ON RECEIVING NOMINATION

5.1.1 The inspection company shall liaise with the terminal operators at the earliest opportunity and ascertain any special requirements which might affect sampling and also ascertain that the work nomination can be conducted to the fullest extent. In the event that complications exist which prevent the Work Requesters instruction being carried out as instructed, then the requester must be immediately informed. 5.1.2 In the case of vessels loading, the inspection company shall ascertain the identity of the storage tanks that will be used for delivering the cargo. The inspection company shall also ascertain the earliest available time when the tanks can be sampled for testing and then sample accordingly, submitting the samples to the testing laboratory without delay.

5.2

PRODUCT SPECIFICATION AND TEST METHODS

5.2.1 The inspection company will review the testing requirements and test methods as provided by the work requestor. In the event that a particular test method is not available at the location then the Work Requester must be immediately informed so that alternative arrangements can be made without delay.

5.3

QUALITY TESTING ON SHORE TANKS

5.3.1 In the case of pre-load quality testing the inspection company shall ensure that quality tests are conducted in accordance with the requirements set out in the inspection nomination. Note that the specification required by Shell may not always be identical to the sellers specification; this is particularly relevant when the analysis is witnessed at the sellers laboratory; arrangements must be made so that any additional analysis, as required by Shell, is performed. 5.3.2 Any deviation from the analysis requirements of the inspection nomination shall be notified immediately to the Work Requester. 5.3.3 Where static, batched shore tanks are employed for loading, which means tanks that have been pre-blended to meet the buyers specification, Shell requires each tank to be tested individually. A composite of multiple shore tanks is not acceptable without prior agreement from the Work Requester. The exception is where the cargo quality is agreed to be based upon a Vessel Composite sample. 34

5.3.4 The homogeneity of each shore tank shall be checked by testing for density on Upper, Middle and Lower samples. Any tanks that are layered by more than 0.0010 kg/l (IP475) shall be alerted to the Work Requester. 5.3.5 For Gasoline, Gasoline blend stock and Naphtha cargoes - where the cargo has a Vapour Pressure specification, shore tank samples intended for vapour pressure testing must be obtained in accordance with the method described in ASTM D 5842. 5.3.6 Unless otherwise instructed by the Work Requester, shore tanks shall be tested and declared on grade for all specification parameters before any cargo is loaded to the vessel.

5.4

QUALITY TESTING ON MANIFOLD AND LINE SAMPLES

5.4.1 Generally, full testing is not required on spot samples and tests will be limited to a laboratory report on Appearance or else ident tests, meaning tests performed on a limited number of key analytical parameters selected by the Work Requester. The inspection company shall therefore be guided by the requirements of the inspection nomination.

5.5

QUALITY TESTING ON VESSEL TANK SAMPLES

5.5.1 Testing requirements for ship composite, individual tank composite, individual spot tank samples and first foot samples will be given with the inspection nomination, or by later notifications from the Work Requester.

5.6

QUALITY TESTING ON IN-LINE BLENDED PARCELS

5.6.1 In the event that in-line blending is used in a programmed loading operation, then the Work Requester shall be informed and guidance sought on the extent of testing against the cargo specification on both the vessels tanks and periodic spot line samples. In liaison with the work requestor, the required interval must be established for conducting spot tests; however, note that the maximum interval is 4 hours; more frequent intervals may be required depending on the circumstances and complexity of the loading operation. 5.6.2 Notwithstanding, the inspector must monitor the line blend test programme followed at the loading installation. When both the inspection company and the terminal are conducting tests on spot samples, then the results shall be compared for divergence. For quality control purposes, these 35

comparisons are best made immediately the individual results are produced by the respective laboratories. Old information has no value as the quality of the cargo may already be compromised. For interpretation of measurement result divergence between the laboratories ISO 4259 or ASTM D3244 shall be used.

5.6.3 Where the installation does not have in-line analysers to monitor dynamic quality parameters, then the inspection company must establish with the work requestor whether frequent testing of samples is required, e.g. hourly line samples on key quality parameters. The inspection company must determine from the Work Requester which analytical parameters are to be checked. 5.6.4 The Work Requester must be notified immediately of unexpected results and the loading operation stopped until a solution has been reached that will correct any quality shortfall in the final blended cargo.

5.7

QUALITY TESTING ON BLENDS

5.7.1 The extent of required testing on loaded cargoes which have either been blended in-line or onboard will be established in the inspection nomination. Testing laboratories may be required to test key parameters at various levels in each ship compartment in order to establish whether the cargo is homogenous.

5.8

TESTING FOR H2S

5.8.1 Whenever Shell Trading nominate an Independent Inspector, or an Inspector is appointed by a third party and Shell Trading participate in the payment of the Inspectors fees then the following will apply to all loading operations of Crude Oil, Condensate, Fuel Oil, Fuel Oil components and VGO cargoes. 5.8.2 To Assess the Presence of H2S Vapour in the Cargo where feasible, Shell requires a measurement of the H2S levels in the vapour-phase of each of the nominated shore tanks prior to loading. 5.8.3 After loading, but prior to any sampling or gauging, Shell requires measurement of the H2S levels in the vapour-phase of at least three vessel cargo tanks per grade. Length-stain detector tubes are deemed suitable for field measurements and for testing of gas bag vapour samples. 5.8.4 To Assess Risk of H2S Release from the Liquid Cargo, from a representative sample taken from the vessel after loading, test for H2S content by either of the following test methods; 36

Hydrogen Sulphide in liquid - IP 399 Hydrogen Sulphide in vapour (Equilibrium Headspace) - ASTM D5705.

5.8.5 If the local office is unable to perform any of the above measurements, then they shall advise the Work Requester without delay, along with an explanation.

5.9

WITNESSED ANALYSIS

5.9.1 When witnessing analysis in a third party laboratory, the witnessing party must verify that the sample tested is the same sample drawn, labelled and sealed in the presence of, or by the inspection company appointed by Shell. Or alternatively, that a sample drawn labelled and sealed by some other party was properly sealed and the origin identified before testing commenced. The witnessing party must verify that the tests conducted on the sample are consistent with the tests outlined in the witnessing nomination, and that the equipment used is properly calibrated by running appropriate standard samples before conducting any tests 5.9.2 Seals must only be broken in the presence of the witnessing inspection personnel, who shall note the date and time that the seals were broken and who was present. 5.9.3 When testing is taking place over a prolonged period, then after each batch of tests the original sample shall be resealed in the presence of the third party laboratory personnel and a sample receipt prepared and signed by all present. The procedure of breaking and re-sealing samples shall be followed throughout testing until the process is completed. 5.9.4 All witnessed analysis reports or certificates of quality may only be endorsed by the inspection company when the above criteria are met. A Letter of Protest shall be issued where the inspection company has been restricted in executing their duties.

5.10 QUALITY CERTIFICATES 5.10.1 All reports and certificates must clearly state, unless otherwise instructed, the following information; Sample origin - Shore Tank no, Vessel name, Terminal

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Type of sample upper, middle and lower spot samples, composite or running Date and time samples drawn and date analysed Whether the product meets or fails the given specification The report shall be signed by an authorised signatory

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5.10.2

Jet Fuel certificates in addition to the above shall state; Additive types (RDE#) and dose level Refinery manufacturing process and the percentage of total volume taken from each component shore tank Batch number Statement indicating that the product meets or fails the latest issues of Defence Standard 91/91 and the Joint Fuelling Checklist

5.11 CALIBRATION OF EQUIPMENT 5.11.1 All laboratory equipment used in the course of Shell inspection nominations shall be properly calibrated in accordance with the test method and manufacturers specification. Procedures for accomplishing calibration shall be established in the companys Management System and appropriate records shall be kept.

5.12 LABORATORY REAGENTS, SOLUTIONS AND STANDARDS 5.12.1 The inspection company shall also have procedures and records for planned maintenance and shelf life monitoring of reagents, solutions and standards used during the course of analysis conducted in inspection company laboratories.

5.13 NOTIFICATION AND REPORTING 5.13.1 The inspection company shall, in a timely fashion, report all analysis results witnessed or conducted on behalf of Shell using the method of reporting established at the time the nomination was given. Any divergence of test results from the cargo specification shall be initially advised by telephone to the Work Requester and followed up with a soft copy report at the earliest opportunity.

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SECTION 6

(About Quantity Determination)

6.1

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

6.1.1 The inspector is required to be in attendance at all necessary and critical stages of the cargo handling to be able to record, measure and report on the cargo quantity as loaded, handled or discharged during the course of the inspection nomination. This task must be carried out as outlined in the following sections. 6.1.2 Manual measurement of shore tanks is required regardless of the stated accuracy of automatic shore measurement systems. If for any reason the inspector is restricted by the shore terminal from taking manual measurements, the Work Requester must be informed so that appropriate action can be taken. 6.1.3 Inspectors must conduct their quantity survey and calculations in accordance with the following guidelines; 6.1.4 Hydrocarbon Measurement Manuals; HM28, HM29 and HM30, issued by the Energy Institute in London. 6.1.5 Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards, Chapters 16.2, 17 and 17.1 through to 17.8, published by the American Petroleum Institute. Petroleum Measurement Tables ASTM D1250, IP 200 and API 2540 6.1.6 All measurement and sampling activities undertaken by the inspection company, ashore or on the vessel, shall be carried out only with the express permission of terminal and vessel staff. All activities carried out whilst on board the vessel must be with a member of the vessel crew in attendance. 6.1.7 All equipment used in the course of measurement shall be properly earthed and provide proper protection against the hazard of static discharges.

6.2

SHORE SYSTEM

6.2.1 The inspection company shall review the shore pipe line system to ensure that it will not compromise the cargo operations with regard to quantity or quality. This will require tracing the pipeline, confirming the status of; valves, tank mixing, water draining, line flushing etc. Any doubts must be brought to the attention of the installation and if action by installation personnel is not proportionate then the Work Requester must be informed.

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6.2.2 When it is predicted that a shore tank floating roof will be positioned within the tanks critical zone, or indeed landed thus affecting measurement accuracy, the inspector must approach terminal personnel and seek a solution. In the event that a solution cannot be reached; then, prior to finalising the Bill of Lading or Outturn quantities the inspector must report the facts to the Work Requester so that action can be taken.

6.3

MANUAL MEASUREMENT OF SHORE STORAGE TANKS

6.3.1 Manual measurements must be performed on a shore tank before and after each transfer using methods currently adopted by the industry and consistent with the standards described earlier. Manual measurements will include; Level measurements Temperature measurements Water measurements

6.4

CUSTOMS APPROVED ATG SYSTEMS

6.4.1 Whilst Customs approved automatic tank gauges (ATG) may be used for custody transfer accounting, the inspection company will additionally obtain manual measurements on all storage tanks and these measurements will be used to verify the accuracy of the ATG. In the event that the ATG measurements are inaccurate; then, the inspection company shall inform the installation of the inaccuracy and ensure that the Custody Transfer Quantities are appropriately corrected.

6.5

SHORE METERING FACILITY

6.5.1 The inspection company shall verify totaliser counts, both field and control room readings, before and after each transfer. 6.5.2 If the meters have a proving facility, during the course of a transfer the inspection company shall witness meter proving and verify the results and the accuracy of meter factor calculations. 6.5.3 When meters are not equipped with an inline proving facility; then, the inspection company shall obtain copies of the most recent periodic proving tests and provide details in their inspection report. When the interval since the most recent proving exceeds 90 days; then, the inspector will issue Letter of Protest to the installation.

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6.6

FULLNESS OF SHORE LINE

6.6.1 The inspector will make all reasonable efforts to establish the status of the shore line before and after the nominated transfers. Full lines are preferred; partially filled lines are unacceptable. Lines declared empty after pigging are acceptable, with the provision that the pigging operation is performed both before and after transfer. Measures which must be taken to ensure that a line is full include: tank to tank transfers or line packing combined with vapour release at a suitable high point on the line. 6.6.2 Confirmation that a line is full is available through the adoption of positive line displacements, either tank to tank on shore, or from a single ship tank to shore. In both cases making the comparison between quantity delivered against quantity received. 6.6.3 Where a vessel to shore quantity difference of 2.0% or more is observed, then an additional line displacement must be performed. Where the vessel to shore differences cannot be resolved or indeed where the shore line content operation cannot be performed; then, a Letter of Protest must be issued. 6.7 LNG & LPG SHORE MEASUREMENT

6.7.1 When a distributed digital control system (DCS) is in use, the inspector shall validate that the DCS or operational data system is actively capturing and recording all data from the Gas Chromatograph (GC) along with the appropriate flow measurements so as to be able to use this data to make a mass weighted composition to be used for custody transfer calculations. This validation should include appropriate capture frequency and history such that the entire loading event is recorded. 6.7.2 The inspector shall validate redundant GCs prior to the operation, this shall be done in accordance with ISO 10723 using a known gas standard. The inspector shall confirm that GC configuration and line-up is in accordance with ISO 6974. 6.7.3 On manually or ATG measured storage vessels the inspector shall verify all temperature measurements for accuracy. The inspector must also verify that the appropriate measurements are in the liquid or vapour phase the height locations for each probe will be available in the tank gauging tables and the temperature corresponding to liquid or vapour will relate to the top probe for vapour and the bottom probe for liquid. The inspector must also verify pressure measurements for accuracy.

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6.8

MEASUREMENT ON BOARD A LOADED VESSEL

6.8.1 All measurements will be taken in accordance with industry standards, this will include; Level measurements Temperature measurements Water measurements

6.8.2 The inspector must visually confirm the vessels trim and list, and any other factors which affect the accuracy of measurement such as; verification that the point of measurement is calibrated appropriately for the method used, i.e. electronic Ullage, Temperature & Interface devices (UTI) or manual measurement. 6.8.3 The inspector must verify; the measurement corrections required for UTI or manual gauges, tank depth at the point of measurement against maximum tabulated tank depth, the calibration of electronic instruments used for temperature measurement - including UTI equipment, verification of wedge data such as tank dimensions and distance of the measurement point from the after bulkhead. 6.8.4 The importance of accurate trim and list corrections cannot be stressed enough; even small variations can result in a large error in quantification. 6.8.5 When the vessel is rolling and or pitching, the inspector must take multiple ullage readings in each tank and adopt the average of these readings for calculation purposes. 6.8.6 The inspector shall independently calculate the quantity on board and prepare a fully completed ullage report which must be verified and endorsed by vessel staff. Any discrepancy between vessels and inspectors calculation must be investigated and resolved prior to exchanging documentation. 6.8.7 Open Measurements are taken with a standard gauging tape and either cup-case or earthed electronic temperature measuring equipment. Water levels will be established using water detection paste, water levels may if possible be additionally validated with properly earthed electronic interface detectors. 6.8.8 API standards apply to both manual and electronic temperature measurement and these standards must always be observed.

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6.8.9 Closed Measurements are obtained when either the cargo is under an inert gas blanket or when the terminal or circumstances prohibit the opening of hatches in the cargo tanks.

6.8.10 Closed measurements are taken with suitable UTI devices (for example those manufactured by MMC, Hermetic). 6.8.11 During use, measurement devices must be properly earthed and the screw or bayonet connection properly attached to the reciprocal connection on the ullage stand. 6.8.12 API standards apply to electronic temperature measurement and these standards must always be observed. 6.8.13 On gas tankers the inspector must verify that each level measurement device is working appropriately, this should include DCS (main) and manual-read (auxiliary) gauges. When establishing the quantity on board, the vessel will remain isolated from the terminal by way of emergency shut down (ESD) valves. The vessel shall not be utilizing cargo gas for shipboard operations by way of isolation of the BOG (boil of gas) fuel gas valves as appropriate and, the vessel shall not be venting gas to atmosphere by way of having the tank pressure under the maximum allowable pressure with vent valves consequently closed. All shipboard spray pumps, compressors, transfer pumps, etc shall be stopped and remain inoperative prior to and while taking initial measurements. When a DCS is installed the inspector shall check automatically generated quantity data against manual measurements and manual quantity calculations. Any measurement or composite calculated value that is unsatisfactory to the inspector, for any reason, should be repeated prior to the transfer operation. The measurements must be undertaken before and after a transfer operation are completed in order to establish the quantity transferred. There are specific methods for calculation of both LNG and LPG which involve the use of mass/heating value calculation and/or correction tables. The method used for calculation of LNG is included in Appendices (c.f. Appendix VI).

6.9

MEASUREMENT AT STS TRANSFERS

6.9.1 At Ship to Ship (STS) transfers precautions to allow for roll and pitch are almost always required; the inspector must take multiple ullage readings in each tank and adopt the average of these readings for calculation purposes.

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6.9.2 For draft readings, these are best observed from the other STS vessel and when inspectors are present on both ships they should read the drafts of the vessel opposite and exchange readings. 6.9.3 On completion of a transfer, comparisons must be accomplished on the respective vessel quantities, taking account of vessel experience factors if applicable (VEF).

6.10 EXCESSIVE FREE WATER 6.10.1 Where significant volumes of free water are measured, samples of the free water must be taken using a dead bottom sampling device. Samples must also be taken from the vessels water ballast tanks and from the harbour or dock water.

6.11 TANK INSPECTIONS ROB AND OBQ 6.11.1 When all nominated cargo has been discharged from the vessel, then the inspector must inspect the vessels tanks to assess whether they are well drained of cargo. The inspector must measure, sample if possible any retained cargo and report the cargo volume remaining on board. In the case of solid waxy residues, an average of multiple tank dips may be appropriate. Where a significant volume is measured, then a Letter of Protest must be issued. 6.11.2 The inspector shall not sign or issue a Dry Tank or similar certificate, or allow any endorsement on the inspection companys ROB/OBQ or Tank Inspection Certificate. If vessel staff expresses the desire to comment on the conduct of the inspection, then the inspector must point out that the appropriate course is to comment on a separate Statement of Facts which may be issued to the inspector, who shall then acknowledge receipt by endorsing the document For Receipt Only.

6.12 VEF DETERMINATION 6.12.1 The inspector shall calculate a Loading Vessels Experience Factor from as many of the ships previous cargoes possible. Ideally this shall be from 10 or more loadings never less than 3. These calculations shall be conducted in accordance with API Manual of Petroleum Measurement Standards (MPMS). The VEF-L must be used to correct the Vessel Quantity figures when comparing ship and shore quantities. 45

6.13 INVESTIGATION OF CARGO LOSS 6.13.1 At loading, when the difference between the Bill of Lading and the vessel quantity loaded is greater than 0.3% after VEF correction, then a check on ship and shore measurements shall be performed. If the matter is not resolved then an investigation shall be conducted by the inspection company with the full involvement of terminal measurement and accounting personnel with the aim of identifying error. 6.13.2 At discharge, when the difference between the Bill of Lading and Outturn quantity is greater than 0.2% or when the difference between the VEF corrected vessel quantity discharged and the outturn quantity is greater than 0.3%, a check on ship and shore measurements shall be performed. If the matter is not resolved then an investigation shall be conducted by the inspection company with the full involvement of terminal measurement and accounting personnel with the aim of identifying error.

6.13.3 In the case where a passage loss exceeds 0.2%, then the inspector shall re-measure the vessel and in addition re-check the variables i.e. draft and list.

6.14 CALIBRATION OF EQUIPMENT 6.14.1 All equipment used in the course of Shell inspection nominations shall be properly calibrated in accordance with the manufacturers guidance. Procedures for accomplishing calibration shall be established in the companys Management System and appropriate records shall be kept.

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SECTION 7 (About HSE Awareness and Requirements)

7.1

HSE REQUIREMENTS AT LOCATION

7.1.1 The inspection company must ensure that all operating personnel have attended appropriate Health, Safety and Environmental (HSE) courses in accordance with statutory requirements for the country where the inspection is being conducted. HSE courses run by National, Regional or local bodies must be identified and assessed and, if appropriate to the nature of work undertaken by the inspection company, entered into the companys training programme. 7.1.2 All operational personnel must attend HSE courses and briefings conducted by the installation where the inspection work is conducted. Inspectors must take note of emergency muster or evacuation instructions for the installation, including the sound signals which may be given, and react immediately and appropriately when those signals are heard. 7.1.3 Inspectors shall restrict their movements to approved areas and notify the appropriate control room at the installation before and after visiting a shore tank or other restricted area for the purpose of conducting an inspection nomination. Preferably the inspector will always be accompanied by authorised installation personnel when visiting a restricted area. 7.1.4 As required for the job or for transporting samples, inspection companies may provide vehicles for inspection personnel, if so the vehicles must comply fully with national, local and installation safety requirements. 7.1.5 The inspection companies HSE policy must adequately cover all activities conducted by the company. In the absence of Statutory, National, local or terminal HSE requirements then the inspection company HSE policy will apply.

7.2

HSE REQUIREMENTS ON BOARD VESSEL

7.2.1 All vessels are governed by strict HSE policy. Inspectors must follow directions given by vessel personnel in relation to HSE matters, paying particular attention to Safety Policy briefings or HSE information cards issued on boarding the vessel. 7.2.2 Inspectors must take note of emergency muster or evacuation instructions for the vessel, including the sound signals which may be given, and react immediately and appropriately when those signals are heard.

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7.2.3 Inspectors must restrict their movements about the vessel to authorised areas and when moving about the vessel will ensure that they are always accompanied by authorised vessel personnel.

7.2.4 Inspectors must have attended a recognised Enclosed Space Entry safety course and be familiar with gas detecting instrumentation and its correct operation.

7.3

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 7.3.1 Please refer to the provisions of the Contract.

7.4

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEETS

7.4.1 The inspection company must provide inspector training in the use of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and ensure that suppliers provide MSDS for substances and materials used in the conduct of inspection nominations.

7.5

HSE INCIDENT REPORTING Please refer to the provisions of the Contract.

7.5.1

7.6

HSE CONTRACTUAL REQUIREMENTS

7.6.1 The Inspection Company shall ensure that all services and operations relating to the Contract are carried out in an environmentally responsible and safe manner and in compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, rules and directions of the governmental, local and port authorities and all relevant international regulations, agreements and codes of practice.

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APPENDIX I

49

APPENDIX II (a)
Manual Shore Tank Measurement Procedural Flow Chart Example
Acquire tank calibration chart

No
Got Chart

Yes
Acquire gauging equipment

Yes
Equipped

No

Calculate TOV, GOV, GSV, NSV

Yes
Measure level, water & Temperatures

Yes Yes

No

Yes
Validate Data

No

Agree Data with Terminal

Yes Yes
Obtain Tank Quality

Yes
Validate Data

No

End

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APPENDIX II (b)
EXAMPLE OF PROCEDURAL CHECKLIST

1.0

Pre-Loading Vessel Inspection

YES N O

1.1 Board the Vessel promptly once the gangway is down or, for White Glove inspection, arrange to inspect the vessel at the anchorage so that it may inert prior to berthing. 1.2 Attend key meeting and exchange information. 1.3 Ensure the vessel is capable of adequate isolation and segregation. If more than one cargo is to be loaded, lack of adequate isolation and segregation will require rejection of vessel to load multi-part cargoes. 1.4 Check vessels tank cleaning history and previous cargoes. Validate against customer requirements 1.5 Check that vessel has adequately drained tanks, pumps and lines by opening all tank valves and cargo pump drains. 1.6 Check arrangements for vapour segregation of cargo

When a vessel arrives with product on board: 1.7 Witness gauging of all tanks to assure procedures are in accordance with API MPMS Chapter 3, Tank Gauging 1.8 Witnesses taking of temperatures to assure procedures are in accordance API MPMS Chapter 7, Temperature Determination.

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52

APPENDIX III (a) - SHIP PRE CARGO MATRIX


WHITE OIL PETROLEUM PRODUCTS & COMPONENTS LIMITATION of LIABILITY The information given within this guide is provided without warranty of any kind. The use of any of the information herein is done so at that parties own risk. 1 PURPOSE 1.1 This guide has been developed to minimise the cargo contamination of white petroleum products and components from previous cargoes, during the loading and transit aboard Coastal and Sea Going Multi-Product Tanker Vessels. 2 AUDIENCE 2.1 The version of the matrix provided in SIRAS is for the guidance of Inspection Companies to assist them with determinations as to the preparedness of tanker vessels for loading the range of Shell cargoes described in the matrix. The Inspection Company must not rely on this guide to the exclusion of best Inspection or Industry practice and must always exercise due diligence when assessing the extent of tank preparation conducted by tanker vessels. 4 SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS 4.1 The guide is limited to dealing with white-oil liquid petroleum fuel and component cargoes only, i.e. cargoes that have a Colour no higher than 2.5 on the ASTM or NPA scale. 4.2 The guide does not encompass the loading of LPG, Black Oils and high purity Petrochemical cargoes. 4.3 The guide explicitly forbids any so called black-oils as a last cargoes, i.e. Heavy Fuel Oil, Slurry, Dirty Condensate and Crude Oil, as these require "special" tank cleaning preparations unless by agreement between Shell and the vessel Operators. 4.4 The use of chemical cleaning agents, such as detergents or caustic soda, is not allowed without the explicit permission of Shell.

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5 LOGIC EMPLOYED IN THE GUIDE 5.1 This guide has been generically based upon current knowledge of the different vessel hardware and operational designs employed in the shipping industry. Therefore the particular guidance may not necessarily be the most appropriate for the operation at hand, and at times may be overly or under prescriptive. 5.2 The guide was formulated with consideration of the following; a) The typical volumes, per preparation method, of last cargo left in the vessel cargo tanks and lines, post discharge. This would Include any Remaining On Board volume at the tank bottom (ROB), the likely tank wall clingage amount and anticipated vapour left in the tank space. b) The Physical and Chemical Characteristics of both the last cargo and of that to be loaded, particularly those critically affected, such as; Flash point, Sulphur, Benzene, Oxygenates (MTBE etc), Lead, Viscosity (clingage), Boiling range, Colour and Odour 5.3 The logic used in this guide also assumes that; a) All the ships pipelines are fully drained of previous product. b) That the suggested tank preparations are carried out effectively. 6 FURTHER NOTES ON DEFINITIONS 6.1 Where the Matrix states that a product is "Not Compatible" with a tank(s) previous contents, then that product must not be loaded into that tank(s). Tank Cleaning may be considered as a mechanism to render the tank(s) suitable to take the product, but this is by exception, and must not be conducted without the explicit guidance and permission of Shell. 6.2 Where the Matrix states "Not Compatible" with Aviation Grades, the product to be loaded, even after Tank Cleaning, is still forbidden. At least one acceptable buffer product cargo shall be carried before considering previous cargo compatibility. FAME, Lubes and Vegetable Oils, shall be a cause for concern if these are seen on the previous 3 cargoes carried by the vessel.

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7 PRODUCT NAMES AND CHARACTERISTICS This section of the guide provides general background information of the materials being handled. The data herein is based upon general knowledge of the product and may not be fully representative of the actual material at a given production location. 8 FEEDBACK ABOUT THIS GUIDE As new product specifications, initiatives and operating practices arise within the oil industry, it is inevitable that this guide will need to be reviewed and in some cases amended

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APPENDIX III (b)

56

APPENDIX III (C)

57

APPENDIX III (d)

58

59

60

CRUDE OIL
Appointment Communicatio ns Information Equipment SIRAS 3.3.2 SIRAS 3. 4 to 3.5 SIRAS 3.8.1, 4.1.1 SIRAS 4.6, 4.7,

FUEL OIL
SIRAS 3.3.2 SIRAS 3. 4 to 3.5 SIRAS 3.8.1, 4.1.1 SIRAS 4.6, 4.7,

GASOIL/KERO
SIRAS 3.3.2 SIRAS 3. 4 to 3.5 SIRAS 3.8.1, 4.1.1 SIRAS 4.6, 4.7,

JET FUEL
SIRAS 3.3.2 SIRAS 3. 4 to 3.5 SIRAS 3.8.1, 4.1.1 SIRAS 4.6, 4.7, 4.9, 4.14, SIRAS 4..15, 5.12 SIRAS 6.1, 6.7, 6.13 MPMS 17.1.7, 17.1.9 MPMS 17.1.12, 17.1.14

MOGAS/NAPHT HA
SIRAS 3.3.2 SIRAS 3. 4 to 3.5 SIRAS 3.8.1, 4.1.1 SIRAS 4.6, 4.7, 4.9,

CHEMICALS
SIRAS 3.3.2 SIRAS 3. 4 to 3.5 SIRAS 3.8.1, 4.1.1 SIRAS 4.6, 4.7, 4.9, 4.14, SIRAS 4..15 5.12 SIRAS 6.1, 6.7, 6.13 MPMS 17.1.7, 17.1.9 MPMS 17.1.12, 17.1.14

LNG
SIRAS 3.3.2 SIRAS 3. 4 to 3.5 SIRAS 3.8.1, 4.1.1 SIRAS 4.9, 6.1, 6.7, 6.13 MPMS 17.1.7, 17.1.9 MPMS 17.1.12, 17.1.14

PLAN

4.9, 4.14, 4.9, 4.14, 4.9, 4.14, 4.14, APPENDIX V - Reference Matrix for Formulation of Procedures SIRAS 4..15, 5.8, SIRAS 4..15, 5.8, SIRAS 4..15, 5.12 SIRAS 4..15, 5.12 5.12 SIRAS 6.1, 6.7, 6.13 MPMS 17.1.7, 17.1.9 MPMS 17.1.12, 17.1.14 SIRAS 3.9 MPMS 17.1.7.1, 17.1.12.1 SIRAS 3.5.4 to 3.5.6 SIRAS 4.1, 4.2, 6.2 MPMS 17.1.7.2.1 MPMS 17.1.12.2.1 SIRAS 4.5.1 to 4.5.15 MPMS 17.1.7.3.4, 17.8 SIRAS 4.9 to 4.20 MPMS Chapter 8 MPMS 17.1.7.2.4 MPMS 17.1.12.4 SIRAS 6.3 to 6.6 MPMS 17.1.7.2, 17.1.12.2 SIRAS 6.8 to 6.12 MPMS 17.1.7.3, 17.1.12.6 SIRAS 4.11 MPMS 17.1.8 MPMS 17.1.13.1 SIRAS 6.13 MPMS 17.1.11, 17.1.16 SIRAS 5.1 to 5.13 MPMS 17.1.11.4, 17.1.16.3 SIRAS 3.5, 3.11 MPMS 17.1.1, 17.1.4 SIRAS 3.10 5.12 SIRAS 6.1, 6.7, 6.13 MPMS 17.1.7, 17.1.9 MPMS 17.1.12, 17.1.14 SIRAS 3.9 MPMS 17.1.7.1, 17.1.12.1 SIRAS 3.5.4 to 3.5.6, SIRAS 4.1, 4.2, 6.2 MPMS 17.1.7.2.1 MPMS 17.1.12.2.1 SIRAS 6.1, 6.7, 6.13 MPMS 17.1.7, 17.1.9 MPMS 17.1.12, 17.1.14 SIRAS 6.1, 6.7, 6.13 MPMS 17.1.7, 17.1.9 MPMS 17.1.12, 17.1.14 SIRAS 3.9 MPMS 17.1.7.1, 17.1.12.1 SIRAS 3.5.4 to 3.5.6 SIRAS 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 6.2 MPMS 17.1.7.2.1 MPMS 17.1.12.2.1 SIRAS 4.5.1 to 4.5.15 MPMS 17.1.7.3.4, 17.8 SIRAS 4.9 to 4.20 MPMS Chapter 8 MPMS 17.1.7.2.4 MPMS 17.1.12.4 SIRAS 6.3 to 6.6 MPMS 17.1.7.2, 17.1.12.2 SIRAS 6.8 to 6.12 MPMS 17.1.7.3, 17.1.12.6 SIRAS 4.20 MPMS 17.1.7.1.2 SIRAS 4.11 to 4.13, 4.19 MPMS 17.1.8 MPMS 17.1.13.1 SIRAS 6.13 MPMS 17.1.11, 17.1.16 SIRAS 5.1 to 5.13 MPMS 17.1.11.4, 17.1.16.3 SIRAS 3.5, 3.11 MPMS 17.1.1, 17.1.4 SIRAS 3.10

Key Meeting Before Operations Shore Facility (Suitability)

SIRAS 3.9 MPMS 17.1.7.1, 17.1.12.1 SIRAS 3.5.4 to 3.5.6 SIRAS 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 6.2 MPMS 17.1.7.2.1 MPMS 17.1.12.2.1 SIRAS 4.5.1 to 4.5.15 MPMS 17.1.7.3.4, 17.8 SIRAS 4.9 to 4.20 MPMS Chapter 8 MPMS 17.1.7.2.4 MPMS 17.1.12.4 SIRAS 6.3 to 6.6 MPMS 17.1.7.2, 17.1.12.2 SIRAS 6.8 to 6.12 MPMS 17.1.7.3, 17.1.12.6 SIRAS 4.20 MPMS 17.1.7.1.2 SIRAS 4.11 to 4.13, 4.19 MPMS 17.1.8 MPMS 17.1.13.1 SIRAS 6.13 MPMS 17.1.11, 17.1.16 SIRAS 5.1 to 5.13 MPMS 17.1.11.4, 17.1.16.3 61 SIRAS 3.5, 3.11 MPMS 17.1.1, 17.1.4 SIRAS 3.10

SIRAS 3.9 MPMS 17.1.7.1, 17.1.12.1 SIRAS 3.5.4 to 3.5.6 SIRAS 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 6.2 MPMS 17.1.7.2.1 MPMS 17.1.12.2.1 SIRAS 4.5.1 to 4.5.15 MPMS 17.1.7.3.4, 17.8 SIRAS 4.9 to 4.20 MPMS Chapter 8 MPMS 17.1.7.2.4 MPMS 17.1.12.4 SIRAS 6.3 to 6.6 MPMS 17.1.7.2, 17.1.12.2 SIRAS 6.8 to 6.12 MPMS 17.1.7.3, 17.1.12.6 SIRAS 4.20 MPMS 17.1.7.1.2 SIRAS 4.11 to 4.13, 4.19 MPMS 17.1.8 MPMS 17.1.13.1 SIRAS 6.13 MPMS 17.1.11, 17.1.16 SIRAS 5.1 to 5.13 MPMS 17.1.11.4, 17.1.16.3 SIRAS 3.5, 3.11 MPMS 17.1.1, 17.1.4 SIRAS 3.10

EXECUTE

Vessel (Suitability) Sampling

Shore Measurement Ship Measurement Blending During Loading

SIRAS 4.5.1 to 4.5.15 MPMS 17.1.7.3.4, 17.8 SIRAS 4.9 to 4.20 MPMS Chapter 8 MPMS 17.1.7.2.4 MPMS 17.1.12.4 SIRAS 6.3 to 6.6 MPMS 17.1.7.2, 17.1.12.2 SIRAS 6.8 to 6.12 MPMS 17.1.7.3, 17.1.12.6 SIRAS 4.20 MPMS 17.1.7.1.2 SIRAS 4.11 to 4.13. 4.19 MPMS 17.1.8 MPMS 17.1.13.1 SIRAS 6.13 MPMS 17.1.11, 17.1.16 SIRAS 5.1 to 5.13 MPMS 17.1.11.4, 17.1.16.3 SIRAS 3.5, 3.11 MPMS 17.1.1, 17.1.4 SIRAS 3.10

SIRAS 3.9 MPMS 17.1.7.1, 17.1.12.1 SIRAS 3.5.4 to 3.5.6 SIRAS 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 6.2 MPMS 17.1.7.2.1 MPMS 17.1.12.2.1 SIRAS 4.5.1 to 4.5.15 MPMS 17.1.7.3.4, 17.8 SIRAS 4.9 to 4.20 MPMS Chapter 8 MPMS 17.1.7.2.4 MPMS 17.1.12.4 SIRAS 6.3 to 6.6 MPMS 17.1.7.2, 17.1.12.2 SIRAS 6.8 to 6.12 MPMS 17.1.7.3, 17.1.12.6 SIRAS 4.11 to 4.13, 4.19 MPMS 17.1.8 MPMS 17.1.13.1 SIRAS 6.13 MPMS 17.1.11, 17.1.16 SIRAS 5.1 to 5.13 MPMS 17.1.11.4, 17.1.16.3 SIRAS 3.5, 3.11 MPMS 17.1.1, 17.1.4 SIRAS 3.10

SIRAS 3.9 MPMS 17.1.7.1, 17.1.12.1 SIRAS 3.5.4 to 3.5.6 SIRAS 4.1, 4.2, 6.2 MPMS 17.1.7.2.1 MPMS 17.1.12.2.1 SIRAS 4.5.1 to 4.5.15 MPMS 17.1.7.3.4, 17.8 SIRAS 4.9 to 4.20 MPMS Chapter 8 MPMS 17.1.7.2.4 MPMS 17.1.12.4 SIRAS 6.3 to 6.7 MPMS 17.1.7.2, 17.1.12.2 SIRAS 6.8 to 6.12 MPMS 17.1.7.3, 17.1.12.6 MPMS 17.1.8 MPMS 17.1.13.1 SIRAS 6.13 MPMS 17.1.11, 17.1.16 SIRAS 5.1 to 5.13 MPMS 17.1.11.4, 17.1.16.3 SIRAS 3.5, 3.11 MPMS 17.1.1, 17.1.4 SIRAS 3.10

VERIFY

During Discharge Reconciliation Testing

ACTION

Reporting and Archiving Protest Letters

APPENDIX VI - LNG CALCULATION METHOD


In order to calculate the volume of LNG received the volume at close is deducted from the volume at opening, which is then converted to an energy value on the basis of it gross heating value and its density as determined from it temperature and quality. The net delivered quantity in terms of energy also subtracts the heating value of the volume of vapour returned to the ship. 1. Determine opening volume on the ship (VO) in m3 :Confirm validity of measurements by comparison of manual level reads with those generated by the ships DCS, if they are within expected accuracy, the DCS measurements shall be used for all further calculations. a) the ships DCS will measure the levels using a time based average as described previously and will record the list and trim. It will also calculate the liquid volume aboard as programmed. b) Verify the DCS calculation by using the DCS measurements as per the volume calculation presented in the ships tank tables. c) If the 2 calculations do match exactly to the nearest 0.001 m3, then the calculation as per part b) shall prevail. 2. Determine closing volume on the ship (VC) in m3 :Confirm validity of measurements by comparison of manual level reads with those generated by the ships DCS, if they are within expected accuracy, the DCS measurements shall be used for all further calculations. d) the ships DCS will measure the levels using a time based average as described previously and will record the list and trim. It will also calculate the liquid volume aboard as programmed. e) Verify the DCS calculation by using the DCS measurements as per the volume calculation presented in the ships tank tables. f) If the 2 calculations do match exactly to the nearest 0.001 m3, then the calculation as per part e) shall prevail. 3. The volume of liquid delivered in m3 is then :- V = VO-VC 62

In order to determine the higher heating value and the LNG density the composition of the LNG must be know. This is obtained from the terminal DCS calculation of the average in stream LNG composition as provided by the GCs. These values should be provided in mol% to the nearest 0.0001%. Surveyor shall verify that the sum of the component mol percentages sum to 100% +/-0.0001%.

63