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Ci^e

tmon

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DR. MILLER'S

COME YE APART. YEAR BOOK. GLIMPSES THROUGH LIFE'S WINDOWS. THE MOST OF LIFE. MAKING
SILENT TIMES.

PERSONAL FRIENDSHIPS OF JESUS.

STRENGTH AND BEAUTY. THE BUILDING OF CHARACTER. THE EVERY DAY OF LIFE. THE GOLDEN GATE OF PRAYER. THE HIDDEN LIFE. THE JOY OF SERVICE. THE LESSON OF LOVE. THE MINISTRY OF COMFORT. THE STORY OF A BUSY LIFE. THE UPPER CURRENTS. THINGS TO LIVE FOR. YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROBLEMS.

25ooMet^
A GENTLE HEART.
BY THE STILL WATERS. GIRLS; FAULTS AND IDEALS.

HOW? WHEN? WHERE?


IN PERFECT PEACE.

LOVING MY NEIGHBOUR. MARY OF BETHANY. SECRETS OF HAPPY HOME LIFE. SUMMER GATHERING. THE BLESSING OF CHEERFULNESS. THE FACE OF THE MASTER. THE MARRIAGE ALTAR. THE SECRET OF GLADNESS.

THE TRANSFIGURED LIFE. TO-DAY AND TO-MORROW. UNTO THE HILLS. YOUNG MEN; FAULTS AND

IDEALS.

Beto gorli

'

(,

--*1

Cjje

3Le0j5on of ilotje

BY
J.

E.
**

MILLER, D.D.

AUTHOR OF

SILENT TIMES," "THE UPPER CURRENTS," "IN PERFECT PEACE," ETC., ETC.

As every

love hue So every grace is

ts lights

love."

I^eto

ioth
CO.

THOMAS

Y.

CROWELL &

PUBLISHERS

THE NEW

YOi-K

ASTOR, LENOX
R
1919

8S7824 AND
L

TILDEN FOUNDATIONS

Copyright, 1903, hy T. Y. Crowell

Sf

Co.

Published, September, 1903

PREFACE

10
The

learn hozv to love


lesson is

is to

learn
it

how
is

to live.

a long one, but


to

the great
jiot
it

business

of

life

master
iii

it.

The Master

only taught the lesson

words, hut also set


life.

down for us
Christ
is

in a

life,

his ozmi

To follow
and
M.

to practise this

great lesson, learning

more of it day hy day, we go Jwme,


Philadelphia, U. S. A.

until school is out

J.

R.

TITLES OF CHAPTEKS
The Lesson of Love Things that are Lovely III. To Suffer anb Love On IV. The Hurt of Flattery V. "Nor Life" VI. Having the Mind of Christ
I.

Page

11.

17

31

45 59 73 85 95
107
119 129

VII.
IX.

The Second Mile

VIII. Losing Self in Christ

Growing by Abandonment X. Leaving Things Undone XI Living for the Best Things XII. Serving and Following Christ XIII. Citizenship in Heaven XIV. Sent XV. Gladdened to Gladden XVI. The Gentleness of Christ XVII. Would Our Way be Better? XVIII. In the Father's Hands XIX. Evening, Morning, One Day XX. True Friendship's Wishes XXI. Christ in Our Everydays XXII. In Tune with God

143

155
169
181 191

203 215

227 239

253 265

Cl^e

tmon

of JLoije

[1]

For

life,

with

all it yields
.

of joy and woe.

And

hope and fear

Is just

our chance

o'

the

prize of learning

love^
is.

How

love

might

be,

hath been indeed, and

Robert Browning.

[2]

CHAPTER FIRST
Cl^e

tmon
learned.

of iLobe

HRISTIAN
affection

love has to be
is

There
which
be

natural

does

not

need

to

learned

the

love of

parents

for chil-

dren, of children for parents, of friend for friend.

But

it is

not nat-

ural to

love

our enemies, to love unlovable

people, to be unselfish, to return kindness for

unkindness.
is

We have to learn
is

this love,
it.

and

it

the great business of life to do


lesson

The

written out for us in

many
for ex-

parts of the Scriptures.

We

have

it,

ample, in Saint Paul's wonderful chapter on


love.

It includes patience.
It
is

"Love

suffereth

long."

not easy to live with

all sorts

of

people and to keep sweet always.

In a letter
stated thus:

from a friend the problem

is

"How

to live victoriously

feel well,

has

many

tasks

and

when one does not duties, and must

[3]

Cl^e

jLc)8)Son

of Lobe
That
is

work with a cranky person."


the problem for

about
it is it

many good
is

people, and

not easy.

There

only one

way of

solving

by

love.

And

natural love will not


it

suffice.

Some mothers solve Some gentle wives


thoughtless,

with their children.


it

solve

with exacting,

ungentle husbands.
it

Now

and
it

then a friend solves


is

with a friend to

whom

not easy to be a friend.


it

But

the Christian

is

to learn to solve

with every kind of person

however disagreeable, unlovable, and uncongenial

he

is

never to come to the end of his

loving.

It takes almost infinite patience to

love thus, more, at least, than

many

of us can

command.
Love
is

kind.

Kindness has been called the


It
is

small coin of love.

not shown in large


little

deeds so
things.

much

as in

countless

gentle

Jesus wrought a few great miracles,


all

but in between the miracles,

the days, hours,

and minutes were filled with kindnesses, little words and acts and looks which no one counted.

Love should always abound

in kindnesses.

Our

love should not be kept for great things,

[4]

Cl^e

tmon

of lobe

but should flow out continually, like fragrance

from a
is

flower, as part of

our own

life.

Love
life,

not something to be added to a busy

as

some men have their avocations to which they turn to rest them from their great vocations.
**

Most men know

They hide

it

love hut as a part of life ; in some corner of the breast

Even from themselves ; and only when they restj In the brief pauses of that earthly strife
Wherewith our world might
else he

not so

rife,

They draw
A7id hold

it

forth
to

it

up

mother, child, or wife.


not life

Ah me ! Why may
Love
is

and

love he

one

"

generous.

It

"envieth

not."

We

have learned the lesson well only when we can rejoice in the joy of others. This is quite as

much a part of
them that

true love's

sympathy

as

it is

to share the griefs of others.


rejoice
;

"Rejoice with

weep with them that weep."

We

can do the latter more easily than the former. When we find one in misfortune or
it
is

in trouble,

not hard to sympathize with


others are honored

him.

But when

more than

[5]

Cl^e tt&0on of Lobe


we
are, or prospered more, or

success while

we
it

fail,

or are very

when they win happy while

we are

less so, is it as

easy for us to be gento be really sorry if

uinely glad as

would be

they were in some kind of grief?

Love

is

unselfish.
is

It "seeketh not its

own."
true

Unselfishness
love.

at the very heart of

all

It

is

the obtruding of self into our

thoughts, feelings, and acts that spoils


of our living.
cost us

much
would

We

love people until

it

something to continue to love them and

then we stop short.


sibility

We
is

accept serious respon-

when we say to anyone:

"I

will

be
his

your friend."
friends,

That

what Jesus said to

and then he loved

to the uttermost.

That

is

what "seeketh not

may

cost

own" means. It us years of self-denial and exhaustits

ing service.

Love keeps sweet amid


not provoked."

all irritation.
is

It "is

It probably

too

much

to

hope for

in this world of infirmity

and

sinfulin

ness, that
life

one shall ever attain a condition

in which there shall be nothing that would

naturally excite bitter or unkindly feeling.

[6]

ci^e

tt&mx

of

tou
exercise our

Indeed, wc could not learn to be sweet-tem-

pered with nothing to


temper.

test

and
is

The problem then

not to find a
live

paradise of sweetness in which to

have to wait for Heaven for that

but

we
in

shall

com-

mon human

conditions,

with infirmities and

failings even in our best friends, with a thou-

sand things in the experiences of each day to


try our temper,
still

and always

to keep sweet.

Good temper is an admirable quality of love. For some people it is easier, too, than for othBut it is part of the lesson of love which ers. we should all set ourselves to learn, whether it
is

easy or hard.

It can be learned, too


it is

it

should be learned, for

a Christian duty,
ele-

one of the fruits of the Spirit, an essential

ment

in Christian culture.

We

should never

apologize for ill-temper as only an amiable

weakness or a pardonable infirmity


be ashamed to yield to
it.

we should
dishonored,

Touchy people
is

should determine to conquer their wretched

weakness and

sin,

by which God

and the

love of tender hearts hurt.


love

George

Macdonald speaks of the hurt of

[7]

Cl^e LejSjson of Lote


its hurt and its sorrows. joy by the might of thy pain Lord of all yesterdays, days and to-morrows. the hope of thy gain. Help us to love on

Thou

k7iowest,

Samoiir,

Didst rescue

its

Love
mean.
fences

is

meek.

That

is

what Saint Paul's


of slights, of-

words, "taketh no account of evil" seem to


It does

not keep a

list

and

injustices.

give .P" Peter asked.

"How often shall I forHe thought he was going

a long way in the path of Christian love when


he suggested that seven times would be enough.

But Jesus
seventy

said

*'0h, not seven times only, but

times

seven"

that

is,

indefinitely.

Let your love be simply inexhaustible.

Nothing

is

harder than to have to endure


ingratitude, to love
It
is

wrong and

and to have

love unrequited.

not easy to keep on lov-

ing when this

is

one's experience.

Yet that
tells

is

what our
life to

lesson teaches us.

writer

story of a

man who had given up his whole Then there came a time when he love.
all

knew that from him.

he cared for was slipping away


after ten years of lov-

At length

ing and serving, a letter came which told him

[8]

Cl^e
that
all

tt&mi

of

Lobe
lost,

he had cherished so tenderly was


life

that the
out.

of those years was utterly blotted

Yet though stunned by the blow, and left alone and desolate, he was not crushed, but went on with his life-work in quietness and
hope.

When

a friend asked him how he could take


life

up a new

after such blighting disappointlost love.

ment, he said, "It was because I never

Whatever happened
constant to love.

to me, I went on loving;

whatever change came in others, I was always

When
I

the crash threw

down

my

palace,

though
soul

was miserable, I was not

embittered; though I was stripped of everything,

my

was

still

young
all

love

had kept

the springs of life flowing in

my

heart."

This

is

a secret which
It
is

of us should seek
creep into

to learn.

easy to

let bitterness

the heart

when one has

to endure

wrong day

after day,

week after week, possibly year

after year.
this

There are women who know what


There are men,
too,

means.

who meet

this

experience.
their souls

Too

often the darkness creeps into


lights of love.

and puts out the

[9]

Cl^e JLeg0on of JLote


Nothing on earth
sort of death that
is is

sadder than

this.

It

is

worse than dying.

Whatwe

ever wrongs or cruelties

we have

to endure

should always keep love in our hearts.


should never allow
its

lamps to be put

out.

We We

should keep on loving and thus be more than

conquerors over

all

the hardness that besets us.

In

all

such experiences love will save us, keep

us alive

and nothing
one
finds
sea.

else will.

Sometimes

sweet

fresh-water
is

spring beside the

When

the tide

low

you may take your cup and drink of the pure


well

and the water


over

is

fresh as if

it

flowed from

the bosom of a rock on the hillside.


sea rolls
it

Then

the

and for long hours the bracklittle

ish floods

bury the

spring out of sight.

But when
*

the tide draws back again,

you

find
in

the water sweet as ever.

So love should be

our hearts when the black, brackish floods of

wrong have swept over them.


never lose
its

The

love should

sweetness.
is

Another quality of love to be learned


ing the good and not the
evil in others.

see-

That

appears to be the meaning of the words, "Re-

[10]

Ci^e lejsjson of lobe


joiceth not in unrighteousness, but rejoiceth

with the truth

bcheveth
is

all

things,

hopeth

all

things."

There
This

in

some people

a disposition to see evil in others and even to


be secretly glad of
it.

is

a satanic spirit.
not," condemns

Our Lord's
it.

counsel,

"Judge
and

We are not to put

on our strongest glasses


see the flaws

in order to look at others

and

faults in them.

Rather we should turn our

glasses on ourselves, to find our

own

defects,
is

while we try to discover the good there

in

our neighbor.

It

is

amazing how some people

are worried over other people's defects and


sins

and how

little

concern meanwhile the un-

seemly things in themselves give them.

In

one of Swedenborg's visions he saw "a hell

where everybody
ing everybody
this vision
is

is

completely busy in mak-

else virtuous."

The

irony of

obvious and wholesome.

But that

is

not what Christian love does.

It
it

looks for the

good

in others

and

seeks to

woo

out into something better.


learn this lesson

If only we would

and think of finding the good

in others, instead of the evil, covering all un-

[11]

Cl^e
lovely things,

tmon
hoping
all

of

toU
how
nearer

beautiful things,
!

changed

all life

would be

How much
if

together we should be drawn

only we saw

each other more clearly, more truly


'*

O God!

that 7nen would see a little clearer, Or judge less harshly when they cannot see. God ! that men might draw a little nearer

To one another.

They'd he nearer

thee.""

These are parts of the great


can we learn
us.
it?
let

lesson.

How
it

Christ only can teach

to

We

must

the heaven-life enter our

hearts.

"When we

were playing out in the

barn to-day," said Marjorie, "the sun shone


in

through a knot-hole high up

in one

of the

boards, and it made a path, a golden path, away up. I guess if anybody could have walked up on it and slipped out where it came
in,

he would have found a road-way into

heaven."

The

child's
is

fancy was very beautiful.


like

Chris-

tian love

such a shining pencil of light


rift in the

breaking into our world through a


sky. If

we could walk up on

it,

we should

find

[12]

Cl^e

tmon

of Lobe
This love
is

a foot-path into heaven.


life

heaven's
Christ

brought down to earth.

Jesus

brought
first

down when he came. who ever loved in this way


it

He
in

was the

our world

He

wants

all his

the same

way
we
it

"As

followers to learn to love in


I have loved you, that

ye

also love one another."


lesson, if
will

He

will teach us the

only learn

it.

When we

have

mastered

we are ready for heaven.

[13]

Cl^ins^

tl^at

are Hobelt

[15]

This was not the beauty

oh, nothing like this,


soft

That

to

young Nourmahal gave such magic of bliss ;


shadowy days.
it flies

But

that loveliness^ ever in motion^ which plays

Like the light upon Auiunm's

Now

here

and now

there^

giving warmth as

from the cheek to the eyes; Now melting in mist and now breaking in gleams,
From, the lips
to the cheeky

Like the glimpses a saint has of heaven in his dreams.

Moore,

My

crown

is

in

my my

hearty not on

my

head^
stones^

Nor Nor

decked with diamonds


to be seen
:

and Indian

crown

is called, content

A crown it is,

that seldom kings erijoy.

Shakespeare.

[16]

CHAPTER SECOND
Cl^ingji ti^at are Hotels

OTHING
tiful
is fit

that

is

not beau-

for a place in a

Christly
essential,

life.

Strength

is

but strength need

not be rugged and uncomely


it
;

art has learned to give


justice
life,

graceful form.

Truth and honesty,


in a

and right are prime elements


true,

worthy

but they need not be unbeautiful.


it is

Sometimes,

we

see

men

ities
is

are strongly

whom these great qualmarked, yet in whom beauty


in

lacking.

Some even

boast of being blunt

men, meaning that they say what they think,


not caring

how they may say

it.

But

there

is

no reason

why

any sturdy quality of character

should be wanting in loveliness.

We may clothe We may be honest and yet gentle and kindly. We


the homeliest virtue in garments of grace.

may

be true and live very sweetly.

In a cluster of "whatsoevers" indicating the

[17]

Cl^e Lesi0on of lobe


principal qualities in an ideal character, Saint

Paul includes "whatsoever things are lovely."

Perhaps

it

has been too

much

the habit in

Christian teachers to overlook beauty as an


essential feature of a complete life.

Christ,

who

is

always to be our model, was "altogether

lovely."

He was strong, and true, and just, and righteous, but there was no flaw in his
life.

character, no defect in his

We

should
is

never tolerate in ourselves anything that


beautiful.

not

Some things

are

not

lovely.

There

are

ways that are not winning.


whose personality
to
is

There are people

not attractive.

draw others

to them.

They

close friends

nor keep friends.

They fail make They may be


neither

good

in the general fabric of their character

honest,

truthful, upright, just.

No

one

could condemn them or charge them with any-

thing really wrong.


in their dispositions.

Yet they are not lovable


There
is

something in

them that hinders


fulness.

their popularity, that

mars

their influence, that interferes with their use-

[18]

Ci^mgs;
Simplicity
tificiality is
is

ti^at

are Hofeel^
Arrea-

one clement in loveliness.

never beautiful.

There are many

people

who

suffer greatly in their lives

by

son of their affectations.


in their manners.

They

are unnatural
to be
It

They seem always

acting under the restraint of rules.


said the other

was

day of a good man that he

talks

even in

common

conversation as if he were de-

livering an oration.

There are some who use


in

a great deal of exaggerated language


the most commonplace feelings.

com-

plimenting their friends, even in expressing

There are

those whose very walk shows a studied air, as


if

they were conscious of a certain importance,

a burden of greatness, thinking that wherever they appear everybody's eyes follow them

with a sort of admiration and worship.

All

affectations in manner, in speech, in dress, in

bearing, in disposition, are unlovely.


are classed with insincerities.
unaffected, natural life
Selfishness
too, of
is is

They

Only the simple,


has

truly beautiful.
It

unlovely.
itself.

many ways,
it

showing

Indeed,

cannot be

hid

it

crops out continually, in act and word

[19]

Wi)t
and
to
disposition.

tmon

of

Hobc
dis-

There are those who are

obhging, never willing to put themselves out

do a favor or to show a kindness to

others.

They may

talk unselfishly, protesting their in-

terest in people

and

their friendship for them,


self asserts itself.

but when the


ishness
is

test

comes

Self-

simply the absence of love own.


Unselfishness
is

love seekIt

eth not

its

lovely.

does not count the cost of sei-ving.

It loves

unto the uttermost and never


ness.

fails in helpful-

It thinks of others, not only as of itself,

but, like the Master, forgets itself altogether.

This old lesson, old as the Christ himself,


rephrased in this

is

fragment of conversation

in

one of Anthony Hope's books " 'Life isn't taking in only ;


too.

it's

giving out,

And

it's

not giving out only words or


It's

deeds or things we've made.


selves out, too

giving our-

fully, freely.'

" 'Giving ourselves out.^' " 'Yes, to other people.

Giving ourselves in

Fancy not having found


Another
lovely

comradeship, in understanding, in joy, in love. " that out before !'


attribute
in

the

Christian

[20]

Ci^ingjs ti^at are tobeli?


life is

peace.
It
is

It never worries.
quiet, not noisy.
life.

It
is

is

never

fretted.
ity of

It

the qualis

a self-disciplined

Hurry
is

always

unbeautiful.

The

lovely life
It
is

never in haste,
If

yet never

loiters.

self-poised.

women

knew how much a quiet, self-controlled manner means in the making up of a winsome personality,

they would seek for

it

more than for

great riches.

Nervous

flurry, especially in a

woman,

is

unlovely.

It shows itself in flustered

manners, in hasty and ofttimes rash speech,


too often in ungoverned temper.
tion,

The

exhorta-

"Be ambitious

to be quiet," does not refer


tO the inner

merely to speech, but especially


spirit, to the

manner, to the whole bearing of

the

life.
is

Nothing

lovelier in life

than the

spirit

of

contentment.

Fretting mars the beauty of


Discontent
spoils
all

many
world.

face.

one's

Out of whatever window he


If there be a contented

looks the
is

discontented person sees something that


pleasing.
is

not

mind there
which are

only good seen everywhere.


in the

The happiest
in

homes

world are not those

[21]

m)t

tmon

of

lobe
which

the finest carpets, the costHest pictures, the

most luxurious furniture, but those


glad,

in

happy

hearts dwell.

mind

at rest

glorifies the plainest

surroundings and even


Saint Paul was in a

the hardest conditions.

prison when he wrote:

"I have learned, in

whatsoever state I am, therein to be content."

The

secret

was

in himself.

"I once talked with a Rosicrucian about the

Great Secret," said Addison.


it

"He
it

talked of

as a spirit that lived in

an emerald, and conto the high-

verted everything that was near


est perfection.

'It gives lustre to

the sun,' he
It irradiates

said, 'and

water to the diamond.

every metal, and enriches lead with the property of gold.


It brightens

smoke into flame,

flame into Hght, and light into glory.


gle ray dissipates pain and care

sin-

from the perhis great

son on
secret

whom
is

it falls.'

Then

found

was Content."
the great master-secret of all beau-

Love
the

tiful things in character; love deals also with

manner of

life's

expression, as well as with

its acts.

Many good deeds [22]

are done in a very

Cl^mgsi t^at are lobelv


unbeautiful way.
in

such an unfitting

Some people do kindnesses way that those they help


There

wish they had not tried to help them.


is

a great deal of thoughtlessness, too, in

many

people.
to do for

They

love their friends

and are ready

them anything the friends need, even


cost or great sacrifice, but they fail

at

much

utterly in the amenities

and graces which


all

to-

gether are the charm and sweetener of


tiful helpfulness.

beau-

Love

in the heart

should
in

always inspire whatsoever things are lovely


behavior, in conduct, in disposition
;

and nothact,

ing that gives pain to others, either in


word, tone, or manner, can be lovely.
Self-love
is

the secret of

many

of the most

unlovely things in disposition, in character, in


conduct.

A writer

says

"All extreme sensi-

tiveness, fastidiousness, suspicion, readiness to

take offence, and tenacity of what we think

our due, come from

self-love, as does the

unfeel

worthy

secret gratification
is

we sometimes
;

when another

humbled or mortified the cold

indifference, the harshness of our criticism, the

unfairness and hastiness of our judgments, our

[23]

C]^e
bitterness

iLejSjson

of JLobe
dislike,

toward those we

and many
less rise

other faults which must more or


before most men's conscience,
tion
it

up

when they queshas


loved

sincerely as to

how far they do indeed


as

love

their

neighbors

Christ

them."

We
self

are told that love "doth not behave

it-

unseemly."

There are many things which


are not beautiful.

cannot be said to be sinful, which are yet unseemly.


unrefined.

They

They

are

All displays of uncontrolled temunfit.

per are unbecoming,

All harsh and un-

kind words are unmeet.

Rudeness

in every

form
love.

is

out of harmony with the spirit of

The matter of manners should


garded
as unimportant.

never be reis

Expression

a true

index of character.

In reading and speaking,

a great deal depends upon pronunciation, accent, emphasis, tone,

and the

fine

shadings of

the voice which help in interpreting thought,


feeling, emotion.

To

a refined and cultivated

ear, defects in expression, inelegances in utter-

ance, are painful.

The charm of good

elo-

[24]

Cl)iU8)S tl^at at:e Lotielr


quence
lies

in its simplicity, its naturalness,

its niceties

of expression, and in

its

true inter-

pretation of thought.

Beautiful living, in like

manner,

is

not only refined and cultivated, but

also interprets truly

what

is

best

and most

beautiful in the heart.

Anything unseemly

is

a worse marring in a

woman than

in

a man.

Men

are of a coarser
material.

grain than women, of more

common
so

Unseemly things do not appear


in a

unseemly

every

man as in a woman. It is expected that woman shall be beautiful, not only in

her character, but also in her behavior, not

only in what she does, but in the way she does


it.

There are books which claim to

tell

people

how

to behave, but true refinement cannot be

learned from even the best of these.

There

is

many
whose

woman who

is

thoroughly familiar

with the rules and requirements of society,


life is full

of unseemly things.
writes that on three succesdifferent preach-

young woman

sive
ers,

Sundays she heard three

and that each of them spoke very

ear-

nestly on the importance of self-control.

This

[25]

Cl^e JLesigon of
persistent recurrence of the
set her to

toU
same lesson had

thinking of the subject, and she wrote

with some alarm regarding her own lack of


self-mastery.

She saw that she had been


fall into certain habits

al-

lowing herself to

which

are very unseemly,

which are marring the

sweetness of her disposition


disagreeable.

and making her


a boarding-

She

is

living in

house, and she began to see that she had been

behaving herself
her hostess.

in a

very

selfish

way toward
fault
like

She had permitted herself to be-

come

exacting

and

critical,

finding

with everything.

She had been acting

peevish, fretful child, losing her temper

and

giving way to her feelings in a most unseemly


fashion.

This

young woman's frank

confession

of

the faults

into which she sees that she has

drifted shows

how unconscious we may be of


in

unseemly things

our

life

and conduct. Othey

people see them, however, though we do not.


It does not take

long for one to get a reputa-

tion as a discontented person, as unreasonable,


as

hard to get along with, as disagreeable, or

[26]

Cl^tngjs ti^at are lotelv


as a gossip, or a meddler in other people's matters.

We

need to keep

it

in

our prayers conto sec our-

tinually, that

we may have the gift


It

selves as others see us.

would be a good

thing
First

if

we

all

were to read the thirteenth of


all

Corinthians at least once a week


life.

through our

It

would be

like

looking into

a mirror which would expose the unseemly


things in our behavior, that we might cure

them.

The

cure for unseemliness

is

not found in

books of etiquette, nor in any mere external


culture, but in love in the heart.

Rudeness

of

all

kinds soon yields to refinement of spirit.


gentle.
It in-

Love makes the roughest man


kindness,

spires in us all beautiful things

gentleness,

ingness, every

good temper, thoughtfulness, obligform of unselfishness, the spirit


Jesus was
all

of serving, and the truest courtesy.

the truest gentleman that ever lived, and

who

really follow

him

will catch his spirit

and

learn the beauty of his refinement.

[27]

Co

puffer anu loic

iSDn

[291

Here^ and here alone,


Is given thee to suffer for God's sake,

hi the other worlds we shall more perfectly


Serve him and love him., praise him, work for him.

Grow near and nearer him with all delight, But then we shall not any more he called To suffer, which is our appointment here.
Canst thou not
suffer, then,

one hour or two?

If he should call thee from thy cross to-day,

Saying,

It is finished

that hard cross of thine


deliverance,

From which

thou

pray est for


thee
f

Thinkest thou not some passion of regret

Would overcome
Let

Thou wouldst

say, " So soon

me go

hack

and
:

suffer yet awhile

More patiently

I have not yet praised

God."

H. E. H. King.

[30]

CHAPTER THIRD

Co

puffer

anti

Lobe
is

flDn

CHRISTIAN
to

not called

an easy, comfortable,
life,

self-indulgent

but to

self-denial, sacrifice, cross-

bearing.
disciples
first

When
asked

two of
for

his

the

places in his kingdom, the Master said to


:

them "Ye know not what ye


to drink the

ask.

Are ye

able

cup

am

about to drink .'^"

Speakye were

ing of suffering wrongfully. Saint Peter says,

"Hereunto were ye called"


called to suffer wrongfully.

that
He
is

is,

writing to

servants or slaves.

Ofttimes they would find

their position very hard.

Their masters would

be

severe,

sometimes cruel.

They

are

ex-

horted, however, to submit quietly, not only to

the good and gentle, but also to the froward.

"If when ye do
it

well,
is

and

suffer for

it,

ye take

patiently, this

acceptable with God.

For

hereunto were ye called."

[31]

Cl^e
None of
to

Hmon
others,

o{ iLotie

us are slaves, but

many

of us have
al-

work under

and the others are not

ways "good and gentle."

The problem

in

lives is how to maintain the Christian how to be Christlike in one's place under others who are unreasonable, exacting, unjust, or unkind. The New Testament teaching is

many

spirit,

that we are to do our work well, to manifest


the patient, gentle spirit of Christ, whatever

our hardships and wrongs


the

may

be.

Back of

human

masters stands another Master, and

it is

for him we are really working.


all

He

is

the

one we are to seek to please in

that we do.

This changes the character of

all service.

Master would not be pleased


negligently, if
bitterness even

if

we skimped

it,

Our we did our work or if we showed

under hard and unjust treatof Christ in suffering

ment.

The example
copy
set for us.

is

the

"Christ also suffered for you,

leaving you an example, that ye should follow


his steps."

What

does this example teach us?

For one
quietly

thing, Christ endured his suffering


patiently.

and

"Who, when he was

[32]

Co
reviled,

^uffci; ann Hotie )n


not again."

reviled

Most of our

Lord's sufferings were at the hands of men.

He

was a friend of men, and sought always to


this kindness

do them good. But


kindness in return.
rejected him.
his

met only un-

Those he sought to save


unto his own, and

"He came
him not."

own

received

We

all

know

the

story of Christ's wonderful love.

He

never

ceased doing good, and

men never

ceased per-

secuting him.
cross,

At

last

they nailed him on a

but really they were crucifying him,

driving nails into his hands and feet and heart,


all

the three years of his public ministry.

Yet

his love

was never

chilled

by the enmity and


a bitter thought
cross,

cruelty of men.
in his heart.

He never had

Even on the
its

when human

hate had done

worst, he loved on as tender-

ly, as patiently, as sweetly, as if

receiving only love


years.

he had been from the world all the

This

is

part of the lesson

set for us,

and

it is

a lesson not easy to learn.

It

is

hard to receive hard to suffer

injury from others and always to return kindness for


it.

Especially

is

it

[33]

Cl^e

iLcjSjSon

of Lobe

wrongfully and keep one's heart sweet and loving through


it all.

Yet that

is

the lesson, and

we

find right here one of

life's

most serious

problems.

We

cannot avoid suffering at the

hands of others.

In the truest and most con-

genial friendships there sometimes are things

which occasion pain.

Even

in the sw^eetest

home

there

is

frequent need of mutual forbear-

ance and forgiveness.

Then

there are

many

who have

to suffer continually, ofttimes cruelly


others.

and bitterly, at the hands of Here then is the problem


the heart through
all

to keep love in

unkindness, ingratitude,

and
in
;

injustice

never to allow bitterness to creep

never to give
;

way

to

any feeling of

resent-

ment always
help.
It
his life to the

to be forgiving, loving, ready to

was thus that Christ went through


very end, praying for his ene-

mies even on his cross, and giving his life to


save those

who were driving him out of

his

own

world.

We

should remember that no one can really


life

hurt our

but ourselves.

Men may
injure us in

rob us

of our money.

They may

many

[34]

Co
ways.

puffer auD

toU
life.

flDn

They may
inflict

cut our bodies to pieces.

But

they cannot touch our real


they can
injury.

All the wrongs

upon us

will

do us no actual

But

if

we give way

to anger, if

we

let

bitterness creep into our hearts, if

we grow un-

forgiving or resentful, we have hurt ourselves.


If on the other hand, we keep love in our hearts

under

all

the

human wrong we

suffer

we have

won

the victory over every wrong.


in his suffering
is

Another of Christ's steps

shown

in

the

words,

"when

he

suffered,

threatened not, but committed himself to him


that judgeth righteously."

He

could have

avenged himself on

his

enemies.

He

could

have smitten them down, when they wronged him so sorely. "Thinkest thou," he said
to his disciples,

who wished

to interfere to save

him from

his

enemies, "Thinkest thou that

I cannot beseech

my

Father, and he shall even

now send me more than twelve legions of angels ?" But he did not do it. He did nothing
to check the wicked plots of his enemies.
lifted
saults.

He
as-

no finger to

resist their

malignant

[35]

Ci^e
"But
these

iLcjSjson

of Lobe
wrongs
in the

were

terrible

against

him," you say.


so quietly?

"Why

did he submit to them

Is there

no justice
to

world?

Must wicked men be allowed


in their wickedness

go on forever

and cruelty ?"

Here

is

the

explanation:

"He committed

himself to him
is,

that judgeth righteously"; that

into the

hands of
It

his Father.

This means two things.


sins

means that he committed the

of his ene-

mies, with their deservings of

wrath and their


just and judg-

power to harm, to God, who


eth righteously.

is

any revenge he left the matter to his Father. Saint Paul teaches us to do the same with those

He

himself would not take

who wrong us or
wrath of God
longeth unto

sin against us

"Avenge not
Vengeance be-

yourselves, beloved, but give place unto the


:

for
;

it is

written.

me

I will recompense, saith the


It

Lord."
is

We are not the judge of any man.


to

not our place to punish a man's sins against

us.

Commit that

God

he
is

is

just.

The

other thing meant

that Jesus committo

ted himself, his

own

life,

God, with

all his

hurts and injuries, and

all

the grievous wrongs

[36]

Co

puffer

ant)

Lote
and

flDn

which had been done to him.


able to take all these cruelties

His Father was


all his

Son's
their
glorihis

untold sufferings, and not only prevent

harming him, but use them even for the


fying of
his

name.
all

He

was able to bring

Son through

the terrible experiences, and

out from them, unharmed, with no trace of

hurt upon him

and he

did.

Christ's enemies
his

thought to quench utterly the light of

name in the black shame of the cross. But we know that no ray of brightness was put out his name never shone so radiantly as it did after he had come again from death. It is thus that we should do with our wrongs, when others seek to injure us, when they treat we should commit us unkindly or unjustly

ourselves

and our

ill-treatment to our Father.

He

will look after the equities.

It

is

not our
also

duty

to

avenge ourselves.
lives to

Then we may

commit our

the same divine love, no

matter how cruel, how vindictive, how relentless

our enemies

may

be,

nor

how

terrible the

hurts they have done to us.


us from
all

He

will preserve

the hurts of men's malignity.

He

[37]

Ci^e
will
all

Ht&mx
evil.

of

Lobe
all
is

bring us safely through


assaults

danger and
he that will
is

of
if

"Who

harm you,
good ?"

ye be zealous of that which

But some one who has been


at the hands of others

suffering injury
:

may

say "This terrible


life,

wrong against me has broken up my


blighted

my

beautiful hopes, ruined

all

my

promise of happiness."
build beauty yet for
things.

Yes; but God can

you out of these broken Keep your heart sweet with love, and your soul unstained by sin, and then trust your
life to

your Father.
all

He

will

bring blessing

and good out of


ruin to-day.

that seems such a pitiful

Could there ever again be such


that was beautiful in a life as

a wreck of

all

there was that

Good Friday
it

evening,

when a

few friends took down the body of Jesus from


the cross and laid

away

in the

grave ?

But

we know what came out of that ruin. It will be the same with every one who, in time of hu-

man

betrayal or wrong, commits

all

with con-

fidence to God.

The same

lesson applies to all suffering, as

[38]

Co

puffer anD lobe )n


wrong from
others.

well as to the enduring of

Some people suppose that sorrow always


good, blesses the
life,

does

enriches the character.

But, in fact,
bly.

it

ofttimes hurts a life irrepara-

If we do not submit ourselves to


if

God

in

our grief,

we

resist

and

rebel, if

we chafe

and repine, and go on grieving inconsolably, our sorrow hurts our lives. It mars the beauty.
It hushes the song.

It dims the eye.


If,

It robs

the heart of

its love.

however, we rever-

ently accept our sorrow as a messenger

from

God, sent on a mission of

love,
us,

bearing gifts
then we shall
loss.

and blessings from heaven for

get good and not evil from our pain and

We

have only to keep our hearts sweet, trustwithout bitterness, without fear,

ful, songful,

and then
There

leave with

God

all

the outcome of the

suffering.
is

a story of an Indian child who one


in

day came

from the wheat-field with a hurt

bird in her hand.


she said: "See!
in

Running
This
is

to the old chief,


bird.
I

my

found
old

it

the wheat.

It

is

hurt."

The

man

looked at the wounded bird and replied slowly

[39]

Cl^e lesJjSon of Lobe


"No,
bird.
it is

not your bird,


it

my

child
it

it is

God's

Take

back and lay

down where

it. If you keep it, it will die. If you give it back into God's hands, he will heal its hurt and it will live."

you found

What

the old Indian

said of hurt birds

is

true of hearts hurt by sorrow.

hand can heal them


in time of grief
is

to

No human
God's

the only safe thing to do

put our

lives into

hands, to commit them to him.


gentle and skilful.

His hands are


not break a

They
be

will

bruised reed nor quench the smoking flax.

We

need

never

afraid

of

suffering.

"Hereunto were ye
know, at

called."

There must be a

reason for this in God's thought of us.


least,

We

that

best things in life

we never can reach the but by the paths of pain.


lie

All the richest blessings of grace


lines

beyond
he was

of suffering which we must pass to get

them.

Even of Jesus

it

is

said, that

made

perfect through suffering.

There were

attainments which even he could reach in no


other way.
Christlike in

All that

is

worthiest and most

good men bears the marks of pain

[40]

Co
upon
it.

puffer anD Lobe )n

We

must pay the price


suffer ofttimes

if

we would
for the

get the blessing.

Then we must
sake of others.

also
all

Christ suffered for

men
is

in

a way in which no other one ever can

suffer. re-

The
in

influence of his unspeakable sorrow


race.

newing and refining the whole

Sorrow
is

any

life softens

other hearts.

If there

crape on a door on any street the whole neigh-

borhood

feels its softening, quieting influence.

Every one who passes the house comes under the mystic spell. Even the children at their
play are impressed.
er into one mystic

We are

all

woven togethso that


will-

web of humanity,

no man can

live to himself.

We must be

ing to suffer that others

may

receive blessing

from our pain.


useful

We

never can become largely

without

suffering.

We

cannot
will

get
fit

the power of

sympathy which alone

us

for being helpful to others in the best ways,

save in the school of pain. We never can do anything worth while for humanity without
first

learning in suffering the lessons we will

teach in song and hope.

[41]

Cl^e i^xtrt of flattest

[43]

**

We

love them^

and they know

it ;

if we falter

With fingers numh^

Among

the

unused strings of lovers expression^


;

The notes are dumb

We shrink

within ourselves in voiceless sorrow^


the

Leaving

words unsaid,
those

And, side by side with

we

love the dearest,

In silence on we tread.

" Thus on we

tread,

and thus each heart in

silence

Its fate fulfils,

Waiting and hoping for the heavenly music

Beyond
The only
Is

the distant hills.


iii

difference of the love


love

heaven

From

on earth below,
tell it^

here we love and know not how to


And there we
all shall

know."

[44]

CHAPTER FOURTH

m)t

C^urt Of flattctr

English writer has some


flattery.

good words about

They
It
is

are suggested by a

character in a recent story.


that of an old
clever

woman

who was
disagreeable.

but very

One of her friends said to her that she ought to be more gracious and to
give amiability a trial in her
conscience
stricken
herself.
said.
life.

She was
as

and

confused

she

thought of

"I'm a beast of an old


"I can be agreeable
if I

woman," she

choose; nobody more so."

"Then why not


So she

choose to be so?"

it

was suggested.

tried the experiment

and was greatly encourup.

aged.
friends

Her

amiability gave pleasure to her


it

and she kept

But

she was not always wise in her

new

role

of amiability.

For

instance, she fell into the

[45]

Ci^e

JLmon

of Lobe way

habit of flattery, thinking that in this


she could please people. she practised this
result

On

every occasion
assiduity.

new art with

was not always

felicitous,

however.

The Too

often she would so overdo her praise of people that


its

insincerity

became apparent. Even

the vainest persons were

made aware, by the


effect

extravagance of her words, that she was only

playing with them, and the


please but to offend.

was not to

She would break out in

enthusiasm over a friend's bonnet or dress.

She would go

into

paroxysms of mirth over

the retelling by another friend of some old

story or of some threadbare bit of humor.

She would
fresh

tell

some

old, withered

woman how
a

and young she looked

like

young
exces-

girl in her teens.

So the good woman's

sive efforts at amiability

had the

effect of sar-

casm upon those she supposed she was pleasing.

There are many people who

fall

into

the

same mistake.

It

is

a quite
is

common

opinion

that almost every one


fluence of flattery.

susceptible to the in-

There are different ways

[46]

C^e
of flattering.

i^wrt of flattett
There are some who are so extake their words se-

travagant in their expressions that none but


the very vain and
riously
silly

and are pleased by what they say.

They flatter every one, on every occasion. They go into ecstasy over everything you do or say. They lose no opportunity in your presence of saying

comphmentary things about


is

you.

But

there

no discrimination
is

in their
triv-

eff*usive talk,
ial

which

as fluent over

most

things as over the most important.

Be-

sides, it lacks the

note of sincerity.

proclaim the shallowness of their

They only own hearts

and

their

want of sense
say.

in

supposing that they

can deceive people into believing that they

mean what they


in

There are others who


sive

flatter

and yet do

it

a much wiser, more delicate, and

less effu-

and objectionable way.

opportunities to

They watch for pay compliments and they do

say things which will please those to

whom
good

they are speaking.


qualities

They exaggerate
They

the

which they commend or the worthy


repeat the

acts

which they praise.

[47]

%])t LcjSjSon of Lobe


kind things they have heard said about their
friends.

Their motive in

all

this

is

to get the

good

opinion of those they laud.


just so far as
it is

But, really, in

insincere, such

complimentthose

ing

is

unwise in friendship.

Even

who

are in a

way

pleased by such praise for the


it.

moment
is

are in the end offended by


in every

There

an instinct

man who
tells

is

not hope-

lessly self-conceited

which

him when the

words of commendation he hears are sincerely


spoken and when they are only empty words.
In every phase and form, flattery
ble.
is

despica-

On

the whole, too,

it fails to deceive,

and,

therefore, fails to please.

It

is

resented by

every worthy person and weakens rather than


strengthens friendship.

The moment

one

who

claims

to

be

our
to be

friend utters anything which we

know

an exaggeration of

his interest in us, his re-

gard for
us.

us, or his opinion of us or of

some-

thing we have done, he has hurt himself with


Friendship needs no flattery in
It
its

profes-

sions or in its intercourse.

must be thor-

[48]

Cl^e
oughlj sincere
ity in

1$mt
in

of iflattet^
Insinceris

in all its expressions.

any form or

any

smallest measure

a kind of disloyalty against which every true

heart instinctively revolts.

Yet there are people who have become so used to adulation that they cannot be happy
without
it.

They expect everyone


things
lived so

to say

com-

plimentary

to

them

and of them.
in

They have
which lacks
to them.

long and so entirely

an

atmosphere of approbation that any speech


this quality

seems tame and cold

This

is

a danger to which

women

are more

exposed than men.

Everybody

tries to

say
are

complimentary things to women.

Men

more

likely to hear the bare truth

about them-

selves even

though ofttimes

it

be disagreeable.

In school, and on the playground, boys are in


the habit of speaking out bluntly and frankly
to each other, not asking or thinking whether

the words will give pleasure or pain.

It

is

very rarely that a boy hears flattery, unless


it

be from his gentle mother,

who

sees every-

thing in him from love's point of view.

In

[49]

Cl^e
college

Hmon
life

of

loie
are not

and university

young men

encouraged to think more highly of themselves


than the facts of their character and conduct

warrant them to think.

Their faults are oft-

times mercilessly exposed.


their best lessons, too,

Men

get some of

from the binisqueness


the time they do not
it

of their fellows.
like it

At

may

even think

almost brutal

but
lege

it

helps to

make men of them.


win
compliments

When
and
are

col-

students

praise

from

their fellows, it

must be for something

worthy,

almost

heroic.

They

not

in

great danger of being spoiled by

flattery.

But with women it is altogether different. Even as little girls they are petted and praised They grow up in a hot-house by everyone. atmosphere of appreciation. Too often they
are trained to expect complimenting on
all oc-

casions, wherever they go, whatever they do.

They

are dressed by their mothers with a view

to admiration,

and

it is

regarded as the proper

thing for everybody who sees them to go into

a measure of rapture over their handsome


appearance.

Their early attainments

and

[50]

W)t i^wt
exaggerated fashion.
is

of flattet;^

achievements are always praised, sometimes in

As they grow

older

it

the same.

In

girls' colleges the

freshmen

are "hazed" with flowers and suppers.

Men

of

all

ages vie with each other in showing gal-

lantry to women.
to

Any

exhibition of rudeness

them

is

regarded as unpardonable.
listening

They

are always

to

compliments which

sometimes verge on flattery.

The wonder is that so many women, brought up in such an atmosphere, escape hurt in their
life

and character, and maintain the sweetness, and the


gentleness, which are

the simplicity, the humility, the thoughtfulness,

among

the

highest qualities in ideal womanliness.

That

more are not spoiled by the continual adulation which they receive and are taught to expect
is

another proof of the innate nobleness of


It

woman's nature.

must be admitted that the

influence of such a training


ter

upon the characlife.

and disposition

is

not strengthening, does

not tend to develop the best things in the

We

all

need opposition and antagonism to


to bring out the graces

make us strong and

[51]

^])t
and

tt&mi
The

of

tou

virtues in us.

always in

who do not hve an atmosphere of flattery, but who


girls

are subject to more or less criticism find their

compensation in the greater self-reliance which


they acquire.

There

is

genuine appreciation of others


is

and of what they say and do which


proper, but
is

not only
right to

a bounden duty.

It

is

express our admiration for what pleases us in


others.

In this case, the motive

is

not to re-

ceive compliments in return, nor to gain favor

and

influence, but to give cheer

and encour-

agement.

Saint Paul

tells

us that

we should

please our neighbor for his

good

to edification.

A
is

child

is

striving earnestly to master some


is

art or science, but he

disheartened, for he

not succeeding.
as a

Notliing will do him so

much good
fidence, a

word of appreciation and conwill


best.

word of encouragement, which


and
criticism,

spur him to do his


fault-finding

If he hears only

he

may

lose heart

altogether and give up.

But when he

learns

that some one believes in him and expects him


to succeed, he receives

new

inspiration which

[52]

Ci^e

^mt

of

fmttvv
his striving.

makes him stronger to go on with


There
is

a great lack of just this proper


spirit of appreciation

and wholesome

and genis

uine encouragement.

Many

times life

made
and

a great deal harder for people by the want


of kind words.

Thousands
their

live faithfully

work hard at

commonplace

tasks,

day

after day, 3^ear after year,

and yet never


tells

hear a single sentence which

them of
in

any
This

human
is

interest

in

them

or

their

work.
so in

many homes where


is

it

might be

supposed that the law of love


fully observed.

most faith-

Scarcely ever

is

a heartening
If
all in

word spoken by one

to another.

the

household would form the habit of giving an


expression to the loving appreciation which
in their hearts, it
is

would soon transform the

home
**

life.

*Tis

a
it

little tliiiig to

say,
'

'

You are kind

I love
But For

each night sends a thrill through the heart,

you,

my dear,

love is tender, as love is blind


life's

I find

As we climb

rugged

height.

[53]

%^t
**

HejSjson of lofae

We starve each other for love's caress; We take, hut we do not give ;
It seems so easy

some soul

to bless,

But we

dole the love grudgingly, less

and

less,

Till His hitter

and hard

to live.'*

The

same

lack

prevails,

too,

everywhere.

Many men

sink under their burdens or faint

in their battles, because

no one ever thinks to

express the kindly interest and appreciation

which are in
vices

his heart.

One of the
his

best seris

anyone can

render to

fellows

always to be an encourager.

How
tingle

rarely do

we say the hearty

w^ord of cheer which

would

warm

the blood and

make

it

We
ly

should miss no opportunity to say kindto all about us.

and encouraging things


is

Life
best,

hard enough for many people at the

and we should be glad to make it easier when we may, and we can make it easier for
all

about us by showing genuine appreciation.


really helps

What
ness,

people and makes them


is

braver and stronger

not flattery, but kindlife to

which

is

bread of

hungry

hearts.

[54]

m^t l$un
**

of flattery

do we wait till ears are deaf Before we speak our kindly word, And only utter loving praise

Why

When
"

not a whisper can be heard


till

Why do we wait

Close-foldedy pulseless, ere

hands are laid we place


f

Within them roses simet and rare, And lilies in their flawless grace

"

wait till eyes are sealed To light and love in death's deep tranceDear wistful eyes before we bend Above them with impassioned glance f

Why do we

**

Why
To

do we wait
tell

till

hearts are

still

them all the love in otirs, And give them such late mead of praise, And lay above them fragrant flowers f

"

[55]

((

00V Mft

[57]

^''

Being perplexed^ I say,


Lord, make
it

right
to thee,

Night

is

as

day
to

Darkness as

light.

I am afraid

touch things

That involve so much,

My My

trembling hand
skilful

may

shake,

hand may break ; Thine can make no mistake."

[58]

CHAPTER FIFTH
''Bov Htfe"

iHii

II I

^^

^^ ^^^

finest

passages
is

in

IP^^SSK^I
I Br

S^i"^^ Paul's letters

his

AfinKaa

triumphant expression

of

confidence that nothing can

separate the Christian from


the love of God.

the items the writer names

is

life

One of
"neither

death nor

life."

We

are not surprised that

he should mention death, for death carries us


out from "our bourne of time and place," into
a mystery which no eye can penetrate.

We

are grateful therefore for the assurance that

death

will not separate us

from the love of

God.
"'TV* but
to

pierce the
to

How
There
is

beautiful

be with

mist and then God!"

a deep significance, however, in the


is named among the perils we are exposed, and in the assurance

fact that life itself


to which

[59]

m)t tt$mx
that
it

of

lobe

cannot separate us from God's love.


is

Living
dying.

fraught with far more danger than


life
is.

Think what

It

is

not merely

getting through this world in the best

way

we
to

can.

We are not here to make


life,

a living, but

make a

to grow, to do God's will, to


little

leave at least one spot of the world a

brighter and better.

Think of the way we

be-

gin

life

as babies, with great possibilities, but

all to

Think how much depends upon our strength, and yet how weak we are upon our wisdom, and how ignorant we are. Think of the evil there is in the world, and
be developed.

how easy it is for us to drift away on its dark Think of the temptations we must meet tides. continually, and how unequal we are to the
terrific

struggle with them.


to do, the burdens

Think of the

we must carry, Think of the responsibilities that are ours. the mistakes we may make and of what
disastrous

work we have

consequences

may

result

from

them.
It is not easy to live.

Every step of the


is

passage from birth to death

through

perils

[60]

^(

0ot Mtt"
Yet we have the assurance
all it

and antagonisms.
that even Hfe, with
conflict,

holds of danger and

cannot separate us from the love of

God

that in all these things we

may

be more
us.

than conquerors through him that loved


Serious then as
live.

life is,

we need not dread

to

can

No enemy can really harm us. No load crush us. No power can wrench us away
all

from the keeping of God.


Indeed, the divine love changes
the hard
liv-

things into blessings.

There

is

a way of

ing in

this

world by which the


good.

evil is trans-

muted

into

Before the Master went


the keeping of his disci-

away he prayed for


them

ples in the perils they

must meet, committing

to the Father's care.

He did not ask that


It
if

they should be taken from the world.

might have seemed greater kindness


he had done
this.

to

them

But they had a work

to

do in the world and there was also a work to be done


er
in them.

When we

find life almost hard-

than we can bear, with struggle, opposition,


enmity, or sore
trial, it will

human

help us to

remember that our Master wants us and needs

[61]

Cl^e Cossion of iLoie


us just where
there.

we

are, or he

would not leave us

But while Jesus did not ask that


that they might be kept from

his disciples

should be taken from the world, he did ask


its

evil.

The

true prayer in time of great trial, care or sor-

row,

is,

not that we shall be delivered from the

experiences, but that

we may pass through


right for us to pray to
is

them unharmed.
be kept from
It
is

It

is

evil,

but there
it
is

only one
it is

evil.

not sickness,

not poverty,
it
is

not

human wrong and


loss

cruelty,

not earthly
else

the only
us.

evil is sin.

Nothing
will
fires

can

harm

One
all

rebellious

thought

hurt us
suf-

more than

the martyrs'

we could

fer, or the longest

and most dreadful agonies

of pain we could endure.

There
comes
love

is

another word of Saint Paul's which

in here:
all

"We know

that to them that

God

things work together for good."

Instead of being something to dread, therefore, because of its


its

dangers and antagonisms,


life is

burdens and sorrows,

a school of good.

Temptations are meant by the Evil One to de-

[62]

'*

j^or Life
resist

stroy us, but

when we

and overcome
Sor-

them, they become helpers of our growth and


progress, leaving us stronger and wiser.

rows which seem only to wound and scar, purify

and enrich our characters.

The

best lives

are those that have suffered the most and

struggled the most.

The men and women who


who have had
to be strong

reach the finest things in character and the


largest usefulness are not those

only ease and a comfortable time, but those

who have
and
gentle.

learned in struggle

how

in suffering

how

to be sympathetic

and

In the hardest experiences of

life

we are sure

always of God's

love.

An

Arctic explorer

was asked whether during the long months of


slow starvation which he and his companions

had endured, they suffered greatly from the pangs of hunger. He replied that these pangs
were forgotten
at
in the feeling that their friends

home had forgotten them and were not comThere


is

ing to rescue them.


bitter as the sense of

no suffering so

abandonment, the thought

that nobody cares.

But however painful and

[63]

Ci^e

Ht&mx
may

of

Lobe
may

hard our condition

be,

however men

wrong us and injure


sures us that

us, Christian faith as-

God

loves us, that he has not for-

gotten us, that he cares.

Life

is

not a

series

of merely fortuitous hap-

penings,

unplanned,

unpurposed.

"Every

man's

life is

a plan of God."
all

A divine purpose
is

runs through
of our days.

the events and circumstances

This purpose

not that we

should do a certain amount of work in the


world, but that we ourselves should be built
into strength
is

up

and beauty of character.


is

Work

not a curse, as

sometimes thoughtlessly

said

it is

a means of grace.
is

The

reason we

have to work

not primarily because the


it.

world needs the work but because we need

Men

are not in business just to build so


sell

many

houses a year, to
to cultivate so

so

many

bales of goods,

many

acres of land, to do the

routine

work of

their calling successfully

they are

set to these duties in

order that in
strong, true,

them they may grow


gentle,

into

men

worthy men.

Women
[61]

are not appoint-

ed to certain tasks in household work, in social

''0otMt"
life, in

teaching or business, merely to become

good housekeepers, good business women, or

good

teachers, nurses, or physicians


all

the di-

vine purpose in

their toil

is

that they

may

grow

into noble

womanhood.
fail in their business

Sometimes men

ventures

or in their professions.

They

give their best

strength and their most strenuous efforts to

some work, and


fails,

it

does not succeed.


fail.

The work
is

but the men need not

It

a great

thing to meet misfortune victoriously, coming


out of
it

with

life

unhurt, with new strength


distinin the

guished jurist
courts.

and courage for another effort. A lost an important case

He

showed no feeling of discourage-

ment, however, and a friend asked him how he could take his disappointment so calmly.

"When
of

it is

over," said the great lawyer, "I


it.

have no more to do with

If I kept thinking

my
is

defeats, I feel that I should

go mad.
one

But
case
be,

I will

not brood over them.


it,

When

done, I drop

whatever the result

may

and go on
is

to the next."

It

fine

thing to see a boy, when his com-

[65]

Cl^e
petitor has

tt&mx

of Loije

won the game, reach out his hand He has lost to him in manly congratulation. The the game, but he has won in nobility. only real defeat is when a man shows an unmanly spirit and yields to depression after
losing in business,
acts like a

or pouts and sulks and

baby when he has failed to get

the prize he wanted.


It
is

one of the wonders of divine love that

even our blemishes and sins

God will

take,

when

we truly repent of them and give them


hands, and

into his

make them

blessings to us in some

way.

friend once showed Ruskin a costly

handkerchief on which a blot of ink had been

made.

"Nothing can be done with that," the


Ruskin carried
it

friend said, thinking the handkerchief worthless

and ruined now.

it

away

with him and after a time sent


friend.

back to his

In a most skilful and


fine

artistic

way he

had made a

design in India ink, using the


Instead of being ruined, the

blot as its basis.

handkerchief was made far more beautiful and


valuable.

So God takes the

blots

and

flecks

and

stains

[66]

''00V life"
upon our lives, the disfiguring blemishes, when we commit them to him, and by his marvellous grace changes them into marks of beauty. David's grievous sin was not only forgiven, but was made a transforming power in his life. Peter's pitiful fall became a step upward
through
dealing.
his

Lord's forgiveness and gentle

Peter never would have become the


if

man
his

he afterward became

he had not denied

Lord, and then repented and been restored.


in the It

There ought to be great comfort for us


truth, that in
all

God is making us. is not easy to make a man or a woman into Some of us beauty God wants to see.
our
life

the

are

harder to make, too, than others.


the cost
is terrific.

Sometimes

It took a great deal of seto

vere discipline
tle

and schooling

make an apos-

of Peter, but the price paid was not too


the result was such a magnificent

much when
man.

Sometimes we think God deals severely with

We have many defeats and disappointments. We have sorrows and losses. We stumble and fall again and again. Why is it? we
us.

[67]

Clje fit&mi of Lotc


ask.

Here

is

the answer

God

is

making

us.

He wants us to grow into strength and beauty. He wants us to do service among men which shall be a blessing to them. He wants to have
us get to heaven at
last.

It costs a great deal,


loss too

but

is

any price of pain, anguish, or

great to pay for such an outcome?

William

Canton writes of the cost of making one man

A man
And

lived fifty
toiled;

Loved,
left

yearsjoy dashed with tears ; had wife and child, and lost
life's

them; died;
of all his long

That lasted

naught beside.

work one

little

song.

Like the Monk Felixes bird, that song was heard ; Doubt prayed, faith soared, death smiled itself
to sleep ;

That song saved Nay, stiffly


'i

souls.

You say
it

the

man paid

God paid

aiid thought
tells

cheap.

There

is

one thing always to be remembered.


us that we become more than

Saint Paul

conquerors in

all life's trials,

dangers, strug-

gles, temptations,

and sorrows, only "through

him that loved

us."

Without Christ we can

[68]

*'mt
but be defeated.

life"
is

There

only one secret that

can turn
that
is

evil into

good, pain into blessing

the love of Christ.

There
life

is

only one

Hand
form

that can take the blotted


it

and trans-

into beauty.

"This

is

the victory that

overcometh the world, even our faith."

But

there

is

way we can

miss

all this blessing.

God's love changes not; nothing can separate


us from
it.

Yet unbelief can rob us of

all

the

blessing of that love.

We

can shut

it

out of
in life

our hearts
will

if

we

will.

harm

instead

Then everything of help us. The one

secret

of being in the world and not of the world, of

passing through
life's evil,

life

and not being hurt by


all

of having

things work together

for good to us

the one and only secret


in our hearts.
it

is

to

have the love of God

No

one

can be lost whose heart keeps in


blessed love.

always this

[69]

J^abing tDc jttinti of \)ti&t

[71]

**

Have ye stood by the sad and weary^ To smooth the pillow of deaths To comfort the sorrow-stricken^

And strengthen the feeble faith ? And have ye felt^ when the glory
Has streamed through
the

open door

And flitted

across the shadows,

That there I had been before?


**

Have ye wept with

the broken-hearted
f

In their agony ofivoe

Ye might hear me whispering


'
'

beside yoUf
'

Tis the pathivay I often go


brethren^

My

my friends^ my
to follow

disciples,

Can you dare

me f
be."

Then, wherever the blaster dwelleth

There shall the servant

[72]

CHAPTER SIXTH
i^atiing tlje

jminD
ideal
in in

of ])ti&t

HE
one

Christian

life

is

which the mind that


Christ Jesus rules.
is

was

But what
was
in

the

mind that
Is

Christ?

there
it ?

any word that describes

What was the very heart of Christ's mission? What one day was there in all his life when he
showed forth most clearly the central glory of
his character?

Was

there

any one

act in all

the multitude of his wonderful works in which


the radiant blessedness of his life was revealed
in greater fulness

than in any other?

If you were asked to


life

name

the one

day

in the

of our Lord when he showed most of the


all

splendor of his person, which day of

would

you choose ?
figuration,

Would

it

be the time of his transhis deity

when the brightness of


it

shone out through the robes of

flesh

that he

wore?

Would

be the day of his miracle of

[73]

Clje LeiSiSDn of Lobe


or tlie day when he Or would you take some scene when he stood amid throngs of lame, sick, blind, and healed them all? Or would you say that the brightest moment of his

feeding the

five tliousand,

raised Lazarus?

earthly life was

when he was riding

into the

city with great processions of

joyous people

crying,

"Hosanna"?
these hours of

None of

human

splendor was

the hour of the fullest revealing of the heart

of Christ.
the

None of

those radiant days was


his true

day when most of

glory was mani-

fested.

None of
day

these achievements of
did.

power

was the greatest thing Jesus ever


brightest

The

in all his earthly career

was the
reveal-

day when he hung upon

his cross.

The

ing of his glory that was divinest was when

deepest shame.

men thought that he had sunk away in the The act that was the sublimest
of
all his

achievements was the giving of him-

self in

death for men.

We

could spare

all

the

miracles out of the gospel story and all the narrative of gentle
cross were left.

and beautiful things,

if

the

The

cross

is

the fullest repre-

[74]

i^atitng tl^c jEiitD of Cl^risit


sentation of the glory of Christ.
then, where, on

If we ask,
act, the

what day,

in

what one

completest reveaHng of Christ can be seen, the

answer

is

on Good Friday, when he died


mind be
in

be-

tween two thieves.

"Let

this

you, which was also in


Christ-

Christ Jesus."
likeness
is

The very hall-mark of

the stamp of the cross.

We
in
it

say we

want
ers,

to be like Christ.
it

We say

it

our prayinto our

we sing

in

our hymns, we put

consecration services.

But what do we mean


Are we not
it

by being

like Christ

in

danger of
a

getting into our vision of

merely some surlife,

face gleams of divinity, an easy kind of

gentle piety, a dainty charity, a fashionable


holiness, a pleasing service.?

When

two

dis-

ciples asked for the highest places, the

Master

spoke to them in serious words of his baptism

and
tism.

his cup,

asking them

if

they were able to

drink of the cup and be baptized with the bap-

When
it is

w^e

say we want to be like Christ,


is

he points us to his cross and says: "That

what

to be like

me

are

you able?"
what our
life

The

cross shows us a vision of

[75]

^\)t
must be
stamps
if

Htmon

of

lobe
The
cross
life.

we are following

Christ.

itself

on every true Christian

Some people wear crosses as ornaments. we are Christians like Jesus, we will wear
cross in our heart.

If the

Suppose we vary the question, and ask what


act in our

own

life

we look back upon with the


what day we think of
all

greatest satisfaction,

as

the brightest and divinest of

our days.

What

achievement of yours do you consider

the highest in all your life ?

Do you

think of

a day when you made some signal triumph in


school, or

won some unusual

success in busi-

ness, or carried off the

honors in some contest,

or did some fine piece of work which


praised.''

men

We
our

are apt to think the red-letter are the days

days

in

life

when we gath-

ered honor

for ourselves.

But

in the light

of the lesson we are now learn-

ing, are these the best days in our lives ?

Some
can

one has said,

"The

greatest thing a
is

man

do for

his

heavenly Father

to be kind to

some of the Father's other children."

The

things that are really the brightest in your

[76]

i^abing
past
self,

tljc

jlrtinD of Cl^rijSt

life

are not the honors

you won for youryou achieved, nor

the brilliant successes

the prosperities which added to your impor-

tance

among men, but


little

the deeds of love which

your hand wrought


of his
all

in Christ's

ones.
life

The one
was the

your past

name for some day in day you did your


brightest
his.

purest, most unselfish, most self-denying act

for your Master, in serving one of

It

is

only when we have some measure of Christ's


self-renunciation
truest

that we have

touched the

and
is

Christliest things in life.

There
ceived

a story of a potter in China

who

re-

from the emperor a command to make


greatest pains he began his work, de-

a rare set of porcelain ware for the royal table.

With
life.

siring to

make it the finest achievement of Again and again, however, when

his

the

pieces were put into the furnace, they were

marred.

At length another
But

set

was ready for


watched

burning, and the potter hoped that this one

would be successful.

as he

it

in

the furnace he saw that this, too, would be a


failure.

In despair he threw himself into the

[77]

C^e
fire

tmon

of

toU
But when

and

his

body was consumed.

the pieces were taken out they were found to

be so wondrously beautiful that nothing Hke

them had ever before been


the potter sacrificed his

seen.
life in

Not

until

own

the doing

of

it

was

his

work

successful.

The

old heathen
life.

legend has

its

lesson

for

Christian

Our work never


is

reaches the

highest beauty,

never
is

fit

for our King, until


into
it.

love's self-sacrifice

wrought

Things

we do for

ourselves, to

win honor for our own

name, to make profit for our own enrichment,


are never the things that are most beautiful
in

God's sight.

The

greatest things

we do are

those that are

wrought

in utter self-f orgetf ul-

ness for Christ's glory.

There

will be

strange reversals in the day of

final revealing,

when

all

things shall appear as

they are.

Many

of earth's trumpeted deeds

will shrivel into nothingness.

Many

of earth's

proud names, bedecked with


and garlanded with human

brilliant

honors

praises, will fade


is

away

into insignificance, because there

no

love in the things which

won them

their distinc-

[78]

i^atins
tion.

tl^e

jttinD of Cl)ri^t

And up

out of the shadows of obscurity

where they were overlooked by men, and left unhonored and unrecorded, thousands of lowly
deeds wiD
rise into

immortal beauty and honor,

because love inspired them.


the throngs of earth's

Up, too, out of unnamed w ill rise a mul-

titude of lowly ones to receive reward, to shine


like the stars,

because they lived out the lesson

of the cross.

There are some w^ho complain


to all

bitterly because

their loving they get such small requital.


it is

Sometimes
is

not only unrequital

the love

hurt, smitten in the face, wounded, scorned.

In

many

home

there

is

one
is

who

loves

and
all

lives for the others

and yet

unloved.

In

departments of

life

there are those

who must

think and plan and labor and endure, while the

honor of
brow.
It

all

they do gathers about some other

ought

to be a sweet

comfort to
is

all

such to

know
vinest

that precisely this

the highest, the dilives

duty of

love.

These are the

that

are likest Christ's.

He

loved and was rejected


hearts, per-

and shut out of people's homes and

[79]

djt tt&^on

of

lote
upon a
cross.

secuted, wronged, at last nailed

Yet he loved on; the fountain


flowed as full as ever.
3'ou,

in his heart

"Let

this

mind be

in

which was also


if

in Christ Jesus."

It

would be well

we could get

into our hearts

a vision of the central meaning of the cross.


It

was not merely a man giving himself for

the helping of his fellow-men

it

was the Son

of

God giving
of

himself, pouring out his

own

blood to redeem lost men.

One of
litanies

the most

wonderful

the

ancient

contains

among
us.

others these petitions:


lie,

"By
all

the cold

crib in which thou didst

have mercy upon


the pains

B}^ thy

flight into

Egypt and
;

thou didst
cold,

suff*er

there

by the

thirst,

hunger,
;

and heat

in tliis vale of

thy misery

by

the inward

and great heaviness which thou


;

hadst when praying in the garden by the spitting on thee and the scourging ; by thy purple

garments and thy crown of thorns; by the


nailing of thy right

hand

to the cross

and the

shedding of thy most precious blood; by the


nailing of thy left

hand and that most holy

wound

purge, enlighten, and reconcile us to

[80]

i^atiing t^e
God.

itttnD

of

W^t
thy

By

the lifting

up of thy most holy


bitterness of

body on the cross; by the


death and
its

intolerable pains;
;

by thy glo-

rious resurrection rious ascension,

by thy wonderful and glohave mercy upon us. For the


us,

glory, and the divine majesty and virtue of

thy holy name, save


ever."

and govern us now and

If such a vision of the loving, suffering, re-

deeming Christ
then
Its

as

these
filled

flaming

sentences

bring before us but

our hearts, we would


the cross means.

know something of what


itself

image would burn


It
is

upon our very


"Let
he
It

souls.

into fellowship with all this in

Christ that
this

we are
gave

called in the words,

mind be

in you,

which was also

in Christ

Jesus."

He

his life to save the

world

calls us to
is

give our lives to save the world.


tell in

not enough to

flaming words of the

love of Christ to
lives

men

we must be

in

flaming
is

the love of Christ to men.


to sit in

It

not

enough

our places of worship and


for our

sing praises to

God

own

salvation

w^e

must hasten out to seek and to save the

lost.

[81]

Cl^e ^econti jitde

[83]

/^,

Up^ Up^

my droivsing eyes ! my sinking heart


Christ arise
!

to Jesus

Claim your part


In
all

raptures of the skies


little

Yet a

while

Yet a

little

way^

Saints shall reap and rest and smile


All the day
:

Up !

let's

trudge another mile

Christina Georgina Rossetti.

[84]

CHAPTER SEVENTH
Cl^e ^econti

pUlt

NE

of our Lord's remarkais,

ble exhortations

"Who-

soever shall compel thee to

go one
two."

mile,

That

go with him is, do more

than you are expected to


do, be better than

farther in love

you are expected to be, go and service and self-denial than


to go.

you are required


erence
is

The immediate

ref-

to the old

hard days when most men

had

to serve despotic masters and often do


service.

compulsory

For example, men would

be required to go with invading soldiers to guide them through the country and carry
their burdens.

"If such forced service

is

de-

manded of you," said Jesus, "do not resist; go cheerfully; go even farther than you are
compelled to go."

Of

course, this

is

only an illustration of a
is

principle.

The

Christian

to accept hardness

[85]

Cl^e
patiently.

iLCjSiSon
is

of

tou
lest
is

He

not to watch the clock

he

may work

a few minutes over time.

He
he

not

to keep account of all the things he does for


others, lest he

may do more than


Rather, when he
strict
is

is

re-

quired to do.
is
is

serving, he

to do to

more than

duty demands.

He

go two

miles instead of one.

The

religion of his

day was not satisfactory


his disciples,

to our Master.

So he said to

"Except your righteousness exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye can-

not enter into the kingdom of heaven."


are Christ's true followers, not

We

no murder that is we keep our hearts free from


unkind feelings,
is

when we do going one mile but when

all bitterness, all

all desire

for revenge

that

going the second

mile.

The

religion of the

Pharisees said they

must love their friends


one short mile.

but hate their enemies, giving as they had received

going only

But

the

friends of Jesus

must go the second mile and

love their enemies

and

pra}' for those

who

per-

secute them.
is

"What do ye more than

others .?"

the question which tests Christian

life.

Any-

[86]

lje ^cconti i^iile


body can love those who love him and be kind You must do to those who are kind to him. more

you must go two


will.
is

miles.
life.

The

principle applies to everything in


to

good many people want


in consecration, in

go only one mile


one-mile fol-

praying, in loving others,

in

doing God's
of

But mere
pitifully

lowing

Christ

inadequate.

What
will

kind of a friend do you

like

one who

go just the easy one mile with you, while


is

the path
odors,
steep

flowery,

and the
off

air full of sweet

and then drop

when the road gets

and rough, and the winter winds begin

to blow?

Or do you
it

like the friend

who

stays

by you when

costs to be

your friend, when

he has to carry burdens for you, has almost to


carry you, sometimes?
friend

Do you

like best the

who goes only one


off, or

short, easy mile with

you and then drops


the second mile ?
ter friend to

the friend

Was Orpah

or

who goes Ruth the bet-

Naomi?

What
little

kind of friends do you suppose Jesus

Christ likes to

have those who go


it is

with him a

way

while

easy,

and then drop out

[87]

Ci^c

iLejSjson

of totie

when the pinch comes, or those who go with him through pain, tears, and cost? those who
go one mile or those who go two ?
of the Christian
life

Some

Chris-

tian people never have learned the deep

joy

because they never have


in loving Christ

gone beneath the surface


in consecration to him.

and
too

Our

religion

is

easy-going.

We
is

think we are fulfilling our

duty

if

we attend church once a Sunday when


clear, if

the weather

we give a few
prayer.

cents a

week to God's cause,


evening and say a

if w^e kneel

morning and

little

Yet

these are

only one-mile excursions in religion, and the


blessing does not
lie

at the end of the little con-

ventional mile

it lies

farther on, at the end

of the second 'mile.

Everything about Christian

life is infinite.

It

has no marked boundary lines beyond which


it

may
no

not reach, no
conquests

Tie

flus ultra, beyond

which
is

its

may

not extend.

There

limit to the

measure of Christian joy and

peace.

We

should never be satisfied with any

attainments we have already reached.


ever

Whatset

we have achieved to-day we should

our

[88]

Cl^e ^econti jEtle


standard higher for to-morrow.

An

artist

when asked which he considered


ure,

his best pict-

would answer:
"

"My

next."

No ma7i can say at night readied ; the hunger for the light Moms witJi the star ; our thirst will not depart However we drink. 'Tis what before us goes
His goal
is

Keeps us aweary, will not let us lay Our heads in dreamland, though the enchanted

palm
Rise from our desert, though the fountain grow Up in our path, with slumber' s flowing halm;

The soul

is o'er the

horizon far away.''

We should

alw^ays look well to that quality of

Christian life which our

Lord himself
are

said

is

the unfailing hall-mark of discipleship.


this shall all
if

"By

men know that ye


is

my disciples,
The measure

ye have love one to another."

of this love

given in the same paragraph

"even as I have loved you, that ye also love one


another."

"As

I have loved

you"

that

is

the second mile in loving others.


is

The first

mile

loving pleasant, agreeable people, in a con-

ventional way, so long as they love you, flatter

[89]

Ci^e

tt$mi

of

lobe
The
second-

you, and pamper your vanity.

mile Christian loves people he does not like


loves the unloveliest,

and does good without


One-mile

measure, hoping for nothing again.


loving asks,

"How

often must I forgive

my

fellow-Christian
to me.^^

when he has been unkind


Second-mile loving
It
is

Seven times?"

never asks any such question.

patient,

forbearing, forgiving seventy times seven, even

unto the uttermost.

It keeps

no account of

how much or how often. Think what patience Jesus had with his disciples, and then read, "As I have loved you." Think how he bore with their faults and failings,

with their dulness and slowness, with

their unbelief

and unfaithfulness, with

their

denials

and betrayals.

"As

have loved you,

that ye also love one another."

How it shames
in courtesy, or

our touchiness, our quick firing up when a


brother seems to fail a
little
!

speaks a

little

quickly

Was

that the

Jesus loved his friends


loves us now.^

.^

Is that the

way way he

If

it

were,

we never could

be saved, we never could learn the lesson of

[90]

d)e ^econD
loving
loves,
;

jttile

and if we never learn to love as Jesus we cannot enter heaven, for heaven is

only for those

who have

learned to love.

Shall

we not

set as

our standard

this love that goes

the second mile?

We should
God.

go a second mile

also in the submit-

ting of our lives to the will and the Spirit of

We say we take Jesus Christ as our Lord and Master. We do not begin to be Christians
until

we

do.

First, he

is

our Saviour.
is

Then
word.

comes surrender.

"Follow me"
seal

his

Martin Luther's
heart
;

was a rose

in the rose a

in the heart a cross.

The

rose suggest-

ed fragrance and beauty.

Christian's life

should be winning.

It should be sweet,

pour-

ing forth the perfume of love.


the rose told that
all

The

heart in

true life

is

love-inspired.

Then
is

at the centre of all was the cross.


it all.

That
we

the inspiration of

Until we have the

cross of Christ in us, in our very heart,

can have neither fragrance nor beauty.

We

should never forget that only the self-sacrificing love of Christ in our hearts can trans-

form our

lives.

And we can [91]

have Christ

in us

'^t Lejssion of Lote


only by yielding our lives to him.
the Spirit of Christ
blessing.
is

To

resist

to cut ourselves off

from

" Though Christ a thousand times in Bethlehem


he bo7m,

If

he's not

horn in

thee, thy soul is all forlorn.

Qod^s Spirit falls on

me

as dewdrops on a rose^

If I hut, like a

rose,

my

heart

to

him

disclose.

In

no tone can he so sweet As when man's heai^t with God''s in unison doth
all eternity

heat.

Whatever thou lomst, man, that too hecome thou

must

God, if thou lovest God ; dust, if thou

lovest dust.

"

[92]

tojsing

^elf (n

i}ti$t

[93]

the hitter

shame and sorrow


be,

That a time could ever

When I let

the Saviour's pity

Plead in vain, and proudly answer ed^, " All of self, and none oftheeV
Yet he found m,e ; I beheld him,

Bleeding on the accursed tree

Heard him pray,

''''

Forgive them. Father \^

And my

wistful heart said faintly,


,

" Some of self and some of

thee."

Day

by day his tender mercy.

Healing, helping, full and free,

Sweet and strong, and, ah


^

so patient,

Brought me lower while 1 whispered,


''

Less of self and more of thee.''


,

Higher than

the highest heavens.


sea.

Deeper than the deepest


Lord, thy love at
last

hath conquered ;

Grant me now my soul's desire, " None of self and all of thee."
,

Theodore Monod.

[94]

CHAPTER EIGHTH
iLojsing

^elf

l)n&t
duty

HE
to

Christian's

first

is

honor

liis

Master.

He

must be willing to sink himself

out of sight in order

that the

name of

Christ
It
is

may
not always possible to

be magnified.

honor Christ and yet


Sometimes the
if

to honor ourselves before men.

wreath on our own brow must fade

we

would keep the wreath for Christ beautiful

and green.
Christ

Sometimes we must decrease that


increase.

may

Sometimes we must be
Sometimes

willing to fall into the shadow, that the full


light

may

be cast upon his face.

we must be ready
of Christ

to suffer loss that the cause

may

be advanced.
if

But

all this

seem-

ing decrease
Master,
is

we are true at heart

to our

only seeming.

The honor on our

brow

is

never so bright as when we have will-

[95]

Ci^e

tt^mx

of

lobe

ingly stripped off the stars from ourselves to

bind them on the brow of Jesus.


It
is

easy to

mar

the beauty.

We have all

seen

people chafing and envying when position and


influence once theirs passed to others.
is

There
in

no severer

test of character
this.

than comes

such experiences as

It

is

not easy when

others achieve promotions that

we had hoped

to win, for us to keep our spirits gentle, generous,

and

sweet.

It

is

not easy, even in school,

to have another win the prize that

we sought

and hoped

to take,

and then not

to feel envious

of him, but to treat him with true affection,

joining his fellows in sincere honoring of him.


It
is

not easy in the home, for a plain, unat-

tractive child to see a bright, popular, brilliant


sister idolized

and petted, receiving universal


homely one,
is
is

praise, while she, the plain,

negnot

lected

and

left

without attention

it

easy for the plain girl to see this and yet keep
loyal affection in her heart

and join cheerfully


in-

and proudly
It
is

in the

honoring of the favorite.


be at our own

always hard to decrease while another


it

creases, especially if

cost.

[96]

Yet only
come
tian
like

as

we learn to die to self, do we beUnrenewed nature seeks all Christ.

of self and none of Christ.


is

Becoming a Chrislife in

the taking of Christ into the


self.

the

place of

Then

all is

changed.

Life has a
first.

new
own.

centre, a

new aim. Christ comes


lives is

His

plan for our


It
is

accepted instead of our


like to do,

no more what we would

but
It

"What

does the Master want us to do.?"

no longer the pressing of our own will, but "Thy will, not mine, be done." This is the dying of the story of all Christian life
is

self

and the growing of Christ in the heart. So long as there remains any self-will, any insubmission, any spirit of disobedience, any unconquered
self,

asserting

its

authority against

the will of Christ, so long

is

our consecration

incomplete.

This lesson has


all

its

very practical bearing on


life.

our common, every-day


to

Naturally we
like to

want

have our own way.

We

carry

out our

to feel, too, that

own plans and ambitions. we have failed in


This

We are apt
life
is

when we

cannot realize these hopes.

the world's

[97]

Ci^e
standard.

iLejSjson

of

lobe
is

The

successful

man

the

one

who
the

is

able to master all life's circumstances


in his career.

and make them serve him

He

is

man who "increases" until he fills a large place among men. The world has little praise or admiration for the man who "decreases" in
his bulk, brilliance,

power, or prosperity. But we who read the word of God know that there
is

an increase in men's eyes which

is

a dwarflife in
is

ing, shrinking, and shrivelling of the

God's sight.
crease in

We know also
eyes,

that there

a deit, is

human

which as God

sees

a glorious enlargement and growth.

The
will

greatest thing possible in any life


it fulfilled,

is

to

have the divine plan for

the divine

go on
It

in

it,

even though
dashes

it

thwarts every
earthly

human hope and


dream.
is

away every

not easy for us to learn the lesson

that God's ways are always better for us than

our own.
to carry

We make
them
out.

our

little

plans and begin

We

think

we have

all

things arranged for the greatest happiness

and the best good.


in

upon ours

Then God's plan breaks and we look down through our

[98]

tears

upon

the shattered fragments of very


It seems wreck, loss,

rare visions.
ter.

and

disas-

But no

it

is

only God's larger, wiser,


little,

better plan

displacing our

imperfect,

shortsighted one.

Is it true that

God

really

thinks about our lives and has a purpose of his

own

for them, a place he would have us

fill,

work he would have us do, a witness he would have us bear.^ It seems when we think of it
that this
is

scarcely possible

that each one of


this
is

the lives of his countless children should be

personally and individually thought about by


the Father.

Yet we know that


to

true of
if

the least and lowliest of us.


cares
life,

Surely

God

enough for us

make a plan
It
is

for our

a heavenly plan,

it

must be better than


a high honor,

any plan of ours could


therefore, for us

be.

to let his
in

plan take the place


lives,

of ours and go on
cost
*

our

whatever the

and the pain may be


07i

to us.
this thing

This thing

which thy heart was set,

that cannot be,


TJiis

weary, disappointing day that dawns,

my

friend, for thee

[99]

827824

Ci^c
name
above.

tmon
is

of lotie
best,

Be comforted; God knoweth


is

the

God whose

Love,

Whose tender care

evermore our passing lives


i

He sends thee disappointment it from his hand.


Shall God^s appointment seem
thyself

Well, then, take

less

good than what

had plan7ied
to

"*Twas in thy mi7id


stay at home.

go abroad.

He
it,

bids thee
thy Guest,

Oh ! happy home ;
he come.

thrice happy, if to

'Twas in thy mind thy friend to see. The Lord says, Nay, not yet. Be confident ; the meeting time thy Lord will not
'

forget.

^Twas in thy mind


'

to

work for him.


to

His will

is,

Child, sit still;'

And surely 'tis


will.

thy blessedness

mind

the Master's

Accept thy disappointment, friend, thy gift from


God's 0W71 hand.

Shall God's appoi7itme7it seem


thyself

less

good than what

had planned

"

This law of the dying of

self

and the magnito true useis

fying of Christ
fulness.

is

the only

way

Not

until self has been renounced

[100]

any one ready for true Christian


While we are thinking how
affect us,

service.

this or that will

whether

it

will

pay us
;

to

make

this

sacrifice or that self-denial

while we are con-

sulting our

own

ease,

our own comfort, our


in

own

interest or

advantage

any form, we

have not yet learned fully what the love of


Christ means.

This projecting of

self into

our serving of

our fellow-men mars the service and hinders


its effectiveness.

We
he
is

wonder
not,

if the

person

is

worthy, and

if

we do not want

to

waste our love upon him.

We

resent with im-

patience the lack of gratitude in those

we

aid.

We decline
neath
us.

to serve others because they are be-

That

is,

we put
it

all

our

life

on a

commercial basis and unless


well in the

seems to promise
are not ready

way of outcome, we

for

it.

We

need to learn the true meaning of

Christ's love, forhe never asks whether

we are

worthy or not, nor does he keep account of the

number of times he has forgiven


of love, which
life,
is

us.
all

The law
Christian
It
is

the one law of

does not follow the world's maxims.

[101]

Ci^e
not so
will be

iLesiiSon of

toU

much

for so much.

It asks not if there

a return.

It does not keep account of

treatment received and strike a balance for the

governance of
serves

its

future actions.

It gives
it

and

and helps regardless of what

has re-

ceived or

may

receive.

* *

According

Pour out

to my cup I must my wine, although

the dust

Doth drink it up when it should he A living draught perpetually ; And I must break my wheaten bread, " Though none upo7i its strength are fed.

This law of the dying of

self

and the magniof Christian


is

fying of Christ
peace.
in us

is

the
is

secret

When
life

Christ

small and self

large

cannot be deeply restful.


us.

Every-

thing

annoys

We

grow impatient of

whatever breaks our comfort.


little trials.

merest

We grieve over We find causes for discontent in trifles. We resent whatever would hinThere
is
is

der or oppose us.

no blue sky

in the

picture of which self

the centre.

There are and ends

no stars shining overhead.


[

It begins

102]

lojimg ^elf in
in a little

Cl^jciiSt

patch of dusty
it

floor,

with gray walls

surrounding

and shutting

it in.

But when

self decreases
is

and Christ

increases,
all

then the picture

enlarged and takes in

of

heaven's over-arching beauty.


shine
its
is

Then the stars down into its night and sunshine bathes day. Then the life of friction and worry

changed into quietness and peace.

When
little,

the glory of Christ streams over this

cramped, fretted, broken


spot and sweetens

life

of ours, peace

comes and the love of Christ brightens every


all

bitterness.
is

Trials are
is

easy to bear when self


large.

small and Christ

We

are apt to

grow weary of the


in

bitter, sor-

rowful struggle that goes on

our hearts,

evermore, between the old nature and the new,

between the old self and the new Christ.


seems sometimes as
if it

It

never would be ended.

It seems, too, at times, as if

we were making no
if there

progress in the struggle, as


decreasing of
self,

were no

no increasing of Christ.
unconquered
still,

We

find the old evil things

after years of battling

the old envies and

[103]

C]^e

tt$mi

of lofae

jealousies, the old tempers, the old greed, the

old irritabilities, the old doubt and fear and


unbelief.
conflict?

Will there never be release from

this

Yes,
faith

if

only we

live patiently

and bravely,

in

and love and loyalty,


will increase until

self will decrease

and Christ
life.

he

fills

our whole

up ever toward the light, our past of failure and unworthiness will be left behind and we shall grow into the fulness of the stature of Christ. The new will conquer and expel the old until it becomes "None of
If we reach
self

and

all

of thee."

[104]

(KrotDi'ng

hv aiianDonment

105

I hear

it

singing^ singing sweetly^

Softly in

an undertone
it.

Singing as if God had taught " It is better farther on."

By

night and day


it

it

sings the same song,

Sings
Sings " It
It
it

while I sit alone

so the heart

may

hear

it

it

is better

farther

on.''"'

sings upon the grave, and sings

Sings

it

when

the heart ivould

groan;

Sings

it

when

the

shadows darken
on.^^

"

It is better

farther

Farther on

How much farther ?

Count the mile-stones one by one.

No
"

No

cou7iting

only trusting
on."

It is better farther

Joseph

Parker.

[106]

CHAPTER NINTH
(0rotDing bt abantionment

GENIAL
ten a
little

author

lias

writ-

book on the evo-

lution of an ideal, taking


as her text the quotation,

"The way of
derful
;

life is

won-

it is by abandonMost people think that the way of life is by acquisition, by getting things and keeping them, by accumulating and conservBut the saying is true it is by abaning.

ment."

donment, by letting things go and leaving

them behind, when they have


purpose, that we really grow.
greatness.
It
is

fulfilled

their
is

Bulk

not

in being, not in having, that

character consists.

Saint Paul gives us in a remarkable sentence a

plan of
it is

life,

a scheme of progress.

He

says

by forgetting the things that are behind


to things that are beit,

and stretching forward


fore, that

we grow.

As we think of

we

see

[107]

Cl^e
that this
is

tt&mx

of

Lobe
to live.

the only true

way

Child-

hood

is

very sweet and beautiful, but no one

would want to stay a child always.


is

The boy
much
him
be-

not sorry when he feels himself growing into

manhood.
hind

He

seems to be leaving
is

much
his

that

winning and

attractive.
los-

Perhaps

mother grieves as she

sees

ing one by one the things she has always liked

his curls, his boyish

ways, his delicate feat-

ures, the qualities that kept

him a

child,

and

taking on elements of strength, marks of manhood.

But

if

he remained always a boy, a child

with curls and dainty tastes, what a pitiful failure his life

would be

He

can press to

the goal of perfection only by putting away,


letting go, leaving behind, the sweetness, the

gentleness,

the

simplicity,

the

innocence of

boyhood.

The same principle runs through Manhood is stern, strong, heroic.


seem that childhood
sweeter, daintier,
is

all

life.

It

would
It
is

more beautiful.

more winning.

But who

re-

grets passing from childhood's gentleness and

[108]

(Brototng hv

3lbanDomnmt
and rugged-

attractiveness to man's strength


ness,

and man's hard tasks ?


easier

Nazareth was

by far to Jesus than what


tlie

came after
gles,

the homelessness,

long jour-

neys, the enmities, the persecutions, the strug-

the sufferings.

But when he
tlie

left the

carpenter shop and went to the Jordan to

be baptized, thence to

wilderness to be

tempted, and thence started on the


his cross,
*'

way

to

was he sorry?

That evening when the Carpenter swept out The fragrant shavings from the workshop floor. And placed the tools in order, and shut to

And barred, for the last time, the humble door. And going on his way to save the world.
Turned from the laborer's lot for evermore, I wonder was he glad i

**

That morning when

the

Carpenter walked forth.


the

From

Joseph's

doorway in

glimmering

light.

And

And, through
bright,

hade his holy mother long farewell. the rose-shot skies with dawning
tlie

Sau) glooming dark

Yet, seeing, set his feet

I wonder

shadows of the Cross, toward Calvary's height, was he sad f "

[109]

Ci^e

tmon
his

of

lobe

He

was eager to go forth from the quiet of

his peasant

friends

home and and neighbors

happy hfe among


Gahlean

in the Httle

village, to enter

upon the great work for which


There are many

he had come into the world.

intimations of this eagerness in the story of

our Lord's

life as

given in the gospels.

He
until

spoke of the baptism with which he must be


baptized,
it

and

said that he

was straitened

At another time he said "We must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day the night cometh, when no man can work." At one time it is said that
should be accomplished.
:

as he and his disciples were on their way, go-

ing up to Jerusalem, Jesus pressed on before

them

so eagerly that the disciples were

amazed

and awed, unable

to understand his eagerness.

He knew what
pelled
will.

awaited him at Jerusalem, but

instead of holding back, he hastened on, im-

by a

resistless desire to

do

his Father's

It

would have been

easier,

knowing

all

the fuat

ture, for

him

to stay in his mother's

home

Nazareth, working at his trade, and living a

[110]

(Brotuing hv
quiet
life,

abanDonmeut

than to go forth into the way

cross.

toil, and pain, which led to a But he forgot the easy, pleasant things which were behind, and with joy en-

of struggle,

tered on the harder

way

before him as he

pressed

toward the goal.


tells

word

in

the

Epistle to the Hebrews

us that for the


cross, de-

joy

set before

him he endured the

spising the shame.

So every true and worthy

life rejoices to leave

the ease and rest and comfort of the days of

training and preparation and go on to where


the burdens are heavier, the paths steeper and

rougher and the thorns sharper,


larger

if

thus fuller,

manhood

is

reached.

It takes courage

and resolution
past.

to continue

ever

moving away from our


to break

We

would
love,

like to

keep the things we have learned to

and we do not want

away from them.

Some people
rows behind.

are not willing to leave their sor-

shadows of their griefs.


their dead.

They never come out of the They stay back with They do not wish to come away
their

from the graves where they have buried

[111]

%})t Lejision
heart's treasures.

of Lobe
never forget their

They

sorrows.

But this is not God's we cannot forget love


duty.
ionships

will for us.

Of

course

that never can be our

We

cannot but miss sweet compandisloyal

we would be unloving, and


we
a

to our heart's covenants, if

could.

But

there

is

way of
still

forgetting our griefs in


all

which we

keep

that

is

sacred of the
so

friendships which have

meant

much

to us,
in

and yet go on with joy and victory


hearts, to a life all the richer

our

and more beauti-

ful because of our sorrow.

We
and

should never leave behind us anywhere in

life, in

true.

any experience, anything that is good George Eliot said "I desire no fu:

ture that will break the ties of the past."


are not living wisely if

We

we are losing anything


In nature nothis

out of our hands as we go on.

ing
its

is

ever really
is

lost.

When wood
is

burned
it is

form

changed, but no particle of


not lost when

wasted.
off to

The blossom

it falls

make room

for the coming of the fruit.

The

lovely things of childhood are not lost

[112]

dProtDing hv aiianDonment
when they are given up for the things that disWhatever is beautiful stays in place them.
the
life

always

only

the outward

form perlose

ishes

or changes.

We

never can

our

friends.

They may
;

leave us as to their visible


so that

presence, passing
see
is

from us

we cannot

them any more but what they were to us ours forever what they did for us, the im;

pressions they left

upon

us, the lessons

they

taught

us, the touches

they put upon our char-

acters, these we never can lose. Abandonment therefore is not losing. We only give up the hull while we keep the kernel. The flower fades, but its fragrance remains in

our hearts, and

its life is

continued in the fruit

which comes
is

in the blossom's place.


its

forgotten, but
its

melody stays
life.

in

The song our mem-

ory and

sweetness in our

We leave the
But
it

days behind us when we have lived them, and


never can go over them again.
the gifts the days brought us from God, the lessons

we

learned from their experiences,

would be

treason for us to forget, or to fail to carry

with us.

[113]

Ci^e

Ht^mx
if

of

Lobe

Sometimes we say that


This

only we could live


live it bet-

our past time over again we would


ter.
is

an unavailing yearning, for time

never turns back.

But we may
live

live

to-mor-

row
over

as
it

we would

to-day

if
is

we could go
a true use of

a second time.

That

our past
follies,

penitence

over our mistakes and

and

the learning of the lessons for the

days that yet remain.


are dear, but losing nothing that was

So we may go on, giving up the things that good or


in them, forgetting the things that are

worthy

behind, but passing ever to new things.

Thus

go from good to better, from blossom to fruit, from hope to fruition, from Henry van Dyke prophecy to fulfilment.
we
shall ever

puts
Let

it

thus

me but live my life from year to year, With forward face and unreluctant soul, Not hastening to nor turning from the goal;
Nor mourning things that disa/ppear In the dim past, nor holding hack in fear From what the future veils; hut with a whole And happy heart that pays its toll To youth and age, and travels on with cheer.

[114]

(0rototng hv
So
let

abauDonment
the hill or
;

the

way wind up

Through rough or smooth


Joy,
Still

the

doum, journey will he

New friendship,

I sought when hut a hoy, high adventure, and a crown. I shall grow old, hut never lose life's zest, Because the road's last turn will he the best.
seeking what

[115]

Leabfng Ci^ingjs enDone

[117]

One of

these

days ichen the sun sinks


its

loir.,

With the glory of God. in


^Ve u-ill

after-glou\

pause and think of the things undone^


ire lost.
ice

Of what Of ichai
0}ie

hare

iron.,

grow.

of these days.
irhen ire older

One of these days,


With the glory of

God

in

our after- glow.

We

will

And God

pause and think of what we have won. grant naught will be found undone.^

One of these days."

[118]

CHAPTER TENTH
leading ^i^mgjs cUnDone
i\10NG the memorabilia of a good man in ancient times
it
is

said:

"He

left

nothis

ing

undone."

That

more than can be said of


most people.
us are apt to leave

The

best of

many
left

things undone.

In

our formula of confession we are accustomed


to say
:

"We

have

undone those things


;

which we ought to have done

and we have

done those things which


done."

w^e

ought not to have


however,

Perhaps we do not often think of


as really sinful not to

it,

do things.

We

admit
;

that
^'e

it is

wrong

to treat another unkindly


it
is

do

understand that

wrong

also not to

show the kindness we had the

call to show.''

We
it is

know

it is

sinful to speak a harsh or bitter


;

w^ord to another

do we always remember that

a sin not to say the word of cheer or com-

[119]

Ojc tt^mx
fort

of

lotc
and which

we had the opportunity

to say,

our neighbor so much needed and longed to


hear?
If we must giye account for idle words,
also give account for idle silences.

we must

" TMiot silences

we keep year after year With those who are most near to lis and dear

We

live beside

each other day by day,

And speak

of

TJtefiill sireet

Beneath the

myriad things, but seldofji say word that h'esjust in our reach^ commonplace of common speech,

" TJien out of sight and out of reach they go These close, familiar friends who loved us so ! And sitting in the shadow they have left, Alone with loneliness, and sore bereft, We think icith vain regret, of some fond, toord That once we might have said, and they have heard."

Very much of our Lord's teaching


sins

refers to

of not doing.

The man with

the one tal-

ent was condemned, not because he used his talent in any

use

it

at

wrong way, but because he did not all. The priest and the Leyite did the

wounded man no injury. The^- probably eyen felt kindly toward him and expressed sympa[ lao ]

Lcabmg
thy with him.

Cl^ingsi ainDonc
as if they

Yet the story reads

sinned grievously against him.

They wronged

him by not giving him the help and the relief he needed and which they had been sent there
expressly to give.

Their passing by on the

other side was a cruel


sin

wrong against him

of leaving a duty undone.

In our Lord's description of the Judgment,


those on the left
evil

hand are condemned not for

things which they had done, but for their

neglect of love's duties. "I was an hungered, and ye gave me no meat I was thirsty, and ye gave me no drink: I was a stranger, and ye
:

took
sick,

me not
and

in

naked, and ye clothed

in prison,

and ye

visited

me not me not."

They had not oppressed


wounding
of their
others.

the poor, they had

not robbed men, they had not gone about

Nothing whatever

is

said

sins,

saving that they had not done the

deeds of love to those


tries.

who needed such

minis-

They had
in this

left

undone things w^hich

they ought to have done.


It
is

way

that

many

people

fail

most

seriously in living.

No grave [121]

fault can be

d)e
do.
ness,

JLesfjson of

lobe

found with their conduct, with the things they

They

are upright, true, dihgent in busilives are full

but their

of omissions and
you.'^

neglects.

How
see

was

it

yesterday with

Did you
lief,

one who needed help, comfort, re-

or encouragement, and did

you

fail to

do

anything for him?


"Lord, forgive
omission"?

Do

not

many

of us need

to pray with the saintly

man who

used to say,

my

sins, especially

my

sins of

Many

of the best of us leave

many

things unfinished.

touched which we

ought
Life

to

have

Most men
left

die with

many
that

tasks only
is

begun and

uncompleted.
all

too large for us;


is

we cannot do
tained even our
to have done.

it

our duty to do.

After we have done our best we have not at-

own standard of what we ought None of us do any day all the


it.

things we meant to do, and none of us ever do

anything as well as we intended to do


^^

I wonder if emr a song was sung


But But
the singer's heart

sang sweeter!
meter!

I wonder if

ever a

rhyme was rung

the thought surpassed the


[

122]

Leaifng '\)mq,& ajntione


"

/ wonder
Or

if eoer a sculj^tor

wrought

ardent thought with light and shade The dream of his inmost heart portrayed !
Till the cold stone echoed his

if ever a painter

* *

/ iDonder

if ever

And

there

a rose was found might not be a fairer !

Or if ever a glittering gem was ground And we dreamed not of a rarer !


**

Ah, never on earth do we find the best, But it umits for us in the land of rest And a perfect thing we shall never behold Till we pass the portals of shining gold.''

Indeed no one ever ought to do everything


that he might do.

There

is

a duty of omitting.

Some people
dred broad

scatter their energies over a hun-

fields

of activity when

it

were far

better if they
little

would

confine themselves to one

spot which they could transform into a

garden of beauty.
a
little

There are those who know


definite

of everything under heaven and know

nothing well enough to make a


accurate statement about
it.

and

We

should show

our wisdom in the selection we make of the


things which we shall do.
[

Some people

select

123]

m^t

Lesi^on of Lotje

a few things, but choose those that are least

worth while, and omit the most important.

Each one

of us

is

set to

do but a
all

little

frag-

ment of work.

No

one does

of anything.

We
that

are responsible only for the small section


is

allotted to us.
it

We should
skill,

do that

well,

putting into
fulness.

our best

our utmost faithtrouble ourselves

Then we need not


all

about the part we cannot do.

That

is

not our
it,

work at
and

some
it.

other one

is

waiting to do

at the right time he will

come forward

ready for

Many

of us vex ourselves un-

necessarily over things for which

we have not

the smallest measure of responsibility.

We

would save ourselves a vast outlay of strength

and energy
to us.

if

we would

learn to confine our-

selves strictly to the things that clearly

belong

Jean Ingelow teaches us a wise lesson


to

I am glad

think

I am

not bou7id

But only

to discove?-

With cheerful

make the world go rights and to do, heart, the work that Ood appoints.
to

But we should

be certain always really to seek

to "discover and to do" our

own

part, small or

[124]

leafaing :]^mgsj

anDone
Not
to

large, with the utmost faithfulness.

do

this, to leave

undone the things we ought

to have done, will be to leave a blank in the

universe where there ought to have been

good

work

well done.

lesson calls us to earnestness and fidelity doing of our allotted tasks. "He left nothing undone." This fine commendation of one man should set us to thinking about ourin the
selves

So our

and our own doing.


little

We

need not fret

about the

that our neighbor does and the

much that he is leaving undone; he may be very negligentperhaps he is but that is not our matter. Our own life is our matter,
however, for we shall have to give account for it. What blanks are we leaving, you and I,
these passing days.?

What

ought to have done for others


kindness,

things of

things that we
love,

encouragement,

have we been leaving undone.? What things that we ought have done our Masterholy heroism duty, purpose, that he may be honoredhave we been
comfort
to
living,
in

uphfting,

cheer,

for

firmness in

self-effacement

omitting.?

[125]

Cl^c
The only way
undone at the
its

ttmon
to

of

LoU
work
in

make
is

sure of leaving nothing

last

to do each day's

day.

Let us never postpone or defer any


shall not

duty that comes to our hand, for we


pass this

way

again.

Let us make sure before


no service of

we

sleep

any night that nothing has been omitlittle

ted that day, no

task,

love.

Life

is

too sacred to be marred by blanks and

breaks.
fall

One of the darkest shadows that can upon any soul in its last days is the shadow cast by the things left undone.

[126]

liUng, for

t\)t

TBcjSt

Cl^mgjs

[127]

There are loyal hearts^ there are

sjyirits brave.

There are souls that are pure and true:

Then give

to the

world the

best

you have^
to you.

And
Give

the best shall

come back

love,

and

love to

your heart will fiow^


utmost need
;

A strength in your
Have faith., and a

score of hearts will

show

Their faith in your word and deed.

For

life is the

'Tis just what you are

mirror of king and and do


world the
best

slave^

Then give

to the

you have

And

the best will come lack to you."

[128]

CHAPTER ELEVENTH
ILttjing fov t\^t

ism

Cl^ingjs

one of our Lord's lesser


is

parables there
story of a

a pleasant
in

man who was

the pearl business.

He

was
for

always
pearls.

on

the

quest

He

must have been

a lover of beauty, for pearls are very beautiful.

In ancient times they were regarded as


all

the richest of

gems.

Writers of those days

speak in highest praise of their value.

The

poets had romantic fancies about the ori-

gin of the pearl.


of dew which
shell-fish
fell

They
its

said it

was

first

a drop

opened

from heaven and which a mouth and took in. With-

in the shell the crystal dewdrop was condensed,

doubling

its

original perfections.
its

They

said,

further, that the pearl took

hue from the


col-

heavens, and

its

iridescence

from the seven

ors of the rainbow.

The

story of the true origin

of the pearl

[129]

Cl^e Le^^on of Loic


though not
is

so romantic as that of the poet's,

very interesting.

Pearls are not precious

stones, as are

diamonds, emeralds, and rubies.

They
in

are of animal origin.


shell-fish,
is

They
in

are found

certain
It

especially

the

pearl

oyster.

generally supposed that they are


suffering.

the fruit of

wounding and
within the

Minute

foreign substances, like tiny grains of sand,


find their

way

shell.

Friction and

suffering are caused and the wounds are cov-

ered by a secretion which the oyster exudes,

which hardens into what we know as pearls.

Hence comes
its shell

the saying,

"The

oyster mends

with a pearl."
in

The man
pearls

the Master's story sought for

he

went over the world looking for


all

them and buying


too, that he

he could get.

It

is

said,
is,

sought for goodly pearls, that

for the best

the whitest, purest, largest pearls

he could
seek for

find.

Thus he

represents those

who

good things

in life

not

the good,

merely, but the very good, the best things.

There are good things, and things that are


better,

and things that are


[

best.

We

do not

130]

lifaing for

tl^e

TBcgt ^\)in%^

have to choose merely between the good and


the bad, but between the good and the best.
It
is

worth our while to ask ourselves whether


striving for the best things, or

we are indeed

whether our aims are lower than the highest.

We may
of our
things.

apply the

test to

every department
spiritual

life,

and not alone to moral and


all

Religion has to do with

our days

and

all

our tasks.

be judged by the
shoes.

Hiram Golf said he would way he made and mended


leave a blank in the

Stradivarius, the old violin-maker, said

that he would rob


universe if

God and
not

he

did

Even God, he
of duty we rob

said^ could not

make good violins. make man's best


In every
line
less

without man's best to help him.

God
all

if

we are content with


It

than the best we can do. This


is

true of

our work.

is

a sin to do

anything carelessly or
igence in business
is

in a slovenly

way.

Dil-

bracketed in the Scriptures

with fervency of spirit and serving the Lord.

Nothing ever should


can do.

satisfy us but the best

we

" Not failure, hut

loiv

aim

is si7i.*^

[131]

Cl^e

ttmon

of iLoije

In the culture of character no ideal but the


perfect one ever should be set before us.
are
all

builders
fit

we

We

are set to build radiant

temples,
trouble

to be dwelling places for

God. The
to

is,

however, that we are


little

satisfied

build poor

wooden barracks instead of

temples of marble and gold.

We should never

be willing to be

less

noble and beautiful in our

character than the noblest and most beautiful.

We should never be
est

content with even the fairArtists say that a


it is

human
is

loveliness alone.

picture without a bit of sky in


It
flat

defective.

and low and lacks height.


attained
It
best.

life

without sky, which does not reach up and take


in heaven, has not
its
is

This

world
world.

is

very beautiful.
It
is

our Father's

strewn with pearls.

We

do well

to seek these shining


into our hands.
find

gems and gather them


if in

But

our quest we

fail to

the one pearl of great price,

we have

failed to find
ever.

anything which we can keep for-

We

need not even ask what the Master meant


price.
It
is life,

by the pearl of great


[

eternal

132]

life.

It
is

is

Christ himself, with

all

that his sal-

vation

to those

who accept him.


this

There was

only one great pearl valuable enough to be

purchased at the price


that he had.

merchant paid
is

all

Jesus Christ

peerless
is

and alone
ever

in his greatness

among men. He

the one al-

together lovely.

No

one of

all

who

knew

him claimed that there was any


him.

sin or fault in

No
evil

witness could be found to testify to

any

thing that he had done.


sin,

Not only was he without


development.

but in him
its

all

moral and spiritual beauty found

complete

Plato expressed a desire that the

moral law might become a living personage,


that

men

seeing
its

it

thus incarnate, might be


Plato's wish was ful-

charmed by
filled

beauty.

in Jesus Christ.

The

holiness

and the
in him.

beauty of the divine law were revealed

The Beatitudes
life,

contain an outline of the ideal

but the Beatitudes are only a rescript of

the life of Christ himself.

What

he taught

about love was but his own love stated in a


course of living lessons for his friends to learn.

When

he said we should be patient, gentle,


[

133

Cl^e

Ht^mx

of

lobe

thoughtful, forgiving, and kind, he was only

saying:

"Follow me."

Jesus called himself the Son of

man

not
is,

the

son of a man, but the Son of man, that

of

humanity. Someone suggests that


gather from
all

if

we could
little

who

ever have lived the

fragments of lovely character which have

blos-

somed out

in

each and bring

all these

frag-

ments into one personality, we should have the


beauty of Jesus Christ.
gentleness, in

In one person you find

another meekness, in another

purity of heart, in another humility, in another kindness, in another patience

there

is

no one

so

sunken in

sin that in

some tiny flower of beauty.


of

him there is not But in the holiest


stained and

men

there are only two or three qualities

of ideal beauty, with

much

that

is

flecked mingled with these qualities.

In Christ,
is

however, the Son of man,


is

all
is

that

excellent

found, with no flaw.


sinless,

He

perfect man, not

only

but complete in his person.

He

is

the pearl of great price.

As Saviour,

also,

Jesus

is

without equal.

There was only one


[

peerless pearl

there

is

134

jLiiiiug for ti^t

ism
is

Cl^mQjJ
who can
save.

only one Redeemer, only one

"In him was


life if

life."

He

the one fountain of


fill

at which every one of us must


life.

his

cup

he would partake of

He
if

is

the light of

the world, the one light at which every one of

us must light his

little

lamp

he would shine

on the darkness of this world.


Saviour in

He
is

is

the one
if

whom we must
life.

all believe

we

would have eternal


Friend
in

He

the one only

whom any

of us can find what our

hearts hunger for of love, of companionship,

of

all

that divine friendship means.


this

When
What
all

merchant had found the one pearl,


it

how did he make

his own.?
it.?

He bought
Nor was

it.

did he give for

"He went and


it."

sold
it

that he had, and bought

bad investment.
fools them, eats

Sometimes men

dispose of

all

they have and invest in some scheme which only

them beggared.
from

up their possessions and leaves But nobody was ever a loser


and buying
It
is

selling all his other pearls

the pearl of great price.

the true riches,

imperishable and eternal.

In

all life

we

find this principle

that we must

[135]

%i)t tt&^on of Loi3e


up the lesser to get the greater. A young away at school wrote to a friend that she liked her school very much everybody was
give
girl

lovely

and everything was beautiful

but

she

thought she would not go back another year,


because she could not bear to be away from her

happy home.
that her work
self, to

The friend wrote her, saying now was to make the most of her-

have her powers developed, disciplined

and

trained, to attain to whatsoever things are

lovely in

womanhood, and that

it

might be

necessary for her to give


ease, the

up

the pleasure, the

freedom of

life at

home, for a while,

in order to reach the nobleness visioned in her

heart when she prayed or sat at Christ's table.

"He went and


it."

sold all that he had,

and bought

We can
says:
be,

get the best in no other way.

man

"I know I
it is

am

not as good as I

ought to

but

hard to give up

my
it

faults

and

vices."
calls

No
us
is

matter how hard


higher, and

is,

our

Master

up

we should give
obey him.
life

up

all

that

unworthy

in order to

We

get wedded to our routines of

and do

not like to sacrifice them for the sake of new

[136]

iLibing fof tijc


things.

Tsm
is:

Cl^inujS
*'Tlie

familiar saying

good

Is is

often the

enemy of the
If

best."

The good

never worthy of us

there be a better possible.


in their

Men
mills

do not keep the old machinery

when

better machines have been invented.

In schools and colleges the new education has

supplanted the
are of no use

old.

The

ancient text-books

now

indeed,

we have

to get

new text-books almost every year


with the rapid march of science.
older people remember the
dles,

to keep pace

Some of

the

day of tallow canand lamps


us re-

but these gave

way

to lamps,

to gas,

and gas

to electricity.

Some of

member the old mail coach and the long wait for letters coming only a few miles. Now we
have the hourly mail deliveries and the swift
trains

and steamers.

And

impatient with even

this slow

communication we talk over telephone

wires with a friend a thousand miles

away and

have our telegraph service girdling the world.

Again the better is crowding out the good, and we are beginning to talk across the sea without wires.

In the

little

story, the
[

merchant had gathered


]

137

Cl^e Cession of Loije


many, pearls, goodly pearls,
a rare collection.
until he possessed

Then he saw one

pearl which

far surpassed in beauty and value any pearl

of

all

that he owned.

He

was

so enraptured
it,

with

it,

and

so eager to possess

that he sold

all his

large store and bought this one noble,

peerless pearl.

And

he never regretted the exall

change, for the one was worth more than


the many.

We

can well afford to give up


If

all

things else

to get Christ.

we have

all

other things

and do not have

Christ,

we are hopelessly poor.


rich

But

if

we have Christ we are

though our

hands be empty of earth's treasures.


**

that nothing in my soul May dwell hut thy pure love alone ; may thy love possess me whole, My joy, my treasure, and my crown ; Strajige fires far from my soul remove ;

O grant

My

every act, word, thought, he love.*^

The law of
ress

Christian life

is

progress

progrest

by giving up

the good to take the better.

We

never come to a point where we

may

content because we have reached the full meas-

[138]

iLibtng for

ti^e

15m

Cl^ingiS
Heavhow-

ure of our attainment and achievement.

en ever

lies

above us,

however high we climb.


to gain,

There always are better things


ever full our hands

may

be of goodly treasures.
fills

Sweet as
there
is

is

the joy that

our hearts to-day,

still

sweeter song that

we may learn

to sing.
'*

The song unsung more sweet shall ring Than any note that yet has rung ; More sweet than any earthly thing. The song unsung A harp there lies, untotiched, unstrung As yet by man, hut time shall bring A player by whose art and tongue This song shall sound to Qod the King ; The toorld shall cling as ne'er it clung To God and heaven, and all shall sing The song imsung.

[139]

^erbing anD ifoUotofng

Cl^ttjst

[141]

" ^Tis not for man


Life
is brief^

to trifle

and

sin is here.

Our age

is but the

falling of a leafy
tear.

The dropping of a Not many


lives.,

hut only one^ have we,

One, only one

How

sacred should that one


to sport

life he

We have no time

away

the hours

All must he earnest in a world like ours.''

[142]

CHAPTER TWELFTH
^erbiiTQ and !foUotx)in5
Cl^risit

ERVING

Christ

is

some-

thing very practical. Some


people seem to think
it
is

something aside from their

common

life,

something

that belongs only to Sun-

days, something that can be done only in certain holy moments.


life,

But

it is

really one's very

or

it is

nothing.

It does not consist mere-

ly in acts of worship.
one's first

There are times when


is

and most sacred duty

to stay

away

from a

religious service.

A young

mother was

regretting that she had been able to attend

church so rarely during the six months since


her baby came.

But
all

if the

baby

really needed

a mother's care

those months, she would


if she

have been unfaithful to her Master


neglected
it

had

even to attend church services.


tells

pleasant storj^-poem

of a young girl
little sick

left

by a dying mother in charge of a

sister.

All her days and nights were

filled

[143]

Cl^e tension of iLobe


with this care of love.

She could not attend

church

services nor take

any part
home.

in Christ's

work outside of her


use in his service.

Httle

It grieved

her, for she loved Christ

and longed

to be of

One night

she dreamed that the

King had

come, and she stood before him, painfully explaining wh^^ she had not been able to do any

work for him because

all

her time and strength


child.

were required in caring for the suffering

"And
ing

the child

is

mine," said the King.

She

could not have served him better than in tendthis little

one of his that needed her care


If she had failed

and was her


in this

special charge.

duty even

in order to attend

church

services, if she

had neglected

this sick child in

order to help others outside her home, the Master

would have been grieved.


in serving Christ lies It
is

Our duty
our hand.

always near to

never some impossible thing

that he wants us to do.

There was an
all time.

artist

who wished

to leave behind
live

him some noble

work that would

through

He

sought for material

fine
[

enough for

his

dream.

IM]

^erbing
He

anfa follotDing Ci^rijst


and journeyed
disapclay

travelled to distant lands

far and near in vain quest for what he sought.

He came home an aged man, weary and


pointed, and found that from the
beside his

common

own door

his old

apprentice had

made marvels of loveliness which were praised by all who saw them, and had won him fame.
So many people longing to do noble things for
Christ look far off for the opportunities, miss-

ing meanwhile services which wait for them


close

by

their doors.

Nothing

is

grander for

us any day than the quiet doing of God's will,

simple faithfulness in
the best of

common duty, making


to our hand.

what

lies close

*' We complain That 'tis not given us to break some aliain, To scale some peak, to fetch some golden fleece. To do some mighty deed whose light shall cease Only when moons no longer wax and wane. *Tis thus we empty all the springs of life, To lose the blessing at our viery hand For faith and love, with glory as of sun. Illume the path to peace through every strife. No work is futile that is nobly planned ; No deed is little if hut greatly done.'^

145

Ci^e
There
is

Ht&mx

of
all

Lobe
may
serve

one quiet way

of us

Christ if

we

will

by

letting the light of his

love shine out in our faces

and our

lives, to

brighten some
brightening.
there lived a

little

spot of earth that needs

About four hundred years ago

man

in Italy

who wanted

to do

something for the world.


for a
little

He painted

a picture

obscure chapel near his

home

picture of the Christ Child and the Mother.

Into the face of the Child he painted a soft


light which has been a delight

and a wonder

ever since.

It

was a warm and hallowed light

which brightened the face of the Mother as


she bent over her Child, and
filled all

the scene

with a gentle radiance.

The who

picture w^as a benediction to the peasants


lived about the village

and saw

it

in the

chapel.

They had

their sorrows, their cares,


soft light cheered
their hard, nar-

their struggles,

and that

and heartened them and made row


life

mean more

to them.

They

called the

painter Ariel, the light-bringer, because he

had brought that holy shining

into their lives.

We may

all

serve Christ in this

way

not by

[146]

painting pictures

like

Correggio's, but by car-

rying

hcavcrilj^ light

on our faces

in the love

that shines there and does not fade out in the

darkest night.

Always serving Christ means


son

living love's les-

among men.

Religious meetings and acts


in

of worship avail nothing

pleasing

God

if

our hearts are

full

of bitterness and uncharity


the law of love.

and

if

we do not

fulfil

Jesus

sharply reproved the religionists of his day


because, while they were most punctilious in
the observance of the minutest forms and cere-

monials they lacked the qualities of mercy, justice,

and

faith.

It

is

just as true

now
in

as

it

was then that the religion which pleases Christ


is

a holy

life,

and a holy
is

life is

one

which

love rules.

It

not enough to be honest

and true and upright

we
;

must love each

other as Christ loves us

thoughtful, kind, helpful.

we must be patient, Here is an evenlife

ing prayer which

will

test the

of our

busy days
" If any iimrd of mine has caused one tear

From

other eyes to flow ;

[1471

W)t

iLejijson of
to

Lobe
appear

]^ I have caused one shadow

On any face I know ;


If hut one thoughtless word of mine has stung

Some loving heart to-day : Or if the word Tve left unsaid has wrung

A single sigh, I pray,


Thou, tender Heart of
love,

forgive the sin.

Help me
That if at

to

keep in

mind
'

last I would thy Well done win, In word as well as deed I must he kind.*'
'

Then we should

serve Christ unweariedly.


little

He

does not call us to follow him for a

while,

but until we are released and called home,

There are things which

test

our perseverance.

Some people
in

are hindered in their earnestness

doing good by the ingratitude of those they


Gratitude
is
is

try to help.
Christian love

very sweet, but

a holy passion which fails not


it is

when

it

meets no requital, even though

re-

jected and insulted.

Others are disheartened


of

by the seeming

failure
it,"

what they

do.

"Nothing comes of
is

they say.

But we
all

have the assurance that no true work for Christ


in vain.

Somehow, some time, somewhere,

[148]

that we do for our Master will have

its

result

and
"

its

reward.
the seed he cast hy the wayside,
it

What though

A7id the birds take

yet the birds are fed."


is

Though nothing
do wdth
reward
blessing in our
in

seems to come of the good we

love, yet Christ

honored, there

is

own

hearts,

and there
see

will be

glory.

We may
though we

go on serving
no
result.

Christ, therefore,

Nothing done for him can

fail.

Some

are hindered in their w^ork for Christ

by

sorrow.

When

they are bereft the tasks are


their hands.

dropped out of
our Master.

But sorrow does

not in any sense release us from the service of

There

is

a story of a

woman who had had


In her great grief she

many
wealth,

sorrows.
all

Parents, husband, children,

were gone.

not. She would not take up any of her wonted work for

prayed for death, but death came

Christ.

One night

she

had a dream.
She
saw^

She
her

thought she had gone to heaven.

husband and ran to him with eager joy, ex-

[149]

Cl^e tt^^on of lobe


pecting a glad welcome.

But strange
his face

no answering joy shone on


prise

to say,

only sur-

and displeasure.
he asked.

"How

did

you come
you

here.f^"

"They
'

did not say you were

to be sent for to-day.

I did not expect

for a long time yet.

With a

bitter cry she turned

from him

to seek

her parents.

But

instead of the tender love for

which her heart was longing, she met from

them only the same amazement and the same


surprised questions.
"I'll

go

to

my
if

Saviour," she cried.

welcome me
but

no one

else does."

"He will When she

saw Christ there was


his

infinite love in his look,

words throbbed with sorrow as he said

"Child, child,
there.?"

who

is

doing your work down

At

last she

understood.

She had no

right yet to be in heaven.


finished.

She had

fled

Her work was not away from her duty.


lose

This

is

one of the dangers of sorrow, that in

our grief for those who are gone we


interest in those

our

who

are living and slacken our


is

zeal in the

work which

allotted to us.

When

one asked to be allowed to go and bury his

[150]

^erbing and follotDing

Ci^risit

father before beginning to follow Christ, the

answer was, "Leave the dead to bury their own

dead

but go thou and publish abroad the

kingdom of God."
reavement,
w^e

However great our

be-

may

not drop our tasks until

the Master calls us away.

[151]

itinn$\jip in i^eaben

[153]

*'

It is well to live

in the valley sweety


is

Where
Where

the

work of the world


i^i

done,

the 7'eapers sing


till

the fields of wheat^

As

they toil

the set of sun.

But beyond the meadows the hills I see, Where the noises of traffic cease, And I follow a voice that calleih to me

From
^^

the hilltop regions of peace.

Aye,

to live is sweet

in the valley faii'^


;

And to toil till the set of sun But my spirit yearns for the hilltop's
When
the

air

day and

its

work are don e


o'er the silent hills

For a Presence breathes

And
As

its

sweetness is living yet


all the hillside fills

The same deep calm

breathed over Olivet.

154]

CHAPTER THIRTEENTH
Citt?en)S]^(p

m f eaten
a great deal
is

UR Lord spoke
this world.

of a kingdom that

not of

He

said this

kingdom
with

does

not

come
is,
;

observation; that
see its

men do not
it

progress

makes no display of pomp and pageant.


it is
is

He
its

said

not an outward kingdom, but that


within men's hearts and
lives.

realm
this

It

was

kingdom which Christ himself came to establish and which he sent his disciples to win
for him.

He
All

is

the King.

He

sets

up no
is

throne in any earthly capital


in heaven.

his throne

who own
it
is

Christ as Master are

subjects of this kingdom, not of this world.

Saint Paul puts

very clearly when he says,


in heaven."

"Our

citizenship

Those who be-

long to Christ are citizens of a heavenly commonwealth.

The thought

is

very interesting.

If you trav-

[155]

Clie
el

tmon
beautiful

of iLotie

through foreign countries, leaving behind


interests,

your loved ones and your dearest


will

you

see

many

things

mountains

and
land

fields, cities, rivers,

noble buildings, works


will

of art

but your heart


the while.

be in your home-

all

Longfellow says

^aG7i man^s chimney is


Is the central point,

Ms golden

milestone^

from which he measures

Through

the

Every distance gateways of the world around him.

So

it

should be with the Christian.


this

He

is liv-

ing in

world for a time, going among the

world's people, taking part in the world's affairs,

but his heart

is

in heaven, his true

home.

His thoughts go continually to that blessed


country.

His highest

interests are there.

This does not mean that we are to neglect our

work

here.

Sometimes men have made the mis-

take of thinking that they could live near to

God
ter

only by separating themselves from


life.

all

earthly

But

this

is

not the

way

the

Mas-

wants us to do.
says not one word against

The New Testament

the life of the world.

Jesus did not ask that

[156]

Citi5ensil)(p in

i^eaben
world

his disciples should be taken out of this

he

asked that they should stay here and


evil.

be kept from the

The

ancient Greeks

thought that

toil

was vulgar.

They had

noth-

ing to do with those who wrought in the shops


or in the
fields.

But

the religion of Christ

from the beginning had the same message for


the
toiling

masses

and for the great and


antagonistic
to

mighty.
godliness,
best,

Instead of being

work

is

a means of grace.

We

grow

away from men and ordinary human experiences, but in the midst of human interests and in connection with common tasks and duties. We grow best in spiritual life when we
not
are doing our part the most diligently in the
affairs of earth.

"It

is

through the limitamonoto-

tions, the collisions, the surprises, the

nies

of this work-a-day world that we lay


life

hold on the

which

is life

indeed."

We

are not therefore to retire from the toils


life in

and tasks of every-day


saintliness.

order to cultivate
lie

Saintliness does not


is

on any such

pathway, but

to be sought rather on the

dusty mart, where men throng, where

human

[157]

Cl^e Lejsjson of Lobe


needs

make

their appeal.

The hoUest

duties

of earth ofttimes are found in places which

seem most unheavenly to our eyes.

But we
Master.

are to do

all

our work to please the

Our

secular life should be penetrated

by

spiritual motives.

Instead of unfitting

men

for doing the world's work, the grace of Christ

should make them


secular duties.

all the more proficient in One may do the lowliest things in a heavenly way. One may work in the humblest calling and make it radiant, and live a

saintly life, while another

may

be engaged in

what

is

regarded as a sacred calling, and yet


his

may do
manner.

work

in a

profane and an undevout

bootblack

may

be more saintly,

may
pel,

live

nearer to God, and

may

be a better

citizen of heaven,

than a minister of the gos-

busy

in incessant religious duties.

Brownwell

ing represents the angel Gabriel taking a boy's


tasks in this world, doing the

work

and

praising
finer

God

meanwhile.

We

have something

even than that, however, not in a mere

poet's fancy, but in gospel story.

God came

to earth

and

lived a

The Son of human life and

[158

wrought at a common

trade, teaching us that

a holy motive glorifies the lowliest work.


**

Yes, yes,

a carpenter

same trade as mine.


the

It warms my heart as I read that line. I can stand the hard worh, I can stand

poor

pay, For ril see that Carpenter at no distant day.''

Yet while Jesus wrought at homeliest work


heart was in the holy of holies.

his

He

toiled

cheerfully and did his work well because he

was

in

communion with

his

Father.

Even
first

while engaged

in the world's

work we are to
the

have a lofty, spiritual motive, seeking

kingdom of God and his righteousness. If we do this, God will care for us. George Macdonald says that a man's business
the will of God, and that then
is

just to do
takes

God
is

upon

himself the care of that man.

When
row
those

the heavenly citizenship

realized, sor-

finds

comfort and blessing.

There are

who say

that because of the greatness of


it

the sorrow of the race,


ter if there never

would have been betlife in

had been any human

[159]

Clje LciS^on of Lobe


this world.

work

is

But wc must wait until sorrow's finished before we speak so hopelessly.

The deepest joys come out of the sorest griefs. "Your sorrow shall be turned into joy," the
Master promised.
It
is

when we

let into

the

darkness of our trouble the sure hope of such

transformation that the stars shine out in our


night.

Some people look only down in their down into the grave, down into time of grief their own breaking hearts, down at the empti-

ness, the ruin,

and the darkness about them.


Others, with grief no
less sore,

These

find

no comfort.
with loss no

less ]:een,

look

up

into

the face of

God and

see love there; look into


;

heaven where their loved ones are


Whittier,

look at the

blessed stars of hope which shine above them,

and

are

comforted.
sets the

in

"Snowside

bound,"
side:

two aspects of sorrow

by

Alas for him who never sees The stars shine through his cypress trees! Who, hopeless, lays his dead away Nor looks to see the hreaM^ig day Across the mournful marbles play !

[160]

Citi?cnjsl)ip in

i^eaben

hath not learned, in hours of faithy The truth to flesh and sense unknown, That Life is ever lord of Death, And love can never lose its own.

Who

The only
ter
is

life

that grows into the best characits

that which has

source in heaven.

This

earth does not afford a large enough sphere


for the growth of an immortal
possibility.
life to its full

"A

star cannot be imprisoned in


;

a shed
fection

it

demands a sky
fully display

and to attain perits

and

glory, the soul

demands a sky."
ethical culturist

The

difference between the


is

and the true Christian

that

the former gathers into his character only

human and
It
is

earthly qualities, while the other

builds in Christ

and heaven

besides.

said that astronomers have

discovered

that a sensitized plate will photograph stars

which the eye cannot


est telescope.

see even with the strong-

You look with your naked eye and you see many stars. You look into a telescope and you see many more. Then you put
your
sensitized plate in its place
it

and

let

the

skies look into

for a while

and on the plate

[161]

Cl^e "Ltmon of note


you
find imprinted the

image of many other


telescope.

stars unrevealed even

by the

A man

looks for the beautiful things of character and


finds

many human life


is

in

human

lives.

But
all

in the perfect

of Christ, where

the fulness of

divinity

revealed, he finds a thousand lovely


else

things which nowhere

on earth can be

found.

A
in

character with none of the beauty of heaven


it is

defective.

One who never prays, who

never ponders the words of God,


fellowship with spiritual things,

who holds no who lives only

on the earth, thinking only earthly thoughts,

groping ever

in the

glooms and mists of doubt


into a measure of beauty

and

fear,

may grow

and may do some noble work, but he has missed for the best can be found only in the best

Jesus Christ.

"He who
life

never connects

God

with his daily


ual

knows nothing of the

spirit-

meaning and the

uses of life; nothing of


ills

the calm, strong patience with which

may

be endured; of the gentle, tender comfort

which the Father's love can minister; of the


blessed rest to be realized in his forgiving love,

[162]

Citi?en0l)ip in l^eaben
his tender

Fatherhood; of the deep, peaceful


infinite

sense of

tlic

One ever
more

near, a refuge

and strength."
There
tion
is

more

culture,

spiritual inspira-

and

uplift, in one hour's study of the

character of Christ, than in years and years of


the study of earth's best lives and rarest wis-

dom.

It

is

a law of

life

that our thoughts build

our character.

If we meditate on the purity,

the holiness, the goodness, the love, the righteousness,

of God, these qualities will print

themselves

upon our own


culture.

hearts.

Saint Paul

has given us an infallible direction for the best


spiritual

"Whatsoever things are


what-

true, whatsoever things are honorable,

soever things are just, whatsoever things are

pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever

things are of good report;


virtue,

if

there be

any

and

if there

be any praise, think on

these things."

do

and the

Then he adds, "These things God of peace shall be with you."


is

If our citizenship
receive inspiration
all

truly in heaven,

we

will

and strength from above for


never easy to live worthily

our

life.

It

is

[163]

%])t le^sion of lote


and victoriously
last, life is

in this world.

From

first

to

a struggle between the natural and

the spiritual.

always in the face of antagonism.

The gains we make must be won The relife

wards and honors of


overcometh."
if

are only for

"him that

We

never can live victoriously

we fight alone. But if we are living in communion with Christy we have all the strength
of omnipotence
v/ith

us in every struggle, in

every striving, under every burden.


alive
**

Christ

is

and

is

with us always.

Why
He

do

I ask and

question
to

is eve?'

coining

me,

Morning and noon and evening^ If I had hut eyes to see ;


the daily load grows lighter^ The daily cares grow stveet, For the Master is near, the Master

And

is

here;

I have

only

to sit

at his feet.'"

Outside a garden wall hangs a noble vine which


every year bears
clusters.
its

great wealth of purple


look for
its

When you
it

root

you
is

find

that

it is

inside the wall.

Its

home

in the

garden where

has

all

care and nurture, while

[164]

its

fruit liangs outside

where the hungry

may
us.

feed

upon

it.

It

should be thus with

With
men.
*'

the roots of our Hfe in heaven,

we should

bear fruit in this world to feed the hunger of

urn where those pure waters rise. And once more mingles with us mea7ier things, Tis even as if an angel shook his wings ; Immortal fragrance fills the circuit wide, That tells us wTience his treasures are supplied.
his
'

When mie Has filled

that holds

comTminion vnth

the skies

'

[165]

^ent

[16T]

*'

I would have gone : God bade me stay ; I ivould have worked God bade me rest.
:

He broke my will from day to day. He read my yearyiings vnexpressed,

And

said them nay.


:

" Now I would stay God bids me go ; Noiv I would rest: God bids me work. He breaks my heart tossed to and fro,,

My soul

is

And
^^

vex

wrung with me so.

doubts that lurk

I go, Lord^ where thou

sendest

me;
it he

Day

after d.ay

I plod and moil


God, when will
alone

But., Christ

my

That I may

let

my
?

toil.,

And

rest with thee

"

[168]

CHAPTER FOURTEENTH

^ent
E
are all sent from God.
least

At

we are unless we

refuse to be sent.

We

are

ready enough to admit that


certain persons have been

For example, the sent. "There came a man, sent from God, whose name was John." Yes, some one says, but he was only one man, and he had a unique
Baptist.
mission.

He came
Then

specifically to herald the

Messiah.

there were the apostles, too

they were sent by the Master.


apostle means sent.

The name

Yes, but there were only

twelve of them, and they were Christ's personal


friends,

whom

he had specially trained.

It

is

easy to understand that they were sent by their

Master.

But our

case

is

different.

We
Can
it

be-

long to a great uncounted throng.

be

that we are sent from God, that each one of


us
is

sent?

[1691

Cl^e ILc0)Son of kott


Yes, each one of us
is

sent on

an errand

all

our

own, with our own word to speak, with some


particular blessing
world, which if
intrusted to

us

for the

we do not carry

will

never

reach those for


the parable, two
other, to help

whom

it

was prepared.

In

men were sent, one after the the wounded man, but both of
doing what they
to send a third

them

in turn passed on, not

were sent to do.

The Lord had

man
all

before he got that errand done.

We

are
if

sent on errands just as definite.


fail to

What

we

do the things of love which we were

sent to do, or to speak the


sent us to speak?
"

word our Master

Condemned f07' silence f Yes, ah, yes ! JJnspoTzen words have no redress ; For who must hear this awful cost Qod sent a word, and it was lost !
'

**

If any word thou sendest me, God, let me speak it clear for thee^
is

It does not follow that every one

sent to

do

something large or conspicuous.


things, the
little

The

lowly

unnamed things of

love, are

[170]

^ent
just as important in their place as the great
things.

poet represents a buttercup amid

the grass, crying to the great sun in the sky,


in despair over its uselessness in

comparison
the world
flower not

with the sun


with light.
to despair.

itself,

which

filled all

The sun bade

the

little

" Ood hung me in the great blue sky To light the world with my one hig eye, To show men hoio they are living. But he put you down in the meadow lot. The world is fairer than if you were not."

We

live best

when we are most nearly what


when we do most nearly

God made
what he
ligion
is

us to be,

sent us to do.

writer says that "re-

indeed a new picture of Jesus of Naz-

areth."

Our errand

in this

world

is

in a small

way

the same that Christ's errand was.

He

now himself, in person, go about doing good we are to go for him. The only
does not

hands Christ has for doing kindnesses are our


hands.

The only

feet he has to
feet.

run the

er-

rands of love are our

The

only voice he
is

has to speak cheer to the troubled

our voice.

[171]

Ci^e Leission of lobe


There
is

a story of a

little

child that

had been

put to bed in a dark room.

She fretted at be-

ing left alone, and her mother brought her


doll,

Happy,

to be with her.

But that did not


to
re-

satisfy the child

she

begged her mother


her.

stay in the

room with

The mother
child

minded her that she had


need not be afraid.

Happy and God, and


was heard
the mother returned

Soon the

sobbing again.

When

and chided
don't want

her, the child said:

"O, mother, I

Happy, and
much

I don't

want God

want someone with a skin face."

We

are all very

like the child.

In our our sor-

loneliness

and heart hunger, and


our need.

in

row and suffering, even Christ


presence does not meet
the
all

in his spiritual

We

crave

human

touch, the

human

voice, the

human
it is

love.

Nothing

else will quite

make

real to us

even the divine gentleness and love.

And

one of the condescensions of grace that usually


the Master reveals himself to us in a friend,

comes to us incarnated
it

in a

human

life.

Thus
and

comes that he sends us out to represent him.


are to be hands and face

We

and

voice

[172]

licart to him.

He

says,

"As

the Father hath

sent me, so send I you."

If

we would understand

wliat our mission

is,

we have but to learn what the mission of Christ Think of the personal influence of his was.
life

among men.

He

went about doing good,

not merely by his works of wonder, as when he


healed the sick, opened the eyes of the blind,

and wrought other miracles, but by a ministry


of

common

kindness, helpfulness, sympathy,

cheer, encouragement,

and

inspiration.

Every

one who met him carried away a blessing from


his presence.

He

is

not here

now

to continue such a minisit.

try, but he sends us to do

By

the coffin

of a
said:

young

Christian

girl

a bosom friend
flowers
blos-

"Everywhere she went,


in her path,

somed

and the

air

was sweeter
This
If he

when she had passed through a room."


should be true of
all Christ's friends.

sends us we must expect to carry on the minis-

try which he began.


Christ was sent to this world, also, to bring love
into
it.

Of

course there was love in the world

[173]

C^e

Lejssion of

Lobe
natural love.

before he came

human
love.

love,

There was domestic


very
sacred

There were some

friendships

among men.

But
love,

Christ came to bring divine love to this earth.

He

not only told

men how they should


life.

but he lived out this love in his own

He
self,

showed such patience, such gentleness, such


thoughtfulness,

such

abandonment of

such interest in others, as the world had never


seen before.

At

last his

heart broke on the


in his desire

cross in loving the

unworthy and

to save them.

This was Christ's mission.

"So send
it.

you"

means that our mission

is

the same
It

not mereis

ly to talk love, but to live

this love
it.

that the world needs to bless


is

it

and save

It

this love that Christians

need to make their


be,

lives

what the Master wants them to them


influence
artist

and

to give

There was an
picture.

among men. who had painted a


it

great

People admired

and praised

it,

and

yet to

all

thing to
rich.

It

who saw it it seemed to want somemake it perfect. Its tone was not lacked warmth and life. The artist

[m]

was conscious of some missing feature


was.
his

in his
it

picture and studied long to find out what

At length he took
canvas
a
slight

his

brush and put on

touch of red.

That

changed everything.

Much
It
is

of our Christian
it

life

seems also to lack


be.

something to bring

may have

in

it

up to what it should much that is beautiful.


moralities.
It
is

It

blameless in

its

active in

benevolences.
It
is

It

is

full of kindness to the poor.

faithful in

its

religious duties.
it

Yet

it

needs something to bring

up

to the ideal
It needs

which the Master

set for his friends.

more

love.

We

must get more of the red of

Christ's heart into our lives, into our serving

of others.

We
and

are conscious of not living as Christ lived,


as he wants us to live.

Here and there


in humility,

some saintly Christian shows us

meekness, patience, and self-denial, in the spirit

of helping and serving, a vision of love as


Christ lived
it

out in his

life.

But we must

confess that our Christian life as a rule needs a

touch of red to give the picture the warmth

[175]

%])t
and glow
Master's
It
is

tt^mx

of

Hobe
realize the

it

must have

if it

would

ideal.

to

show

this divine love that


it

we are
lives,

sent

from God

to show^
it.

in

our own
is

not

merely to preach
will save the

This

the evangel that

world and convert the wilderness


roses.

into a

garden of

Christ came to

lift

men up
is is

to a higher, truer,

nobler
best

life.

This

our mission, too.

The
them
into

way

to help others

not by trying to
to protect

build

embankments about them


hearts
the

from temptation, but rather by putting


their

strength

and heavenliness
evil,

which

shall lift

them above the power of

and make them overcomers by the force of the


divine life in them.

During a great
Orleans, two

flood in the Mississippi, which

threatened the destruction of the city of

New

men

stood on the levee, watching

the rising waters.

One asked the other, "If you had the strength and the money to use at will, what would you do for our city.^^" Not
in this definite

having thought of the matter

way, the gentleman referred the question back

[176]

to his friend.

"What would you do?"


so wide

"I

would build these dykes


ger the city again.
thing any

and

so high,"

he answered, "that no flood could ever endan-

That would be the

finest

man

could do for

New

Orleans."
said,

The
get

other thought a

moment and then


city,

"I would not do that.

If I were able, I would

my

arms beneath the

and

lift it so
it

high that no flood could ever endanger


again."

Christ was sent not to build sheltering walls

round men, to shut

off

danger from them

for then they never could grow strong


to put into their hearts

but
is

new

life,

new courage,
lift

new hope, new

strength, so as to
evil.

them bethe

yond the reach of the world's best, too, that we can do for
not destroy sin nor shut
that
it
it

That

others.

We

canso

away by dykes
but we can help

will

no more
sin

assail,

to

make men whom

cannot reach.

We

are sent to continue in this world the

work

which Christ began to do.

If we fail to do our

part, there will be a blank instead of Christian

work

well done.

Christ has

made himself

de-

[177]

Cl^e
pendent upon
self

Hmon
us.

of

toU
it-

The

vine bears no fruit

the fruit must come on the branches.

If

the branches then fail in fruitfulness, the vine

has failed.

If we realize that we are sent


to every
it will

from Christ
our

new duty,

to every

home

that needs us,


all
life.

put a new meaning into

We

will

go forth each morning,

sent by the Master, for the day's tasks, and


will
is

hasten to finish them well before the day

done.
** The time is short thou wouldst work for Ood, it must he now ; If If thou wouldst win the garland for thy hrow^

Redeem

the time.

" Shake off earth* s sloth ! Go forth with staff in hand while yet 'tis day ; Set out with girded loins upon the way,

Up !
What has

linger not

" Fold not thy


the

hands !

pilgrim of the cross and crown To do with luxury or couch of down f " On, pilgrim, on

[178]

(Blautienet) to

dPlatiDcn

[179]

Stand in

the sunshine siveet

And
Nor

treasure every ray^

seek with stubborn feet

The darksome way.

Have courage ! Keep good Our longest time is brief. To those who hold you dear Bring no more grief.
But
cherish blisses small.,

cheer i

Grateful for least delight

That

to yoiir lot

doth fall

However

slight.

And

lo

all hearts will

bring

Love., to

make glad your days

Blessings untold will spring

About your ways.

Celia

Thaxter.

[180]

CHAPTER FIFTEENTH
(KlaDDeneD to dSlatiDen

ERHAPS
often

we do not think enough of the re-

sponsibility of joy.

When
the

God makes
gladness
ourselves
it
is

us

glad

we

not to end with


are to pass

on.

The Lord

said

two things to Abraham

"I

will bless

thee" and

"Be thou a

blessing."

The
own

blessing was not merely for Abraham's


sake, nor

was

it

to terminate in him.
this gift of

He
It
is

was the custodian of


in turn

God, that he

might give

its

benefits to others.

when he had cut wood and built a fire and warmed himself, he would call himself before the bar of conscience and
told of Thoreau, that

require himself to answer the question,

did you do while you were warm.^^"

"What Not many


fire

of us think that being warmed by the

which our own hands have built involves any


responsibility, but

Thoreau was

right.

The

[181]

Cl^e Heission of

jiofae

comfort he had received from the heat was not


his to
life

keep

all to

himself

it

ought to make

his

mean more
it.

to others,

and he must give ac-

count for

So we may ask ourselves the question, after


receiving

any favor or blessing from God,


have experienced any pure, sweet
did you receive from

"What

did you do when you were blessed?"

When we
"What

joy, we need to put this question to ourselves,

enrichment of

life

your joy?
learn to sing

What

new, sweet song did you

when you were happy?

What

benedictions of cheer did j^ou pass to others

when your heart was glad ?" For one thing, we ought to be
has given us joy.

better

when God
to the

The joy should add

charm and power of our personality, the


strength and beauty and depth of our character.

If

we are not richer-hearted after God


from Whenever we have

has given us some new, sweet gladness, we have


failed to receive his gift aright or to get
it

what he meant us to

get.

vision,

day of radiant joy or sweet peace or blessed and are not better therefor, we have

[182]

(BlaDDcneD to cKlaDtien
missed the real object of the blessing which

God
by us
us

intended us to get.

Our mountain-top

days are not merely experiences to be enjoyed


;

the radiance should become part of our

life thereafter,

and the light should shine from

upon

others.

merely to be

The object of living is not happy ourselves, but to make oth-

ers happy; not only to have blessings, but to grow into lives of deeper, sweeter blessedness.

One

writes of a

day of rare beauty

Into our lives a rose

amid

the thorns

star in

night there came one perfect day^

Framed

And

all in sunshine, lit with light of love. compassed round with blessing ev'ry way. Hush ! let us keep it, sweet,

By

God's

own grace complete.

Now, though the shadows gather round our path ; Now, though the darkriess rise and hide the
light

NoiD, though

we never reap

life's

aftermath^

Nor

ever touch again so fair a height

Now,

let

come what may,


one perfect day.

We know

Sweet, looking up,

we know

that

pain must

rise,

And

strife,

to

mar

that

day's most perfect

peace ;

[183]

i)z Lejsjson of lofee


But, looking farther, in God's light of lorn We see the land icJiere all the discords cease ;

And
But
new

where,

Qod grant, we may

Relive that perfect day.

besides

being enriched ourselves by the

blessings that

God

sends to us, besides getting

faith

and hope and joy from the glimpses

of heavenly beauty

God

gives to us along
fit

the way, these experiences should

us to be

more largely helpful

to others.

It goes withit.

out saying that our faces should show

Not many of
joyous
faces.

the people one meets have really

and discontent.

Too many show traces of care But if we have the joy of


it

Christ in our hearts


is

ought to shine

out.

This

one of the ways we

may

let

our light shine

before men.

We

should remember that we are

responsible for

what our faces say to people.


in

We

have no right to show

our features

doubt, fear, discontent, unhappiness, fretfulness, bitterness.

We

are not witnessing wor-

thily for Christ unless

we are witnessing

in

our faces to the joy and blessing of his love.


Professor

Drummond says: [184]

"The machinery

dSlaDticnctJ to
of the kingdom
is

cKlaDDcu
silent,
all

very simple and very


parts do most
;

and the most

silent

and we

believe so little in the medicines of Christ that

we do not know what ripples of healing are


in

set

motion when we simply smile on one an-

other."

Thackeray

also sa3^s that the world

is

a look-

ing-glass which reflects our looks, whether they

be sweet or sour.

Joy

in

our faces, breaking

into smiles, starts smiles on other faces.


is

There

many
it.

a face which

is

a blessed evangel beillu-

cause of the love, peace, and joy which

mine

When we sit for our picture the photographer says, "Now look pleasant." That
is

well.

We

cannot get a picture we

will care

we wear a face is bright, cheerful, and sunny when we that Of course we are sitting before the camera.
for our friends to see unless

want a pleasant face

in a

photograph.

But
if

we have no right

to

wear an unhappy or a

clouded face anywhere.

Wherever we go,
is

we know the
and

love of Christ, there

a voice bid-

ding us look pleasant.


Christ's face

We

represent Christ,

was always a benediction.

[185]

Ci^e lesision of iLobe

He
any
that

never

made any

one's

burden heavier, or

one's heart sadder,

by a gloomy

face.

Our faces should shine with the joy of Christ


is

in

our hearts.
is

But

the face

not

all.

The mind of

Christ

should also inspire in us a personal ministry

of kindness.

When we

have been warmed by

our

fire

of love, we should shed the warmth on

others, not only in

happy

faces,

but also in a

ministry

of thoughtfulness and helpfulness

bless many. Love is always kind, and nothing is more worth while than kindness.

which

may

Nothing

else

does more to brighten the world


lives.

and sweeten other


"It

Robert Louis Stevenson wrote in a


is

letter:

the history of our kindnesses that alone


tolerable.

makes the world


kind
one

If

it

were not for

that, for the effect of kind words, kind looks,


letters,

multiplying, spreading, making


another, and

happy through

bringing

forth benefits, some thirty, some fifty, some

a thousandfold, I should be tempted to think

our

life

a practical jest in the worst possible

spirit."
[

186

(KlaDDeneD to dPlaDtien
Kindnesses are the small coins of love.

We

should always be ready to scatter these bright


coins wherever
little

we go.

Kindnesses are usually

things that we do as we go along the

way.
They are little, simple things to do To sweep a room, to hake a loaf of bread. Kiss a hurt finger, tie a baby's shoe, To mend a crying schoolboy's broken sled.
**

simple things! But they above little world attendant wait, And joyful wait, note only if through love The deed he done, to count the work as great''
**tSuch
little,

Who on our

We
ble

do not know the value of these

little

acts

or their far-reaching influence.

In the paraseed

we are

told

how a mustard

grew
was

into

a tree, amid whose branches the birds perched

and sang.

It

is

said that the fuchsia

first

introduced into

England by a

sailor boy,

who

brought a single plant from some foreign


country as a present for his mother.
it

She put
that

in her

modest window, and

it

became an atlittle

traction to all

who passed

by.

From

plant came

all

the fuchsias in England.

The

[187]

Ci^e LejSjson of Lobe


boy did not know when,
in

loving thought for

his mother, he carried home the Httle plant,

what a beautiful thing he was doing, what a


ministry of good he was starting,

how widely
of love

the influence of his simple thought

would reach.
of

We

never

know when we do any


what the end
will

smallest thing in love for Christ


it will
it.

be,

what a harvest of good

come

from
It
is

a beautiful thing to plant a flower which


be the beginning of a lovely

may grow and


garden which
the desert.

shall brighten one little spot in


is

That

worth while.

It

is

worth

while to put a bit of beauty into a dreary spot


to brighten
it.

It is

worth while to plant a

few flowers where no flowers had bloomed before.

It

is

a beautiful thing to change a spot


It
is still

of desert into a garden.

more worth
sel-

while to get love into a heart in which only


fishness
all

and hate dwelt before.

It

is

best of

to get Christ admitted where he has not

been received before.


best ministry.

That

is

the truest

and

[188]

Cl^c (Bentlcncsijs of Cl^ttsit

[189]

*'

Spirit of infinite kindness^

And

gentleness passing all speech

Forgive when we miss in our blindness

The comforting Hand thou dost reach.

Thou sendest the Spring on thine errand To soften the grief of the world For us is the calm of the mountain^ For us is the roseleaf uncurled !
*'

[190]

CHAPTER SIXTEENTH
Cl^e (0entleneiS0 of ])vx&t

ENTLENESS
ness.

is

not weak-

There are men who


gentle

are

sympathetic,
who are But that is

kind, tender, yet

not strong.

not the kind of manliness

we admire.

The

true

man

is

always strong.
the Alps,

Tourists sometimes find high

up on

on some bald crag, on the edge of the eternal


snows, a sweet, lovely flower growing.
is

That

gentleness

the

mighty rock, immovable,


it

unchanging, and on
fragrant bloom.

growing the tender,


is

Gentleness

essential
is

to

complete manliness, but gentleness

beautiful

only when combined with strength.


Christ
is

gentle in dealing with sufferers.

Skill

in giving

comfort

is

very rare.

Many

people

are sure to speak the

down
Job's

beside

wrong word when they sit those who are in pain or trouble.
were "miserable comforters."

friends

[191]

ci^e
They
evil

tt^mi
make Job
and that

of JLotie
believe that he

tried to

had

displeased God,

this

was why

so

much

had come upon him.


sit

Many good

people

think that when they

beside a sufferer or a

mourner, they must talk about the trouble, entering into


all all its details,
it

and dwelling upon


not the one

that makes

painful and hard to endure.


is

But

the truest comforter

who

seems to sympathize the most deeply, going

down

into the depths with

him who

is

in grief,

but the one who, sympathizing with the sufferer, yet brings cheer

and

uplift, sets a vision

of Christ before the mourning eyes, and sings of peace and hope.
It
is

thus that Christ deals with pain and sor-

row.

He

does not seek to take

away
us

the bur-

den

rather,

he would
it.

make

brave and

strong to bear
lady who had a

One

writes of an invalid

little

locket in which were five

dates written in red ink. "Those are the blackletter,

not the red-letter, days of

my

life," she

"The first is the date of said to her friend. mother's death, and O, how I rebelled, though The second, I was only a girl in my teens.

[192]

Cl^e (0entlenesi0 of Ci^risit


three years later,
is

the date of

my

father's

leaving us, and again I rebelled.

The

third

marks the time of my husband's going, and The fourth still I murmured and struggled.
is

the date of the taking of


little

my

only darling,
this time I alall

a sweet

fellow of

five,

and

most cursed

my

heavenly Father, for now

my

loved ones were gone and I was

left alone.

All the while I was not a Christian

indeed, I

had grown

bitter

and hard.

thought God

was punishing me.

Now

I see that he

was not

punishing, but educating


discipline.

me by a strange
last

But
She

want you to look at the


continued.
said,

date," the
3,

woman

It read

"March
day I
notice
first

1898."

"That was

the

gave

my

heart to the Saviour.

You

there were twenty-six years between the

date and the last


less rebellion.

twenty-six years of
me
will be done.'

fruit-

It took

learn to say,

'Thy

twenty-six years to "

This
tle

is

a beautiful illustration of Christ's gendealing with those

way of

who

suffer.

The
first,

gentleness did not appear, however, at

because the sufferer did not submit to the Mas-

[193]

'i)t
ter.

ttmn

of iLobe

While the struggle was continued there


love.

was no peace, no joy, no revealing of


Resistance only

made the darkness seem

deeper,

the trials harder to endure, the cup more bitter.

At

last the sufferer yielded

and crept

into

the Master's bosom.


will

Then joy came.


those six

Who
all his

say the Master was not gentle in


life

dealing with that


years ?
Christ
is

and twenty

very gentle also with those who have

sinned and are trying to begin again.

He

has

no tolerance with
with the sinner.
rigible soldier

sin,

but
is

is

infinitely patient

There

a story of an incorso often

who had been punished


officer

for so

many

offences, without avail, that his

commanding
amendment.
the
officer

despaired of the man's


arrest

Again he was under

and

spoke hopelessly of him, asking

what more could be done to save him from


his

own undoing. A fellow-officer suggested, "Try forgiving him." The man was brought
and asked what he had
"Well," said the
to say for himself.

in

He

replied: "Nothing, except that I'm very


officer,

sorry."

"we have

de-

[194]

Ci^e

(15entlenc)3si

of i)ti^t
stood dazed

cided to forgive you."

The man

for a moment, and then burst into tears, saluted,

and went out

to

become the best and


Gentleness

bravest soldier in the

command.

had saved him.

That

is

the

way

Christ deals with the penitent.

He

saves

by forgiving.
His grace
is

He

loves unto the ut-

termost.

inexhaustible.

How-

ever often

ask to

when we come back and try again, he welcomes us and gives us


we
fail,

another chance.

This

is

our hope

if

he were

not thus gentle with us, we should never get

home.
Christ
is

very gentle with us also in our serv-

ing of him.

We

sometimes hear

it

said,

when
do

the bareness and poverty of certain people's

homes are spoken

of, that "the one half

not know how the other half live."


is

That

very true and thinking of this "other half"


live

ought to give those who


Christly

in

comfort

sympathy with those who

live in

want

and poverty.

But the same

distinction exists

among Christians, between those who live in a happy religious environment and those who

[195]

l)e

tt&mi

of ILobe
in

must follow Christ with almost nothing


or help them.

their condition or circumstances to encourage

Those with
have
of

all

the refinements and inspira-

tions of the best Christian culture about


little

them
with-

conception of the disadvantages

others

who

arc

following

Christ

out any of this help, in the face of most

uncongenial

surroundings.

What

kind of

Christians would

we

would we
stances ?

live,

if

be, and how beautifully we were in their circum-

In a railroad accident a young fireman stood

manfully at

his post

and was fatally hurt.

Everything was done for him that kindness


could do.

A minister spoke to

him of the
in Christ.

love

of Christ.

"Yes," he gasped, "I do believe

But
long

God knows
hours,

I've

had

to

work

so hard, such

and have been

so tired at night that I

have had no chance to pray much or to go to


church."

His brother stood by and broke


been a good boy.

in.

"But

he's

He worked [196]

night and day

Cl^e (I5cntlenc0)S of Cl^ri^t


to

support our crippled mother


I

and

me,

when
"Yes,

was

laid

up for a year."
I

sir,

and he took care of me," said a big

baggageman, "when

had smallpox and no-

body would come near me."

"And more than


man, "he's taken
his

once," added another

young

my

run, after coming in from


sick to

own, when

was too

go out."

The poor
praise.

fireman smiled on his friends

will

smile of gratitude.

He had

never heard

much

"God
he.''"

will

not keep him out of heaven

said his brother, tenderly.

The

minister bent over the dying boy

said, reverently

and and with deep feeling: "The

peace of God, the peace of Christ, be upon


you.

You

have done what you could."


the gentleness of Christ in such
infinitely patient

Can we doubt
a case ?

He

is

with

all

whose
than

lot is hard.

we can do. knows when the burdens are too heavy for
Once
he,

He never exacts more of us He is never unreasonable.

He
us.

"being wearied with his journey, sat

thus by the well" in his exhaustion.

He

sym-

[197]

;]^e lesision of lotie


pathizes with those

who

are weary and helps

them.

There

is

a picture which shows a girl at

her spinning-wheel.

The hour

night, as a clock in the the spinner, exhausted

midbare room shows and


is

late

by her long

toil to

earn

enough

to support her little household, has

fallen asleep beside the wheel.


is

And an
come
to

angel

finishing her work.


is
!

How
it is

gentle our Taskto

master

How

sweet

him

at

the close of the long days and rest at his feet


"if^/ heart is tired, so tired to-night,

How
Day

eyidless

seems the strife !

after

Of all I come

this

day the restlessness weary life!

to lay the burden down That so oppresseth me, And shutting all the world without. To spend an hour with thee, Dear Lord, To spend an hour with thee.

" I would forget a little while The bitterness of fears. The a^ixious thoughts that crowd
TJie

my

life,

buried hopes of years ;

[198]

Ci^e

(Bmtltm^^
My patiejit

of Ci^tijit
toil

Forget that mortals' weary


care must
be.

tired child I come to-night. To spend an hour with thee, Dear Lord, One little hour with thee,
'

[199]

IS^ottlD

^m- Wav

be

isettei; ?

[201

^''

Being perplexed, Isay,


Lord^ make
it

right
to thee,

Night

is

as

day

Darkness as

light.

I am afraid

to touch

things

That involve so much,

My trembling hand may shake, My skilless hand may break


Thine can make no mistake.
*'

Being in doubt, I say,


Lord, make
it

plain

Which

is the true, safe

way
?

Which would

be

vain

I am not wise to know. Nor sure of port to go

My

blind eyes cannot see


is so

What

plain
it

to thee ;

Lord, make

clear to

me."

[202]

CHAPTER SEVENTEENTH
l^oulD )ut;

Wav

be l3ettei:?
we could do
were in
think we

often think
if

better

things

our hands.

We

could direct our affairs so


as to get

more happiness

and greater good out of


life.

Sometimes

it

seems to us that

many

things go wrong and that the consequences


to us are very calamitous.
It

must be cona great

fessed that there

is

in

the world

deal of discontent with the

ways of Providence.

Not many people seem who

to be quite satisfied

with their circumstances, and there are


tliink that the divine dealings

many

with them

are not in accordance with that love which they

are told directs the affairs of all God's children.

Would

it

be better if we had the direction of


So, sometimes
it

our own affairs ?


ed to think.
If

we are tempt-

were permitted to us to do

[203]

]^e
this,

fimon

of

iLotje

no doubt there would be a great change

in the

method of what we now


in

call
all

Providence.
is

We
ful

would at once eliminate

that

pain-

and unpleasant

our

lot.

We would have
would exclude

only prosperities, with no adversities, only


joys, with no sorrows.

We

pain from our

life

and

all trouble.

The days
all

would

all

be sunny, with blue skies and no

clouds or storms.

The paths would

be

mossy and strewn with


or any rough places.

flowers, without thorns

All this has a very pleasing aspect for us

when we think of
way.
have
it

it

lightly

and

in a superficial

Would
now.?
life

not that be better than as we

would not
good,
if

Would we not be happier, and mean more to us in blessing and we could direct our own affairs, and
.^^

leave out the painful, the bitter, the adverse,

and the sorrowful


probably say at

So most of us would
before we have thought

first,

of the question deeply and looked on to the


end.

But

really the greatest misfortune that

could come to us in this world would be to have


the direction of the
aff*airs

and the shaping of

[204]

Woult} )ur

Wav

be iBetter?
own
is

the experiences of our lives put into our

hands.

We

have no wisdom to know what

best for ourselves.

To-day

is

not

all

of

life

there

is

a long future, perhaps

many

years in

this world, and then immortality hereafter.

What would
gratification

give us greatest pleasure to-day


in

might work us harm


hurt in the future.

days to come.

Present
loss

might cost us untold

and

Our wants and our


the same.
perity

real needs are not always

We

want pleasure, plenty, prospain, self-denial, the

perhaps we need
from

giving up of things that we greatly prize.

We

shrink

suffering,

from

sacrifice,

from struggle
which

perhaps these are the very

experiences which will do the most for us,


will

bring out in us the best


fit

possibilities

of our natures, which will


service to

us for the largest

God and man.


is

We

should alwa3^s remember that the object

of living here

not merely to have present

comfort, to get along with the least trouble,


to gather the
ures, to

most we can of the world's treas-

win the brightest fame.

We

are here

[205]

Cl^e
to

ttamx

of

Lobe
and to do

grow

into the beauty of Christ

the portion of God's will that belongs to us.

We

cannot therefore work out our own course,

for we do not for us


stances
is.

know what

the divine purpose

We

cannot choose our own circum-

and experiences, for we do not know


lives.

the pattern set for our

There

is

something wonderfully inspiring in

the thought that

God

has a plan and a purpose


life.

for our drifting

lives,

for each
this

We

do not come

into

world and do not drift

through
sent

it like

waifs on the ocean.

We

are

from God, each one of us with a divine


his life

thought for

something
in the

God wants
fill.

us to do, some place he wants us to

All

through our

lives

we are

hands of God,
things work
in all this

who

chooses our place and orders our circum-

stances

and

is

ready to make

all

together for our good.


is

Our part
to us

the acceptance of God's will for our lives as


is

that will

made known

day by day.

If

we thus acquiesce
It

in the divine

way

for us we

shall fulfil the divine purpose.


is

the highest honor that could be conferred

[206]

la^oulD tSDm
upon us
of God.
us
is

Wav

be OBetter?
in the

to

occupy such a place

thought

We

cannot doubt that his


is

way

for

better than ours, since he


so.

infinitely wiser

than we are, and loves us


ful

It

may

be pain-

and hard, but


is

in the pain

and the hardness

there

blessing.

One is called apart from active life and shut up in a sick-room. It seems to him that his time is being wasted. There are many things
that need to be done and which he might have

done while lying there with folded hands in


his
is

darkened room.

People to

whom

his life

a continual blessing miss him when he comes

not.

He

seems in his

illness to

be leaving a

great blank where there ought to have been

many good

deeds and gentle ministries.

Be-

sides this loss to others

and

to the

work of the

world, sickness
himself.
Its

is

most costly to the sick


cost
is is

money

great.

man Then its

burden of suffering

great.

What
and

is

there to compensate for all this loss

cost

and to make the long


Is there

illness really

blessing.'^

anything

.^^

If we were dilives

recting the affairs of our


[

own
]

we would

207

Ci^e

tmon
;

of JLoiic
possible that God's

not put the sickness in

is it

way is better than ours would have been ? Of course we may not claim to know all
reasons there are in the divine

the

mind for the


lives,
is.

pains and sufferings that come into our

or what God's design for us in these trials

Without discovering any reasons


ever,

at

all,

how-

trust God, who loves us with and whose wisdom also is infinite. But we can think of some ways in which it is possible for blessing and good to
still

we may

an

infinite love

come out of a sick-room experience.

The Master
we do
in

has other work for us besides what

our common occupations.

We

have

other lessons to learn besides those we get from

books and friends and current events, and

through

life's

ordinary experiences.

There

is

a work to be done in us, in our own hearts and


lives,

which

is

even more important than any-

thing assigned to us in the scheme of the


world's activities.

There are

lessons

which we
shaded

can learn much better

in the

quiet,

sick-room than outside, in the glare of the


streets

and amid the clamor of

earth's strifes.

[208]

Wouin
Our

i3S)m

Wav

be 'httttvl
be lost days.

shut-in days need never


cost us in

money or in we need not be poorer when they are over than if we had been busy all the while at
suffering,

Whatever they may

the world's tasks.

Or take sorrow.
plan
if

We

would not have


lives.

it

in

our

we shaped our own


It takes

It seems

only cajamitous.

away our

brightest

joys and breaks our sweetest happiness.

Can
sorif it

we think of any way had not come to us ?


are blessings
willing to pass to
grief.

in

which the work of

row may leave us better or richer than

We know well that


unless

there

we never can reach

we are

them through pain and


that
it

To-day
oy s

it

may seem
life's

would be

better if

we could miss
;

sorrows and have

only

but when we get home we shall see


all

that the best days of

our years have been


it

the days we thought the saddest and found


the hardest to pass through.
shall

Some time we know that God has made no mistake in


us,

anything he has done for

however he

may

have broken into our plans and spoiled our


pleasant dreams.

[209

Ci^c
It

iLejSjSon
if

of lobe
we could have our
lost

would not be better

own way.

When we

thought we were choosa

ing wisely, we should find we had

heavenly good for some trinket of earth which

we could keep only for a day. When we thought the path we were taking would lead to lasting good, we should discover that it
ended only
in darkness

and sorrow.

It should

be reason for measureless gratitude that our


lives are

not in our

own poor

feeble hands, but

in the

hands of our Father.


'*

/am glad
to

to

think

make the world go right, But only to discover and to do, With cheerful heart, the work that God appoints, I will trust in him. That he can hold his own ; and I will take
7iot

I am

hound

His will, above the work he sendeth me, To he my chiefest good. "

We

need only to accept God's way and go as

he leads, and at the end we shall find that in


not the smallest matter have we ever been unwisely led but that at every step

we have been

brought to some good.

We do not know what

[210]

WoulU
may have
drift

^m

Wat

ht Better?

the future, even the nearest liour of the future,


for us, but we

know that we cannot


care,

beyond our Father's love and


all

and

that

that

may seem dark

or disastrous will

reveal joy
Yesterday,

and blessing

at the end.
"

when T said,

Thy

ivill be

done"
he,

I knew not what that will of thine would

What clouds would gather black across my sun, What storm and desolation waited me ; I knew thy love would give me what was best, And I am glad I could not knoio the rest.
Tliy will be done,"" I say, and to the scroll Of unread years co7isenting set my name ; Day after day their pages loill unroll In shining words that prove thy love the same,
*'

Until tny years are gathered into one

Eternal, sanctified,
'*

Thy

will be dorie.'*

[211]

91n

ti^e

fatW^

l$anti&

[213]

The great round ivorld

is full

of things^
kings,.
tall,,

Not only armies and realms and

And
But

lands and seas^ and forests


things so small
to
see,,

little

So many that they cannot counted


Yet,,

be,,

wonderful thought^ the Lord knows

all.

Oh,,

wonderful thought^ that he can know


the small

all^

Not only the mighty hut

And

Not only the Alp but each flake of its snows ! he pities and pardons,, and loves so well,.
dwell,

That you and I in the thought may

And

not he

afraid.,,

though we know he knoivs.

Susan

Coolidge.

[214]

CHAPTER EIGHTEENTH
gin
t\)t

^atl)cr')S

^mm
infinite

HERE
Father

is

comfort

in the triitli

of the divine

Fatherhood.
carries

The
in

name
it

whole theology of joy and


peace.

If we accept

it

as

a true revealing of the heart of God, we need


not go farther in our quest after a definition

of the divine Being, and an explanation of his


relation to us

and

his interest in us.


is

If he

is

indeed our Father, that

all

we need to know.
loves us

We
is

require no proof that

God

if

he

our Father that


reasons

suffices.

We
to

need not ask


be

for

when he seems

dealing

strangely with us
providences

whatever the form of the


we know that love
our Father
is

may

be,

the
all

guiding principle and the great motive of


that he does.
If he
is

w^e

do not

need to be disturbed by

life's events,

however

[215]

Cl^e Cejssion of
they

iLotie

may

break into our plans and seem to

work us
It

hurt.
this truth

was Jesus Christ who revealed

of

the divine Fatherhood.

If he had taught the

else, this alone would have made him the most wonderful Teacher that ever spoke from God to man. When he taught us

world nothing

to say

close to us

"Our Father," he brought God down and opened the way for us to his
its

heart of infinite love.

Life has

strange experiences for

all

of us

some time.

There come days when human reaEverything seems


gives us unmeasura:

son can find nothing beautiful or good in what

we are passing through.


destructive.

We

can see no love in the dark


it

enigma.
ble

In such hours

comfort to be able to say "It


loves

is

my

Father,

and he
It

me and

is

making no mistake."
sustained Christ

was

this confidence that

himself in his darkest moments on the cross.

In the inexplicable mystery of

his suffering,

when he could not see the face of his Father and felt as if he were even forsaken by him, his faith found assurance in what he knew of

[216]

3n
God."

tUe

amtt'^ l$a\m
It

the divine love.

was
held,

still

"My
in a

God,

my

The anchor
it

and

few mo-

ments more
"Father,
spirit."

was light again, and he said:


thy

into

hands

commend my

The Master
when he

gives us the lesson for ourselves

assures us that his Father has in his


lives.

hands the care of our

"My
to his

Father

is

the husbandman," he said

disciples.

The husbandman
vines.

has entire charge of the

He

understands them and knows how

to care for them.


will

He

plants them where they

grow the

best, looks after their culture,

prunes them, and does for them whatever


needs to be done.

They

are not left to

grow

without intelligent care.

When

Jesus said

"My
is
is

Father

is

the husband-

man," he meant
care of their lives

to tell his disciples that the


in the

hands of God, whose

name
and

is

love.

It

not intrusted to a being of


finite

only limited intelligence and only


love.
Still less is it

power

chance that directs

the events and shapes the circumstances of our

days.

That

is

what Atheism would have us

[217]

Cl^e
believe.

tt^mi
is

of

toU
it

"There

no God,"
is

says to us.

"Things happen.
tre of all things
is

There

no one at the cen-

who

thinks about you.

There

no hand but the iron hand of law working

in

human

affairs.

There

is

no

love,

no heart,

anywhere

in the vast spaces, feeling, caring;

no mind, planning good.

The great machine


resistless, re-

of the universe grinds on, with


lentless

power, and what comes into your

life

comes as the result of this


ed, loveless grinding."

inflexible, undirect-

There

is

small comfort in this teaching.

It

never can give confidence and peace to any


heart in the time of trouble.
It

suggests

no comfort when
against us.

all

things

appear to be

But that is not what Jesus Christ teaches. The theory of the universe which he gives us is that this is our Father's world. Not only
did he create
fitting
it
it,

adorning

it

with beauty and

to be the
it

home of

his children,

but he
has

cares for

with constant, tender care.

He

not
it

left the

world he made to get along as best

may

without any thought from him.

Re-

[218]

3!n

tl)c jfatljct'si

i^anDjS
Jesus
I

fcrring to the affairs of providence,


says:

"My

Father worketh hitherto, and


is

work."

There

no chance

all

things are
love.

under control of intelligence and


universe
is

The
is

no mere

loveless

machine which

grinds out our destiny for us.

There

great Heart of everlasting love at the centre

of

all

things.

We
little

have nothing to do with


it is

the vast machinery


will

ours only to do God's

and

fill

our

place.

We

are not required to

make

all

things work

out for good.

We

do not have to bring

about the beneficent

results.

Our part

is

sim-

ply to learn what God's

will for us

is,

what

our duty
heart.

is,

and then do that with cheerful


is

This

our Father's world, and

if

we

do our own

little

part faithfully and well, we

need give no thought to the outcome.

"My

Father

is

the husbandman."

That

is,

when we are taken up and transplanted,


the Father

it is

knife cuts

who does it. When the pruningaway beautiful things that we so


to keep, the

much wanted
is

Father does

it.

It
life

not chance that sometimes uproots our

[219]

Clje tt&^on of
so ruthlessly.

HoU
can I believe
afflicting

Nor

is

it

cruelty that brings

suffering and pain to us.

"How
is

that

God

loves me, while he

me

so?" people sometimes say.


question
is,

The answer
is

to the

"My

Father

the

husband-

man."
In one of Ralph Connor's books* he
story of
tells

the

Gwen, a

wild, undisciplined girl,


in the free

who
of

had been brought up


the far West.

ranch

life

She was motherless.

She was

unable to read, and knew nothing of God.

She had an imperious


restraint.

will

which brooked no
accident she

By
life.

a terrible

was
the

lamed for

The missionary among


little

cowboys had
for God. again.

visited

her before her accident

and had made a

opening into her heart

After the accident he visited her

Very gently he answered her questions


on until she saw that

and

led her

God had

al-

lowed her to be hurt, because he loved her and

wanted to do her good.

The

story of Gwen's canyon

is

a fine parable

*The Sky Pilot. By Ralph Connor. H. Revell Company, N. Y.

The Fleming

[220]

31u t^c fatljet'si


of spiritual teaching.

f auDjs
loved this canthe great, deep,

Gwen

yon and
with

called

it

her canyon
slie

wild gorge which


its life.

knew

so well, so glorious

The

minister said to her, in his


there were no canyons

parable, that at

first

only broad, open prairie.

The master of

the

prairie missed his favorite flowers, which

would

not grow on the wind-swept plain.


called for the lightning
cleft to its heart

Then he

and the prairie was

in agony over But a stream ran through the cleft and carried down black mould, and the birds brought seeds and strewed them in the gorge. By and by the rough rocks

and groaned

its

great,

gaping wound.

were decked out with soft mosses and trailing


vines,
atis
lets

and

all

the nooks were

hung with

clemvio-

and columbine, and everywhere the


until the

and wind-flower and maiden-hair grew and


canyon became the master's
taught

bloomed

place for rest and peace and joy.

With
son.
life.

this parable the minister

his les-

Gwen's canyon was a parable of Gwen's

The rending of

the level prairie by the

terrific

lightning seemed to be the utter ruin

[221

:i)e
of the land.
its

tt^mx

of

lobe

The

great, unsightly cleft, with

dark chasm and bare, jagged rocks, gave

small promise of anything lovely.

But

in the

end the yawning gorge became a place of marvellous beauty.


life.

It

was the same with the

girl's

With magnificent powers

there was only

untamable wilfulness.
neither

She would yield to

God nor man.

The
grow

lovely flowers of

the Spirit would not

in her life.

Then

came the

terrible accident

which crushed her

and broke her strength and shut her away from all activity. Then the Master came, and

good

seeds were

sown

in the clefts,

and the

dark canyon bloomed with the flowers of the


Spirit.

We

should never forget, when we are called to


is

suffer, that it

always in love our Father

causes us pain.
to the

The name Father


discipline.

is

the key

meaning of the

understand

we
it is

We may not
It
is

need not understand.

enough that
of our
lives.

our Father who has the care

We

should remember, too, that there are blessles-

ings which can come to us only in sorrow,


[

222

91u

tl)c

mW^
it is

i^ati0

sons which can be learned only in pain and suffering.

Even of Jesus

said that he

was

made

perfect through suffering.

There were

qualities in

best save in
all

him which could not reach their the school of pain. There are in
love

of us possibilities of spiritual loveliness

and strength and


save in suffering.

and helpfulness which


suffer-

never can come to their highest development


If

we cannot endure
best.

ing we cannot grow to our


said:

A gentleman

"When my new

gardener came to me he

said he would have nothing to do with these


vines unless he could cut

them down clean to

the stalk

and we had no grapes for two years.


the result," pointing to great clus-

But
ters

this

is

of luscious grapes

weighing down the


not

vines.

This

is

a parable of Christian

life.

It

is

required that we shall pray to be permitted to


suffer.

But we may pray

to reach the high-

est possibilities
est

of Christlikeness and the larg-

measure of usefulness of which we are

capable.

Then

w^hen

we

find ourselves face to

face with pain or suffering which

we must

ac-

Ci^e

l.mon
is

of Loi)c
we must
is

cept if our prayer

to be answered,

not shrink from the experience.


alone, in suffering, that
fect.
**

It

thus,

we can be made per-

Oiily

upon some

cross of pain or
lie ;

woe

God's son

may

Each soul redeemed from self and sin must know


Its Calvary.
'*

we must crave neither for joy or grief Qod chooses best He only knows our sick souVs best relief
Yet

And

gives us

rest.^'

[224]

Cbenittg, jEonTinQ, )ne W>av

[235]

'Is

not this

day enough for

all

our powers

If its exactions tvere but fully met, If not one unpaid debt

Were

left to

haunt the peace of future hours,


"

And

sting us with regret ?

[226]

CHAPTER NINETEENTH

NE

of the secrets of

happy
If

and beautiful
would learn
save
us
in

life is, to live

one clay at a time.


it,

we

it

would
people

from the worry


so

that
spoils

many

the days, and would add immeasura-

bly to the value of the work we do.


reall}^,

For,

we never have anything

to do

any day
If we
else

but the bit of God's will for that day.

do that well we have absolutely nothing


to do.

Time

is

given to us in days.

It

was

so

from

the beginning.

We

need not puzzle ourselves

trying to understand just what the "day" was


in

which God wrought

in creating the universe

we

may

leave this matter to the scientific


;

men and the theologians but it is interesting to know that each day had its particular apportionment in the stupendous work. At the [ 227 ]

Cl^c

tt^mx

of

lobe

end of each of the creative periods we read,

"There was evening and there was morning,


one day."

So

it

has been ever since.

measured to us by days.

Time is Each day has its

particular section of duty, something that be-

longs in between sunrise and sunset, that can-

not be done at
hours.

all if it is

not done in

its

own

"There was evening and there was


daily por-

morning, one day, a second day, a third day."


This breaking up of time into
tions
little

means

a great deal

more than we are wont


it

to think.

For one thing,


life

illustrates the

gentleness and goodness of God.

It

would

have made

intolerably burdensome if a

year, instead of a day, had been the unit of


division.

It

would have been hard to carry a

heavy load, to endure a great sorrow, or to


keep on at a hard duty, for such a long stretch
of time.

How

dreary our

common task-work
in
it,

would be

if there

were no breaks
to the

if

we

had

to keep our

hand

plough or our foot

on the treadle for a whole year!


our suffering,

We

never

could go on with our struggles, our battles,


if

night did not mercifully

settle

[228]

down with

its

darkness and bid us rest and re-

new our strength.

We

do not understand how great a mercy


is

there

for us in the briefness of our sh^rt

days.

If they were even twice as long as they

are, life

would be

intolerable.

Many

a time

when the sun goes down, we


have fainted

feel that

we could
should
to rest

scarcely have gone another step.


in defeat if the
it

We

summons

had not come just when

did.

Night with

its

darkness seems to be a blot on


It seems to fall across

the whiteness of day.

our path as an interruption to our activity,


compelling us to lay down our work when we
are in the very midst of
done.
It seems to be
it,

leaving

it

only half

a waster of precious time,

eating up half the hours.

How much

more

we could accomplish, we sometimes


sun did not go down,
out pause
!

say, if the

if avc

could go on withits

Night throws

heavy

veil

over

the lovely things of this world, hiding

them

from our view.

Yet night

really

is

no stain on

the splendor of day, no thief of time, no waster

of golden hours, no obscurer of beauty.

[229]

Clje lejijion of Lobe


It reveals as

much beauty
set,

as

it

hides, for

no

sooner has the sun

leaving earth's splendor

of landscape, garden, and forest in gloom,

than there bursts upon our vision the other


splendor of the sky
filled

with glorious stars.

noble sonnet by Blanco


first

White

relates the

experience of our

parent as he watched

the sinking of the sun to his setting at the


close of his first

day
this lovely frame

Bid he not tremble for


TJiis glorious
Yet, 'neath

canopy of

light

and

blue

a curtain of translucent deWj

Bathed in

the rays of the great setting flame^ Hesperus, toith the host of heaven, caine, And lo ! creation widened, in man's view. Who could have thought such darkness lay con-

cealed

Within thy beams,


Whilst fly

and

leaf

sun ! or loho could find, and insect stood revealed,


f

That

to

such countless orbs thou mad'st us blind

When
God
sleep.

the privilege of work

is

interrupted,

has another blessing

the blessing of

One may

figure out with mathematical

certitude that

it is

a waste of time to spend

[230]

Cfaenmg^ jHorning^
But
new

flDne

at

one-third of each' day in the idleness of sleep.


these hours, which seem to be lost, in

which we appear to be doing nothing, bring us


gifts

from God.

An

old version renders

the Psalm verse,


sleep."

"He

giveth his beloved in

down with our vitality exhausted in the toils and struggles of the day. Then, while we sleep, God comes to us in the silence and stillness, and refills the emptied fountains. It is really a new creation that takes place in us while we sleep, a miracle of
lie

We

renewal and restoration.

We

die, as it were,

and are made

to live again.
hints of the graciousness of the

Thus we get

divine thoughtfulness in giving us time in periods of little days, which

we can

easily get

through with, and not

in

great

3^ears, in

which

we would
it

faint

and

fall

possible for us to

by the way. It makes go on through all the

long years and not to be overwrought, for

we never have given to us at any one time more than we can do between the morning and the evening. George Klingle puts it
well:

[231

Cl^c lLc)S0on of Lobe


to hours and days, That hour by hour, and day by day, Just going on a little way, We might be able all along to keep quite strong. Should all the u) eight of life Be laid across our shoulders, and the future rife With woe and struggle, meet us face to face

Qod broke our years

At just one

place.

We could not go ; Our feet tvould stop ; and so God lays a little on us every day. And never, I believe, on all the way
Will burdens bear so deep. Or pathways lie so threatening and But toe can go, if by God's power We only bear the burden of the hour.
so steep,

Not only

are the days short, so that

we can go

on to eventide with our work or our burden,


but they are separated as by an impassable
wall, so that there

can be no overflowing of

one day's care or responsibility into another.

Night drops down


the days, so that

its

dark curtain between

we cannot see to-day anyto-morrow. Our Lord taught thing that is in us that we sin if we let ourselves try to carry
the load of any day but this one
[

little

day.

232]

"Be not anxious


to-morrow
will

for to-morrow," he said, "for


be anxious for itself.
is

Suffi-

cient unto the

day

the evil thereof."

If we

allow ourselves to borrow anxiety from to-

morrow, we

shall find that

we have a greater

load than we can carry.

Canon Wilberforce

interprets the lesson well

Lord, for to-morrow I do not pray ;

and

its

needs,

Keep me,
Let

my Ood,from

stain of sin

Just for to-day.

me
me me

both diligently work^


he

Let Let

duly pray ; kind in word and deed Just for to-day.


he slow to urge
to

And

my

will,

Prompt
Help me
Let
to

obey ;

mortify

my flesh
word
lips

Just for to-day.

me no wrong

or idle

Unthinking say ; Set thou a seal upon my Just for to-day.


LOy for to-morrow

and

its

needs
Lord,

J do not pray, But keep me, guide me, Just for to-day.

love me,

[233]

m)t tt^mi
The only
at a time.

of

Lobe
is

true

way

to live, therefore,

one day
all

This means that we should give

our strength to the work of the present day,


that we should finish each day's tasks by nightfall,

leaving nothing undone at setting of

sun that we ought to have done.

Then, when
its

a new morning dawns we should accept


ties,

du-

the bit of God's will


is

it

unrolls for us,

and

do everything well that

given us to do.
is

We

may

be sure, too, that there


if

something for

each moment, and that


of our day we cannot

we waste any portion make it complete. We


all

should bring

all

the energy and

the skill of

mind and heart and hand


take
it

to our

duty as we

up, doing nothing carelessly or negli-

gently.

Then we can

lay our day back into

God's hand at nightfall with confidence, saying, "Father, I liave finished the w^ork which

me to do to-day." But we should never be anxious about


thou gavest
yesterday or to-morrow.

either

Yesterday

is

gone,

and we never can get


thing in
it.

it

back to change anywaste a

It

is

idle, therefore, to

moment of time

or a particle of strength fret-

[234]

Cfaening, jHorning, nc ?i>at


tina:

over

it.

To-morrow
its life

is

not yet ours, and


it

we cannot touch day. God means us

until

becomes our to-

to

put our undivided en-

ergy into the doing of the present day's work.


If we do this we shall have quite enough to do
to
fill

all

the hours and to engage our best


skill

energy and

and strength.
slighted or neglected

In this way, too, we shall best prepare for to-

morrow.

One day's duty


are all

prepares confusion and overburdening for the


next.

The days

woven together

in

God's plan, each one following the day before

and

fitting into the

day coming after


which
the
it

it.

Each

takes

up
it

the

Avork

day before
forT\^ard to

brought to
deliver

its feet,

and

carries

to the one which waits.

marred

or

empty day anywhere

spoils the web, losing

the thread.

If we learn well the lesson of living just one

day

at a time, without anxiety for either yes-

terday or to-morrow, we shall have found one


of the great secrets of Christian peace.
is

That
is

the

way God

teaches us to

live.

That

the

lesson both of the Bible

and of nature.

If we

[235]

Cl^e leiS0on of JLote


learn
it, it

will cure us

of

all

anxiety

it

will

save us from all feverish haste;

it will

enable

us to live sweetly in any experience.


**

One day

at

a time !

That's all

it

can he
;

No faster than

that is the hardest fate


^

And

days have their limits however we Begin them too early and stretch them late"

[236]

Cnic ftitimw^

l^ijs^css

[237]

^^

As we meet and touch each day The many travellers on our way^
Let every such brief contact he

glorious^ helpful ministry^


contact of the soil

The

and

seed^

Each

givi7ig to the oiher^s need^

Each helping on

the other's best^

And

blessing, each^ as well as blest.^

[238]

CHAPTER TWENTIETH

AINT PAUL
many

has given us

lessons in friendship.

He

himself had a genius

for friendship, and no one

can study him in his rela^

tion to his friends without


is

finding

much

that

beautiful enough to be
epistles, for

followed.

In one of his

example,

he reveals the nature of his wishes for his


friends in a very striking sentence.

He

writes

that he longs to see them, that he

may impart
this

unto them some spiritual gift.

One suggestion from the character of


longing
is

that the truest Christian friendship

desires, not to receive,

but to give.

Saint Paul

wished to see his friends, not to be refreshed,

encouraged,
their love,

and strengthened himself, by but that he might impart gifts of

enriching to them.
true friendship
is

Always the attitude of

the same
[

the longing to do

S39

Ci^e

Hz^mx

of

Lobe

something for our friend, to be of use to him,


to be of help to him, rather than the desire to

get something from him, to be helped by him.

This

is

put well

in

Dr. Babcock's

little

morn-

ing prayer
Lord, I pray That for this day 1 may not swerve

By foot
From
Not
to he

or

thy

hand command,

served, hut to serve.

This too

I pray

That for this day

No

love of ease

Nor pride prevent

My good
Not
to he

intent,
to

pleased, hut
,

please.

And if I may rd have this day


Strength from above,

To

set

my

heai^t
art.
to love.

In heavenly
Not
to he loved,

hut

Another suggestion from Saint Paul's longing


is

that the very heart of true Christian

[240]

friendship

is

helpfulness.

We

begin to be

like

Christ only when we begin to desire to do


others good.

The

world's ideal

is,

"Every man

for himself," but Christ set a


for his followers.

We

are to

new standard look upon every-

one we meet with the question in our hearts,

"What
serve

can I do for this man.^


In what

How

can I

him?

way can

I do

him good,

help him, comfort him, strengthen him?"

We
that

are always to hold ourselves ready to show the

kindness of love to every


crosses our path.

human being
not need us

He may

then he may,
to give

and if he does we must not him the help he needs.


us.

but
fail

We

do not know how many of those

meet any da^^ do need

whom we There may be none

of the great crying needs which kindle compassion in


all

human
But

breasts.

We may

go for

years and come upon no one lying wounded by


the wayside.
as these,

there are needs just as real


as tragic.

and perhaps quite

There

are hearts that are discouraged, needing cheer,

that they faint not.


are tempted,

There are people who


fall.

wavering, and ready to

[241

i)t

tz^mx

of

tobt

of sorrow, crying out for comfort.


those

There are those who are carrying a burden There are

who

are

hungry

for love.

There ahvays are opportunities for helping, and the world needs nothing more than men

and women who are ready to respond to each


call

for love's gentle ministry.


is

pleasant

story

told of

Wendell

Phillips, the great


his

orator.

He

was passionately devoted to

invalid wife.

One night after he had delivered

a lecture in a suburban town, his friends urged

him not

to return

home

till

morning.

"The

last train has

gone," they said, "and you will


It will

have to go in a carriage.
miles of cold riding

mean twelve
sleet."

through rain and

"Ah, yes," he

replied, cheerily,
see

"but at the

end of the ride I shall

Annie Phillips."

Christianity exalts every

good thing of

life

and nothing more than its friendships. The ministry to which our Master calls every one
of us
is
is

a ministry of personal helpfulness.


It

It

not always easy.


self.

may mean
the lower
is.

utter forits

getfulness of

But
it

conde-

scension, the diviner

Tlicre

is

beautiful story of the boyhood

The family lived in Switzerland. One day Louis and a younger brother were crossing a lake near their home, and came to
of Agassiz. a crack in the
ice

which the smaller boy could


older one then laid himself

not leap over.

The

down
There

across the crack,

making a bridge of

his

body, and his brother climbed over on him.


is

need

all

the while for

human
and

bridges

over gaps and

yawning
is

crevices,

let

no one

say that this

asking too much even of love.

We

remember that the Master said he was a


his precious life sin

way, a bridge, that he laid


across the great impassable

chasm between

and heaven, that men might walk over on him, from death to life. If it was fit that the Master should

make of himself such a bridge, can any service we may be called to do in helping
humbling?

others be too costly, too

The new friendship in which the Master leads us is known by its ministry of helpfulness. The love Selfishness is always most undivine.
that heaven inspires serves, and serves unto the
uttermost.

Christ himself had no other errand

[243]

Ci^c

tz&mx

of lotie

to this world but to help people.

the largest

way

in giving his
little

life.

He did it in He did it

continually in countless

and great ways


our hearts

along

his years.

We

should go out every


like this in

morning with a longing

" }Vhat can I do to-day f Not goldy or ease^ or power, or love, Or pleasure gay ; But to impart Joy to some stricken heart To send some Jieaven-horn rays Of hope, some sad, despairing
Soul to cheer ; To lift soine weighing doubts ;

to

gain,

Make
To

truth moi^e clear ;

dawning fear ; some pain ; Bring to the fold again Some lamb astray ; To brighten life for someone.
Dispel some
lull

Now and
This
let

here
to-day.'''^

me do

Saint Paul's longing suggests also that we

should seek to help our friends in the best and


highest ways.

He
gift.

wished to impart to them

some spiritual

There are many things


]

[2M

we can do for

others.

We may

help them in

temporal ways.

If they are poor,

we may

pay

their rent, or provide fuel for their fires

or bread for their hunger.


ter things

But
w^e

there are bet-

than these which

can do.
is

No

doubt sometimes a loaf of bread

better than

a tract or even a gospel; or, rather, the loaf

must go

first

to prepare the

way

for the tract


first,

and the gospel.

Whatever we do

how-

ever, for a friend or a neighbor,

we must not
bless-

be content until we have sought to impart to

him some
ing.

spiritual gift,

some heavenly

Is it this higher

thought of friendship that

most of us put into our conception of what


belongs to the mission of friendship.'^
should not forget that
if

We
would

we are Christians we

represent Christ in this world.

He

reach other
his

lives

through

us.

He

would pour

grace into other hearts through our hearts.


all

In

this

world there

is

no other privilege
to an-

more sacred than that of being a friend


other person.
in this holy

When God
[245]

sends us to someone
lift

way, we should

up our

hearts

^})t
in reverent

iLejSjSon

of lotie

and grateful recognition of the


us.

honor conferred upon

We

should think

also of the responsibility

which

this trust puts

upon
life

us.

We

stand in Christ's place to the

that looks to us in love and confidence and

waits for the help

we are

to bring, the comfort

we are to
part.

minister, the blessing

we are

to im-

One speaks thus

to a friend

whom God

had sent
**

God never loved me in


*Tis
lie

so sweet a way before; alone loho can such blessings send ;

And when
friend

his love

He brought
'

thee to me,

would neto expression find, and said, Behold a


'

But

if

you are the friend thus


what
it will

sent

from God
to
fill

to another, think

mean

the

sacred place.

What

are you going to be as

a friend to the one who looks to you with hun-

gry heart for strength, for encouragement,


for inspiration, for help ?

What

have you to

give that will

make

the life richer?

What

touches of beauty are you going to put upon


the soul that
is

nestling in the shadow of your

friendship ?

[246]

It

is

very sure that merely worldly case and

comfort are not the best things we can seek for


our friends.
to shield
It
is

natural that we should want

them from hardship, burden-bearing,

and sorrow.
love

But

in the

very tenderness of our


best possibilities
bless us

we may rob them of the


lives.

of their

When God

would

most

largely in a spiritual way, he does not ordinarily give us all ease

and luxury.

He knows

that the room must be darkened sometimes if

we are
things
shall be

to learn to sing the new, sweet song,


will

and that before we


it

accept heavenly good

may
first

be necessary that our hands

emptied of absorbing earthly things.


duties of friendship
is

One of

the

prayer.

Perhaps most of us do pray for those we love when they are sick or in great trouble. But what do we ask for them then.'' Probably we pray that they may recover from their sickness or be comforted in their trouble.

But are
our

these

love's

best

intercessions?

When

friends are sick,

it is

right for us to pray that

they

may

get well, but that should not be

our only request for them.

The

sickness has

[247]

m)t
a mission

iLe0)Son oe lotie
it

something
It

was sent to do in them

and for them.

would be a great misfortune,

therefore, if they should recover


illness,

from

their

and get out

into the busy world again,

and miss receiving the blessing which the illness was commissioned to bear to them. While then we pray for the curing of our friends,
that they

may

return to their duties, we should

also ask that the will of

God

in their sickness

may

be done in them.
if

Then

we praj* for our friends who are

in

sorrow, what should we ask for them?

The

sorrow also comes as God's messenger, bring-

ing gifts of
lie

love.

The

best blessings of life

beyond experiences of pain, and we cannot

get the blessings without passing through


the experiences.
friends

We

should plead that our

may
It

not miss receiving the gifts which

the messenger, sorrow, holds in his hands for

them.

would be very sad


life

if

pain or grief

should come into a


blessing,

and pass, leaving no


sick or in sorrow

no enriching.

But not only when they are

should we pray for our friends,

they proba-

blj need our prayers far more


in health

when they are

and joy and prosperity.


ricli,"

"When
man
all

you

see

me growing

wrote a good

to a friend,

"pray for

my

souh"

We may

say to those who love us and watch over our


lives,

"When

am

very
all

happy and very

pros-

perous, and

when

things are bringing

me
fail

joy, pray for me."


to

So we should never

pray for our

friends, to beseech of
lives.

God

the

best things

for their

Their greatest

danger
loss

is

not sickness, nor bereavement, nor

of money, nor pain, but

lest

they for-

get God.

Thus should we
ships. It
is

exalt the aims of our friend-

not enough to seek to give pleas-

ure to those we love, to make them happier;

we should endeavor
during good.
friends should
all w^hose lives

also to

impart to them en-

And
we

not only to our personal

seek thus to do good, but to

we touch.

Every one who meets


it,

us should be the better for

taking from us

some inspiration,
**

One

bit

of courage

For

the

darkening

sky, one

gleam of faith

[249]

]^c

Ht^mx
ills

of iDtiC
of
life,

To brave the thickening

One glimpse of brighter


mist,

skies beyond the gathering

To make this life more worth while, And heaven a surer heritage.'''

We

are debtors to

all

men

we owe
God

love

and

love's service to everyone.

sends us to
It

carry blessing to each person we meet.


be a lowly one

may
it

who

stands before us to-morrow,

one who

is

unworthy, one who has sinned;

may
us,

be an enemy, one

who yesterday wronged

spoke bitter things of us, tried to injure us.


are sent from

No matter. We
ever he
to this

God with some-

thing for this very person, whoever or what-

may

be.

The

love of Christ in us says

man, "I long to impart unto you some

and we dare not refuse this ministry of love to any being under heaven.
spiritual gift,"

Then we do not know how sorely he needs us, how hungry he is for love, in how great peril he is this very moment sent to us perhaps

as a refuge, that

Christ to

we may be the bosom of him, that he may be saved by a word,

a look, a kindness, a prayer, of ours.


[

250

C]^fi0t in

^m

tUt^tta^^

[251]

^''

Not mine high place and power;

But humble

task^

And

duty done each hour,

Is all
^^

I ask.

To

be

myself so strong

I shall not need To do another wrong By word or deed.


^'

To know

the quiet hearty

The happy mind,

That come

to

one ivhose part

Is to be kind.^''

[252]

CHAPTER TWENTY-FIRST

OME

people seem to miss

altogether the thought of

bringing Christ into their

common,

everyday

life.

When
man

a Christian young

was

talking

about

what calling he would choose, expressing much


uncertainty and perplexity on the subject, he

was asked

if

he had prayed about

it.

He

was

astonished and said he could not think of

troubling the Lord with such a matter as that.

There are many good people who have the


same thought.

They suppose

that

God

is

in-

terested only in their spiritual affairs


in their secular matters.

and not

But that
for us.

is

not the true thought of God's care


is

He
life

interested in everything that


is

concerns us.

There

nothing in

all

the range

of our

which we

may

not bring to him.

There are none of our

affairs in

which religion

[253]

Cl^e
does not have

tt&mi
its

oJ

lobe
make
the

place.

We may

most common things of business as beautiful

and

as holy as a prayer.
is

There

a story of an artist in the olden days,


falsely

who was

charged with crime and cast


allowed to have his paints

into prison.

He was

and brushes, but no canvas or paper, nothing on which he might paint. One day a man came to the artist's cell-door and said to him, "I
wish you would paint

me

a picture."

"I

would," replied the

artist, "if I
it."

had anything
visitor looked

on which to paint

The

about him, and on the floor of the prison corridor he found an old soiled napkin.
it

"Paint

on this," he said, as he passed the napkin


cell.

into the

The

artist

began at once, and


fin-

continued his work until the picture was


ished. It w^as a picture of the Christ, a

marfound

vellously beautiful one, which afterward

a place in one of the old cathedrals.


soiled

Thus the common napkin was redeemed from


to

and dishonor, and consecrated highest honor and sacredness.


destruction

There

is

nothing in

all

our

life,

however lowly

[254]

and commonplace, however prosaic and secular,

on which we

may

not put the

name of

Christ, something of the beauty

of Christ.

There are not two departments


ligious

in life

one

re-

and one with which religion has noth-

ing to do.

The Sabbath

is

meant

to bring us

more consciously
into his face,

into the divine presence than

the other days, that we

may worship God, look and get fresh cheer and strength
as on

but we are in God's presence as really on Mon-

day and Tuesday

Sunday, and we should

do the work of the week just as religiously as

we do our praying and Bible reading.


"Whatsoever ye do,
in the

Our
do
all

business should be as devout as our worship.


in

word or

in deed,

name of

the

Lord Jesus."

name of Christ means, for one thing, to do them in Christ's wa}^ The commandments are for week-day life we are to obey them always. They are as binding when we are buying and selling, when we are at our daily task-work, when we are seeking pleasure or recreation, as when we are engaged
things in the

To do

in

some

specifically religious duty.

There

is

[255]

Ci^e

iLeiSjSon
is

of

Lobe
way

no true success which

not found in the

of obedience to the divine law.


the

To
is

disregard
to write

commandments
it.

in

anything

anathema over

Some men,

indeed, seem to

ignore God's law and to climb

up some

other

way, scaling even to giddy heights.

They

make a great show of prosperity, but it is an empty show, which lasts, at the longest, only
through the earthly
falls to
life

and then

vanishes,

nothing.

are the only ones

God's saints are


life's

They who take God's way who really attain success. those who do God's will in
it is

common

days.
utterly imlife

Sometimes people think that


possible for
their lot
is

them to
cast.

live

a saintly
it is

where

They say

easy for the


is

minister to be a holy man, for he


all

engaged

the time in sacred duties.

Or they think of
set

some deaconess or of a woman


work, and say that

apart in a

peculiar devotement of some kind to Christian


it is

easy for her to be good

and

to keep always near to Christ.


it
is

But with
Their

themselves

altogether different.

time must

all

be spent in secular work, at some

[256]

trade or in household tasks.

If thej were emit

ployed

all

the time in religious duties,

would

be easy for them to be saintly too.

But we may do the most common, prosaic things in the name of Christ, and this brings
the lowliest occupation as near to Christ as

that of the minister or the deaconess.

Jesus

was just as holy


near to

in his life

and

lived just as

God

the

first

thirty years

when he was

a carpenter as the last three years

when he was

engaged

in the great

work of

his Messiahship.

We may
ings.

live as saintly

hves in the lowliest

trade or calling as in the most sacred of call-

" The sainthoods of the firesides

And
27iey

of the market-place^

wear no shining

halo,

No
**

glory -lighted face.

Each day

they do the duty The passing hour doth bring, Still looking unto Jesus,

Their chosen Lord

and

King.^*

Doing anything
doing
it
is

in the

name of

Christ

is

also

it

for him.

We
[

are acting for him,

and
it.

the same as if he himself

had done

257

Cl^e lejsjson of Lobe

What
if

a hallowing of our lives there would be

in

we always remembered that we are here thus Christ's name, to do what he would do if

he were where we are, doing the things that


are set for us to do
!

What
way
!

a splendor there

would be

in even the lowliest tasks, if

we concom-

sciously lived in this

How

dull,
!

monplace duties w^ould be transformed


glad
w^e

How
!

should be to do the most lowly things


well

Then how
ing of
it,

we would do everything

There
slight-

would be no skimping of our work, no


no half-doing of
it.

No

duty would
menial

seem unworthy of
for us.

us, too small or too


tells

Browning

of an angel

who took
it

a boy's place at a lowly task while the boy in


his discontent

was away from

it,

and did

year after year as cheerfully, as joyfully, as

had been the highest service of heaven. If only we could always keep in mind that we are working in the name of Christ, we should never find any
patiently,

and

as well as if

it

task irksome nor

If we really

any duty hard. know the name of Christ

as

we
us.

may know

it, all life

would be changed for

[258]

Cl)ri)St
In

in )ur Cber^Dai^s;
beautiful story
told

Hcnrj van Dyke's

"The

Lost

Word"

we are

how Hermas, who

had become a follower of Christ, was tempted


to part with the one

word which was the key


and hope.
In return

to all the treasures of life

for this word thus parted with he got riches,


pleasure,
life

and power.

But he went through


In

unable any more to find the lost word.

time of need or sorrow or peril he would begin


to recall the comfort, the hope, the joy, he

had once known, but


was the word

all

was blank.

"Where

the

word that he had been

used to utter night and morning, the word


that had meant to him more than he had
ever

known ?

What had
it.

become of

it

?"

But
ter-

he could not find


it

Someone had taken

away.

At

last the

day came when the

rible

bargain was annulled and Hermas was

restored to peace.

He found
left

again the word

the loss of which had


It

him

in such darkness.

was given back to him.

It

was

this sweet,

Name. If we know this Name, it is the key to all that No burden is beautiful, true, and eternal.
precious, blessed
[

259

Cl^e

tt^mx
if

of

lobe
it

would seem heavy

we bore

in

Christ's

name and

for him.
if this

hard to carry

No cross would be too Name were written on it.


if

No work

would seem hard

we were doing
If

it

consciously for our Master.

we remem-

bered him, and saw his eyes of love looking

down upon us continually, we could not let the hateful mood stay in our hearts, we could not do the mean or wicked thing, we could not say
the bitter, cutting word,

we could

not,

by our

wretched jealousy, hurt the gentle heart that


never had given us anything but love.
this little

Then

prayer would be our daily morning

prayer
**

Grant us, O Lord, the grace to hear The little prickli7ig thorn ; The hasty word that seems unfair ; The twang of truths well worn ; The jest tohich makes our weakness plain ; The darling plan overturned ; The careless touch upon our pai7i The slight toe have not earned ; The rasp of care, dear Lord, to-day.
Lest all these fretting things

Make

needless grief, oh give,


trusts

we pray^

The heart that

and

sings.'**

[260]

This name of Christ

tests all life for us.

Anycannot
all.

thing over which we cannot write this blessed

name
do in

is

unfit for us to do.

What we
to

this

name we ought not

do at

The
the

friendship on which we cannot put "in

name of Jesus"

is

not a friendship we

should take into our

life.

The

business

we

cannot conduct in Christ's name we would better not try to

conduct at
is

all.

The gate

over

which
enter.

this

Name

not carved we should not

[261]

9!n

Cune

"toitl^

(Koti

[263]

There was never a song that was sung hy But a sweeter one was meant to be.

thee^

There ivas never a deed that was grandly done^ But a greater was meant hy some ea^'nest one.

For

the sweetest voice can never

impart

The song thai trembles within

the heart.

And

the brain

and hand can never

quite do

The thing

that the soul has fondly in view.

And
For

hence are the tears and. the burden of pain^


the shining goals are never to gain.
the real song is ne'er heard by
y/nt/t,,

And

iVbr the

work

ever done for which

we plan.

But enough that a God. can hear and see The song and the deed that were meant to be. Benjamin R. Bulkelet.

[264]

CHAPTER TWENTY-SECOND
91n

Cimc
N

xoitt)

dPoD

music everything depends


It
is

on tune.
living.
like

so also in

Many

people are
out
of

instruments

tune, sometimes badly out

of tune.
ness in their lives.

There

is

no sweet-

The

chords of their being

are jangled.
is

The

object of Christian culture

to bring our lives into perfect tune, so that

they will give forth sweet music.

The

standis
is

ard key to which


the life of

all lives

are to be tuned

God

himself.

This attunement

the work of the whole life

it

takes

all

our

earthly years to come into perfect accord with


the music of heaven.

Some people do not


Such terms suggest
disliked

like

theological terms.

to

them abstruse doctrines

which are not easily understood.

One of

these

words

is

"atonement."
of

There are
its

wide differences

opinion

concerning

[265]

Ci^e
meaning.

Lmon

of

toU
battles

Many

ecclesiastical

have

been waged round this word.


linger

We

need not

now

to discuss

meanings or wage over

again old controversies.


tiful

Yet there
in

is

a beauall

meaning
It

in the

word

which

may

agree.

means attunement

the

bringing

of two persons, hitherto at variance, into cordial

and kindly
is

relations.

meaning

the reconcihng of

The theological God and man,


and

the bringing of them together in love

friendship

that
is

is,

the bringing of

harmony and fellowship ways loves us, but we have


him.
in

men into with God. God alto learn to love


is

That

what religion
us
into

intended to do

us

to

lift

harmony with God.


lives

It takes

our discordant

and brings them

into tune with the holy life of Christ

who was

the revealing of God.

Before we can receive the blessings of the


heavenly
life,

our hearts must be made ready,

must be
tuned to
message.

in tune with

God

himself.

In wireless

telegraphy, the receiver must be perfectly atits

transmitter, or

it

will not get the

Little waves of ether are set in

mo-

[266]

31n
tion

^um

tDtti^

dEioti

and ripple out


is

in all directions, as

when a
starts

pebble

dropped into a quiet bay and

wavelets which widen out and roll on

till

they

have touched every shore.

There may be a
elec-

thousand stations, with their wires and


trical

apparatus, but only the receivers which

are in tune with the transmitter sending the

message can get

it.

God's love sweeps out from his heart over


the world.

all

It comes to the door of every life.

among all earth's families, however far off he may be, whom God does not love. But there are many
There
is

not one person anywhere

who know nothing of


hearts the

that love, into whose

consciousness

of the love never


is

comes.

The message of grace


lives are in
it.

for

all,

but
life

only those whose


of God, hear

tune with the

The
let

divine

summons

is,

"He

that hath an ear,


saith."
**

him hear what the Spirit In one of the psalms we read

The friendship of Jehovah is with them that fear him And he will shoio them his covenanf*
is,

Only those who fear God, that

who

love

[267]

Cl^c

tmon
will,

of iLobe
and are
in accord

him, trust him, do his

with him, receive the secret revealings of his


friendship.

The standard
will

of spiritual attunement
is

is

the

of God.

Every note

to be

keyed to that,

We

are to learn to say always,

"Thy

will

be

done."

In the Scriptures, good men are

sometimes said to walk with God.

That

is,

they go in God's way, think God's thoughts,

and obey God's commandments.

"Shall two

walk together, except they have agreed .f^" All


over the world saintly ones are walking with

God
they

all

these

common

days.

When

he speaks

listen to his voice

and answer. Yes.


is

Their

communion with him

never broken.
is

The
never

music in their hearts never ceases and


jarred and spoiled by discords.

We
if

cannot see

God

with our natural eyes, but

our hearts are in tune with his Spirit, we


its

are conscious of his presence, and


flows into our lives.

blessing

Our beholding him

does

not depend on the darkness or the light.

We
can

can see flowers and trees and


in the day,

human
shining.

faces only

when the sun

is

We

[268]

31n ^unt

tDitlj

(0dD

see the stars only at night,

when the sun has

gone down.

But our

seeing
little

God depends on
tells

our own hearts.

rhyme

of a

mother's talk with her child:


*
'

It is

dark, the night


the

is

come,

And
**

world

is

hushed and

dumb ;

here!'' Shall I see him, mother dear ?"


Sleep,

my

darling,

God

is

'*

It is day, the

And
**

the

sun is bright, world is laid in light


darling,

Wake,

my

Qod

is

here
?

Shall I see him, mother dear

" Not

the day's awakening light. Babe, can shoio thee Qod aright;

Not
*'

the dark, that brings thee sleep.

can from my darling keep. Bay and night are his, to Jill We are his, to do his will Bo his will, and never fear ;

Him

Thou

Shalt see him, baby dear.""

Some good people have


tional experiences.

the impression that

Christian joy comes only as the result of emo-

No

doubt there are those

who

are lifted

up

at times on the high tides

of spiritual feeling.
basis for a glad life

But
is

really the only true

obedience to the divine

[269]

Ci^e
commandments.

Ht&mx

of

Lobe
life.

Jesus lived the perfect

His joj was never broken.

There was never


his

any interruption
Father.

in his

communion with

And

the secret of his gladness was

his patient, quiet,

unbroken doing of the

di-

vine will.

He

said of his Father,


;

"He

hath

not left

me

alone

for I do always the things

that are pleasing to him."


disciples the secret of a

Then he gave
joyous
life

his

in the

words, "If ye keep


shall abide in

my commandments,

ye

my

love; even as I have kept

my

Father's commandments, and abide in his

love."

Could any teaching be plainer than


are in tune with

this ?

We

God when we obey


and

his

words

without
quietly

question

when
It

we

acquiesce

and trustfully

in his will.
is

Disobediso in music.

ence always makes discord.

When

the singer or the player strikes a

wrong

note, the

harmony is broken. It is so in life. So long as we are obedient, sweetly accepting


it

God's way, however

may

break into our

way, patiently enduring pain, or sorrow, or


loss,

when God

wills it so,

we make pleasing

[270]

91n "Hunt
music.

"wit])

(0ot>

But

the

moment we
pleading

fail to

obey some
evil

word of our Master's, or do some


or
resist

thing,
rebel
dis-

some

of

love,

or
is

against some hard experience, there

cord; at once we are out of tune with

God

and our joy

is

broken.
training
is

The
our

object of
lives into

all spiritual

to bring
this

tune with God.

Toward

we

strive in all

our training and discipline.

We

begin very far away and at the best we are

Heaven always keeps above us But we are living worthily only when we are getting a little more into the
only learners.
at our best.

heavenly spirit every day.

We never can enter

heaven until we have brought heaven down


into our hearts.
if

We would not be happy there

we had not learned heaven's lessons before we go there. All the qualities of beautiful
character set for us in the word of

God
life.

are

things that belong to the perfected


a great artist one wrote

Of

" His face a mirror of his holy mind; His mind a temple for all lovely thi7igs

to

flock to

And

inhabit.'^

[271]

Cl^E

tt&mx

of iLotie
Evil

This should be true of every good Hfe.

things should be cast out, and whatsoever

things are lovely should have their home in the


heart.

The
not
in

life

that

is

in tune with

God

is

keyed to

the note of love.

"He
is

that loveth not knoweth

God

for

God

love."

Any

unlovingness

thought, feeling, word, or act makes discord

in the music of our life.


close, intimate,

We are brought into


relations with

and unhindered

God, only as we have learned the lesson of


love.

This includes loving relations with men

as well as with God.

We are besought by
Holy

Saint
It
is

Paul not to grieve the Spirit of God.


startling thought that the

Spirit loves

us enough to be hurt by anything we


or

may do

may

fail to do.

this exhortation

The words which follow show us how we may thus


:

grieve the divine heart "Let

all bitterness,

and

wrath, and anger, and clamor, and railing, be

put away from you, with


each other, even as

all

malice

and be ye
forgave

kind one to another, tender-hearted, forgiving

you."

This

is

the

God also way to


[272
1

in Christ

get in tune with

God.

%n Cune
We
can please
love.

toiti^

dsoti
his

God and enjoy

favor only

when we

Any

failure in loving inter-

rupts the consciousness of God's presence.

John Wesley wrote day I grieved the


faith.

in his diary

one day, "To-

divine Spirit

by speaking

uncharitably of one

who

is

not sound in the

Immediately I was in great darkness."


peace of

We cannot keep the


unless our
be.

God

in

our hearts

human

relations are as they should

We

cannot claim to be Christians unless

we

love others.

"As
it

I have loved you, that

ye

also love one another."

One of the

benefits of

prayer

is

that

keeps us in tune with God.

good man was overheard saying one night

at the close of his devotions,

"Dear Lord

Jesus,

we are on the same old terms." There was no discord in the music of his communion with
Christ.

We are taught to pray


quest
If

always, after every re-

we make, "Thy

will,

not mine, be done."

we do

this sincerely it will

always bring us

into complete agreement with God.


first

When we

begin our pleading we

may

be insubmis-

sive; at least

God's

will

we may not be ready to accept and take up the burden of sorrow,

[273]

Ci^e

Hmon
to pray,

of Hotie
our
feet.
will,

disappointment, or
as

trial, laid at

But
but

we continue
intense

"Not my

thine, be done," gradually the struggle


less

grows

and our mind comes more and

more
of

into the

mood

of quiet acquiescence, until

at last

all resistance
fills

has ceased and the peace

God

our hearts.

We have a high

example of

this in

our Lord's

own pleading in Gethsemane. When he went away alone the first time his prayer was, "My
Father,
if it

be possible, let this cup pass

away

from me:
thou wilt."

nevertheless, not as I will, but as

But when he went away a second time and prayed, there was a marked change
in his

words

"My

Father,
it,

if this

cannot pass
done."
that

away, except I drink

thy

will be

Instead of a strong pleading, as at


the cup might pass, there was

first,

now an
way.

accept-

ance of the fact that

it

would not pass and


His
will

an acquiescence
Father's.

in the Father's

was coming into perfect acquiescence with

his

The same

is

true in the history of

many

ear-

nest prayers.

We

stand face to face with a

[274]

gin

Cime

taiti^

(0oD

great sorrow and wc

fall

upon our knees and

plead with

God

to spare us the grief.


it

We are
all

not rebellious, but

seems to us we cannot
ear-

endure

it.

However, as we pray with


in

nestness

and importunity, yet

faith,

and

submissively, there comes into our hearts a

strange feeling of trust, which deepens into


peace, until we
are

ready to acquiesce in

God's

will

without

any

further

struggle.

Our
This

will

has been brought into accord with

God's.
is

the great work of life

to

come into

tune with God, to grow into such trust that we


shall rest in

God

in the silence of love, so to

lose

our

wills in

God's that there shall never

be any disharmony in our relations with God.

The outcome of such a


peace and joy.

life

of acquiescence

is

"But

I cannot do half those things," said the

bewildered new pupil to the teacher of physical culture, as ihc^

two stood together in the

gymnasium.
all."

"I simply cannot do them at

"If you could do them there would be

little

[275]

m^t
use
in

ileisjson

of Hotie

your coming here," was the reply.

"You

are here to learn

how

to do them."
lives into

We say we
with God's.

never can bring our

tune

We think it will be impossible for


way in all things But that is just

us to learn to take God's


quietly, joyfully, sweetly.

what we are here for


peace.

to be fashioned into the

likeness of Christ, to learn to live in perfect

[276]

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is

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