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04/04/12 Purpose

Denaturation Lab Report

The purpose of this experiment was to determine what types of changes cause denaturation. We labeled the four controlled experiments by the amount of denaturation, in which occurred.

Background In the text book Essentials of General, Organic, and Biochemistry, protein is the most abundant of the biomolecules because they have many functions and act as many things (Guinn pg.389). Protein is essential to humans diet because its the building block for repairing muscle tissue, blood, and cartilage. Because protein is water-soluble, our body needs to continuously keep replenishing by means of diet (why protein, Para. 1). The structure of protein is held together by covalent and peptide bonds. The term primary structure, is used to identify the order of amino acids joined together to create the protein (protein structure para. 4).

Procedure See instructions for procedure in Alverno Lab Manual for Amino Acids and Proteins pgs. 4-7 Conclusion

In conclusion when we disrupted the hydrogen bonds we increased kinetic energy, which caused the molecules to disrupt causing a solid to form (denaturation).

Discussion In this experiment my group, examined changes caused by denaturation with egg whites (a globular form of protein). We performed four separate controlled experiments, which involved heating, stirring, adding HCl, and Nacl to the egg whites. We observed different levels of denaturation between the four controlled tests. When we heated the egg white we observed the most denaturation. The 2nd most denaturation was when we added the HCl and the 3rd amount of denaturation occurred when we added the Nacl. The least amount occurred when we stirred it for two minutes.

Denaturation Graph Sample Condition Stirred Heat

Observation aquis-yellow with bubbles White solid foam The consistency became a gel-like substance as each drop was added Settlement forming on the bottom

Inference Foamy solid, least denaturization Foamy solid, Most denaturization

HCl NaCl

Partial solid gel, 2nd most Denaturization Coagulated molecules settled on the bottom, 3rd most denaturization

References

"The Importance of Protein in Your Daily Diet." Why Protein Is Important. Web. 07 Apr. 2012. <http://www.catalogs.com/info/health/why-protein-is-important.html>. "Protein Structure." Chemguide: Helping You to Understand Chemistry. Web. 07 Apr. 2012. <http://www.chemguide.co.uk/organicprops/aminoacids/proteinstruct.html>. Guinn, Denise and Brewer, Rebecca (2010). Essentials of General, Organic, and Biochemistry: An Integrated Approach 1st edition; pg. 389 and 405, W.H. Freeman Alverno College CH213 Chemistry Survey/Biochemistry Laboratory Manual, Spring 2012; Amino Acids and Proteins pgs. 4-7.