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Service Manager 9.30 Deployment Sizing Guide
Service Manager 9.30 Deployment Sizing Guide

Introduction

2

Service Manager 9.30 Sizing Questions

3

Sample Service Manager 9.30 Deployment Diagram

5

Service Manager 9.30 Application Server

6

Service Manager 9.30 Web Tier

7

Service Manager 9.30 Help Server

7

Service Manager Load Balancer Server

7

Service Manager Knowledge Search Engine Server

7

Mobility

8

SRC

8

Rules of Thumb

9

Service Manager Application Server (servlet container)

9

Service Manager Web Tier

9

Self Service / Catalog User considerations:

9

Service Manager Help Server

9

Service Manager Load Balancer

9

RDBMS server

10

Virtualized Environment (VMware)

10

Mobility

10

SRC

10

Search Engine

10

Appendix A: Mobility Deployment Example and Response Times

11

Appendix B: KM Search Engine Deployment Example and Response Times

13

Appendix C: Horizontal and Vertical Scaling

14

Appendix C: Horizontal and Vertical Scaling

14

For more information

15

14 Appendix C: Horizontal and Vertical Scaling 14 For more information 15 Rev. 8 Updated for
14 Appendix C: Horizontal and Vertical Scaling 14 For more information 15 Rev. 8 Updated for

Introduction

The reference configuration data supplied in this document is based solely on the usage of the Service Manager (SM) 9.30 Out of the Box (OOTB) environment, including the Web Tier, SRC, Mobility and the Knowledge Management Search Engine running on top of the Service Manager 9.30 Runtime Environment (RTE).

Individual implementations will most likely see an increase in the amount of resources that are utilized or needed by the application to perform in an acceptable manner. This would include running on an earlier version of the RTE.

Failure to test the application with the concurrent user load and transaction rate that is expected at the height of the daily system usage and utilizing the tailored application may result in an undersized environment to support the requirements.

The recommendations described in this document should be considered the minimum requirement to run Service Manager effectively.

should be considered the minimum requirement to run Service Manager effectively. Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30
should be considered the minimum requirement to run Service Manager effectively. Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30

Service Manager 9.30 Sizing Questions

The following list of questions is designed to gather the necessary information required to make a recommendation on the overall system architecture for the Service Manager environment.

Note: Although not all of the information requested here is required for sizing of the environment it is very useful information to obtain for a thorough architecture recommendation.

1. What kind of environment will you use?

a. In house solution administered by internal IT

b. In house solution administered by HP

c. Software as a Service

2. Expected Hardware (HW) / Software (SW) environment

a. Do you plan to operate in separate Development / Test / Production environments in order

to assure quality?

b. ITSCM/Disaster Recovery (DR) or High Availability (HA) requirements?

c. Do you plan to operate in a virtualized environment or on physical machines?

3. Do you have existing hardware that you want to reuse?

a. What Operating Systems (OS) are you using, is the OS 32 or 64 bit?

b. Number of CPU’s per machine?

c. Amount of RAM per machine?

d. What RDBMS?

4. Can you provide a diagram of your network with minimum latency and bandwidth values?

a. Can you provide a Microsoft Visio™ diagram of your intended deployment? (See Sample

Diagram)

5. Which integrations do you plan to employ with HP Service Manager?

a. Inbound/Outbound Email, SMTP/POP3 requirements?

b. Active directory (LDAP) integration or Single Sign-on?

c. Data import of persons/organizations from an HR or other environment?

d. Integration to Universal Configuration Management Database (UCMDB)/CMS?

e. Integration to other HP Software solutions?

f. Import of Configuration Items (CI’s)?

g. other

6. Licensing requirements?

a. Is Service Catalog to be part of the configuration?

b. Is Knowledge Management (KM) to be part of the configuration?

of the configuration? b. Is Knowledge Management (KM) to be part of the configuration? Rev. 8
of the configuration? b. Is Knowledge Management (KM) to be part of the configuration? Rev. 8

c. What is the expected number of KM users? (Authors, Editors, Administrators)

d. Which languages do you expect to operate?

e. What is the overall number of IT specialists? (Technicians, Administrators, Helpdesk)

f. How many of them should have guaranteed access to Service Manager?(Named Users)

g. What are your module level user requirements for Service Manager?

7. The Web Tier is the recommended client for accessing Service Manager.

a. How many Self Service users will have access to the software? Use the calculation in the Rules of thumb section to translate the number of possible Self Service users to the number of concurrent users.

8. What is the geographical breakdown of your Web user base?

9. What are your expected data volumes by module including attachments?

a. Service Desk

b. Incident Management

c. Change Management

d. Problem Management

e. Knowledge Management

f. Request Management

g. Configuration Management

h. Service Level Management

10. What are your reporting requirements?

a. Will you use the bundled Crystal Reports solution?

b. Or an external reporting solution?

c. Or will you use data replication into a Data Warehouse for reporting?

solution? c. Or will you use data replication into a Data Warehouse for reporting? Rev. 8
solution? c. Or will you use data replication into a Data Warehouse for reporting? Rev. 8

Sample Service Manager 9.30 Deployment Diagram

Sample Service Manager 9.30 Deployment Diagram Hardware Load Balancer User Mobility SRC Web Web Farm Tier
Sample Service Manager 9.30 Deployment Diagram Hardware Load Balancer User Mobility SRC Web Web Farm Tier
Hardware Load Balancer User Mobility SRC Web Web Farm Tier User Web Tier Hardware Load
Hardware
Load
Balancer
User
Mobility
SRC
Web
Web Farm
Tier
User
Web
Tier
Hardware
Load
Balancer
Service Manager Load
Balancer
Service Manager JGROUP
Web
Services
Servlets
User
User
User
Servlets
Servlets
Servlets
KM
Database Server
Services Servlets User User User Servlets Servlets Servlets KM Database Server Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30
Services Servlets User User User Servlets Servlets Servlets KM Database Server Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30

Service Manager 9.30 Application Server

Minimum required reference configurations the hardware indicated below was used to obtain the Memory and CPU minimums. The hardware is not intended to be a specific recommendation but rather a guideline.

Small (<200 concurrent users)

Windows / Linux:

Service Manager: HP DL360 2 CPU cores, 8GB RAM, 36GB HD

RDBMS:

HP DL360 2 CPU cores, 8GB RAM, 2 x 36GB RAID

Medium (201 600 concurrent users)

Windows / Linux:

Service Manager: HP BL460c 4 CPU cores, 24GB RAM, 36GB HD

RDBMS:

HP DL585 2-4 CPU cores, 12GB RAM, 3 x 36GB RAID

Unix:
Unix:

Service Manager: HP rx6600 HP-UX 11i, 4 CPU cores, 24GB RAM, 36GB HD

RDBMS:

HP rx6600 HP-UX 11i, 2-4 CPU cores, 12GB RAM, 3 x 36GB RAID

Large (601 1,000 concurrent users)

Windows / Linux:

Service Manager: HP BL460c 8 CPU cores, 48GB RAM, 36GB HD

RDBMS:

HP DL585 4-8 CPU cores, 16GB RAM, 3 x 36GB RAID

Unix:
Unix:

Service Manager: HP rx6600 HP-UX 11i, 8 CPU cores, 48GB RAM, 36GB HD

RDBMS:

HP rx6600 HP-UX 11i, 4-8 CPU cores, 16GB RAM, 5 x 36GB RAID

Extra Large (1000 2,500 concurrent users)

At this size it is recommended to run SM on multiple machines in Vertical/Horizontal Scaling

At this size it is recommended to run SM on multiple machines in Vertical/Horizontal Scaling

mode.

At this size it is recommended to run SM on multiple machines in Vertical/Horizontal Scaling mode.

Please see appendix C for references

machines in Vertical/Horizontal Scaling mode. Please see appendix C for references Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30
machines in Vertical/Horizontal Scaling mode. Please see appendix C for references Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30

Service Manager 9.30 Web Tier

Web Tier (400 concurrent users) see Rules of Thumb

Windows / Linux:

HP DL360 2 CPU cores, 6GB RAM, 36GB HD

Unix:
Unix:

HP rx2600 HP-UX 11i, 2 CPU cores, 6GB RAM, 36GB HD

Service Manager 9.30 Help Server

HP DL360 2 CPU cores, 2GB RAM, 36GB HD see Rules of Thumb

Service Manager Load Balancer Server

HP DL360 2 CPU cores, 2GB RAM, 36GB HD see Rules of Thumb

Service Manager Knowledge Search Engine Server

Small (<200 concurrent users)

Windows / Linux:

HP DL360 1 CPU cores, 2GB RAM, 36GB HD

Unix:
Unix:

HP rx2600 HP-UX 11i, 1 CPU cores, 2GB RAM, 36GB HD

Medium and Large (>200 concurrent users)

Windows / Linux:

see Rules of Thumb

HP DL360 2 CPU cores, 4GB RAM, 36GB HD

Unix:
Unix:

HP rx2600 HP-UX 11i, 2 CPU cores, 4GB RAM, 36GB HD

cores, 4GB RAM, 36GB HD Unix: HP rx2600 – HP-UX 11i, 2 CPU cores, 4GB RAM,
cores, 4GB RAM, 36GB HD Unix: HP rx2600 – HP-UX 11i, 2 CPU cores, 4GB RAM,

Mobility

see Rules of Thumb

see Rules of Thumb  Small (<200 concurrent users)
 Small (<200 concurrent users)

Small (<200 concurrent users)

Windows / Linux:

HP DL360 2 CPU cores, 6GB RAM, 36GB HD

Unix:
Unix:

HP rx2600 HP-UX 11i, 2 CPU cores, 6GB RAM, 36GB HD

Medium and Large (200~500 concurrent users)

Windows / Linux:

HP BL460c 8 CPU cores, 32GB RAM, 36GB HD

Unix:
Unix:

HP rx6600 HP-UX 11i, 8 CPU cores, 32GB RAM, 36GB HD

SRC

600 concurrent users see Rules of Thumb

Windows / Linux:

Service Manager: HP BL460c 4 CPU cores, 16GB RAM, 36GB HD

Unix:
Unix:

Service Manager: HP rx6600 HP-UX 11i, 4 CPU cores, 16GB RAM, 36GB HD

HD Unix: Service Manager: HP rx6600 – HP-UX 11i, 4 CPU cores, 16GB RAM, 36GB HD
HD Unix: Service Manager: HP rx6600 – HP-UX 11i, 4 CPU cores, 16GB RAM, 36GB HD

Rules of Thumb

Service Manager Application Server (servlet container)

A servlet container requires approximately 2 GB of Ram

500 MB JVM requirement including the 256MB of Default JAVA heap

50 MB for the process overhead

10 MB 20 MB per users session (thread) (see Note * below)

Plus shared_memory setting value = 128,000,000 in the sm.ini file. (counted only once for all Servlet containers on a single machine)

On a 32 bit Operating system we recommend starting with 50 threads (users) per process (servlet container) in the UNIX environment and then change based on process memory usage being experienced in your environment.

On a 32 bit Windows Operating systems we recommend starting with 30 threads (users) per process (servlet container) and then change based on process memory usage being experienced in your environment.

On any 64 bit Operating system listed in the Service Manager compatibility matrix we recommend starting with 50 threads (users) per process (servlet container) and change based upon process memory usage being experienced

in your environment to a maximum of 100 threads.

Note Increases in user session memory usage may be caused by inappropriately large global lists, usage of global variables that are not cleaned up and multiple application threads being opened simultaneously. This will have a direct effect on the number of user threads that can be supported per servlet container.

Service Manager Web Tier

The Service Manager Web Tier configuration used to determine sizing recommendations is based upon Tomcat web application server with 4 JVM’s running 1.0 GB of RAM Java Heap each per JVM, and an Apache Web Server for connection distribution to these JVM’s. Create a Web Farm by adding machines as required with additional Tomcat JVM’s to support additional user load.

Self Service / Catalog User considerations:

It is important to include and consider the Self Service / Catalog user base when calculating the hardware

requirements for supporting the environment. As a rule of thumb calculate the number of concurrent users to support by adding 2 3% of the total number of expected self-service users to the number of licensed module users. For example: 200,000 total user base * .03 = 6, 000 total number of projected Concurrent Self Service/Catalog users.

Service Manager Help Server

With Service Manager 9.30, the Service Manager Help Server must be deployed on Apache Web Server or Internet Information Server (IIS) and can be configured to run on one of the machines configured for the Web Tier and it should be accessible through the Service Manager clients. It can also be configured to be on a standalone machine using a small machine configuration.

Service Manager Load Balancer

The Service Manager Load Balancer should be located on a separate machine and should always be sized as a small machine since it performs no other function than connection redirection to an available servlet. It also must run using the same Operating System as the Service Manager Application Servers.

Since this is the one component of the configuration that can be considered a single point of failure, it should be replicated and placed in a clustered environment for high availability. Failure of this component will only affect new user connections that are attempting to initially connect into the environment until such time as the Load Balancer is

to initially connect into the environment until such time as the Load Balancer is Rev. 8
to initially connect into the environment until such time as the Load Balancer is Rev. 8

restarted or failed over. All currently active users connected to the environment will be unaffected by the loss of the Load Balancer.

Load balanced machines and servlet machines should use the server sizing given in this document and the number of nodes would depend on the size of the machine chosen and total number of concurrent production users.

RDBMS server

The RDBMS server sizing specified above represent the configurations that were used during the benchmarking runs for the Service Manager out-of-box product. The actual servers that will be used in a production environment should plan their storage needs based upon expected data volumes including attachments, etc. The CPU and memory requirements for the selected database should be based upon the recommendations of the Database vendor for supporting the expected transaction volumes.

Virtualized Environment (VMware)

An addition of approximately 30% above the recommended Service Manager Sizing must be made in order to efficiently run that Service Manager component in a Virtual environment.

Mobility

Startup options below are recommended for Mobility application in the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) instance:

-Xms1024m -Xmx1024m -XX:MaxPermSize=256m

The mobility application uses an in-memory lazily loaded cache (i.e. a record is only loaded into cache when accessed) to optimize performance. Objects loaded in the cache are shared by all users connected to the same mobility application. Therefore, the cache size will grow as users log in, navigate to view incident tickets and change requests, and enter activities (or journal entries). It is possible performance will degrade if the cache grows too large, or if insufficient resources are allocated to the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) instance.

Multiple Mobility application servers are recommended for 200-500 users. Please see Appendix A for deployment examples and sample response times.

SRC

Startup options below are recommended for SRC application in Java Virtual Machine (JVM) instance:

-Xms1024m -Xmx1024m -XX:MaxPermSize=128m

Modify the following lines in the applicationContext.properties file in SRC_HOME\src-1.20\WEB-INF\classes

src.sm.userInboxBatchSize=500

src.sm.defaultMaxConnectionsPerHost=40

src.sm.maxTotalConnections=40

Search Engine

The startup options below are recommended for SRC application in Java Virtual Machine (JVM) instance:

-Xms512m -Xmx1024m -XX:PermSize=256m

Please see Appendix B for deployment examples and sample response times.

Please see Appendix B for deployment examples and sample response times. Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30
Please see Appendix B for deployment examples and sample response times. Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30

Appendix A: Mobility Deployment Example and Response Times

Small(<200 users) HTTP
Small(<200 users)
HTTP

LoadRunner simulating

150 Mobile Devices

The Cluster Mobility Layer M1 SM Layer SM1 SM2 SM3 DB
The Cluster
Mobility Layer
M1
SM Layer
SM1
SM2
SM3
DB

Transaction Name

Average Response Time

01_Startpage

0.257

02_Login

2.933

03_Logout

0.04

Change_01_ClickAssignToMyGroups

4.555

Change_02_GroupClickChangeDetail

0.564

Change_03_GroupClickActivities

1.31

Change_07_GroupClickBack

0.507

Change_08_GroupClickHome

0.41

Incident_01_ClickAssignToMe

0.485

Incident_02_ClickIncidentDetail

0.504

Incident_03_ClickActivity

0.558

Incident_07_ClickBack

0.418

Incident_08_ClickHome

0.434

Incident_09_ClickAssignToMyGroup

4.666

Incident_10_ClickIncidentInGroup

0.509

Incident_11_ClickActivityInGroup

0.552

Incident_12_ClickBackInGroup

0.399

Incident_13_ClickHomeInGroup

0.435

Incident_12_ClickBackInGroup 0.399 Incident_13_ClickHomeInGroup 0.435 Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30 Page 11
Incident_12_ClickBackInGroup 0.399 Incident_13_ClickHomeInGroup 0.435 Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30 Page 11

Medium and Large (200~500 users)

HTTP LoadRunner simulating
HTTP
LoadRunner simulating

500 Mobile Devices

The Cluster Apache Software Loadbalancer Mobility Layer 2 to 5 nodes M1 M2 M3 M4
The Cluster
Apache Software Loadbalancer
Mobility Layer 2 to 5 nodes
M1
M2
M3
M4
M5
SM Layer
SM1
SM2
SM3
SM4
SM5
SM6
SM7
SM8
SM9
SM10
DB

Change_07_GroupClickBack

Incident_04_ClickNewEntry

03_Logout

Incident_03_ClickActivity

Incident_07_ClickBack

Change_01_ClickAssignToMyGroups

Change_08_GroupClickHome

01_Startpage

Incident_01_ClickAssignToMe

Incident_05_SaveNewUpdate

Incident_08_ClickHome

Incident_13_ClickHomeInGroup

Incident_09_ClickAssignToMyGroup

Change_03_GroupClickActivities

Incident_11_ClickActivityInGroup

Incident_10_ClickIncidentInGroup

Incident_12_ClickBackInGroup

02_Login

Change_02_GroupClickChangeDetail

Incident_06_ClickOKAfterEntryAdded

Incident_02_ClickIncidentDetail

4

3.5

3

2.5

2

1.5

1

0.5

0

Incident_02_ClickIncidentDetail 4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 500 users/2 Mobility/10 SM 500 users/3
Incident_02_ClickIncidentDetail 4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 500 users/2 Mobility/10 SM 500 users/3

500 users/2 Mobility/10 SM

Incident_02_ClickIncidentDetail 4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 500 users/2 Mobility/10 SM 500 users/3

500 users/3 Mobility/10 SM

2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 500 users/2 Mobility/10 SM 500 users/3 Mobility/10 SM Rev. 8
2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 500 users/2 Mobility/10 SM 500 users/3 Mobility/10 SM Rev. 8

Appendix B: KM Search Engine Deployment Example and Response Times

HTTP LoadRunner simulating
HTTP
LoadRunner simulating

500~1000 users

The Cluster Apache Software Loadbalancer SM Web-tier 2-5 nodes M1 M2 M3 M4 M5 SM
The Cluster
Apache Software Loadbalancer
SM Web-tier 2-5 nodes
M1
M2
M3
M4
M5
SM Layer
SM1
SM2
SM3
SM4
SM5
SM6
SM7
SM8
SM9
SM10
KM Search
Engine
56k documents
indexed
DB

Test Duration: 2 hours

Average

90%

Successful Searches

500 users

0.243

0.641

113717

1000 users

0.174

0.217

228213

500 users 0.243 0.641 113717 1000 users 0.174 0.217 228213 Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30 Page
500 users 0.243 0.641 113717 1000 users 0.174 0.217 228213 Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30 Page
500 users 0.243 0.641 113717 1000 users 0.174 0.217 228213 Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30 Page

Appendix C: Horizontal and Vertical Scaling

More detailed information can be found in the online help server under System Installation and Setup > Server implementation options

help server under System Installation and Setup > Server implementation options Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30
help server under System Installation and Setup > Server implementation options Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30
help server under System Installation and Setup > Server implementation options Rev. 8 Updated for SM9.30

For more information

Please visit the HP Management Software support Web site at:

This Web site provides contact information and details about the products, services, and support that HP Management Software offers.

HP Management Software online software support provides customer self-solve capabilities. It provides a fast and efficient way to access interactive technical support tools needed to manage your business. As a valued customer, you can benefit by being able to:

Search for knowledge documents of interest

Submit and track progress on support cases

Submit enhancement requests online

Download software patches

Manage a support contract

Look up HP support contacts

Review information about available services

Enter discussions with other software customers

Research and register for software training

Note: Most of the support areas require that you register as an HP Passport user and sign in. Many also require an active support contract.

To find more information about support access levels, go to the following URL:

http://www.hp.com/managementsoftware/access_level

To register for an HP Passport ID, go to the following URL:

http://www.managementsoftware.hp.com/passport-registration.html

Technology for better business outcomes

© Copyright 2009Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

Linux is a U.S. registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. Microsoft and Windows are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group.

4AA1-xxxxENW, October 2011

UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group. 4AA1-xxxxENW, October 2011 Rev. 8 Updated for
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group. 4AA1-xxxxENW, October 2011 Rev. 8 Updated for
UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group. 4AA1-xxxxENW, October 2011 Rev. 8 Updated for

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