Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 40

2 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012

Newsroom
829-7242
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Circulation
Jim McCabe 829-5000
jmccabe@timesleader.com
Published weekly by:
Impressions Media
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Periodicals postage paid at
Scranton, PA
Postmaster: Send address changes
to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)
USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-232
INSIDE
Page 13 Playhouse offers a glimpse into the past
Page 14 Finding back to school savings
Page 24 Area golfers shine at tournament
Page 27 Obituaries
Page 28 Crossword puzzles
GO Lackawanna Editor
Don McGlynn - 558-0113
dmcglynn@golackawanna.com
Reporter
Rich Howells 558-0483
rhowells@golackawanna.com
Sports Reporter
Tom Robinson
Photographer
Jason Riedmiller
Advertising Representative
Jill Andes 970-7291
jandes@timesleader.com
Obituaries
558-0113
News Tips
558-0113
news@golackawanna.com
Missed Paper 829-5000
Classified
1-800-273-7130
Advertising 829-7101
Subscriptions 1-800-252-5603
Office Hours
9a.m. 6p.m.; M-F; 109 New Street, Pittston, PA18640
OUR TEAM
The Go Lackawanna Lower Valley edition
publishes information about the
communities in the Old Forge, Riverside and
West Scranton school districts. Send your
information to dmcglynn@golackawanna.com
or 109 New Street, Pittston, PA 18640.
McGLynn
Howells
Robinson
Riedmiller
Andes
Coal Mining info sought, Carl Ore-
chovsky, research editor of Anthra-
cite Archives, Old Forge, is seeking
information about the coal mining
industry during the 1950s and 60s in
Old Forge.
Anyone interested, with information
or photos of mine openings, build-
ings, miners, breakers or stories of
life and workings in the mines can
contact Orechovsky evenings at
702.4217 or e-mail info@oldforge-
coalmine.com.
STACKS Writing Group will be meet-
ing at 6:30 p.m. every other Tuesday
starting August 21 at The Banshee,
320 Penn Ave., Scranton. Writers are
invited to send an unpolished sample
of their fiction, maximum of 15 pages,
to Stef and Chris at stackswriting-
group@gmail.com. For more in-
formation, visit STACKS Writing
Group on Facebook.
The West Scranton Hyde Park
Neighborhood Watch will hold its
next meeting on Thursday, Sept. 20
at 7 p.m. at All Saints Auditorium,
1403 Jackson St., behind St. Pa-
tricks Church. Info: http://hyde-
parkneighborwatch.word-
press.com/.
Womens Day Out (PLUS Men) a
fundraiser held on Sunday, August
19, 2 to 8 p.m. at Nails First Salon
located at 207 S. Main St., Taylor.
This will benefit Traceys Hope
Hospice Care Program and Rescue
for Domestic Animals, Inc. A variety
of services will be offered, there will
also be live entertainment by Dani-
elle Khela, a wine and cheese table,
and psychic readings. For more
information, call 457.1625.
Social Action Round Table: Voter
ID Law at Temple Hesed on Friday,
August 24 at 7:30 p.m. The Round
Table will feature Atty. Abigail By-
man who will explain the law, the
court challenge filed to halt its
implementation and what you must
do before the November election.
Temple Hesed is located on Knox
Road.
The Playwrights Project will pre-
sent Providence Speakeasy, on
Sunday, August 26 at the Old Bricke
Theater, located at 126 W. Market
St., Scranton. The theater will be
transformed to look like a speak-
easy from the 1920s, complete with
costumes, a jazz band and deco-
rations. All proceeds from the event
will go towards the production costs
of Dyonisia 12, the playwrights
festival.
Johnson College will hold Comput-
er Numerical Control (CNC) Train-
ing from August 27 to February 7,
2013. Classes will be held Monday
through Thursday, 4 to 10:15 pm in
the Woolworth Buildings Precision
Machining Classroom. The College
is located at 3427 N. Main Ave.,
Scranton.
For more information or to register,
visit http://www.johnson.edu/con-
tinuing-education/upcoming-train-
ing/ or call 702.8979.
The Catholic Choral Society will
begin its 64th season on Tuesday,
September 4, with rehearsals on
Tuesday evenings at 7 p.m. at the
IHM Center at Marywood University.
The group, composed of members
from both Luzerne and Lackawanna
counties, performs sacred, classical,
Broadway and popular music at
performances in both Luzerne and
Lackawanna counties. New mem-
bers are welcome and no auditions
are required.
The groups first concert is sched-
uled for October. For more informa-
tion, visit www.catholicchoralsocie-
ty.org or call 587.2753.
Riverworks III: Lackawanna
River Corridor Association, Cele-
brating 25 Years will be held
September 6 through 29 with an
opening reception on First Friday,
September 7 from 6 to 9 p.m.
The theme for this juried exhibition
is the river and its watershed. Those
who are interested are invited to
create artwork that shares their
views and interpretations of the
theme, the drop off dates are Au-
gust 24 and 25 from11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at ArtWorks Gallery & Studio, 503
Lackawanna Ave., Scranton.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
See CALENDAR, Page 7
POLICE ASSIST AT CLUE! FORENSIC CAMP
Members of Clue! Forensics Camp at Lackawanna College were recently part of a crime scene
team where they learned about crime scene photography, fingerprinting and sketching.
Participating in the camp, from left, front row, Patrick Gilman; Oliver Egan; Nick Swift; Jared
Mastillo; Amelia Smicherko; Isabello Ayden; second row: Lyn DeSanto, instructor; Michelle
Mohyla, Lackawanna College student; Madison Green; Peyton Reese; Frank Perry; Lilianna
Ruby; Devyn Davis; Emily Newton; and Detective Joseph Castellano, Scranton Police Depart-
ment
W
ith the start of school just few weeks away,
manychildrenarebusysettingpersonal goals
for the year ahead. Old Forge Elementary
SchoolsNathanCieslakhasmadeit hisgoal totryand
make the school experience better for everyone.
Proving youre never too young to make a differ-
ence, the10-year-old, fifth grade student is selling T-
shirts featuringa logoof his owndesign, andtheslo-
gan Only You Can Prevent Bullying.
Nathan is hoping the shirts, priced at
$12, will create a greater awareness of
the problemof bullying.
I just want to get the
word out that bullying is
wrong, and its not cool to
do, its not fun for anyone,
(and) its not a good experi-
ence, said Nathan.
Nathan brought the idea
of creating a shirt to his
mother, April Cieslak, a few weeks ago,
who explained to him that he would
need a logo and slogan to put on the
shirt. She said a few hours later her son
had everything he needed.
It didnt take long because I was
thinking about it the whole day, so I al-
ready had the design
planned out in my head,
said Nathan.
With the design of the
shirt ready, Cieslak started
looking for someone to
print them. She said she
talked to a few people but
ultimately decided to go with GC
Sweats.
T-shirt campaign targets bullying
GO LACKAWANNA/BRADLEY LANPEAR
With their T-shirts Hunter Tisdel, Keegan Barbetti, Nathan Cieslak, Kevin Pepsin and Carissa Delucca are telling the community that Only You
Can Prevent Bullying.
Making a DIFFERENCE
DON MCGLYNN
dmcglynn@golackawanna.com
To order a Only You
Can Prevent Bullying
T-shirt, email Lirpa-
cat1@yahoo.com or
gcsweats@aol.com
GET ONE
See DIFFERENCE, Page 15
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 3
4 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
S
herry Skramstad of Scranton has worn many hats over
her 70 years. Shes was a medical researcher for over a
decade; a special education teacher for 33 years; a free-
lance journalist; a publicist for Monticello Raceway, Goshen
Historic Track, and Pocono Downs; a horse owner, breeder,
and trainer; and an award-winning member of the United
States Harness Writers Association.
All of these things,
she feels, she owes to
her late sister Wendy,
whoshe consideredher
best friendas they grew
up together in New
York. Wendy lived with
Down syndrome and
passed away at the age
of 59.
I dont think I would
have become what I be-
came in any field with-
out knowing Wendy,
Skramstad insisted.
At that young age, I
couldnt appreciate all
the positive contribu-
tions of people with
Down syndrome and I
thought I was going to
become the researcher
that was going to elim-
inate it from the world.
Now I think that they
are the meek that are
supposed to inherit the
Earth.
Wendy alsomade her
an author, as she felt
compelled to tell her sisters inspi-
rational story after some unusual
circumstances following her
death.
When she passed away, her
spirit, believe it or not and I nev-
er used to believe in these things
wouldnt let me sleep. My
horseshadnt done much in
2007, whichwas the year she died.
I hadone horse who hadnt earned
a penny since January 1. After
Wendy died, my horses started to
do incredible things, Skramstad
recalled, explaining that two of
her race horses sudden-
ly began placing first
and second.
The state steward
came up to meand
said, Boy, you must re-
ally know how to live.
You had two of these
happen in two weeks. A
trainer can go a whole
lifetime, awholecareer,
and never have that
happen. One of my fe-
male trainer friends,
who was in the pad-
dock at the time, said,
No, thats her sister
Wendy pushing really
hard fromheaven. And
I laughed, but I trulybe-
lieved that.
One night, I was try-
ing to sleep, and it was
about six weeks after
Wendy died, and I
heard this little voice in
my ear, Sherry, get up
andtype. Tell my story.
In the introduction, I
say the author had no
choice but to obey.
She wrote Wendys Wisdom:
The Challenges and Accomplish-
ments of a Woman with Down
Syndrome in just four months,
but it took two years for the book
toeventuallybepublishedin2010.
It not only chronicles her siblings
life, but it also paints a portrait of
the many facets of her personality.
She was very wise. She didnt
see grays things were black and
white to Wendy, and I frequently
Sherry Skramstad, author of Wendys Wisdom: The Challenges and Accomplishments of a Woman with
Down Syndrome, is eager to share her sisters story at the Taylor Community Library.
Wendys Wisdom lives on
Taylor Library hosts
Scranton author
RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
What: Author
Sherry Skramstad
signing of Wen-
dys Wisdom
Where: Taylor
Community Li-
brary, 710 South
Main St., Taylor,
PA18517
When: Aug. 25, 1
p.m.
Cost: Free
Info: Wendys
Wisdom is avail-
able as a paper-
back and e-book at
www.tatepublish-
ing.com.
MORE INFO
See WISDOM, Page 6
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 5
T
o the naked eye, Reps Place on
Jackson Street may seem like any
other corner bar in West Scranton.
But if oneweretowander inthebackand
read the thank you cards and letters
pinned to the bulletin board hanging on
the wall, one would learn of the quiet but
generous actions of a groupwho call them-
selves the Black Sheep of West Scranton.
If thenamedoesnt soundfamil-
iar, thats because they depend on
word of mouth to spread their
mission and do not spend money
on advertising. Instead, 100 per-
cent of their proceeds go to help-
ing children under the age of 18
with illnesses and other issues.
Our charities are children.
Helping kids in need thats our
motto, and thats our mission
statement. We find a sick child
thats out there or a family that
needs our help. Its a kid in need,
not always a sick child, but a child
or a family that needs our sup-
port, explained Treasurer and
Vice President Joe Matyjevich.
Ninety-five percent of the time
they go right through because we
do our homework, and then we
decide on a monetary donation
anywhere from $100 to $1,000.
Two weeks ago, we actually gave
out $3,000 to three different char-
ities.
Matyjevich has been a member
since 1992; the group itself has
been around for over 20 years and
has aided hundreds of children
Group prepares annual charity golf tournament
GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER
Bob Booth, Dave Lesh, Jack Hubshman, Larry Spathelf, Sr., Joe Matyjevich and Nick Azzarelli promote the Black Sheeps 9th Annual Golf Tournament .
Black Sheep help out
RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
What: Black Sheep of West Scranton 9th
Annual Golf Tournament
Where: Pine Hills Country Club, 140 S.
Keyser Ave., Taylor
When: Saturday, Aug. 25 at 1 p.m.
Cost: $320 per team, $25 per dinner-
only guest, entry fee includes cart and
green fees, lunch, dinner, gifts, flight
prizes, and raffle ticket prizes
Info: 18 holes, four-man captain and crew
format, limited to 36 teams, RSVP by
Aug. 20, checks payable to the Black
Sheep of West Scranton, 2225 Jackson
St., Scranton, PA18504
Contact: Nick Azzarelli at 570.241.3850
or Dave Lesh at 570.241.3640
IF YOU GO
See SHEEP, Page 12
6 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
LOWER VALLEY EDITION
West Side, Taylor,
Old Forge
golackawanna.com
your community your concerns your schooIs your teams
The best & brightest weekIy in the market!
LOWER VALL
ADVERTISE IN
Call 970-7291
MOOSIC- Moosic Borough Coun-
cil approved the nomination of the
appointment of Matthew Smith as a
part-time police officer for the Moos-
ic Borough Police Department, dur-
ing its monthly meeting on Tuesday,
August 14.
Smith, a Moosic native and River-
side HighSchool graduate, is a veter-
an of the Persian Gulf War.
He is back now looking to start a
new career as a part-time patrol offi-
cer, what better place to do it than
where he grewup, saidCouncil Vice
President Joseph Dente.
The appointment will now go
through the review of Moosic Police
Chief Charles Maurer and Mayor
James Segilia.
In other business, Council Presi-
dent Joseph Mercatili appointed a
committee made up of council mem-
bers Mary Ann Nawrocki, Eugene
Prusinski, William Sweeney and
Mayor Segilia to reviewthe councils
policy on reserving Mercatili-Segilia
Park in Moosic.
The European American Action
Coalitions third annual European
American Heritage Celebration was
scheduled to take place on Saturday,
August 11, at Mercatili-Segilia Park.
According to borough Administra-
tor JaneSterlingandMercatili, Steve
Smith booked the park for the event
by claiming he was a resident of
Moosic, but it was later discovered
he lived in Pittston.
Members of council made the dis-
covery prior to the event being held,
and council denied the group per-
mission to use the park. But, in light
of these events, the committee will
take a closer look at the current pol-
icy.
Moosic Borough will meet for its
next monthly meeting on Tuesday,
September11, at 7p.m. at theMoosic
Borough Building council chambers
located at 715 Main St., Moosic.
Moosic native considered for
police department position
DON MCGLYNN
dmcglynn@golackawanna.com
TAYLOR The Riverside School
Board unanimously approved to fur-
lougheight teachers duringits month-
ly meeting on Monday, August 13.
The eight teachers who were fur-
loughedarePamalaInsalaca, Michelle
Getts, Stephanie Monahan, John Ya-
rem, AndrewBennie, ElizabethDeAn-
gelo, Valerie Glasner and Lisa McDo-
nough.
In other news, a motion was unani-
mously accepted to allow the River-
side School District the chance to en-
ter into a consortium of eight other
school districts to begin offering En-
glish as a Second Language, through-
out the 2012-2013 school year.
Ryan Collins was also approved by
the board to take over as head soccer
coach for the Riverside High School
varsity team for the 2012-2013 school
year.
Riverside furloughs eight teachers
TYLER MILES
For Go Lackawanna
asked her advice on different
thingsShe became a world
traveler. She collected works of
art. She loved going to art gal-
leries inGreenwichVillage, and
she especially likedPicasso and
Marc Chagall. She gave a tour
at the opening of the Guggen-
heim Museum theres a chap-
ter in the book about that, she
described.
Wehadgoneonopeningday
to see the museumWendy
would wax philosophical about
the different paintings that she
was viewing and everybody
who came off the elevators be-
hindus wouldstopandlistento
her explain her thoughts on
each work of art. She had a
whole tour! By the time we got
to the lobby at the bottom peo-
ple were thanking her. Some-
body even gave her a tip.
Skramstad laughed as she re-
membered Wendys incredible
luck.
She was a very, very lucky
and avid gambler. She won all
her color at the roulette wheel
at the largest casino in the
Western Hemisphere in the Ba-
hamas, she noted.
I was gone. I was standing in
the back watching her. I lost all
my chipsShe had a number
system for winning at the race
track. Everybody wanted to be
her partner.
She also had a distinct sense
of humor.
She wonthe jackpot at a bin-
go hall and it was $1,000The
woman came back with a stack
of twenties and put them down
on the table in front of Wendy
and her face was crestfallen.
She said, Thats $1,000? Soshe
took the stack of twenties away
and she said to Wendy, Ill be
right back. She came backwith
her arms loaded with $1,000
worth of singles and she put
them on the table and they fell
into her lap. She said, Now
thats $1,000! She was such a
kick. I enjoyed her so much.
Growing up in the time peri-
od they did, however, wasnt
easy for those with Down syn-
drome despite her obvious in-
telligence, wit, andcapabilities.
When my sister was born in
1948, the doctors toldmy moth-
er that she would never walk,
talk, or be toilet-trained, that
my mother would be better off
placing her in Willowbrook,
where they knew how to take
care of people like this, she
said.
Skramstad pointed out that
an investigative report by Ger-
aldo Rivera of Willowbrook
State School in New York re-
vealed horrific abuse of pa-
tients that led to its closure in
1987 andfederal civil rights leg-
islation protecting those with
intellectual disabilities.
If only my sister had been
born 30 years later, she could
have been the first astronomer
with Down syndrome. She
loved planetary things. Wed go
to the library and shed make
me take out books and read to
her about all the different plan-
ets and shed quiz me about
them. She was amazing.
Their mother and stepfather
becameco-founders of theorga-
nization that would eventually
become The Arc, which pro-
tects the rights of those with in-
tellectual disabilities, and
while Skramstad feels that
much progress has been made
it terms of understanding and
helping those with Down syn-
drome, she continues to edu-
cate people through readings,
signings, anddiscussions of her
book, stopping for an appear-
ance on Aug. 25 at the Taylor
Community Library, 710 South
Main St., Taylor.
Theres still prejudice in
some areas. I want people to
know that people with Down
syndrome, I think, are not
greedy; they are not self-serv-
ing, generallyThey are grate-
ful for the planet that the Cre-
ator gave us, and I dont think
theyd destroy it like we would.
I just thinkthey care about each
other and doing the right
thing, she commented.
Im hoping that the people
who come to Taylor will have
an interest in listening and
learning and sharing their
ideas, their questions, whatev-
er.
At a similar appearance in
New York, one woman she
spoke to was able to pin down
the central message of the book
and Wendys simple, yet pro-
found wisdom.
She said, Wow. Wendy had
a really powerful message if
youjust dont get involvedinall
the grays and you do the right
thing, you live a happy, healthy
life. Thenext timeI haveaprob-
lem, Im going to ask myself,
What would Wendy do? My
heart just swelled when she
said that. That was the whole
purpose of me namingthe book
Wendys Wisdom. I felt sograt-
ified when that woman said
that,
My sister saw things in
black and white it was wrong
or it was right. If you stick to
that, youre OK. You do the
right thing.
WISDOM
Continued from page 4
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 7
NOW OPEN
SUNDAYS
10AM - 3PM
RT. 309
WILKESBARRE TWP. BLVD.
8222025
COMING SOON - ORDER NOW!
DIRECT FROM CALIFORNIAS LAMANUZZI &
PANTALEO VINEYARDS (PIA & REGINA BRAND)
AND ANGELO PAPAGNI VINEYARDS
(CALIFORNIA SPECIAL & TEASAR BRAND)
WE ALSO HAVE A LARGE VARIETY
OF LUVA BELLA FRESH WINE JUICE
WE OFFER 36# HOUSE PACK WINE GRAPES, 6.0 GAL PAILS
FRESH WINE JUICE & 58 GAL DRUMS OF FRESH WINE JUICE
MANY VARIETIES TO CHOOSE FROM
SPECIAL ORDER WINE MAKING EQUIPMENT AVAILABLE
STAINLESS STEEL TANKS, DEMI JONS, BOTTLES & GUARANTEED
HIGHEST QUALITY & LOWEST PRICES!
ORDER NOW! CALL VITO FOR DETAILS 570-262-8683
GRAPE & JUICE SEASON IS HERE
In recognition of 100 years of
4-H in Pennsylvania, the Lacka-
wanna County 4-H is looking for
4-H members, alumni, leaders,
and parents to explain how 4-H
has influenced their lives.
The Penn State Extension Of-
ficesgoal istocompileatleast100
stories of how4-Hhas influenced
lives in Lackawanna County and
then turn the essays into a book-
let.
Photos can be included, but
they are not required.
Everyone who sends in a story
will receive a free copy of the
booklet.
The stories, which should be
100 words or less, can be mailed
to the Penn State Extension Of-
fice, 200 Adams Ave., Lower Lev-
el, Scranton, PA, 18503, e-mailed
to LackawannaExt@psu.edu or
faxed to 963.6853.
For more information, call
963.6842.
Penn State
Extensions
sponsor
essay contest
SCRANTON A 20-year-old
West Scranton man was
charged with committing an
armed robbery of the Sunoco
Gas Station, 1227 S. Main
Ave., on Aug. 14 in addition to
a separate street robbery just
days earlier.
When questioned by detec-
tives, police said Christian
Matthew Cox of Rock Street
admitted to committing the
robbery because he was re-
cently laid off from his job and
needed the money so he didnt
have to live on the streets.
Cox allegedly
said he dis-
carded the
clothing he
wore during
the robbery
and the gun he
used in an al-
leyway while
he was run-
ning from the scene and
agreed to show detectives
where he discarded the items.
Detective James Pappas re-
covered a BB gun that resem-
bled a semi-automatic hand-
gun in an alleyway near Gerri-
tys Supermarket in West
Scranton that was allegedly
used in two robberies by Cox.
The second robbery was on
Aug. 9 on the 300 block of S.
Main Ave. The victim report-
ed being robbed at gunpoint
and provided a physical de-
scription of the suspect that
met Coxs description.
According to a press re-
lease, Detective Michael
Schultz recovered the victims
access card and brown wallet
with the belongings of Cox
while investigating the Suno-
co robbery. Cox allegedly ad-
mitted to also committing
that robbery and said he stole
the victims gym bag, wallet,
and access card because he
needed money.
Cox was charged with rob-
bery, theft by unlawful taking,
simple assault, and recklessly
endangering another person
for his role in the Sunoco
armed robbery; he was
charged with robbery, theft by
unlawful taking, receiving sto-
len property, simple assault,
and recklessly endangering
another person for the Aug. 9
robbery.
Cox was transported to the
processing center for process-
ing and arraignment.
W. Scranton man charged in two robberies
RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
Christian
Matthew Cox
For information on the LRCA, including a com-
plete description of the watershed and its access
points, visit www.lrca.org.
For information on entering the exhibition, visit
http://www.artworksnepa.com.
Fight For Air Walk kick off luncheon will be held
at Unos Restaurant in Dickson City on Thursday
Sept 13 from noon to 1 p.m. to learn about our
upcoming Fight For Air Walk to be held at Nay
Aug park on Saturday, Oct. 13. RSVP is necessary
to attend the luncheon. Info: 823.2212. To regis-
ter for the walk, visit www.lunginfo.org/scranton-
walk.
Laughter With A Purpose: A Benefit for
Michael Meoni will be held at the AFA Art
Gallerys second floor on Saturday, Sept. 15. The
money raised at the event, hosted by the gallery,
located at 514 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton. Tick-
ets for the event are priced at $20. This night of
entertainment includes improv groups Here We
Are In Spain and Unorganized Business, juggler
Mike Simon, rock band Fire With Friends and
acoustic guitar player Brendan Regan. Shows
are scheduled for 8 and 10 p.m. Tickets are time
specific, and can be purchased at the door, or in
advance at 604.1874.
Actors
Circle 31st season will open with Bell,
Book & Candle by John Van Druten. The show
will run September 20 to 23 and 28 to 30. at the
Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Rd.,
Scranton. For more information, call 575.2223
Blakely Hose Company No. 2 is holding their
fourth annual Kielbasa Smoke Fest on Saturday,
October 6 from 4 to 8 p.m. at the station locat-
ed at 315 Second St., Blakely.
For more information, visit www.blakelyfire.org.
CALENDAR
Continued from page 2
8 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
I
ts not uncommon for yearly events, no
matter how long theyve been around or
how popular they are in the community,
to suddenly stop due to any number of rea-
sons. But some events are special, and worth
fighting to keep around. For its organizers,
theannual LatinPrideFestival is oneof those
special events.
The festival, scheduledfor Saturday,
August 25, from11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. at
Courthouse Square in downtown
Scranton, has become a much antici-
pated event for many since its incep-
tion, putting Latino countries culture
on display each year.
Its very nice when you get to see
andlearnabout other cultures andeth-
nicities, said Scranton resident Cesar
Reyes. Its a nice way to reach out to
people andsay, This is where we come
from, this is what we do. I believe we
should have more of that.
Reyes is one of several organizers
who are helping put the event togeth-
er. He said his main responsibilities in-
clude bookingsome of the DJs andmu-
sical acts and acting as emcee for the
event.
Hes helped with the festival in years
past but found more responsibility
thrust upon him this year, along with
the events other organizers, when
Scranton residents continue Latin festival
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Grupo Weepa will perform at the annual Latin Pride Festival in downtown Scranton on Saturday, August 25.
Keeping a tradition alive
DON MCGLYNN
dmcglynn@golackwanna.com
What: Latin Pride
Festival
When: Saturday,
August 25, starting at
11:30 a.m.
Where: Courthouse
Square in downtown
Scranton
Info: www.face-
book.com/cesars.co-
pacabana or call
906.1850.
IF YOU GO
See LATIN, Page 9
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 9
7
3
1
3
0
9
7
3
1
3
0
9
ALL JUNK CARS &
TRUCKS WANTED
V&G 570-574-1275
Free Removal. Call Anytime.
Highest Price Paid In Cash!
BEER SYSTEM RENTALS
For Graduation & Holidays
CALL NOW TO RESERVE
570-825-5509
Refrigerator Conversion Kits
Beer Glasses, Coasters and Novelties
Brass Railing
Portable Beer Systems
For Sale or Rent
Parts For All Beer Systems
Large Variety Of Bar Stools
Widdy Dartboard and
Scoreboards Apex & Widdy Darts
Home Winemaking
Beer Brewing Kits
HUGE SELECTION OF
TAP HANDLES
TIN SIGNS
Neons and Pub Lights
C02
Tank Rells
and Testing!
507 Blackman St., Wilkes-Barre
825-5509
Hours: Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 10-6, Sat. 9-3. Wed. & Sun. By Appointment
BEER & WINE MAKING SUPPLIES
BEER SOLUTIONS
MEISTERS PARTS RENTALS
they discovered that Pedro Gon-
zalez, the festivals previous orga-
nizer, was not planning onputting
it on this year.
The main goal is actually to
save the festival, because there
wasnt going to be a festival, said
Reyes. And, out of nowhere Blan-
ca (Fernandez) had to start put-
ting it together, start organizing
it.
Reyes said Fernandez, a Scran-
ton resident, took it upon herself
to start planning the event.
The group discovered only six
weeks ago the festival was not be-
ing planned, and had to get to
work immediately to make sure
that the annual event would con-
tinue in the Scranton area.
With the short window of time
to put it together, the planning be-
came even more time consuming
than it normally would be. For or-
ganizers like Reyes, who is in the
process of beginninghis ownbusi-
ness, 5 Star Promotions and En-
tertainment, spare time is scarce.
But he founda way tohelpout, be-
cause he said he believes in the
festival.
Its something thats been go-
ing on for a few years. Everyones
expecting it, everyone knows its
going to happen, and its very im-
portant to actually keep that go-
ing, said Reyes.
Its very important for the peo-
ple in the community. Its impor-
tant also to the locals to show
them something different, just
like people see different things
when we have the Italian Festival
(and) theSt. Patricks DayParade,
its very important.
Reyes added that in many ways
the work hes done with the festiv-
al reflects what hes aiming to do
with his new business.
Basically, were going to be
putting together a lot of shows as
well as community activities
along with this business, said
Reyes.
There were some drawbacks in
having to put the festival together
in six weeks. The length of the
event, for example, had to be cut
from two days down to one, elim-
inating the parade that usually
takes place on the second day.
But, despite the changes, those
involved still feel the festival will
showcase the same spirit in one
day that it usually does in a week-
end.
Its a lot of musicfoodpeo-
ple, its fun, said Sarah Faria.
Faria became involved with the
festival after running into Fernan-
dez at the supermarket. Fernan-
dez shared with Faria the story of
how the group needed to move
quickly to put the event together.
I asked if she needed any help,
and she was like, Yes, I need all
the helpI canget, andthats howI
became anorganizer, laughedFa-
ria.
In addition to the help Faria is
able to provide, her involvement
also marks the first time in years
that the Brazilian community will
be represented at the event, a fac-
tor that also influenced Farias de-
cision to get involved.
I thought it was very impor-
tantsomeone from my commu-
nity had to do itso all the Brazi-
lians would see how important it
is to bring the community togeth-
er, said Faria.
Faria had attended the event in
years past, and said she thought
it was very interesting how all
the different Latino backgrounds
got together, howthey each come
with their culture and how they
showed it.
Faria and her fitness instructor,
Allan Souza, along with their
dance troop, will be displaying
some traditional Braziliandances,
including Samba, Zumba and Pa-
gode.
There will be traditional dances
froman assortment of many more
Latin countries as well as a per-
formance from the local group
Grupo Weepa, a demonstration
from the Scranton Police Depart-
ments K-9 unit, games for the
kids, Latin food and more.
Now that the festival is getting
closer, some organizers have al-
ready started to think about next
year. Reyes said he hasnt decided
if he would be an organizer again,
but hopes that the festival will
continue.
Someone should do it every
year. It doesnt have to be the
same people doing it, someone
should do it. Were hoping that if
someone else does it, they do it
right, (and) they do it for the right
reasons.
Theres still timetoget involved
with the annual Latin Pride Fes-
tival this year, as the organizers
are still looking for sponsors and
volunteers to work the day of the
event.
For more information on the
festival, visit www.face-
book.com/cesars.copacabana or
call 906.1850.
Part of the proceeds raisedfrom
the festival will be donated to the
K-9 unit.
LATIN
Continued from page 8
The Greater Scranton Cham-
ber of Commerce and MetroAc-
tion, the Chambers small busi-
ness development arm, are cur-
rently acceptingapplications for
the third annual SAGE Awards
(Scrantons Awards for Growth
and Excellence).
With 20 categories, these
awards celebrate the outstand-
ing efforts of the local business
community andtheir talent, cre-
ativity and innovation.
The deadline for applications
is September 12, 2012.
The application, instructions
and judging criteria are availa-
ble at www.scrantonchamber-
.com.
For more information, email
Nicole Barber at nbar-
ber@scrantonchamber.com.
Chamber and MetroAction seek nominations
10 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
S
t. Joseph Melkite Greek Catholic Church held its Lebanese-American Food Festival on Saturday and Sunday, August 11 and 12.
The festival featured ethnic foods and pastries, picnic favorites, games, a used-book sale, basket raffle and more.
For more information on the Lebanese-American Food Festival at St. Joseph Melkite Greek Catholic Church, call 343.6092.
Albert James Abda and Jamie Abda Holden Cravetts and Abby Hanson John Abda and James Abda
Delicious weekend in WS
GO LACKAWANNA/DON MCGLYNN
Bertha Milewski and Lisa Dos Santos sold tickets for the basket raffle.
GOFOR IT!
Got a news tip on your community?
online @ golackawanna.com
GET IT TOGO Call 558-0113
S
U
M
ME
R
O
F
F
U
N
G
IVE
A
W
A
Y
SUMMER OF FU
N
GIVEAW
A
Y
LOWER VALLEY EDITION
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM - $50 PRICE CHOPPER GIFT CARD
Name: _____________________________________
Phone: _____________________________________
Address: ____________________________________
_______________________________________
City: __________________________ State: _____ Zip: _________
E-mail: _______________________________________________
All entries must be received by Saturday, August 25, 2012. to be eligible. No purchase necessary. Prizes have no cash value and
are nontransferable. Winners agree to having their name/or likeness used for publicity. Entries and copies to be examined available
at our 15 North Main Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA office. Winner will be determined from all entries received and will be contacted.
Employees and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.
Or enter online at golackawanna.com
Mail entries to:
GO Summer Contest
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
All $50 Price Chopper
entries must be
received by
Saturday, August 25
LOWER VALLEY EDITION
West Side Taylor Old Forge
YOU
is now all about
E
All en
are no
at our
Employ
OO
Look for it
E
VE
R
Y
Sunday
WINNER of a
$50 REVELLOS
GIFT CERTIFICATE
Congratulations!
ANTHONY
GUILLORN
of Old Forge
W
IN
N
E
R
!
THIS WEEK...ENTER TO WIN
$50 PRICE CHOPPER GIFT CARD
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 11
12 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
Randys BarBQ
& Burger Joint
303 N. Keyser Ave. Scranton, PA
AUGUST DINNER SPECIALS
4:30 till 8pm Eat in Take Out
Like us on facebook for more specials
see menu at menusnepa.com/randysbbq.html
Tues: Pork BBQ Night
Special pricing on Pork BBQ & Ribs
Wed: BOGO Plates - buy one, get one price
Thurs: Chicken BBQ
Fri: Seafood Friday
(570) 207-3627
FREE ESTIMATES | KNOWLEDGEABLE SALES PEOPLE
GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICE!
BEST SELECTION! BEST SERVICE!
INSTALLATION
PADDING
ESTIMATES
FREE
FREE
FREE
STOREWIDE
SAVE
50
%
UP
TO
OFF
Nowavailable with
See store for details.
NO INTEREST FOR 36 MONTHS
*
$
.69
$
.69
$
139
$
.69
$
1.99
$
1.49
$
.79
$
.99
$
75 OFF
$
.99
$
2.99
$
.49
SF
SF
SF
SF
SF
SF
SF
SF
SF
SF
Material Only
Material Only
Material Only
Material Only
Material Only
Material Only
Material Only
Material Only
Material Only
Material Only
OUTDOOR CARPET
COMPARE AT: $.99 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
LAMINATE Heavy weight
COMPARE AT: $1.69 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
8x10 AREA RUGS
COMPARE AT: $169
DISCOUNT PRICE
COMMERCIAL CARPET
COMPARE AT: $1.69 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
LAMINATE Attached Pad
COMPARE AT: $2.69 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
HARDWOOD Engineered
COMPARE AT: $2.99 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
BERBER CARPET
COMPARE AT: $1.29 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
FIBER FLOOR
COMPARE AT: $1.49 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
CARPET REMNANTS
Large sizes
UP TO
PLUSH CARPET
COMPARE AT: $1.69 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
HARDWOOD
COMPARE AT: $3.49 SQ. FT.
DISCOUNT PRICE
VINYL REMNANTS
Big enough for large kitchens
FROM
3 1/4
Solid Oak
Heavy
Cushion
At participating stores only, not all products at all locations. Photos for illustrative purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Offers cannot be combined with other discounts
or promotional offers and are not valid on previous purchases. Carpet One Floor & Home. *See store for details. Subject to credit approval. See actual warranty at store for details.
Wilkes-Barre Rt. 315 Plains Twp. PHONE: 825-3435
Scranton 75 Morgan Highway PHONE: 342-7727
Hazleton 750 West Broad Street PHONE: 454-3593
Bartonsville Rt. 611 in the Poconos PHONE: 629-4082
GiantFloor.com | Serving Northeast PA since 1965.
$
100OFF
Any Purchase of $1,499 or More!
WITH COUPON
Hurry, While Supplies Last!
andtheir families inthat time. Cur-
rently, they have 33 active mem-
bers who meet once a month at
Reps Place.
It was a group of guys who ac-
tually got together at one of the lo-
cal establishments and heard of
someone that was in need. They
passed the hat around to get some-
thing started to try and help the
child who needed help and it
evolved from there, Matyjevich
said of the Black Sheeps origins.
We hear of a charity and we push
the money right back out.
We basically gave parents of a
sick child money for lodging and
gas whentheir childwas inthehos-
pital, so then it just evolved into
helping kids in need. We just try to
help kids any way we can, Ser-
geant-at-Arms Larry Spathelf, Sr.
continued.
We have our meetings on Sun-
day. We start with a meal and then
we do our general business and
then were done. We just figure out
whowere goingtohelp, Joe writes
out the checks, and everyone goes
home happy. Its a good feeling.
New members are typically
brought in by other members and
voted by majority into the group,
with some coming from families
the group has helped in the past.
Theirranksincludefirefighters, po-
liceofficers, mailmen, publicworks
employees, businessmen, lawyers,
chefs men from all walks of life.
And while they are strictly a male
organization, they are quick to
credit their girlfriends and wives
with their ongoing support.
The wives and the girlfriends
do help out. They make the food,
they sell the tickets, theyll watch
our holes at the golf tournament,
and theyll help get the prizes.
Theyrenot excluded, but it started
as a groupof guys andweve kept it
that way as a private organization,
Matyjevich clarified. We wouldnt
be here if they didnt say, We know
what youre doing, and its a very
good cause.
Their causes are also decided by
a majority vote, and in addition to
helping kids with illness or special
needs, theyve alsodonatedmoney
tocancer benefits, theScrantonPo-
lice Departments K-9 Unit, Little
Leagues, those affected by house
fires, and other charity organiza-
tions. Typically, though, they ask a
family towrite a letter tothe group
explaining their situation and the
men read it and vote on it at their
monthly meeting.
Somehow the word gets out
therethat wedowhat wedo. Some-
one will approach us or make a
phone call to a member or a friend
of a friend or sometimes you read
something in the paper, Spathelf
explained. Well sit here while
somebody reads a letter andtheyll
be 33 guys crying.
Theguyreadingwill say, I cant
read it anymore, and he passes it
ontosomebodyelse. Anillness can
popupanytime, but weretryingto
do what we can, Matyjevich add-
ed.
Its unbelievable. Its just heart-
wrenching, but were here to help
families, Spathelf emphasized.
The families keep in touch with
us. They let us know whats going
on and how things have worked
out.
It is a financial burdenona fam-
ily when a sick child is there, and
thats the last thing we want them
worrying about when they have to
worry about their kid, member
Dave Lesh said. We try to help
ease the burden that falls upon a
family. Its something very little,
but its something.
Much of their funding comes
from two annual fundraisers the
Black Sheep hold: the Spring Fling
at the Taylor Hose Company,
which was held in April, and the
Golf Tournament at Pine Hills
Country Club, 140 S. Keyser Ave.,
Taylor, scheduled for Saturday,
Aug. 25at 1p.m. Bothevents are in
their ninth year.
The money that the golfers pay
SHEEP
Continued from page 5
See SHEEP, Page 15
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 13
For $20 a person can have a
decent night out in many
venues in Scranton, but at
The Olde Brick Theatre on
Sunday, Aug. 26, it can buy
you a trip in a time machine.
To offset production costs
of Dyonisia 12, the second
annual Jason Miller Play-
wrights Project Invitational,
the Project and the Scranton
Public Theatre will hold the
Providence Speakeasy, a par-
ty with a Prohibition-era
theme featuring live jazz mu-
sic by the Mark Montella
Band, surprise guest singers,
a cocktail tasting, and more.
The location itself just sort of
lends itself to something like that.
We are located behind Stirnas
Restaurant, so the place is tucked
back and out of the way. The thea-
ter is very small; it only seats
about 100 people, maybe a little
more. The walls are exposed
brick. It can get dark in there
when we dont have the house-
lights on. It looks the part, so to
speak, so it just seemed natural
that we would want to turn the
theater into a speakeasy, ex-
plained Sarah Stachura, project
associate with the Jason Miller
Playwrights Project and part of
the volunteer committee that or-
ganized the speakeasy.
Aspeakeasy was a place where
people would gather if they want-
ed to enjoy illicit pleasures, you
could say. During the 1920s, Pro-
hibitionwas ineffect, anda speak-
easy was a place where you could
enjoy a cocktail or two and also
music at the time that might not
have been the norm. A speakeasy
was usually run by local people
and obviously the alcohol and the
things that they would enjoy were
made by themselves, and we like
to think of ourselves as sustaina-
ble and local as well. Were pro-
ducing the work of local play-
wrights, and thats what we try to
do throughout the year.
An hors doeuvre buffet made
up of donations from local busi-
nesses will be set up on the stage,
and candlelit cocktail tables will
line the vintage-decorated venue
in lieu of the theaters usual seat-
ing. Guests are encouraged to
wear period costumes inspired by
jazz-era or neo-burlesque fashion,
and prizes will be awarded for
jazziest flask, most festive fas-
cinator/hat, and other catego-
ries, such as vintage vixen.
I was a director and a play-
wright and an actor in last years
festival, so, of course, I was all
about making this years bigger
and better, and if we have to raise
a little money todoso, thenImall
for that, Stachura said.
We want to make sure that all
the local artists that were lucky
enough to have help us out re-
ceive some sort of compensation
for their time and effort. It takes a
lot of work to put on a show, and
were firm believers that everybo-
dy should receive a little reward
for their hard work.
Last year, Dyonisia was funded
by grants and money frompartici-
pants own pockets, so this year a
committee was formed to raise
the funds. The Jason Miller Play-
wrights Project Invitational will
be held the last two weeks of Sep-
tember, containing 12 short plays
by local writers inspired by the
theme apocalypse and present-
ed during two alternating profes-
sional programs. The project is
determined to pay all play-
wrights, directors, actors, and
productionstaff a stipendfor their
work.
The Jason Miller Playwrights
Project itself is committed to pro-
ducing and nurturing local writ-
ers. We do stage readings
throughout the year of work that
was written by local writers. Wed
lovetodofull productions all year,
but we cant afford it, Stachura
noted, a participant herself since
2009.
But at least with a stage read-
ing were able to nurture the local
writer and perhaps encourage
them to put of a full-fledged pro-
duction. Were all about doing ev-
erything we can to help out local
playwrights and get their work
noticed. Were here for the local
art community, and we just want
to get bigger and better.
The Project is made up of local
stage and screen writers who
work with the Scranton Public
Theatre at The Olde Brick Thea-
ter to challenge and encourage
each other in the creation of new
scripts. It is named for Pulitzer
Prize and Tony Award-winning
actor and playwright Jason Mill-
er, the Theatres artistic director
for16years until his deathin2001.
Among his goals for the Theat-
re was a writers forum, sothe Pro-
ject continues to take submis-
sions from regional playwrights
year-round.
Tickets for the speakeasy are
$20 in advance or $25 at the door
and include food and a limited
open bar. $5 a la carte tickets are
available for an optional menu of
micro performances to be offered
backstage throughout the eve-
ning, including a 1930s-syle cock-
tail tasting in the greenroom, a
spiritual consultation in the
wings, and an intimate improvisa-
tional comedy experience or pulp
drama peep show in The Bur-
lesque Dressing Room.
Its going to be a lot of fun. We
are going to have a couple surpris-
es. Its not going to be like any-
thing weve seen in Scranton for a
longtime. Wevegot alot of talent-
ed folks on our roster helping us
out with the event, Stachura
said.
Not only are you going to pay
$20, which is a great deal, for food
and wine and things like that, but
youre also going to get great mu-
sic and a great variety of enter-
tainment. Andyouget todress up.
Who doesnt want to do that?
Surprises in store at speakeasy
SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Sarah Stachura is part of the volunteer committee that organized
the Providence Speakeasy.
Kait Burrier and Carla Reck are encouraging guests to wear period
costumes to the Providence Speakeasy.
What: Providence Speakeasy to
benefit Dyonisia 12, the second
annual Jason Miller Playwrights
Project Invitational
Where: The Olde Brick Theatre, 126
W. Market St. (rear), Scranton
When: Sunday, Aug. 26, 6-9 p.m.
Cost: $20 in advance, $25 at the
door
Info: Learn more about the Jason
Miller Playwrights Project at
http://nepaplaywrights.word-
press.com or e-mail nepaplayw-
rights@live.com.
IF YOU GO
RICH HOWELLS
rhowells@golackawanna.com
14 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
I
ts the time of
year that you will
see parents smil-
ing from ear to ear
as their sweet little
ones head off to
school for the 2012-
13 school year.
Before heading
back to school next
week, head over to
the free Back to the
Books in Style event
for some quality NE-
PA family fun.
If you are looking
for some last minute
back to school sav-
ings and a fun filled
afternoon with fam-
ily, visit Back to the
Books in Style at
The Mall at Steam-
town on Saturday,
August 25 from
11a.m. to 3 p.m.
Stores in the mall will
be offering special dis-
counts on school suppli-
es, haircuts, clothing
and accessories.
The 2012 Back to the
Books in Style event is
hosted by PA Moms
Connect, a collaborative
venture composed of
two NEPA website own-
ers from Bucktown Bar-
gains and NEPA Mom.
filled with over $50
each in products in-
cluding a special work-
book on bullies from
Neon Tiki Tribe, gift
cards, special offers and
deals from national
brands and local compa-
nies. The purpose for
this giveaway is to rec-
ognize the hard work of
our favorite NEPA teach-
ers.
In addition to teachers
being rewarded at the
Back to the Books in
Style event, the first 500
people at the event will
receive a free grocery
tote for school supplies
or to use at the grocery
store throughout the
school year to save up
to six cents each visit.
The first 500 people
will also receive a free
folder filled with over
$20 in savings.
Visitors to the event
will also receive a free
Gutzy Gear, which is
the perfect accessory to
add personality to any
backpack, messenger
bag, rolling bag or duf-
fel and a great way to
send kids back to school
in style.
Special coupons will
be provided by Stony-
field Farm.
The back to school
event is free for the
entire family.
For more information
on this back to school
event, visit www.buck-
townbargains.com/
back2books.
This event is sponsored
by The Mall at Steam-
town in order to help
showcase local busi-
nesses, birthday party
venues, educational ser-
vices, after school activ-
ities, healthy kid activ-
ities, local services, par-
enting resources, com-
munity activities and
events from NEPA busi-
nesses.
This fun filled after-
noon will include ven-
dors from Price Chop-
per, Mainsource Food &
Party Warehouse, Fam-
ilies United Network,
Jewish Community Cen-
ter (JCC), YMCA, Refer-
Local, Party2Ya, Keeping
It Kleen, Commonwealth
Connections Academy,
United Sports Academy,
Great Wolf Lodge, Linn
McDonald School of
Dance, MetLife and over
a dozen direct sales
representatives.
Free entertainment
will be provided at cen-
ter court, including
magic by Michael Jinx,
performances by the
Keystone Extreme
Cheerleaders, United
Sports Academy, Green
Ridge Youth Theater
and a fashion show host-
ed by the Moms Club of
Scranton.
The first 100 teachers
in attendance will re-
ceive a free tote bag
Heading back to school in Style
DEAL DETECTIVE
J E N N A U R B A N
Laughter will have a purpose on the
AFA Art Gallerys second floor on Sat-
urday, Sept. 15.
The gallery, located at 514 Lackawan-
na Ave., Scranton, will host Laughter
With A Purpose: A Benefit for Michael
Meoni.
Meoni was diagnosed in March 2011
with acute myeloid leukemia, and all
proceeds from the benefit will be donat-
ed to help defray Meonis medical costs.
Tickets for the event are priced at $20.
This night of entertainment includes
performances from improv groups Here
We Are In Spain and Unorganized Busi-
ness, juggler Mike Simon, rock band A
Fire With Friends and acoustic guitar
player Brendan Regan.
Tickets for a basket raffle will also be
available to purchase, and refreshments
will be served.
Tickets are time specific. Shows are
scheduled for 8 and 10 p.m. Tickets are
available in advance or at the door.
For more information or to purchase
tickets, call 604.1874.
AFA gives laughter a purpose
Your
Entertainment
News Source.
Read The Guide
every Friday in
The Times Leader.
Subscribe today. 829-5000.
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 15
takescareof theprizesandthegolf fees, but
thecommunityandthelocal businessesdo-
natemoneytous knowingwhat wedo. Our
members go out andreachout to themand
the money we get fromthat is howwe help
the children. Our sponsors help us a great
deal, Spathelf said.
Once people find out what we do, they
just seemto be always there when we need
them. Theyre just a phone call away.
The guy at Pine Hills said its one of his
bigger tournaments of the year, so our suc-
cess rate is very good, Trustee Nick Azza-
relli added.
Organizingthe fling, withall its foodand
beverages donated by local residents and
businesses, and the 36-team, 18-hole tour-
nament with raffles and prizes is no easy
task, but they find that every member
comesthrougheverytimetomakethemon-
going successes.
We do what it takes. Everyone in the or-
ganization rolls their sleeves up when it
comestimetoworkingthebenefit, working
the golf tournament, and going out there
andlookingfor sponsors. Weall dowhat we
need to to make sure it is a success at the
end, Matyjevichacknowledged.
We have an outpouring of support. You
can count on your fellowsheep to do what
they saidthey were goingtodoWeve had
people join the organization for what we
did. Wehelpedason, adaughter, oragrand-
child, and, in turn, they became members
andthey couldnt do enoughfor the organi-
zation.
Matyjevich noted that even the strug-
gling economy has only had a negligible
effect ontheir fundraising efforts.
The families feel that (economic) hit
too, but were still able to help them, Lesh
said.
Its reallybeensurprisingthelast couple
years with the economy. The people have
been great, Trustee Jack Hubshman
agreed.
The group recently registered a web ad-
dress and joined Facebook to increase
awareness of their cause, and while their
name may throwpeople off at first, Hubsh-
mansaidthe BlackSheepof West Scranton
definethemselves not bytheir moniker, but
by what we do.
That namesticks out inpeoples heads,
Azzarelli pointedout.
Who would think that a bunch of guys
calling themselves the Black Sheep would
dosomuchforacharity?Wejustwanttoget
the word out that were here to help chil-
dren, Spathelf said. Basically, thats it. It
makes us feel good.
Theres no greater feeling in the world,
Hubshmaninsisted.
When you get that letter saying Thank
you, or Shes progressing, or Hes pro-
gressing, there is nothing like that, Lesh
concluded.
SHEEP
Continued from page 12
The Scranton Cultural Center at the
Masonic Temple will welcome Cats Paja-
mas, a nine piece rock band for children,
that will entertain with stories, dances,
puppets and props.
The performance is being presented as
part of the Lackawanna County Summer
Passport Program on August 23 at 11 a.m.
in the Grand Ballroom of the Scranton
Cultural Center.
This summer children who participated
in the Lackawanna County Library Sys-
tems Summer Reading Clubs were able to
obtain a passport that earned them one
free admission to the Electric City Trolley
Museum, Steamtown National Historic
Site, Lackawanna Historical Society,
Lackawanna Coal Mine Tour, PA Anthra-
cite Heritage Museum, Everhart Museum
and Scranton Cultural Center.
Children, accompanied by an adult who
has purchasedanadmissionticket, canget
their passport stamped at each site
through Friday, August 31 when the pro-
gram ends.
The program will start at the Scranton
Cultural Center before the show with a
free craft at 10:30 a.m.
All childrenattending will create a piece
of art work to remember their day with the
Cats.
For more information, visit www.scran-
tonculturalcenter.org.
Cultural Center presents Cats Pajamas
Cieslak said she felt a connec-
tion with Joseph F. Schillaci,
president of GC Sweats, who
was also passionate about the
cause.
Immediately we gave thema
discount, because of the nature
of it. I thought it was so admira-
ble of Nathan that I couldnt get
involvedfast enough. Theresno-
body that wasnt bullied at one
time in their life, including me,
said Schillaci.
After coming on board, Schil-
laci helpedmakesometweaks to
the design, and shared the news
of Nathans project with his son
Rocco A. Schillaci II, Esquire,
who, also being able to sympa-
thize with what some children
are forced to go through, spon-
sored the T-shirts through his
law firm, Schillaci Law, LLC,
paying for a portion of the pro-
duction cost.
I thought it was a great idea
and a great cause for such a
youngkidtowant toget involved
in, said Schillaci II. I think its
really in the forefront right now.
With social media, bullying is
not what it used to be. Its not
stealing your lunch money and
pushing you on the playground,
its really a psychological game.
Bullying has changed for chil-
dren in the last 10 years. After
school, children used to be able
togohome andbe safe, but now,
because of the popularity of
Facebook and texting, the bully-
ing can followstudents home.
Its more serious, added
Cieslak, a teachers aide in the
Old Forge School District. You
have children committing sui-
cide over it. Ive obviously, and
fortunately, havent been in a
school district where thats hap-
pened, but it has happenedlocal-
ly. So, its serious, and I think we
need to take it seriously.
One way to have the problem
taken more seriously is to create
awareness and also educate chil-
dren and adults on what to do if
they are being bullied, witness
bullying, orif theyaretheonedo-
ing the bullying.
Nathans T-shirt campaign
will hopefully be able to have an
impact onboth, withaportionof
the proceeds from the shirts be-
ing donated to the PACERs Na-
tional Bullying Prevention Cen-
ter.
The nonprofit organization,
whichwas originallyestablished
as an advocacy for children with
disabilities, became involved in
bullying prevention about 10
years ago, according to Julie
Hertzog of PACER.
We had so many parents con-
tacting us about bullying situa-
tions, said Hertzog.
The stories we were hearing
were heartbreaking andthey im-
pacted us, especially as an advo-
cacy organization.
PACER developed resources,
primarily online, for children.
The donations from Nathans
project will be going to help and
continue the development of
those resources.
But possiblyevenmoreimpor-
tant than the money they will be
receiving will be the potential
impact Nathan will be making
on his community, as Hertzog
explained that peer-generated
projects usually have a larger ef-
fect on children.
When a young person like
Nathan takes action like
thisthe message has just a
much stronger impact when its
comingfroma peer, andwe hear
that from students all the time,
said Hertzog.
Adults can talk about this to
kids, and its important that
adults model thepolicies andset
the procedures andrules, but its
really the kids themselves that
have such an influence in this
topic, and its really their social
issueand theyre probably the
ones that can take the strongest
action to remedy it, said Hert-
zog.
Members of Old Forge, and
surrounding communities, may
have already proven Hertzogs
theory true, as Nathan was able
to sell 75 shirts in three days.
He came in originally for 12
shirts and said, I want to sell
them to my friends, said Schil-
laci.
Andthenthis kindof all esca-
lated, said Nathan.
Cieslak said the family didnt
have to make any phone calls for
the sale of the first run of shirts,
with word of mouth bringing
members of the community to
them, who were also passionate
about their cause.
I know a lot of the parents
that bought themwere (saying),
This is so important. This is an
amazingthingthat Nathanis do-
ing, Alot of comments and a lot
of positive feedback, said Cies-
lak.
The positive feedback will
most likely continue in the com-
ingweeks, asNathanandSchilla-
ci plan on notifying the sur-
rounding school districts, about
the T-shirt sale.
Nathan has requested permis-
sion from the Old Forge School
District to sell the shirts in the
district. Old Forge Elementary
School Principal Nicole Vanlu-
vender said she is unaware if a
decision on that has been made
yet, but addedthat sheispleased
with Nathans project.
I couldnt beprouder of his ef-
forts, said Vanluvender.
He really stands up, in every
situation, for what he thinks is
right.
For moreinformationonPAC-
ER visit www.pacer.org/bully-
ing/.
DIFFERENCE
Continued from page 3
GO LACKAWANNA/DON MCGLYNN
Rocco A. Schillaci is sponsoring Nathan Cieslaks T-shirt fun-
draiser.
7
6
8
9
3
1
TO ADVERTISE IN THE DINING GUIDE CALL:
Jill Andes - 829.7188 Aubree Armezzani - 970.7291
7
6
7
9
8
6
The Real Deal...
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm
Friday & Saturday 11am-Midnight
570-341-5100
532 MOOSIC STREET, SCRANTON, PA
ANY CHEESESTEAK
OR SUB
$
1 OFF
COUPON VALID AT BOTH LOCATIONS
EXP. 8/31/12
CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER COUPONS OR DISCOUNTS.
PAGE 16 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012
7
7
0
4
5
6
7
6
8
9
3
2
BREAKFAST AND LUNCH
MON-SAT
6:30AM - 4PM
SUNDAY
7:00AM - 3PM
Eat in or Take out
Breakfast Served All Day
Catering Available
Featuring Boars Head products
www.downtowndeliandeatery.com
OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK
300 SPRUCE ST
SCRANTON
570-871-4137
715 N. STATE STREET, CLARKS SUMMIT, PA
WWW.MYCANGIANOS.COM
570-586-4896 FAX: 586-0573
400 SPRUCE STREET, SCRANTON 570-207-2667
CREEK SIDE GROVE
WWW.MYCANGIANOSCREEKSIDEGROVE.COM
CATERING
GIFT BASKETS GOURMET ITALIAN SPECIALITIES
DINNERS DELI
DESSERTS PASTRIES & MORE!
JOIN US AT OUR SCRANTON
LOCATION THURSDAYS FROM
5PM TO ? FOR HAPPY HOUR.
$1.00 OFF ANY SANDWICH
To Advertise in the
Call
Jill Andes 829-7188
Aubree Armezzani 970-7291
The Real Deal...
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Sunday-Thursday 11am-10pm
Friday & Saturday 11am-Midnight
570-341-5100
COUPON VALID AT BOTH LOCATIONS
EXP. 8/31/12 CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH
ANY OTHER COUPONS OR DISCOUNTS.
ANY
CHEESESTEAK
OR SUB
532 MOOSIC STREET, SCRANTON, PA
$
1 OFF
Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF
Blaise Alan Dente, CCC, HAAC
655-0801 www.dentescatering.com
DENTES CATERING
TABLE TALK
Dentes Tent and Rental Co.
August...the month of the Pittston Tomato Festival
For proper storage of tomatoes,
place stem side down in a single
layer on a plate and keep at
room temperature away from
direct sunlight. This will prevent
tomatoes from bruising and
softening.
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 17
18 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
wife, Mary Ann, and then in New
Mexico.
His next stop was Slippery
Rock University where, after hav-
ing been admitted on probation,
he graduated summa cum laude,
the highest honor a graduate can
receive, with a bachelor of arts in
English.
Acquiringa life-longpassionfor
poetry en route to his English de-
gree, BishopFailinghas published
what he refers to as a spattering
of his workinThe Awakenings Re-
view, Sharings Journal, Relief,
Viet Now, Mulberry Poets and
Writers Journal and Alive Now.
His work has often been cited
by The Pennsylvania Poetry So-
ciety, Inc.
He said most of his favorite po-
ems have not been submitted for
publication.
Im really not a poet, he as-
serts. Im a lazy novelist, so I try
to fit it all into one page.
The Scranton Ward is one of
eight Northeastern Pennsylvania
congregations that make up the
Scranton Stake.
Weekly services are held on
Sundays from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. at 505 Griffin Pond Rd.,
South Abington Township.
For more information, visit
http://www.facebook.com/pag-
es/Church-of-Jesus-Christ-of-Lat-
ter-Day-Saints-Scranton-Ward/.
T
o those in the 500 homes and businesses on his route,
he is known as Chuck, the ever-smiling Hawaiian
postal carrier.
To the 500 members of the Scranton Ward of The Church of
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints he is known as Bishop Fail-
ing.
Charles Keawe Failing III was recently named the bishop of
the Latter-day Saint (LDS) congregation, which meets in
South Abington Township
and serves the greater Scran-
ton area.
He is one of thousands of LDS
bishops around the world who, as
lay ministers, are not paid for the
approximately 30 hours they com-
mit to their ecclesiastical respon-
sibilities each week.
Bishops and two counselors
constitute a bishopric that over-
sees local Church programs, min-
isters to members of their congre-
gations, known as wards, and
seeks to serve the surrounding
community.
Servingas counselors toBishop
Failing in the Scranton Ward bish-
opric are Dr. Scott D. Rieder, a na-
tive of Lackawanna County and a
podiatrist with a practice in Tay-
lor, and John H. Mills, mainte-
nance manager at Keystone Col-
lege and a resident of Clarks Sum-
mit.
Bishop Failing succeeds Dr.
Kenneth R. Lord, associate dean
of the Kania School of Manage-
ment at The University of Scran-
ton, who served as bishop for the
last five years.
Bishop Failing left his native
Hawaii in1973 on a four-year tour
of duty with the U.S. Air Force.
He was stationed first in Tur-
key, where he met andmarriedhis
Called to
LEAD
Poet, postal carrier named bishop
of Latter-day Saint congregation
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Charles Keawe Failing III succeeds Dr. Kenneth R. Lord as the bishop of the Scranton Ward of the Lat-
ter-day Saint congregation.
VULLOMOTORS.COM
570-344-1600
238 RAILROAD AVENUE | SCRANTON, PA 18505
APPLY ONLINE
BANKRUPTCY...... WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT
DIVORCE...... WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT
FIXED INCOME...... WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT
FIRST TIME BUYER.... WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT
REPO...... WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT
FORECLOSURE...... WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT
UNEMPLOYMENT...... WE HAVE A BANK FOR THAT
SPECIALIZINGIN
LATE-MODEL AND
LUXURYVEHICLES
ACURA AUDI BMW
LAND ROVER LEXUS
MERCEDES-BENZ SAAB
GUARANTEEDCREDIT
APPROVAL
SIN
C
E
1
9
4
7
WE DISCRETELY FIND AND
FINANCE ANY VEHICLE
TRI-VETS
COMMUNITY
ACTION TEAM
Honor
&
Respect:
What I Most
Learned from My
Family Member
Who Served in
the Military.

Essay Contest
Wha Wha W aa hha ha
Lear Lea earr

In 500 words or less, write an essay on what you learned


most from your family member who is currently serving
in the military or has served in the past. A panel of judg-
es from all participating sponsors will select rst, second
and third place prize winners from EACH category.
Award Categories Awards
Elementary School:
Grades 4 through 6
Middle School:
Grades 7 and 8
High School:
Grades 9 through 12
College: any age student
actively enrolled
Adult: Any non-student
age 18 to 100
Awarded in
each category.
FIRST PLACE:
$250.00
SECOND PLACE:
$150.00
THIRD PLACE:
$100.00
PLUS $100 will be donated
to the library of each school
represented by the rst
place winners in the
elementary, middle and
high school categories.
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2012 SUNDAY OCTOBER 14 2012
Deadline to Enter
Please mail all entries to:
The Times Leader Essay Contest,
15 North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 19
20 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
The Old Forge Junior Blue
Devils will begin the regular
season at home today, Sunday,
August 19 with games begin-
ning at noon.
The A, B, C and D football
players and cheerleaders have
been seen the last few weeks
preparing for the season by
practicing in Pagnotti Park.
The teams home games are
played at Old Forge Veterans
Memorial Stadium.
For more information on the
Junior Blue Devils, call
877.5503, 335.4295 or
451.5076.
Lorenzo Febbo and Chris Matsko run a drill as the A team looks on.
Casey Holzman and Noah Leschinsky.
CHAMPIONS
are made in the
OFFSEASON
Nick Dodge, Colin Holzman and Logan Walton.
Tommy Souryvong.
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 21
GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER
Mike Digregorio and Jackson Linwood.
Cyrl Jeffers and Joe Cook. The D team runs line drills.
22 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
T
he Vintage Theater in Scranton has a new address.
Co-owners Conor OBrien and Theresa OConnor signeda
lease on Thursday, August 16 to move their combination all-
ages concert venue/art gallery/cafe/you-name-it to 326 Spruce St.,
Scranton.
The two are tentatively planning a soft opening at the new loca-
tion for Friday, Sept. 7 followed by a grand reopening on Friday,
Sept. 14
Prior to making the announcement, OConnor saidthat their plan
Vintage Theater co-owners plan grand reopening
FILE PHOTO
A view of the crowd from the first Scranton StorySlam, which was held at the Vintage Theater on March 31
Finding a new home
BILL THOMAS
Weekender Correspondent
The Vintage
Theater
co-owners
Theresa
OConnor
and Conor
OBrien are
planning to
reopen their
business in
September.
See VINTAGE , Page 23
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 23
is to stay in downtown Scran-
ton, within the First Friday
footprint.
We want to be somewhere
thats in walking distance of our
former space so that our regular
customers wouldnt have to go
too far out of their way from
what they were used to, she
said.
The travel may be a short one,
but its not without challenges.
Hopingtomake the move a little
more painless, OBrien and
OConner have taken to crowd-
source-funding website Indiego-
go.com. The deadline for dona-
tions was Saturday, Aug. 18.
We have the funds to get
started, at least, OConner said.
Were just hoping Indiegogo
can help us with the renovations
and our sound equipment and
maybe building a little nest just
so were not crossing our fingers
in October when the next
months rent comes.
LOOKING BACK
When the Vintage closed its
doors at 119 PennAve. inJune, it
came as a shock to many. Since
September 2009, that address
had been the Vintages home. It
now houses a print shop.
The building owners were
just looking to do something dif-
ferent, so we had to find some-
where else to go, OConnor
said. We had15 days to move. It
was a bit of a surprise to us, but
weve tried to keep the ball roll-
ing.
This isnt the first time the
Vintage has had to change loca-
tion. Originally foundedinJanu-
ary 2009 as a revival movie-
house at 222 Wyoming Ave., the
venue quickly outgrewthat spot
as it transformed into some-
thing of a one-stop destination
for all things art related. Over
the years, the Vintage has host-
ed plays, poetry readings, con-
certs, discussions and exhibits
of all kinds.
We call that arts integra-
tion, where youre bringing art
into other contexts and also in-
termingling, exchanging and in-
terchanging between the differ-
ent arts, Ted Michalowski, a
Marywood University and Keys-
tone College art instructor said.
Its always good because artists
need to support each other as
well as befriend each other.
From that comes collaboration
and growth.
Michalowski, who participa-
ted in Rhythm of the Region II,
one of the last art events the Vin-
tage heldbefore goingonhiatus,
believes the venues open-armed
eclecticism makes it a valuable
contributor to the burgeoning
NEPA art scene.
On the other hand, for people
like Pamela McNichols, even
more significant may be the Vin-
tages all-ages inclusivity.
In March, McNichols and her
daughter Zoe held the first-ever
Scranton StorySlam at the ven-
ue. Originally conceived as
Zoes high-school senior project,
the mother-daughter duo decid-
edtocontinue holdingslams fol-
lowing the success of their Vin-
tage debut.
We need to create an atmo-
sphere for our young people so
they have something to do, so
that theyre not just goingtopar-
ties all the time and so they can
become involved with a music
scene and with other different
kinds of art and culture, she
said. The local art scene is awe-
some. Great theater. Fantastic
music. Thats where a place like
the Vintage fits in, for example,
providing a place for musicians
to perform that isnt a bar.
Dan Rosler knows what thats
like. The lead singer and guita-
rist for A Fire with Friends cred-
its the Vintage with helping his
band find its footing when the
group was still in its formative
days.
When our previous practice
space was not working out,
Theresa andConor offeredtolet
us practice there, Rosler said.
Theygaveus aplacetostart, re-
ally. A lot of the first shows we
ever played were there. We had
both of our CD release shows
there. I have a lot of great memo-
ries at that place.
MOVING FORWARD
At press time, the Vintages In-
diegogo page had surpassed its
goal $3,500, earning$3,646with
15 hours left to increase that
amount, anestimated$1,000 ad-
ditionally raised through fun-
draising events at the Houdini
Museum and the bar Merts in
Scranton. The Steamtown Orig-
inal Music Showcase, set to take
place the first weekend of Sep-
tember, will also donate a por-
tion of its proceeds.
Therehavebeenpeoplecom-
ing out asking if they can donate
a portion of this or that,
OBrien said. Its a lot of little
things, but the support has been
overwhelming and every dollar
is helping.
Viewing their unexpected
move as a blessing in disguise,
OBrien and OConnor are using
it as an opportunity to evolve.
Not only are they actively seek-
ing a larger space for their new
home, the Vintage owners are al-
so concocting ideas for new of-
ferings, as well. Among such of-
ferings are plans for new cre-
ative workshops and classes.
Just as our history has pro-
ven, the Vintage has a mindof its
own, OBrien said. Its such a
community-minded venture
that it reallydepends onwhat di-
rection the community wants it
to go in. As long as that support
is there, were willing to do any-
thing and everything.
Regardless of what changes
the Vintages new location and
continued evolution bring, how-
ever, OBrien remains commit-
ted to the philosophy with
which he founded the venue
years ago.
The biggest problem in the
arts is the barrier that is often
created. While Im a firm believ-
er that the arts are something to
be honored, treasured and re-
spected, all too often it becomes
this ostentatious institution
with an attitude that its only for
the elite. Thats so wrong. Art is
for everyone, regardless of age
andregardless of experience lev-
el. Wherever there is a void, that
is what we want to fill. Its some-
thing meant to be open and in-
viting, a true community.
VINTAGE
Continued frompage 22
Just as our history has proven, the Vintage has a mind of its own.
Its such a community-minded venture that it really depends on
what direction the community wants it to go in. As long as that
support is there, were willing to do anything and everything. -Conor
OBrien
Jeannine Luby, author of Wartz and All, presents the first copy of the
childrens book to the Lackawanna County Commissioners, who funded
the work through an arts and culture grant. The book details the scenery
around the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail as seen and enjoyed by Wartz
the frog and his forest friends.
A youth coloring contest involving the book was held in conjunction
with its presentation to the Commissioners and the community. Contest
winners are, front row, from left, Ellie Moses, Scranton; Alexa Evangelist,
Blakely; and Isabella Moher, Clarks Summit. The three winners were con-
gratulated by, from left, Luby, Commissioners Jim Wansacz and Corey D.
OBrien, Maureen McGuigan, deputy director of the countys arts and
culture department, and Commissioner Patrick M. OMalley.
Wartz and All author presents first copies of new book
The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick of Lackawanna County recently present-
ed the Dr. John Corcoran Scholarship for study in Ireland to the University
of Scrantons Greylan Heffernan of Taylor.
The scholarship winner is chosen based on services, activities, interests,
work experience, a personal statement, essay and having a grade point
average of 3.0 or above. A Deans List student at the University of Scran-
ton, Heffernan is an English major with minors in communication and
history. She will be using the scholarship to support her plan to study
abroad in Galway, Ireland.
In attendance for the scholarship presentation are, seated, from left,
University of Scranton President Kevin P. Quinn, S.J., Heffernan, Dr. John
Corcoran of the Friendly Sons, standing, John L. Walker, Patrick J Cum-
mings, and Robert J. Lynett, all of the Friendly Sons, and Michael R. Si-
mons, director of study abroad and global initiatives at The University of
Scranton.
Taylor resident receives scholarship from Friendly Sons
24 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
M
OUNT COBB Riversides
Carl Pugliese was ready to
go when the high school
sports year got underway
in Lackawanna County Friday morn-
ing, August 17, with the playing of the
49th annual Jackman Memorial Boys
Golf Tournament at Scranton Munici-
pal.
Pugliese birdied two of the first six
holes and played the front nine in 1-
over-par before slowing down some-
what on the back nine.
The senior finished at 6-over-par, 78
to tie for 16th out of more than 100
players in the tournament.
I had a lot of putts drop, Pugliese
said.
A long drive on 10 had Pugliese go-
ing for the par-5 green in two and hop-
ing to get back to even par. Pugliese
lost some momentum when his sec-
ond shot was off target and he settled
for a par.
I need to work on my driver and my
short game, Pugliesesaid. I still need
to do a lot more work.
Pugliese helped Riverside to a 382
Teams compete in Jackman Memorial Golf Tournament
GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER
Scranton Preps Evan Joyce of Moosic shot 74 to finish third for the Cavaliers .
Golf season in full swing
TOMROBINSON
For Go Lackawanna
(Friday at Scranton Muni, par 72)
Team Scores
Scranton Prep 292, Wallenpaupack
308, Valley View 309, Abington
Heights 310, Dunmore 315, North
Pocono 328, Holy Cross 332, Lake-
land 332, Montrose 338, Honesdale
348, Lackawanna Trail 359, Scranton
362, Forest City 366, Delaware Valley
369, Mid Valley 370, Mountain View
379, Riverside 382, Western Wayne
385, Old Forge 395, West Scranton
413.
Top Individual Scores
70: David Pompey (SP).
72: Gary Geldhof (VV).
73: Michael Weber (D), Chris Cermina-
ro (SP), Kyle Jackson (W).
74: Evan Joyce (SP).
75: Nick Johnson (SP).
76: Jamie Egan (AH), Greg Reeves (L).
77: Alex Altier (AH), Mike Thomas (L),
Joe Chaudhari (SP), Anthony Stam-
bone (VV), Eric Miller (W), Alex Jack-
son (W).
78: Sean Conway (AH), Owen Walsh
(H), Kerry Connors (NP), Carl Pugliese
(R), Codi Bennedict (M).
79: Anthony Sebastianelli (AH), John
Barone (D), Dave Lopatka (D), Tom
Dzwonczyk (HC), Mike Brennan (L).
JACKMAN MEMORIAL
See GOLF , Page 25
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 25
MOUNT
COBB
Previewing
the up-
coming
season in most high
school sports involves
assessing returning ath-
letes and reputations of
established programs.
Better impressions are
formed when the first
contests are held, but
even then the compari-
sons must be weighed
against differing compe-
tition and challenges.
The Lackawanna League
golf season is much easier
to assess after just one day.
All of the teams with any
chance of competing for
titles attend the season-
opening Jackman Memorial
Tournament each year at
Scranton Municipal, giving
a strong hint as to who will
be the top teams and indi-
viduals in the season ahead.
As is often the case, it
was Scranton Prep that left
the strongest impression
Friday.
The Cavaliers won the
team championship by 16
strokes and had four of the
top seven individuals, in-
cluding Moosic residents
Evan Joyce and Nick John-
son.
The Jackman title does
not assure regular-season
and post-season champion-
ships for Scranton Prep, but
it does make it clear that
the teams wishing to pur-
sue those titles will have to
find a way to beat the Cava-
liers.
A year ago, Abington
Heights, Scranton Prep and
North Pocono went 1-2-3 in
the Jackman. Those teams
produced half of District 2s
eight state qualifying boys
players. Abington Heights
and North Pocono tied for
first in the Lackawanna
South, just ahead of third-
place Scranton Prep and
North Pocono ultimately
emerged as the District 2
team champion.
It was great to get the
title back from Abington
Heights, said Joyce, who
shot 74 to finish third for
the Cavaliers behind indi-
vidual champion David
Pompey (70) and low soph-
omore Chris Cerminaro
(73). Its kind of like a
kickoff to the year. Were
always pumped to win it.
Whoever wins it, it gives
a little confidence going
into the season.
Pompeys confidence
should be soaring. He ral-
lied to the title with a re-
markable 5-under-par, 31 on
the back nine, including a
hole-in-one at the par-three
12th hole.
It was a very good day,
said Johnson, who shot 74.
To win the Jackman is
spectacular. Its a very pres-
tigious team tournament to
win and to win as an indi-
vidual.
Its a great win for Dave
Pompey to take that one
home.
Joyce was dominant early
and Pompey was even
stronger late.
Johnson was steady while
posting the tournaments
second-best score among
juniors. He put his driver
within 70 yards on 14, his
fifth hole, knocked his ap-
proach to four feet and
posted his only birdie of the
day.
I just hit it solid all day,
Johnson said.
The 49th rendition of the
pre-season golf tournament
leaves the distinct impres-
sion that Scranton Prep will
once again be a solid team
all season.
Cavaliers make a
good first impression
KEEPING
SCORE
T O M R O B I N S O N
team score. The Vikings finished
17th in the 20-team field, while
neighboring rivals Old Forge and
West Scranton finished in the bot-
tom two spots.
ScrantonPrep wonthe teamtitle
with 292, beating Wallenpaupack
by 16 shots and Valley View by 17.
David Pompey won the title with
a 2-under-par, 70 and two of his
Scranton Prep teammates were
among the others to receive indi-
vidual awards.
Valley Views Gary Geldhof, who
was secondoverall, tookthe lowse-
nior award with a 72.
After the individual champion-
ship, the top two players in each
grade were honored.
Kyle Jackson of Wallenpaupack
was second in lowsenior with a 73.
Dunmores Michael Weber shot
73 and Scranton Preps Nick John-
son 75 to finish as the top two ju-
niors.
ScrantonPreps Chris Cerminaro
had a 73 and Valley Views Anthony
Stambone a 77 to lead the sopho-
more class.
Tom Dzwonczyk of Holy Cross
was the top freshman with a 79, fol-
lowed by Dylan ODell of Forest
City with an 84.
Teamscores consisted of the top
four players for each school. Teams
were allowed to use up to six play-
ers.
Pugliese, Adam Leasure (92),
Shawn Soroka (101) and Sal De-
Francesco (111) made up the River-
side score from a five-man lineup.
A.J. Cantarella and Cameron
Carpenter shot 95 each to lead Old
Forge while Ryan Voyack added a
102 and Jordan Ohler a 103. The
Blue Devils had the full six-player
lineup.
Ryan Fletcher shot 96, Mark Ma-
rinchak 97, Sam Alecky 102 and
Austin Riviello 118 for West Scran-
ton, which entered just four play-
ers.
The Jackman Memorial Girls
Tournament is scheduled for Tues-
day, August 21 at Scranton Muni.
GOLF
Continued from page 24
MOUNT COBB Junior Jordan
Ohler and sophomore A.J. Cantarel-
la return to the starting lineup this
season for the Old Forge golf team.
Blue Devils coach Joe DeStefano
expects the rest of the starting li-
neup to fluctuate throughout the
season.
Sophomore Cameron Carpenter
showed that he could be ready to be
the top newcomer to the lineup
whenheshot 95Friday, August17at
Scranton Muni to match Cantarella
for the teams best score in the Jack-
man Memorial Golf Tournament.
Our numbers are in the 20s,
DeStefano said. We have a lot of
kids playing who are pretty close to
each other.
Senior Vince Talarico, junior Rob-
ert Donovan and sophomore Cam-
eron Carpenter were the others in
the starting lineup for the season-
opening tournament.
Seniors Jared Heckman, Dave
Chromey, Tyler Cavalieri and John
Vols could all make the lineup at
times this season, along with some
of the teams younger players.
As a young team, we hope to
grow throughout the season, DeS-
tefano said.
The Blue Devils are part of the
Lackawanna Leagues new format,
which has replaced geographic divi-
sions with enrollment-based divi-
sions.
Itsagoodthingfromthefact that
we are playing smaller schools;
schools our size, DeStefano said.
But, its harder travel and some
courses we have not seen before.
The Blue Devils were seventh in
the 12-team Lackawanna Southern
Division schedule last year with a 7-
5-2 record.
Old Forge, which plays its home
matches at Summit Hills, opens its
leaguescheduleWednesday, August
22 at home against Elk Lake. The
complete schedule is: Aug. 22, ELK
LAKE; Aug. 27 at Blue Ridge; Aug.
29, HOLY CROSS; Sept. 3, LACKA-
WANNA TRAIL; Sept. 5 at Carbon-
dale; Sept. 10 at Riverside; Sept. 12
at Forest City; Sept.14, DUNMORE;
Sept. 17, MOUNTAIN VIEW; Sept.
24 at Lakeland; Sept. 26, MID VAL-
LEY: Sept. 28 at Montrose.
Old Forge has options with lineup
GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER
A.J. Cantarella returns to the starting lineup this season for the Old
Forge golf team.
TOMROBINSON
For Go Lackawanna
26 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
The challenges are plentiful for the Riv-
erside girls tennis team.
The Lady Vikes return just one player
who has ever started a varsity match as
they prepare to move to a more difficult
schedule with less hope of title conten-
tion.
We lost nine or 10 girls, Riverside
coach Robert Thomas said. Were start-
ing fromscratch. We have four returnees,
but only one girl who started a varsity
match ever.
Senior Samantha Keoonela, a part-time
starter at second doubles, is that player.
She is likely to move up to singles play
this season.
Junior Ashley Fuentes and sophomore
Morgan Gable played exhibition matches
last year and have a chance to join Keoo-
nela in the singles lineup.
Senior Kayla Creedon, the other re-
turnee, is likely to be part of the doubles
lineup.
Riverside went 6-5 to tie Elk Lake for
first place in Division 3 last season before
losing a championshipplayoff tothe Lady
Warriors, 3-2.
The Lackawanna League has eliminat-
ed divisional play this year.
Abington Heights, which was the un-
beaten Division 1 champion the last two
years, and Scranton Prep, which was the
unbeatenDivision2championduringthe
same span, are likely to battle for the title.
The smaller schools are less likely to
contend.
It gave us something to fight for, Tho-
mas said of the divisional format. For
myself and the Elk Lake, Holy Cross and
Dunmore coaches, I cant imagine theyre
too thrilled about this.
Instead of playing just Division 2 and 3
teams, Riverside will play all the Lacka-
wanna teams.
I preferred it the other way, Thomas
said, but Ive always enjoyed playing
Honesdale and North Pocono in the past.
This will give the girls a little diversity
as well.
The Lady Vikes open Tuesday, August
21with a rematch of last years Division 3
championship match then host West
Scranton Thursday.
The complete schedule: Aug. 21, ELK
LAKE; Aug. 23, WEST SCRANTON;
Aug. 27 at Mid Valley; Aug. 29 at Holy
Cross; Sept. 4 at Delaware Valley; Sept. 6
DUNMORE; Sept. 10, VALLEY VIEW;
Sept. 11, ABINGTONHEIGHTS; Sept. 13
at North Pocono; Sept. 17 at Wallenpau-
pack; Sept. 19 at Western Wayne; Sept. 24
at Scranton; Sept. 25, SCRANTON
PREP; Sept. 27, MONTROSE; Oct. 1, HO-
NESDALE.
Tougher
schedule ahead
for Lady Vikes
TOMROBINSON
For Go Lackawanna W
est Scranton en-
ters the Lacka-
wanna League
girls tennis season with a
new coach, a new lineup
and a new schedule.
Jenn Spott is the Lady In-
vaders third coach in three
seasons.
Sophomore singles player
Arianna Goldstein is the only
returning starter fromlast year.
The Lackawanna Leagues re-
turn to a complete round-robin
schedule could give West
Scranton a boost after strug-
gling in the top division for the
past three years.
Spott is in her second year as
an autistic support and special
educations teacher at West
Scranton. She played tennis for
Misericordia University after
beingpart of the teamat the for-
mer Bishop Hannan High
School in Scranton.
Goldstein is a likely singles
player.
The Lady Invaders will play
every other team in the Lacka-
wanna League while looking to
end a 19-match league losing
streak that dates back to the
2010 season. West Scranton
went just 2-32 combined while
playing the other biggest
schools during the years the
Lackawanna League split
teams up based on enrollment
size.
It will be a new set of players
trying to take advantage of the
somewhat relaxed schedule.
The remaining starters from
last years team graduated.
We spread the word out
fromlast year because we knew
the girls were graduating,
Spott said. We will have a lot of
girls who are going to be
switching around between sin-
gles and doubles.
Emily Flatt, a newcomer to
the program, is the only senior
on the team.
Junior captain Sara Skori-
towski, a likely singles player,
won on the roster last year but
not part of the starting lineup.
Coletta Remke, who may play
singles, and Kaitlyn Tokash,
whoprobably will play doubles,
are juniors who have joined the
team.
Some of the freshmen will
be part of the starting lineup,
Spott said. That will be good
for us over the next four years.
Spott said Nicole Sinclair,
one of the freshmen, probably
will be in the doubles lineup.
West Scranton faces a tough
opener Tuesday, August 21
against Abington Heights,
which has won 25 straight
league matches and claimed
the last two Division 1 titles.
The schedule is: Aug. 21,
ABINGTON HEIGHTS; Aug.
23 at Riverside; Aug. 27 at Dela-
ware Valley; Aug. 29 at Western
Wayne; Sept. 4, WALLENPAU-
PACK; Sept. 6, VALLEY VIEW:
Sept. 10 at North Pocono; Sept.
11at Mid Valley; Sept. 13 at Ho-
ly Cross; Sept. 17, SCRANTON
PREP; Sept. 19, SCRANTON;
Sept. 24, MONTROSE; Sept.
25, HONESDALE; Sept. 27,
ELK LAKE; Oct. 1, DUN-
MORE.
Lady Invaders are starting over
TOMROBINSON
For Go Lackawanna
GO LACKAWANNA/JASON RIEDMILLER
West Scranton High Schools Nancy Ramirez is looking to make
an impact on the girls tennis team this season.
Yankees stretch lead
The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees
defeated the Pawtucket Red Sox, 8-6,
Friday night, August 17, in an Internation-
al League game.
Darnell McDonald had a three-run shot
in the fourth inning, Melky Mesa hit a
two-run homer and Ramiro Pena had a
solo blast. Corban Joseph had the teams
first home run.
The win completed a victory over the
PawSox in a five-game series to help the
Yankees reach a season-high 16 games
over .500 at 72-56 while stretching their
IL North Division lead to three games.
Miners set scoring record
A.J. McKenna threw three touchdowns
in his NEPA Miners debut Aug. 11, help-
ing the team set its single-game scoring
record with an 84-8 rout of the Maryland
(NPF) is scheduled to produce more than
150 audio football game broadcasts live
over the Internet during the upcoming
season.
The North Pocono Sports Network and
the Mid Valley Sports Network have
joined the NPF Network this season.
They are added to returning affiliates,
including the Blue Devil Football Net-
work (Old Forge), the Scranton Prep
Football Network, the Dunmore Bucks
Radio Network and the Cougar Sports
Network (Valley View).
Bold Gold Media, with radio stations
Fox Sports Radio The Game (1340 and
1400 AM) and 95.3-DNH, will also have
its radio broadcasts accessing through
www.northeastpafootball.com.
The NPF Scoreboard Show will be aired
on Fox Sports Radio The Game Friday
nights from 9:30 to 11 p.m. and also fea-
tured on the Web site. The NPF Kickoff
Show will air 6 to 6:40 p.m. every Friday.
-compiled by Tom Robinson
Hawks at Scranton Memorial Stadium.
McKenna, a former Scranton High
School and Lackawanna College quarter-
back, went 4-for-5 for 112 yards passing.
The Miners scored 60 in a 2009 game
against the New York Stallions for their
previous record.
Ray Berry returned two interceptions
for a touchdown and brought a punt back
63 yards for another score.
Ceresko, Scarpetta 1-2 in state am
Moosics Kate Scarpetta finished sec-
ond in the Pennsylvania State Womens
Amateur Golf Championship Friday, Au-
gust 17.
Scarpetta lost the all-Lackawanna
County final at Allegheny Country Club
in the Pittsburgh suburbs when Ellen
Ceresko took the title on the second extra
hole.
NPF announces broadcast schedule
The Northeast Pa Football Network
SPORTS BRIEFS
Sunday, August 19, 2012 GOLackawanna 27
OBITUARIES
Jane L.
Haschak,
81, of Old
Forge,
passed
away
Thursday
morning, August 9, 2012 at
home, following an illness.
She is survivedby her be-
loved husband, Stephen M.
Haschak. The couple
would have celebrated
their 56th wedding anni-
versary on September 15.
Born in Scranton, she
was a daughter of the late
Alex and Catherine Teret-
sky and stepfather, Adam
Simonovitch.
Jane was a graduate of
Dunmore High School.
Throughout the years, she
resided with her family in
Denver, Colo., Lancaster
County; Montoursville,
and most recently, Old
Forge. Of Byzantine Ca-
tholic faith, she was a de-
voted member of St. Nicho-
las of Myra Church in Old
Forge. She will be dearly
missed by those who loved
her.
Sisters, Mary, Rose and
Olga precededher indeath.
In addition to her hus-
band, she is also survived
by two daughters, Linda
McHugh and husband,
Tim, Scranton, and Laura
Norodandhusband, David,
Clifton, Va.; granddaught-
er, Leah; grandson, Ste-
phen; brother, Nicholas
Terrace, Dunmore.
Funeral services were
scheduled to begin on
Tuesday, August 14 with
Panachida in the Thomas
P. Kearney Funeral Home
Inc., 517 N. Main St., Old
Forge, with a Divine Litur-
gy in St. Nicholas of Myra
Byzantine Catholic
Church, 140 Church St.,
Old Forge, with the Rev.
Gary Mensinger, pastor, as
celebrant. Interment will
follow in the parish ceme-
tery, Old Forge.
Please visit www.kear-
neyfuneralhome.com to
leave an online condo-
lence.
Jane L.
Haschak
AUGUST 9, 2012
Tracee A. Henning, 42,
passed away peacefully on
Thursday morning, Aug. 9 at
Abington Manor, Clarks Sum-
mit after a courageous battle
with brain cancer.
Born in Scranton on Novem-
ber 2, 1969, she is the daughter
of Helen C. Kobeski Henning
and the late Thomas G. Hen-
ning. Tracee was a 1987 gradu-
ate of Riverside High School
and received her associate de-
gree from Penn State Universi-
ty. She was also employed by
many prominent lawyers as a
paralegal.
She took pride in learning
new things and was very proud
when she learned sign lan-
guage. She was a lifelong ani-
mal lover and was the proud
owner of two adorable cats,
Snuggles and Monte.
Throughout her life she was
an avid sports fan who loved
watching her favorite teams the
NewYork Yankees and the Mia-
mi Dolphins. She also enjoyed
watching the NCAA March
Madness. Tracee loved the out-
doors and took every opportu-
nity to play tennis and golf. She
was veryproudof her swingand
would often beat everyone in a
round of golf. Her memory will
live oninthe hearts andmindof
her family for many years.
Tracee was a very beautiful
and caring person who put oth-
er people first even while fight-
ing her own disease. She was a
proud supporter of St. Judes
Childrens Hospital and of the
Paralyzed Veterans of America.
She was a member of St. Ma-
rys Church of Greenwood until
its closing when she then be-
came a member of St. Anns
Basilica, West Scranton.
Also surviving is a sister Tri-
cia, a brother Todd and a niece
Victoria, all of Scranton.
The family would like to
thankandacknowledge the out-
standing care and compassion
provided by the following pro-
fessionals: Dr. Philip Gutin, Dr.
AndrewLassman, Dr. Ingo Mel-
linghoff and Dr. Iyavat Thaisip-
kil of Memorial Sloan Kettering
Cancer Hospital, and the nurs-
es, aides and staff of Abington
Manor and Asera Care Hospice,
Clarks Summit.
Tracees family would like to
extend a very special thank you
to Dr. Mark Lyons and staff. Dr.
Lyons never stopped showing
care and compassion for Tracee
since being first diagnosed. We
cant express enough gratitude
with how much it meant to the
family and to Tracee.
Mass of Christian Burial was
held Tuesday, August 14 in St.
Anns Basilica by the Rev. Rob-
ert Jones. Memorial contribu-
tions may be made to St. Judes
Childrens Hospital, 501 St.
Jude Place, Memphis, Tenn.
38105.
Tracee A.
Henning
AUGUST 9, 2012
Aurora M. Tonti, 94, of Old Forge, died
Sunday afternoon, August 12, in the Re-
gional Hospital of Scranton.
Born in Old Forge, she was the daughter
of the late Giacinto and Alvisa Silvestri
Tonti. She was employed as a field ac-
countant in the Scranton Unemployment
Office for 48 years before her retirement.
Survivingare nephews, Jerome Tonti, of
Jessup; JosephTonti, of OldForge, andBill
Tonti, of Moosic Lake; great-nieces, great-
nephews, great-grandnieces and great-
grandnephews. She was precededindeath
by a brother, James Tonti; and a sister, Er-
cilia Tonti.
Thefuneral was heldThursday, August16
with Mass in St. Mary of the Assumption
Churchat Princeof PeaceParish, OldForge.
Interment will be in Old Forge Cemetery.
Arrangements are by the Victor M. Ferri Fu-
neral Home, 522 Fallon St., Old Forge.
Aurora M. Tonti
AUGUST12, 2012
Libia M. (Notari) Taroli, RN, 98, Old
Forge, died Friday, August 10, 2012 in the
Regional Hospital of Scranton. Her hus-
band of 71years is Chester Taroli. She was
a daughter of the late Frank and Candida
Mancia Notari and was a registered nurse
at Mercy Hospital, Scranton.
She was preceded in death by son, Ni-
cholas Taroli; brothers, John and Leo No-
tari; sister, Ada Notari. Surviving are sons,
John "Jack," Lancaster, and Paul, Athens,
Ala.; grandchildren, William and Cara Ta-
roli, Laura Walsh and John Taroli; three
great-grandchildren; nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Monday, Au-
gust 13 with Mass in St. Marys Church,
Lawrence Street, Old Forge. Arrange-
ments are by Victor M. Ferri Funeral
Home, 522 Fallon St., Old Forge.
Libia Taroli
AUGUST10, 2012
Lillian Conlon, 82, formerly of Plane
Street, Avoca, died Tuesday, August 14,
2012 at Allied Skilled Nursing, Scranton.
Born in Moosic on June 1, 1930, she was
a daughter of the late Ambrose S. and Lil-
lian (Neiman) Conlon. She was a graduate
of College Misericordia and a member of
St. Marys Church.
Prior tomovingbacktoAvocain1965, she
was employedas anurseat N.I.H., Bethesda,
Md. She was precededindeathbyher broth-
er, Ambrose Conlan Jr., and nephew Joseph
Conlon. She is survived by four nephews.
A graveside service was held on Friday,
August 17 in St. Catherines Cemetery,
Moscow. Kniffen OMalley Funeral Home
Inc., Avoca, was inchargeof arrangements.
Lillian Conlon
AUGUST14, 2012
Karen Blomain, a retired Keystone College
and Kutztown University professor, poet and
novelist died on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at
the home of her daughter in Union Dale, Pa.
When faced with grave illness, Karen contin-
ued to say with a smile that she was "lucky,
lucky." Her greatest joys in life were her family,
her travels, her innumerable best friends and
teaching how to write from the heart. All who
knew her realize that we are the ones who are
"lucky, lucky" to have had her in our lives.
Her first novel, "ATrickof Light," first publish-
ed in 2000, began what was to be a trilogy delin-
eating the lives of three women over a period of
60 years. "The Season of Lost Children," the sec-
ond novel in the series, carried the lives of Blo-
mains main characters into another generation.
The third book in the trilogy, "Im Still Me," re-
mains unfinished. A highly regarded poet, she
authored several books of poetry, and her work
appeared in numerous literary periodicals.
Born in Scranton, Karen was
a daughter of Thomas and Lu-
cille Blomain.
Survivors are her husband,
playwright Michael Downend;
brother, Thomas Blomain, and
fiance Jessica Engel; sisters,
Lucille Lyman and Donna Vandegrift; children,
James McHale, Dr. Kielty Turner and husband
R.J. Turner, Brett McHale and wife Lori McHale;
grandchildren, Kayla McHale, Colin and Claire
Turner, Lilliana and Dylan McHale. Also surviv-
ing are her six step-children, John, Mark, Patrick
and Aaron Downend; Kenwyn Loefflad and
Amanda Downend Modrovsky.
Arrangements for a Celebration of Karens life
will be made at the convenience of the family.
Cremation is through the Kevin M. Lesjack Fu-
neral Home, 513 Main St., Forest City, Pa.
Contributions inKarenBlomains memorycan
be made to the Karen Blomain Memorial Fund
established at Marywood University, Scranton.
Condolences can be sent online at www.les-
jackfuneralhome.com.
Karen Blomain
AUGUST15, 2012
Barbara J. Kirstein, 86, for-
merly of Old Forge, died Sun-
day morning, August 12, at
Wesley Village, Jenkins Town-
ship, where she has been a resi-
dent the past three years.
BorninRahway, N.J., shewas
the daughter of the late William
J. and Ruth Muddell Brunning.
Barbara spent most of her life in
New Jersey; lived in New
Hampshire from 1978 until
2005. She lived in Old Forge
since 2005. Barbara attended
the Independent Bible Church,
Duryea.
Surviving are three children,
David P Kirstein and wife, Lin-
da, Scarborough, Maine; Jo-
nathan P. Kirstein and wife,
Kathleen, Troy, N.H.; Leslie La-
Cava and husband, Reverend
Joseph, Old Forge; eight grand-
children; three great grandchil-
dren; a brother, Richard Brun-
ning, Deland, Fla.
A brother William J. Brun-
ning, Jr. preceded her in death.
The funeral services were
held on Saturday, August 18 in
the Semian Funeral Home, 704
Union St., Taylor, with her son-
in-law, Reverend Joseph LaCa-
va, associate pastor, Independ-
ent Bible Church, Duryea, offi-
ciating.
Barbara J.
Kirstein
AUGUST12, 2012
28 GOLackawanna Sunday, August 19, 2012
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 29
PAGE 30 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 31
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classied ad: Call 1-800-273-7130 Email: classieds@golackawanna.com
golackawanna.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Automatic
All Wheel Drive
Alloy Wheels
6 Airbags
IIHS Top Safety Pick
PER MONTH LEASE
10,000 MILES PER YEAR
42 MONTHS
$
259
$1,384
Total due at signing
$1,000 down payment
$0 security deposit
$259 1st month's payment
$125 registration fees
Financing contingent on lender approval. No security deposit required. Tax not included. Other lease terms available. Call for 570-346-4641 details.
570-346-4641
1-800-982-4054
HOURS: MONDAY THRU THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 8:30 P.M.
FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M. SATURDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 2:00 P.M. CLOSED SUNDAY
www.minookasubaru.com
Model DFB-21
2013 SUBARU
2.5X
FORESTER
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
BUYING
USED
VEHICLES
Call
Vitos & Ginos
949 Wyoming Ave,
Forty Fort, PA
288-8995
120 Found
FOUND. Young male
cat, tiger striped,
very friendly. Vicinity
of Broad St.
Pitttston -883-0412
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
150 Special Notices
ADOPTING
YOUR NEWBORN
is our dream.
Endless love, joy,
security awaits.
Maryann and Matt
888-225-7173
Expenses Paid

BUYING BUYING
JUNK
VEHICLES &
Heavy
Equipment
NOBODY PAYS MORE! NOBODY PAYS MORE!
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
6am to 9pm
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner. 91K.
4.8 engine, auto.
Runs great. New
paint, stake body
with metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
$4990.
412 Autos for Sale
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
MERCURY `79 ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
$1500.
570-899-1896
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE 02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
VW 10 JETTA
15,900 miles, stan-
dard transmission.
Garage kept, white
with sunroof. $15K
570-387-8639
The solution has never been easier!
Contact us at 570-970-7307 localmantra.com contact@localmantra.com
wonder how
ecommerce can
work for you?
Do you...
PAGE 32 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
557 Project/
Program
Management
566 Sales/Business
Development
557 Project/
Program
Management
566 Sales/Business
Development
www.theadvocacyalliance.org
SPEECH THERAPISTS
& OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPISTS
FULL-TIME AND PART-TIME
Speech Therapists and Occupation-
al Therapists needed to be part of
Early Intervention Evaluation
Teams.
Each Team is made up of a Speech
Therapist, Occupational Therapist,
and/or Registered Nurse (two pro-
fessionals per team) which meets
with an infant/toddler and his/her
family in Lackawanna or Susque-
hanna County to access the
infants/toddlers eligibility for early
intervention services.
Qualifications include:
A Bachelors Degree in communica-
tion disorders, speech pathology, or
occupational therapy and have
Pennsylvania certificate of clinical
competence. Experience working
with infants/toddlers or young chil-
dren preferred.
Salary and benefits commensurate
with experience. Reply in confi-
dence or for more information,
please contact:
The Advocacy Alliance
Chief Administrative Officer
846 Jefferson Avenue,
P.O. Box 1368
Scranton, PA 18501
Email:
info@theadvocacyalliance.org
Fax: (570) 207-9194
Equal Opportunity Employer
PROJECT MANAGER/
ESTIMATOR
We are the premiere, full service electrical
contractor providing professional design
services for industrial, commercial, and
residential clients in NEPA and surrounding
areas. Our integrity and can-do attitude
has earned us the reputation as the most
desirable contractor to work with in our
market.
We are a highly successful company
committed to providing quality installations
that are affordable for today, flexible for
tomorrow and incorporate up-to-date
technology.
Our dynamic growth creates an urgent need
for a Project Manager, with some estimating
experience. The PM is responsible for public
and private projects from start to finish.
The PM will work closely with the estimating
department. & field personnel with budget-
ing & planning multiple projects at a time.
The correct person for this position is cus-
tomer friendly, organized; detail oriented &
works well with team to complete projects
on time & under budget.
Qualifications include 5+ years verifiable
experience in project management on
projects of $100,000+. Experience in the
electrical field a +, knowledge of the NEC
code. Honesty, integrity, problem solver,
good listener, are all qualifications needed to
succeed in working with a large electrical
contractor that values a family atmosphere.
If you are qualified and wish to
discreetly obtain more
information,please e-mail your current
resume to nepapm@gmail.com
AUTOMOTIVE AUTOMOTIVE
SALES SALES
CONSULTANT CONSULTANT
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre
Salary & Commission Benefits
401K Plan 5 Day Work Week
Huge New & Used Inventory
BE PART OF THE
BEST SALES TEAM
IN THE VALLEY!
Valley Chevrolet is seeking
individuals who are self starters,
team oriented and driven.
(No Experience Necessary)
Apply in person to:
Blake Gagliardi, Sales Manager
Rick Merrick, Sales Manager
VALLEY CHEVROLET VALLEY CHEVROLET
412 Autos for Sale
MARZAK MOTORS
601 Green Ridge St, Scranton

SPECIAL OF THE WEEK
07 DODGE CALIPER R/T
AWD, loaded with
options including
power sun roof,
heated seats,
cruise, power win-
dows, etc. NADA
book value $12,995
Our Special
$6,995
00 Ford Taurus
Station Wagon
Silver, grey leather
interior, 132,000
miles, all options
work. $2,895
02 Mercury
Mountaineer
AWD, green exteri-
or, tan leather interi-
or, lots of options.
$4,500
99 GMC Sierra
Pickup 4x4,
extended cab, bed
cap, gray, 132,000
miles $4,795
05 CHEVY AVEO
Silver, 4 door, grey
cloth interior, A/C,
re-built transmission
with warranty, 4 cyl.
79,000 miles
$4,995
03 Mazda 6
5 speed, yellow with
grey interior, 4 door,
loaded with options.
$5,295
Warranties Avail-
able

570-445-5622
To place your
ad call...829-7130
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
FORD 76 THUNDERBIRD
All original.
$9,000
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $5,500
OR TRADE
JUST REDUCED
(570) 655-4884
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. Priced to Sell!
$23,000.
Call 570-825-6272
421 Boats &
Marinas
FISHING BOAT.
Like new. 16 1/2
Trophy Fiberglass.
25 HP Johnson
motor, 48 lb
thrust, trolling
motor with foot
control. Recharg-
er, pedestal front
seat, carpeted
floor. Live well,
storage compart-
ment. Excellent
condition. $4500.
570-675-5046
after 12 noon
YAMAHA
WAVERUNNER
GP800R
2001 2 cylinder
2stroke 784cc
Less than 20
hours of use
Recently serviced
New battery New
spark plugs
No cracks or
fades in seat
Included Yamaha
GP800Cover and
single PWC trailer
Must pick up
$4500.00
Call 570 313 7744
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
To place your
ad call...829-7130
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY 10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD 02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
FORD 02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
FORD 73 F350
Stake Body Truck
55,000 Original
miles - garage
kept, only 2 own-
ers, hydraulic lift
gate, new tires,
battery and brakes.
Excellent condition.
No rust. Must see.
$4900 or best offer
Call 570-687-6177
JEEP 02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder 4 WD, air
conditioning power
windows, door
locks, cruise, dual
air bags, tilt wheel,
AM/FM/CD. keyless
remote. 130k miles.
$5400.
570-954-3390
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18 alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
NISSAN `04
PATHFINDER
ARMADA
Excellent condition.
Too many options to
list. Runs & looks
excellent. $10,995
570-655-6132 or
570-466-8824
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18 alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LEE LE LLEEEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
DALLAS
COMMERCIAL
BUILDING
FOR LEASE
3593 MEMORIAL HIGHWAY
(RT. 415)
2625 SF BUILDING
GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR
OFFICE OR BUSINESS
SOME UTILITIES INCLUDED
AVAILABLE 9/1/12
CALL JOHN 690-0610
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 33
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
JOB FAIRS!
EVERY
THURSDAY
IN
AUGUST
FROM
12 NOON
TO 4PM
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge...LEARNAND EARN!
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
High School Diploma/GED
Computer Skills
Valid Drivers License
Criminal Background Check
Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benets Available *
Growth Creates Opportunity...Start A New Career!
506 Administrative/
Clerical
OFFICE POSITION
NEEDED
Nardone Brothers
Bakery is currently
accepting Resumes
for our office locat-
ed in the Hanover
Industrial Park.
The successful can-
didate should have
experience in work-
ing in a fast paced
office setting. In
addition to this the
candidate should
also have experi-
ence in processing
transactions, han-
dling incoming
phone calls, and
interacting with our
customers on a
daily basis. Cus-
tomer Service/Call
Center Service is a
plus. In addition to
this having the abili-
ty to create and
manage spread-
sheets in Excel is
desired. Experi-
ence using
Microsoft applica-
tions such as Excel
and Word are nec-
essary. This is a
permanent full time
position with the
starting salary
beginning at $11.00
per hour. Benefit
package also sup-
plied.
For immediate con-
sideration please
forward a current
resume to:
John Surdy
Controller
Nardone Brothers
Bakery Inc.
420 New
Commerce Blvd
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
QUANDEL
CONSTRUCTION GROUP,
INC.
Celebrating 130
years in Business
CARPENTERS
Experienced com-
mercial carpenters
needed for NE PA
Metal Stud &
Drywall
Finish Carpenters
Must meet I-9
requirements and
pass pre-employ-
ment and random
drug screens.
Fax resume to
570-544-2050 OR
e-mail
hr@quandel.com
or call
570-504-4000 to
have application
mailed to you.
Competitive
Benefits and Pay
*EOE/AA Employer*
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
522 Education/
Training
Needed at our
Wilkes-Barre, Dallas &
Mountain Top
Locations.
CALL 570-905-3322
ASK FOR LAKE GEMZIK
OR EMAIL RESUME TO:
LGEMZIK@
BUILDINGBLOCKS
LEARNINGCENTER.COM
ChildCare Teachers
TEACHERS AIDE
For school/day
care. Part time
and full time.
$7.50/hour. Call
570-823-7907
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
AGOSTINI BAKERY
OLD FORGE
Baker Wanted
Night shift.
Experience
preferred but will
train. Good hours,
good pay.
570-457-2021
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
LAWN DOCTOR
Fertilizer Technician
Full time position
applying fertilizer
and weed control.
Must be able to
work out side and
have a valid and
clean drivers
license. Starting
pay $11/hour,
includes healthcare.
Call 570-654-2575
or send resume to
group805@lawn
doctor.com
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVER, Local/Full-
time/Weekly Min.
pay. Weekend/
Casual positions
also available. CDL-
A, 2 years experi-
ence. 23yoa.
GoPenske.com
#1203677 or
866-823-0357
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DRIVERS: Co.
Great Pay/
Hometime! No-
Touch! 80% D&H.
CDL-A with 1 year
experience.
866-564-8639 x107
551 Other
Do you want
the best for
todays
children?
Foster families
are urgently
needed. Training,
support and
reimbursement
provided.
Call FCCY
1-800-747-3807
EOE
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
LOOKING FOR
SALES REP
for Fuel Right
additives for diesel
fuel/heating oil in
Eastern PA area.
Call 800-642-1910
or email:
deb@fuelright.com
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
STORE MANAGER
Large retail thrift
store in the Wilkes-
Barre,PA area
seeking a store
manager with 3 to
5 years of retail
management expe-
rience. Email
rsum to Dave
Garlinger at
dgarlinger@
voapa.org or fax to
717-766-7505.
Call 717-766-2999
for more info.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
MEASURABLE CLEANING
GUARANTEED RESULTS
Make Your
DD 214
Mean more.
JAN-PRO, a rapidly
growing, global
commercial clean-
ing franchise net-
work introduces
VetConnection, SM
the 1st branded
commercial clean-
ing business
opportunity creat-
ed just for Veter
ans.
If youre ready to
make your DD 214
mean a whole lot
more contact us
about VetConnec-
tion from JAN-PRO
today at
570-824-5774
Stephen.Zirnheld
@jan-pro.com
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
710 Appliances
REFRIGERATOR
Danby compact 1.7
cu. ft. for college
$40. 570-822-9240
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each. SOFA,
CHAIR,
OTTOMAN, 3
TABLES, great
for den. Wood
and cloth, all in
excellent condi-
tion. $450.
Call after 12 noon
570-675-5046
DINING room table,
6 high back chairs
$800. Small kitchen
set, 4 chairs $50.
Rectangle kitchen
set 4-6 chairs $70.
Round glass table, 4
chairs $85.
570-357-0264
$ $ $ $ $
Mattress
A Queen Size
Pillow Top Set
Still in Plastic
Must Sell!!!
$150
570-280-9628
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
PATIO DINING SET 4
sling spring chairs
with 4 round glass
top table, very good
condition. $100.
570-714-4350
754 Machinery &
Equipment
TRACT TRACTOR OR
John Deere Garden.
Front end loader
attachment. Other
attachments incl.,
many extras. Low
hours. excellent
condition. Serious
only. $6500 e-mail
alto.ptd.net. for
photos/questions.
758 Miscellaneous
COLLECTIBLE DOLLS
with certificates.
Wide variety of sizes
and styles. Call
570-262-2845
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
MICROWAVE CART
2 door storage on
bottom, spice shelf
on top, nearly new
$50. Sump pump,
new still in box $50.
8 place setting
Holmes & Edwards
silverware in hinged
wood storage box
$10. Long handled
garden pick $10.
Long handed single
edge ax $10. 53
cassette tapes,
mostly western $1.
each or $50 for all.
35 videos $1. each.
570-675-0920
774 Restaurant
Equipment
HOBART MIXER
Used. Model H600
60 qt. bowl, dolly,
wire whip, dough
hook, mixing
paddle plus 30 qt.
bowl, 2 wire whips,
mixing paddle
$5,000.
WALK-IN COOLER
used, size: 65wide
x 6 deep x 86 high
with floor, remote
outdoor compres-
sor & 25 line set
$3,750.
U.S. RANGE
Used, 10 burner,
2 oven base, shelf
on rear, lp gas
$800
570-675-7423
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports.
Sets, singles &
wax. Also buying
comics.
570-212-0398
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
PAGE 34 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012
815 Dogs
AUSTRALIAN
SHEPHERD PUPS
AKC, red tri. Ready
to go 8/31. $500.
Please call and
leave message.
570-762-3046
To place your
ad call...829-7130
GERMAN SHEP-
HERD purebred
pups. $550 less
cash discount.
570-836-8044
ITALIAN CANE CORSO
Mastiff Puppies
ICCF Registered &
ready to go! Par-
ents on premises.
Blue. Vet Checked
Price Reduced!
$500 & Up
570-617-4880
YORKIE PUPS
SPECIAL TODAY!
Tiny, registered.
Teddy Bear Faced
Hypo-allergenic
$800-$950
Vet checked &
dewormed
570-436-5083
840 Pet Services
MAKLE LIFE LESS
STRESSFUL
PUPPY OBEDIENCE
CLASSES
& BEGINNERS
AGILITY.
Have fun while you
learn.
Classes starting
Sept. 8th & 9th
Call Mary at
570-332-4095
or Phyllis at
570-814-9317
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
HOMES FOR SALE
5 Homes left. 3 in
Nanticoke, 2 in
Edwardsville. Price
ranging from
$20,000 to $37,000
Call 516-216-3539
Leave Message
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
HANOVER TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Aug. 19th
12:00 to 2:00
New Construction.
Lot #2, Fairway
Estates. 2,700
square feet, tile &
hardwood on 1st
floor. Cherry cabi-
nets with center
island. $399,500.
For more details:
patrickdeats.com
570-696-1041
PITTSTON TWP.
23 Ridge Street
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday 12pm-2pm
4 Bedroom
Colonial Home in
Pocono Ridge
Estates. Large
2 Car Garage,
Paved Driveway,
Electric Heat &
Central Air, 1.5
Baths, Large Eat in
Kitchen & Dining
Room. Double
Deck with Hot Tub.
Low Taxes.
$219,000
Call
570-212-1404
SWOYERSVILLE
689 Main Street
2 bedroom home on
large lot with bonus
efficiency apart-
ment. Large living
room, eat in kitchen,
screened porch.
Freshly painted and
new flooring. See
www.craiglslist.org
$69,000. Call
570-696-3368
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
& Duplex Home.
Out of flood area
On same lot. 7
apartments, 5 in
excellent condition.
Hardwood floors.
$119,000
570-822-9697
912 Lots & Acreage
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Prestigious
Highland Hills
Development
.88 Acres. $75,000
570-947-3375
915 Manufactured
Homes
PITTSTON TWP
2 bedroom. Clean.
Needs no work.
Remodeled
throughout.
$16,000.
570-851-6128 or
610-767-9456
To place your
ad call...829-7130
921 Open House
Directory
PITTSTON
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY
AUGUST 19
10AM-12PM
264 S. MAIN ST.
3 Bedrooms, 1 1/2
bath. Private drive-
way. Fenced yard.
Newer appliances.
Partially finished
basement.
$129,000
Prudential Real
Estate
Robert Bartorillo
283-9100
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
EDWARDSVILLE
1 bedroom, first
floor. W/w carpet-
ing, w/d hookup,
stove and fridge
included. Large
porch. Utilities by
tenants. 1 year
lease. $350/mo +
security. No pets.
Credit and back-
ground check.
Not section 8
approved.
570-779-5218
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, off
street parking, NO
PETS, NO SMOK-
ING. Water, Sewer,
Garbage included.
Lease & Deposit,
$625/month. Call
570-466-0005
KINGSTON
2 Deluxe 3 BR
apts. 1st floor, 2
baths plus. 2nd
floor 1.5 baths &
den plus. All
appliances,
washer/dryer
included. Car-
peted, A/C,
garage, no
pets/smoking,
lease.
(570) 287-1733
KINGSTON
72 E. 72 E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
A Available Now! vailable Now!
2nd floor. Located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room. Sun-
room. Bath. 3 bed-
rooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of clos-
ets. Built in linen
closet & hutch.
Hardwood and car-
peted floors. Fire-
place. Storage
room. Yard. Washer
/ dryer, stove /
fridge. Heat and hot
water included.
One year lease+
security. $950
570-283-4370
To place your
ad call...829-7130
KINGSTON
Available Sept. 1st
1st floor, Large 1
bedroom, bath with
shower, wall to wall
carpet. Off street
parking. $525 +
utilities. References
required. Gas heat.
No pets or smok-
ing. 570-407-3991
or 570-779-4609
KINGSTON
Beautiful, over-
sized executive
style apartment
in large historic
home. Two bed-
rooms, one bath,
granite kitchen,
hardwood floors,
dining room, liv-
ing room, base-
ment storage,
beautiful front
porch, washer/
dryer. $1,100
monthly plus util-
ities. No smok-
ing. Call
570-472-1110
KINGSTON
Modern, 1st floor, 1
bedroom, off-street
parking, no pets,
$495/month, plus
utilities & security.
Call 706-5628
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
LARKSVILLE
AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY!!
Spacious 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor with
balcony. W/d
hookup. Includes.
heat, hot water and
water. No pets.
$675 + 1 month
security.
845-386-1011
To place your
ad call...829-7130
LUZERNE
LUXURIOUS/ LUXURIOUS/
UNITS UNITS
America
Realty
Managed
570-288-1422
REMODELLING
2/3 BEDROOMS
$750+ UTILITIES,
2 YEAR LEASE,
MAPLE
KITCHENS,
APPLIANCES
SOME UNITS,
CARPORTS, GAS
FIREPLACES,
SUN PORCHES,
ETC. NO PETS/
NO SMOKING
EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION
APPLICATION.
LUZERNE
Available Sept. 1st.
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room & bath. All
appliances. Heat,
water, hot water &
sewer included. Air,
washer & dryer.
Newly painted. No
pets, non-smoking.
Security, lease &
references required.
$600/month. Call
(570) 288-4253
Leave message
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
PITTSTON
2 bedroom,
includes, fridge,
stove, heat,
garbage stickers.
Off street parking
avail. $500/month
plus security
570-388-2271
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
CLEAN & SPACIOUS
4 room apt. 2nd
floor, stove &
refrigerator, off
street parking.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Non smokers & no
pets. $575/month.
570-655-2567
To place your
ad call...829-7130
PITTSTON
MUST SEE!!!!
Modern 1 bedroom,
sunroom/patio, all
appliances. Off
street parking. Air,
utilities by tenant.
No Pets. $575/mo.
Security & Refer-
ences required.
570-655-6598
Leave message
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST WYOMING
1st floor, 1 bedroom
1 bath, newly
remodeled. All
appliances, washer,
dryer. Off street
parking, no pets.
$575 month plus
utilities, security
and references.
570-954-2972
To place your
ad call...829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
307-309 South St E.
2 bedroom, 1st
floor. New windows
& carpet. Ceramic
tile in kitchen &
bath. $650/month.
Landlord pays
water & heat. No
Pets. 1 month secu-
rity & 1 months
rent. Call Manny
718-946-8738 or
917-295-6254
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio, 1 & 2
bedroom apart-
ments. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence & all
doors electronically
locked.
Studio - $450.
1 bedroom - $550.
2 bedroom - $650.
Water & sewer
paid. One month
security deposit.
Call
570-793-6377 after
9:00 a.m. to sched-
ule an appointment.
Or email
shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com
wilkesliving.com
WILKES-BARRE
MUST SEE!
1st floor, 2 bedroom.
Heat & water in-
cluded. Washer/dry-
er hook up, yard.
$635/month. No
pets. Lease, 1st, last
& security. Refer-
ences & back-
ground check.
570-822-4302
944 Commercial
Properties
MODERN OFFICE
SPACE
WEST PITTSTON
OFF STREET
PARKING INCLUDED
Suite 1725 sq ft
Utilities included
Suite 21,450 sq ft
Utilities included
Units are unfinished
& can be fit out to
your specifications.
Call: 570-655-3329
Extension 2 -
Margie
WILKES-BARRE
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES YOULL
EVER SEE!
Warehouse, distri-
bution, storage,
light manufacturing.
Gas heat,
sprinklers,
overhead doors,
parking for 30 cars.
Yes, that $1 sq.ft.
lease!
We have 9,000
sq.ft., 27,000 sq.ft.,
and 13,000 sq. ft.
Can combine.
There is nothing
this good!
Call Larry @
570-696-4000 or
570-430-1565
950 Half Doubles
EXETER/WYOMING
2 bedrooms, new
tile kitchen & bath.
Stove, washer/dry-
er hookup, off-
street parking. No
pets. $750/month +
utilities & security.
Call (570)237-2076
To place your
ad call...829-7130
FORTY FORT
A Available Sept. 1 vailable Sept. 1
2 bedroom, newly
renovated, custom
oak kitchen cabi-
nets, tile floors,
paddle fans, 1.5
baths. Off street
parking, deck and
patio, $800 + utili-
ties; gas, electric
and water, washer
dryier hookup. Ref-
erences required,
no pets or smoking.
570-779-4609
570-407-3991
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
half double,
$700 plus
utilities, sewer
included. No pets.
Call 570-443-0770
WILKES-BARRE
Academy Street
Well maintained in
move-in condition. 6
room house with 3
bedrooms & 1 1/2
baths. Gas forced
air heat. No pets. 1
year lease. Credit
check.$625 + utili-
ties & security. Call
908-510-3879
953Houses for Rent
PITTSTON
2 bedrooms,
1 bath, newly
remodeled, all new
carpeting, washer
/dryer hookup,
off-street parking.
$650/per month
plus security, tenant
pays utilities. Call
570-883-1463,
570-654-6737 or
570-362-4019
PITTSTON
80 River Street
Newly remodeled
two story, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator, stove
& dryer, washer
hookup, two car
driveway, fenced
yard, no pets.
$800/month +
utilities. 1st,
last & security.
Call 570-417-9781
To view house go to
www.wilkesbarre
djs.com/
789PhotoAlbum
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 35
953Houses for Rent
PRINGLE
38 Hurbane St.
Central location. 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
all new appliances.
Off street parking.
Lease/security.
Pets negotiable.
$775 + utilities.
570-237-0275
WYOMING
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, living/dining
combination, refrig-
erator & stove,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets.
Gas heat with
central air. Front &
back porches.
$675/month +
utilities, security &
1st month.
570-655-8928
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1213 Paving &
Excavating
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm
Licensed & Insured
PA013253
570-868-8375
1339 Window
Service
PJs Window
Cleaning &
Janitorial
Services
Windows, Gutters,
Carpets, Power
washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
570-283-9840
timesleader.com
PLACE YOUR
GARAGE
SALE AD
CALL 800-273-7130
OR VISIT TIMESLEADER.COM 24/7 TO PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD
Package includes a sales kit, garage
sale signs, a FREE unsold merchandise
ad, your salemappedFREE onlineand
on our mobile app.
GET RIDOF
HIS STUFF
BEFORE YOU GET RID OF HIM
WELL HELP YOU
Plus a FREE BREAKFAST
fromMcDonalds.
$15
1, 2, OR 3 DAYS
8 LINES
STARTING AT
PAGE 36 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 37
PAGE 38 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012
EXIT 1 70B OFF I- 81 TO EXIT 1 . BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH L IGHT. JUST BEL OW W YOM ING V AL L EY M AL L .
*P r ices p lu s ta x & ta g s . P r io r u s e d a ily r en ta l o n s electvehicles . Selectp ictu r es f o r illu s tr a tio n p u r p o s es o n ly.
XM a n d On Sta r f ees a p p lica b le. Lo w AP R to w ell q u a lif ied b u yer s .N o tr es p o n s ib le f o r typ o g r a p hica l er r o r s .
M o n .- Thu rs .8:30- 8:00p m ; Frid a y 8:30- 7:00p m ; Sa tu rd a y 8:30- 5:00p m
821-27721-800-444-7172
601 Kid d er Street, W ilkes-Ba rre, PA
VA LLEY
CHEVROLET
Sca n Fr om
M ob ile
D evice For
M or e
Sp ecia ls
C hevy R uns Deep
$
13,999
*
2004 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT 4X4
#12416A ,6 C yl,A uto,C lim ate C ontrol,
Pow er O ptions,H eated Leather FrtSeats,
6 D isc C D ,A djustable Pedals
2010 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA
4DOOR
$
14,999
*
#12095A A ,4 C ylinder A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
A M /FM /C D ,XM Satellite Radio
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
12K
M ILES
$
14,999
*
2010 TOYOTA
COROLLA S
#12109A ,1.8L4 C yl.,A utom atic,A ir
C onditioning,PW ,PD L,Rear Spoiler,A lloy W heels,
C ruise C ontrol,Stability C ontrol,46K M iles
ONE
OW NER
$
27,999
*
#Z2735,6.0L6 Speed A utom atic,Front/Rear
A /C ,PW ,PD L,Keyless Entry,A ppearance Package,
C ruise,D eep Tinted G lass,A ux,Rear H eater,Pow er
H eated M irrors,Stabilitrak,O nly 5K M iles
2012 CHEVY EXPRESS 3500
1LT 12 PASSENGER VAN
$
16,999
*
2010 M ERCURY
M ILAN
#12739A ,4 C yl.,A uto.,A ir,PW ,
PD L,A M /FM /C D ,A lloy W heels,
Fog Lam ps,Sunroof
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
22K
M ILES
$
13,888
*
2008 SATURN AURA
XE
#12004B,A uto,A ir,PW ,PD L,Pow er Seat,
C ruise,Tilt,Traction C ontrol,A m /FM /C D
ONLY
38K
M ILES
$
13,900
*
#Z2712,6 C yl.,A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,A ir,
PW ,PD L,C ruise C ontrol,A M /FM /C D ,SteelW heels
2008 CHEVY IM PALA LS
ONLY
36K
M ILES
$
13,999
*
2011 CHEVROLET AVEO LT
4 DOOR
#12233A ,4 C yl.,1.6LEcotec A utom atic,
A ir,PW ,PD L,Tinted G lass,FrontBucket
Seats,Pow er M irrors,Victory Red,15K M iles
ONE
OW NER
$
13,987
*
2010 FORD FOCUS SE
4DR
#Z2711,4 C yl.,A uto.,Traction C ontrol,A ir,PW ,PD L,
A lloys,Rear Spoiler,Fog Lam ps,Bluetooth
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
22K
M ILES
$
13,499
*
2005 CHEVROLET
EQUINOX LS AW D
#12657A ,6 C ylinder A utom atic,A ir
C onditioning,Luggage Rack,PW ,PD L,
Tilt,A M /FM /C D ,Privacy G lass
ONLY
48K
M ILES
$
17,999
*
2008 TOYOTA RAV4
AW D
ONE
OW NER
#12737A ,A utom atic,A ir
C onditioning,C ruise C ontrol,Front
Buckets,SteelW heels,A M /FM /C D
ONLY
45K
M ILES
$
20,987
*
2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
OVERLAND AW D
HEM I
#12662B,5.7LV8 A utom atic H em i,A ir
C onditioning,D ualPow er Seats,PW ,PD L,
RoofRack,A lloy W heels,Leather & M ore
SUNROOF
ONLY
41K
M ILES
$
20,999
*
2009 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LT 4X4
#12678A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir,H eated Leather Seats,
PW ,PD L,Pow er A djustable Pedals,Running Boards,
6 D isc C D ,H igh Polished A lum inum W heels
SUNROOF
ONLY
41K
M ILES
$
17,999
*
2011 DODGE AVENGER
#12036A ,2.4LdualVVT A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,PW ,
PD L,C ruise C ontrol,A lloy W heels,C ruise C ontrol,Red,Sunroof
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
10K
M ILES
SUNROOF
$
25,999
*
2008 CHEVY SILVERADO
EXTENDED CAB
4X4
#12536A ,5.3LV8 A uto.,A ir,PW ,PD L,
P.M irrors,A lum inum W heels,Trailering Pkg.,
Locking RearD ifferential,Pow erPack Plus
ONLY
18K
M ILES
W E W ILLBUY
YOUR VEHICLE!
2005 or N ew er 2005 or N ew er
TOP DOLLA R OFFERED!
C A LL BLA KE or RIC K 821-2772
$
23,999
*
2012 CHEVROLET CAPTIVA
LS
#Z2729,4C yl.,A utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,
A M /FM /C D ,C ruise C ontrol,Traction
C ontrol,Privacy G lass,A lloy W heels
11K
M ILES
ONE
OW NER
2005 CHEVY COBALT
4 DOOR
$
8,999
*
#12014A ,4 C yl.,A uto.,A ir,SteelW heels,PD L,
Tilt,A M /FM /C D ,Rear Spoiler,O nly 58K M iles
ONE
OW NER
PRICES
FOR
E
V
E
R
Y
O
N
E
$
25,999
*
2008 HUM M ER H3 4W D
#Z2390,3.7LA uto.,A /C ,PW ,PD L,Pow er
H eated Leather Seats,Running Boards,
Keyless Entry,RoofRack,A M /FM /C D
ONLY
28K
M ILES
ONE OW NER
V is itu s 2 4 /7 a tw w w .va lleyc hevro let.c o m
$
22,499
*
2009 TOYOTA TACOM A SR5
ACCESS CAB
W / CAP
#12482A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,
Keyless Entry,Bedliner,A M /FM /C D ,
Sliding Rear W indow ,C ruise,Tilt
ONLY
34K
M ILES BACKUP
CAM ERA
VALUES
VALUES
VALLEY
VALLEY
IN
THE
$
10,499
*
2004 CHEVY M ALIBU
LX CLASSIC
#Z2722,2.2LA utom atic w / O D ,A ir,PW ,PD L,
C ruise,A M /FM /C D ,FrontBucketSeats
ONLY
22K
M ILES
$
15,999
*
2011 CHEVROLET
CRUZE LS
#12492B,1.8LEcotec A uto.,A ir,PW ,PD L,
A M /FM /C D ,Stabilitrak,O nStar,O ne O w ner
ONLY
9
M ILES
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
45K
M ILES
$
10,950
*
02-03 CHEVY ASTRO
& GM C SAFARIVANS
O nly 35K A verage M iles,
Som e w ith Bin Packages
YOUR CHOICE
ONE
OW NER
GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012 PAGE 39
THE NUM BER 1DEAL ER IN N.E.AND
C ENTRAL PENNS YL VANIA**
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils .
**As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f April 2 0 12 . All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 8 /3 1/12 .

BB
II
G G
SS
AA
VV
I I
NN
GG
S S
2012N IS S A N
ROGUE S FW D
STK#N21750
M O DEL# 22112
V IN# 282868
M SRP $23,050
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S V S E DA N
V6, CVT , Hea ted S ea ts ,
M o n ito rPkg, Ba ck-Up
Ca m era , L ea ther, S u n ro o f,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
*$279 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $20,063.70; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1725 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te
STK# N22286
M O DEL# 16212
V IN# 860766
M SRP $37,525
B U Y FOR
$
29,995
*
+ T/T
W / $30 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE,
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
279
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FOR
SA VE O VER
$7000 O FF M SR P !!!
3 A VA IL A B L E 3 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
2012N IS S A N M URA N O
S A W D
V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o r
M a ts , Ca rgo Co ver&
S p la s h Gu a rd s
*$279 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14,281.10; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1500 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te
STK# N21472
M O DEL# 23212
V IN# 211509
M SRP $32,525
B U Y FOR
$
26,995
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE,
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
279
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FOR
SA VE
O VER
$5500 O N
A LL 2012
M U R A NO S
2 A VA IL A B L E 2 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
H U G E SA VING S O N H U G E SA VING S O N
A L L 2012 M U R A NO S A L L 2012 M U R A NO S
2012N IS S A N X-TE RRA
X 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
S tep Ra ils & F lo o r
M a ts , M u ch M o re!
*$289 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14,638; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N21462
M O DEL# 24012
V IN# 508885
M SRP $28,150
B U Y FOR
$
24,995
*
+ T/T
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE,
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
28 9
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FOR
SA VE
O VER
$3000 O N
A LL 2012
XTER R A S
3 A VA IL A B L E 3 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
2012N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R
S 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C, Allo ys ,
AM / F M / CD, T ilt, Cru is e,
Rea rT in ted Gla s s ,
F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
*S a le Price p lu s ta x a n d ta gs .
STK# N22166
M O DEL# 25012
V IN# 625154
M SRP $32,315
B U Y FOR
$
26,315
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE & $250 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
$6000 O FF M SR P
O N IN STO C K 2012
P A TH FINDER S!
2 A VA IL A B L E 2 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
4 Cyl, CVT ,
A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt,
F lo o rM a ts &
S p la s h Gu a rd s
*$269 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $12,740;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity.
(+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2,202.50.
STK# N22416
M O DEL# 20212
V IN#125283
M SRP $22,750
B U Y FOR
$
20 ,995
*
+ T/T
OR
$
269
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FOR
2012N IS S A N FRON TIE R
S V V -6CRE W CA B 4X4
V6, Au to , Prem Utility
Pkg, IPo d In terfa ce, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o r
M a ts & M u ch M o re!
*$239 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18,498; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $125 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te
STK# N22053
M O DEL# 32412
V IN# 451247
M SRP $30,830
B U Y FOR
$
25,8 30
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE,
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
$
239
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FOR
SA VE
$5000 O N
A LL 2012
FR O NTIER
C C SVS
& SLS
9 A VA IL A B L E 9 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
W / $50 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE &
$50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
2012N IS S A N JUK E
S A W D
2013N IS S A N A L TIM A
2.5S S E DA N
4 Cyl, CVT , Zero Gra vity S a t,
PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o r
M a ts , T he Bes tAltim a Y et!
M u s tS ee & Drive T o d a y!
*$249 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 24 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $17,089;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1995 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50.
STK# N22340
M O DEL# 13113
V IN# 100062
M SRP $23,410
B U Y FOR
$
22,222
*
+ T/T
OR
$
249
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FOR
8 A VA IL A B L E 8 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
ROGUE
ROGUE
M ANIA M ANIA
A L L 2012N IS S A N
ROGUE S IN S TOCK
W IL L BE
S OL D!
OR M ORE !
S A V E $4,000
OFFM S RP
*
L EAS E FOR :
P ER
M O.
P L U S TAX
$
18 9
A LL 2012
R O G U ES
M U ST G O
+ T/T
$
18 ,995
*
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
OR
*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r;
Res id u a l= $12,677.50; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1;
$1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l
d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te.
O VER 100
2012 R O G U ES A VA ILA B LE
10 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS P R IC E
2 A T
TH IS
P R IC E!
PAGE 40 GOLACKAWANNA, SUNDAY, AUGUST 19, 2012