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Comment [sjs1]: Have students work on this individually. Talk about the various ways students evidenced it. Hopefully some will have listed them all out, some would have made some-sort of tree diagram, and maybe some would have made a grid (dinosaur kind on one side, color on another)…

The first method of randomly listing is just random… it’s like the first picture of thunderbolts… You might miss one! How do you know you’ve gotten them all?

The other methods are ways of counting without counting… talk about how the “multiplication” fits in there and how it is a nice way to organize your data.

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Name:

Date assigned:

Precalculus | Packer Collegiate Institute

Band:

Counting!

Today we’re going to start learning how to count. Like, yeah, you already know how to count. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, … Duh. But we’re going to come up with shortcuts to counting things. Like, counting without counting. WHAAA? Let me illustrate.

How many lightning bolts are there?

Let me illustrate. How many lightning bolts are there? How many lightning bolts are there? Okay
Let me illustrate. How many lightning bolts are there? How many lightning bolts are there? Okay

How many lightning bolts are there?

bolts are there? How many lightning bolts are there? Okay so the way you solved both

Okay so the way you solved both problems were different. And clearly the second way was way faster. What we’re going to do is to learn to count without counting.

1. A quick question: A totally made up fact: there were only four different types of dinosaurs: the Iguanodon, the Juravenator, the Allosaurus, and the Gigantosaurus. Each dinosaur came in one of three colors: red, purple, and blue. The Museum of Natural History wants to have a model of each different-looking dinosaur. How many different models

does the museum need to create? And more importantly: somehow convince me that your response is

correct.
correct.

`

2. Another quick question: There is one more additional piece of made-up fact for you to consider. Each dinosaur had one, two, three, four, or even five claws. With this additional piece of information, how many different models does the

one, two, three, four, or even five claws. With this additional piece of information, how many
one, two, three, four, or even five claws. With this additional piece of information, how many
 

museum need to create? And more importantly: somehow convince me that your response is

museum need to create? And more importantly: somehow convince me that your response is

correct.

correct .
 

Comment [sjs2]: The tree method would work The tree method would work

 

great here. However, the grid doesn’t quite work well, because we have to go into 3D.

 
  However, talk about what it would look like in 3D. Draw the 3D shape on
  However, talk about what it would look like in 3D. Draw the 3D shape on

However, talk about what it would look like in 3D. Draw the 3D shape on the board, and talk about what each small volume represents… and how it covers all possibilities.

3 (a). Ms. Tramontin gives you a multiple choice vocabulary test written in Azerbaijani.

3 (a). Ms. Tramontin gives you a multiple choice vocabulary test written in Azerbaijani .
gives you a multiple choice vocabulary test written in Azerbaijani .   Comment [sjs3]: A good
 

Comment [sjs3]: A good question for this: A good question for this:

Gecə göyün rəngi var:

2 +3 =

Okean edilir:

 

“What is relevant information from this problem?” and “What feels like it is irrelevant information?”

A. Mavi

A. altı

A. konfet

 

B. Yaşıl

B. beş

B. su

C. Qırmızı

C. sıfır

C. pul

D. Qara

D. on doqquz

D. karandaşlar

 

E. Sarı

 

How many different possible tests responses could she get back? Explain!

 

`

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(b) Ms. Tramontin gives you a fill-in-the-blank vocabulary test written in Estonian. She puts more words in the wordbank than can be used – however no word in the wordbank is used more than once.

Fill in the blanks:

Koer läks

Oli

in

Lehmad olid lähedal. Samuti oli

Word bank:

 

kakskümmend

metsa

viima

ahvide

tiik

magama

How many different possible tests responses could she get back? Explain!

(c). Ms. Tramontin gives you a fill-in-the-blank vocabulary test written in Estonian. She puts more words in the wordbank than can be used – however the words in the wordbank can be used once, twice, thrice, or even four times!

Fill in the blanks:

Koer läks

Oli

in

Lehmad olid lähedal. Samuti oli

Word bank:

 

kakskümmend

metsa

viima

ahvide

tiik

magama

How many different possible tests responses could she get back? Explain!

`

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(d) Now compare your answers to (b) and (c). Is it significantly better for you as a student to know you can’t repeat words, moderately better, or just slightly better? Justify your answer. If you can come up with a way to mathematically

express how much better, do

that!
that!

that!

that!
that!

4. (a) You are using the URL shortener bit.ly. What it does is it takes a URL like http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G- OVrI9x8Zs and converts it to something smaller and slightly less ugly like http://bit.ly/TpCmH3. Each bit.ly link has a six characters, which include only the letters of the alphabet (and are case sensitive!) and numbers! So bit.ly/TpCmH3 is different than bit.ly/TpCmh3).

According to http://bit.ly/QtaFQK, on August 28, 2012, there were about 8.2 billion different webpages out there in Internet land. Could bit.ly assign each webpage a unique webaddress?

`

Comment [sjs4]: This is a question which asks students to compare two quantities and come

Comment [sjs4]: This is a question which asks students to compare two quantities and come up with a conclusion. Coming up with a metric is harder – and that could lead to a good class discussion.

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(b) QR codes are similar to URL shorteners, except instead of generating a shorter URL, the URL is encoded in a picture:

generating a shorter URL, the URL is encoded in a picture: The way this works is

The way this works is slightly more complicated than I’m letting on, but in essence, except for four weird square shapes, each of the small squares are colored either black or white. And so there are a ton of QR codes that can be generated. (In reality, there is some awesome error correction that goes on, where things can be slightly off and it will still encode the right webpage.) For now, assume different QR code images correspond to different URLs.

If you subtract out the four “big squares” (three in the corners, one near a corner) which are used for a camera to position the QR code), there are 872 tiny squares remaining which are each colored black or white. How many different QR codes can be generated?

(c)

Which can encode more URLs: bit.ly or QR codes?

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5. New Scrabble game. You play first. You have the following seven scrabble letters. You have a computer at your disposal which will create a list all possible arrangements of those letters, whether they are words or not. 1 You will then look through this output to help you! Can you figure out how many different arrangements the computer will list? (And while you’re at it, what’s the best word you can come up with?)

at it, what’s the best word you can come up with?) 6. (a) You have the

6. (a) You have the following Scrabble tiles. But you aren’t playing Scrabble anymore. Instead, you decide you want to

find out how many different four letter arrangements can you can create (they don’t have to be words… so EBEP

works!).
works!).

works!).

works!).
works!).
create (they don’t have to be words… so EBEP works!). So… how many? (b) How many

So… how many?

(b) How many different three letter arrangements can you create?

1 The best word can be found here: http://bit.ly/NoozzQ

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Comment [sjs5]: I don’t anticipate kids will mathematize this… it’s a small enough number of

Comment [sjs5]: I don’t anticipate kids will mathematize this… it’s a small enough number of letters that they will just list them. And that’s okay! We’ll get at these things later when we move from exploration to organizing/solidifying our information.

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Comment [sjs6]: Seemingly random question… They will probably do it with dimensional analysis. We should

Comment [sjs6]: Seemingly random question… They will probably do it with dimensional analysis. We should talk about it as a tree diagram: CENTURY has arrows to 100 years… and each year has arrows to 365 days… and each day has arrows to 24 hours… and each hour has arrows to 60 minutes… and each minute has arrows to 60 seconds.

Comment [sjs7]: Again, this will be easy. We can talk about this in the tree diagram, or the 6-

dimensional cube (!)… But I like the idea of talking

about the

etc…

I like 8a because it puts in context how HUGE the answer in 8b is.

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(c)

How many different two letter arrangements can you create?

(d)

How many different one letter arrangements can you create?

(e)

We’ll go over this in more detail later (promise) but do you see anything different between Problem 7 and Problem

8a? Can you use the same method/reasoning to solve both?

7. (a) How many seconds are in a century (assuming no leap

years)?
years)?

years)?

years)?
years)?

(b) You are taking a 25 question high-energy particle physics test with 6 choices for each question, and you know

nothing about high-energy particle physics. Eep! Scary! How many different ways could you fill in the

down if that result surprises you, or if it was expected.

test? Then write
test? Then write

`

8 (a). Applebees currently has a promotion called

from their “Simmering Soups” menu, their “Sensational Salads” menu, and their “Sandwiches and Pasta” menu – and you only pay $6.99! You can’t order two things from the same menu (so you can’t get two soups). You love everything Applebees! You want to go everyday until you try every possible combination. How many days in a row are you going to Applebees? [https://vimeo.com/44314536] Justify your response by explaining why you are doing what you’re doing.

by explaining why you are doing what you’re doing. 2 . The deal has you choose

2 . The deal has you choose two items

you’re doing. 2 . The deal has you choose two items (b) Applebees decides if you

(b) Applebees decides if you want to get two soups, you should be allowed to. In fact, you are allowed to get two of the same soup! (Similarly for the other menus!) Now how many days in a row are you going to Applebees? Is it a lot different than in the previous scenario?

2 http://www.applebees.com/menu/pick-n-pair (accessed 10 August 2012)

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9. Mozart’s Musikalisches Würfelspiel (Mozart’s Dice

Game)
Game)

Game)

Game)
Game)

A minuet is a highly stylized piece of music in ¾ time. Mozart, in his infinite pianoforte wisdom, created a little “game”

where you roll a pair of dice, add them together, and they define a musical measure to be played in the minuet. You do

this 16 times, to get the 16 measures.

Assume for the first measure you roll a 2. You look on a chart that tells you what to play, and you’d play that measure. In this case the chart would read:

play that measure. In this case the chart would read: on the other hand, you rolled

on the other hand, you rolled at 10 for the first measure, you look at the chart that tells you what to play. In this case, the chart would read and you’d play this measure:

If

case, the chart would read and you’d play this measure: If A sample chart is below.

A sample chart is below. Even though I’ve only placed 8 measures in there, assume your teacher had the patience to paste all the measures in there – so every cell is filled with a measure of music!

measure measure measure measure measure measure measure measure measure measure measure measure measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
measure
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
15
16
dice sum
2
dice sum
3
dice sum
4
dice sum
5
dice sum
6
dice sum
7
dice sum
8
dice sum
9
dice sum
10
dice sum
11
dice sum
12

Roll two dice 16 times and record your sums:

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

measure

Measure

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

Go to http://bit.ly/mozartdicegame and enter your results. Ignore measures 17-32 (that’s for the trio that comes after the minuet, which we shan’t concern ourselves with) and listen to your composition (click on “Play some Music.” You can generate the score sheet for your piece too! You just (kinda) composed a minuet! (With a little help from Mozart.)

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Comment [sjs8]: Idea came from John Scammell: http://thescamdog.wordpress.com/2010/06/02/mo zarts-dice-game/
Comment [sjs8]: Idea came from John
Scammell:
http://thescamdog.wordpress.com/2010/06/02/mo
zarts-dice-game/

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`

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

Comment [sjs9]: Putting this huge number in context

Comment [sjs10]: Will generate a good class

discussion… and hopefully we’ll start previewing some prob material… where rolling a SUM of 2 is way less likely than rolling a SUM of 6. So the answer is clearly some minuets (the ones with 6s and 7s) are favored and the ones with the 2s and 12s are unfavored.

I love this question!!!

(the ones with 6s and 7s) are favored and the ones with the 2s and 12s

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Before doing any calculations, estimate how many different minuets that Mozart can generate with his little dice game. Like, just write a number estimation below. No one will look at this – but write all digits of your number out (no exponent notation).

My estimation is:

Try to figure out mathematically how many different minuets Mozart can generate. Do not only get your answer, but explain in words (and possibly diagrams/charts) how you got your answer.

If Mozart was a super fast writer, with his quill and all, and could script out a minuet every minute (see what I

did there? Anagrams! Scrabble!), how long would it take him to write out all the different possible

Write your answer in the most appropriate units (is an answer in seconds better, or is it better to give your answer in years? Or something bigger?).

minuets?
minuets?

You’re tossing dice, which is random. Are you equally likely to get every single one of the minuets, or are some

minuets more likely to pop up than others? Explain how you’re thinking of your

answer.
answer.

answer.

answer.
answer.

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