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17-1 Mcy 2005
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DepcrImenI cf SIrucIurc| Engineering
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BEHAVIOR OF SHEAR CONNECTORS
USING NORMAL AND HIGH STRENGTH CONCRETE:
PART (II): THEORETICAL STUDY


MOHAMED DABAON
1
AND MOSTAFA FAHMI
2


ABSTRACT
Theoretical work is carried out by using finite element package to study the strength and the
behavior of stud shear connectors embedded in high strength concrete. The non-linear
properties of materials were taken into consideration in the finite element modeling. The
theoretical study is verified by using the results of the experimental program in the previous
part of this paper. Parametric study was also carried out to study the effect of yield stresses of
welds, values of concrete compressive strengths and stud diameters on the strength and the
behavior of stud shear connectors. From theoretical investigation, design provisions are
proposed for the prediction of number of studs to be used in composite beams for different
concrete strengths and different diameters; taking into consideration the effect of welds types.

Keywords: composite construction, finite element modelling, high strength concrete, push-
out tests, normal strength concrete, shear connectors.


1 INTRODUCTION
Several researches were conducted to study the behavior of the interface between the concrete
slab and the steel beam for composite beams. As a summary for the theoretical investigations,
Abd-Rabou and Dabaon [1] investigated the behavior of composite beams with spiral and
bent bar shear connectors. In this model, the concrete inside the spiral space and the spiral
itself act together as one unit to resist both of the bearing pressure and the shear at the
connector base. Later on, a nonlinear finite element model for the determination of both the
endurance and the residual strength of stud shear connectors was carried out. The
investigation was carried out by Ghorab, et. al [2] under cyclic loadings. It was concluded that
the range of the applied load is inversely proportioned to the endurance. By the same year,
2003, Hegger, et. al [3] investigated, experimentally and theoretically, the effect of using
high strength steel and concrete materials on the behavior of the stud shear connector. This
study improved a test set-up for testing single studs in order to optimal the results of the
standard push-out test. In this paper, theoretical investigations are conducted to study the
strength and the behavior of stud shear connectors embedded in high strength concrete slabs
using standard push-out specimens [4].
___________________________________________________________________________
1
Prof. of structures and steel bridges, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Egypt,profdabaon@Yahoo.com.
2
Ass. Lecturer, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University, Egypt.
E05ST28 - 2
2 THEORETICAL PROGRAM
The theoretical work was structured, herein, in order to substitute the lack of investigations
involved in the finite element analysis of push-out tests using high strength concrete. The
shear connection, under this title, is formed by using the "stud shear connectors" type of
different common diameters (16, 20 and 25 mm). The ANSYS 5.4 program [5], as a finite
element package, is used in this theoretical work. In the following, a brief summary for the
present finite element model is introduced.
2.1 Solid Modeling
The geometric boundaries of the push-out specimen such as the reinforcement concrete slab
(in two parts), steel I-beam and the shear connectors should be defined as the first step in solid
modeling. The reinforcement concrete slabs were simulated by the Solid 45 3-D structural
solid. The connectors as well as the steel I-beam were also simulated, as same as the concrete
slab, by using the Solid 45 3-D structural solid. The interface between the concrete slabs and
the steel I-beam was maintained away from each other, and only to slide relative to each
other, by using the Contact 52.
2.2 Discretization Process
Using the dimensions of the push-out specimen as been tested experimentally, a finite element
mesh was performed. As known, refining the finite element mesh leads to more accurate
results, but it may lead to an expensive process. To minimize this problem, a finer mesh was
used in the region of the model where the failure was expected to take place. The finite
element mesh for the typical push-out test specimen is shown in (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1: Finite element mesh for Push-out test specimen
2.3 Material Properties
The behavior of a composite structural element may be explored in relation to the various
approximations that may be made to the real stress-strain behavior of the material of which
the structure is composed. The behavior of the material of the steel profile, the shear
connectors and the concrete slabs in the push-out test specimen would be treated as follows:
1. Steel beam material: concerning the elastic range, all structural steels exhibit nearly
identified mechanical properties, where the stress-strain ratio (modulus of elasticity)
for various kinds of steel is as E
s
= 2100 t/cm
2
. (Fig. 2) shows an idealized stress-
strain curve of the common kinds of steel materials having the same behavior in
tension and compression. This stress-strain curve is so called BISO.
2. Shear connector material: three specimens of the shear connectors are tested and the
real stress-strain curve has been used as shown in (Fig. 3). This stress-strain curve, in
ANSYS manual [5], is so called MISO.
E05ST28 - 3
f
f
y
E
s
1
`
E
t
= 1/1000 E
s

c
Stress-strain curve
Axial strain
A
x
i
a
l

s
t
r
e
s
s

[
M
P
a
]

0
A
x
i
a
l

s
t
r
e
s
s

[
k
s
i
]

0.002
10
9

8
7

6
5

4
3

2
1

0.004 0.006
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
3. Concrete slab: the stress-strain distributions of the concrete materials, (Fig. 4), are
obtained from literature [6] according to the strength of the different kinds of
concrete. The curve, in ANSYS manual [5], which simulates the behavior of the
concrete material, is the MISO one, at which the stress-strain curve is entered as a
series of several points.










Fig. 2: BISO-curve for steel profile material [5]
0
1
2
3
4
5
0 5 10 15 20


Fig. 3: MISO-curve for connector material [5]













Fig. 4: MISO-curve for concrete material [6]
2.4 Boundary Conditions
The test specimens were prevented from the transition, only, in the three nodal x, y and z
directions, at the bottom of the concrete slabs. This level was of y = 0.0 m, as shown in Fig. 1.
Strain %
S
t
r
e
s
s

[
t
/
c
m
2
]

E05ST28 - 4
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
0 1 2 3 4 5
s [mm]
P

[
t
o
n
]
Experimental [4]
Present F.E. model

2.5 Application of load
The load was applied to the top of the I-beam, distributed on 39 nodes in order to simulate the
use of the spreader plate in the experimental program. The loaded level was at y = 0.70 m.
2.6 Model analysis
In the current study, a nonlinear analysis was used, taking into account the material
nonlinearity to determine the ultimate load of the modeled push-out test specimen. A
proposed load value, bigger than the expected ultimate load, was automatically divided into
equal sub-steps searching to the ultimate load. The program adjusts the stiffness matrix to
reflect the nonlinear changes in the specimen stiffness using the Newton-Raphson equilibrium
iteration, which drove the solution to equilibrium convergence. In this research, the number of
iterations of each sub-step was taken equals to 40 iterations while the tolerance was equal to
(0.1). The ANSYS program was able to stop solving the model in two cases. These two cases
are if there is no convergence and the second if the nodal solution gets more than the 50 mm.
2.7 Verification of finite element predictions
In order to asses the validity of the finite element model to simulate the actual behavior of
push-out specimens, results of three experimental test specimens have been compared with
the results of the present finite element model. Figs. From 5 to 7 show the load-slip
relationships for the three test specimens.










Fig. 5: Load-slip relationship for P12
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
0 1 2 3 4 5
s [mm]
P

[
t
o
n
]
Present F.E.
Experimental [4]

Fig. 6: Load-slip relationship for P15
The matter of fact, during the casting of the concrete slabs of the push-out test specimens,
some times a part of the steel I-beam flange is embedded inside the concrete slab which
causes a friction resistance especially in the elastic region of loading. This may be one of the

E05ST28 - 5
reasons for the differences between the results of the finite element model, where the friction
is prevented, and the results of the experimental tests.

0
5
10
15
20
0 1 2 3 4 5
s [mm]
P

[
t
o
n
]
Present F.E.
Experimentat [4]

Fig. 7: Load-slip relationship for P16
3 EVALUATION OF CURRENT CODES
According to most relevant international codes, the design of shear connection may be
achieved by one of the following two methods:
1. Experimental evidence (Test evaluation) of push-out test considering the properties of
materials and the dimensions of test specimens.
2. Empirical formulae or tables.
3.1 Design Forces From The Test Evaluation
According to EC4 three tests are conducted on normally identical specimens to determine the
characteristic resistance PRk for the concrete and connector material of specified strengths fck
and fu, respectively.
The characteristic resistance should then be taken as the minimum failure load, divided by the
number of connectors and reduced by 10 %, thus,
P
Rk
= (0.9).P
u,exp
(1)
The design resistance of P
Rd
, using any type of shear connectors, may be determined by using
the following formula:
P
Rd
= (f
u
/f
ut
).(P
Rk
/
v
) _ (P
Rk
/
v
) (2)
where, f
u
= 3.6 t/cm
2
, f
ut
= 4.0 t/cm
2
and
v
= 1.25 then,
P
Rd
= (f
u
/f
ut
).(0.9).( P
u,exp
/
v
)
= 0.9 (0.9/1.25). P
u,exp

= 0.648 P
u,exp
_ 0.72 P
u,exp

P
Rd
= 0.648 P
u,exp

This value is according to the EC4 test evaluation whereas BS5450, considers the same
results. Accordingly, the design values of the present tests are summarized in (Table 1). From
(Table 1), it can be noticed that the proportional limit of the push-out test for all loads are in
good agreement with the design values of P
Rd
for all tests. From (Fig. 8), it can be recognized
that the design values, generally lie, in the elastic zone and this is the safe side for the design
of shear connectors. From our point of view, the method of calculating P
Rd
obtained from the
test results by means of the test evaluation, as in the EC4 [7] and BS5450 [8], is accurate and
quite suitable for design purposes for both normal and high strength concrete.

E05ST28 - 6
P
Rd
P
p,exp
Table 1: Design values of P
Rd
of the test evaluation

*
P
p,exp
: proportional load of shear connector,
**
P
u,exp
: ultimate load of shear connector, 1:

Without sheeting,

2:

Parallel sheeting, 3: Transverse sheeting.
0
5
10
15
20
0 5 10 15 20

Fig. 8: Evaluation of test results against the proportional load
3.2 Design Forces From Empirical Equations
It is well known that there is another technique for the evaluation of the design resistance for
a composite shear connector by using the formulae given by the international codes of
practices such as the EC4, AISC 1985, ECP 2001 and the BS5450. Some of them give the
value of resistance through formulae as in the EC4, AISC 1985 [9] and ECP 2001[10]. The
others use design tables as in the BS5450. The connector resistance is identified as a design
Exp. loads
[
P
p
,
e
x
p


/

P
R
d
]

T
e
s
t


e
v
a
l
u
a
t
i
o
n

P
R
d

[
t
o
n
]

P
u,exp
**

[ton]
P
p,exp
*

[ton]
C
o
n
c
r
e
t
e

s
t
r
e
n
g
t
h

[
k
g
/
c
m
2
]

A
n
g
l
e

o
f

i
n
c
l
i
n
a
t
i
o
n

[
d
e
g
r
e
e
]

W
e
l
d

s
i
z
e

[
m
m
]

T
y
p
e

o
f

s
l
a
b

T
y
p
e

o
f

c
o
n
n
e
c
t
o
r

S
p
e
c
i
m
e
n

N
o
.

1.05 10.5 16.20 11 365 P1
1.12 12.51 19.30 14 555 P2
1.12 12.96 20.00 14.5 630
0 5 1 Angle
P3
0.98 11.21 17.30 11 290 P4
1.04 11.99 18.50 12.5 560 P5
1.12 12.05 18.60 13.5 850
0
P6
1.04 10.58 16.32 11 260 15 P7
1.02 9.83 15.17 10 260 30 P8
1.18 7.67 11.83 9 255 45
5 1 Channel
P9
0.95 5.25 8.10 5 380 P10
0.96 5.42 8.36 5.2 410
5
P11
1.05 7.63 11.77 8 600
N.A.
*
12
1 Stud 16
P12
0.82 7.3 11.27 6 430 P13
0.96 7.32 11.30 7 540
5
P14
0.95 10.53 16.25 10 650
N.A.
12
1 Stud 20
P15
1.06 11.34 17.50 12 700 1 P16
1.03 4.86 7.50 5 400 P17
1.08 7.44 11.48 8 650
2
P18
1.12 3.56 5.50 4 360 P19
1.0 3.79 5.85 3.8 630
N.A. 12
3
Stud 22
P20
0.94 7.97 12.30 7.5 430 P21
1.13 9.72 15 11 520
N.A. 5 1 Stud 25
P22
E05ST28 - 7
resistance (P
Rd
) as introduced in the EC4 and the BS5450 while it is calculated as an
allowable design force (P
Ad
) in the AISC 1985 and the ECP 2001. In the following, a brief
summary of these equations and tables is provided. The main goal of this section is to
examine the results obtained from the different codes and specifications in case of using high
strength concrete in the composite connection. New formulae or tables are also suggested for
design application. (Table 2), represents the calculated design forces for test specimens made
of high strength concrete (HSC). In these specimens, the used concrete is of the high strength
concrete type and the test specimens were welded using typical welds technique. (Figure 9)
demonstrates the relationship between the experimental ultimate and proportional limits
compared with the design resistance (P
Rd
) calculated by the equations of EC4 for the tested
specimens. By careful inspection of Table 2 and Fig. 9, it can be seen that the design forces,
more or less, in good agreement with the proportional load in case of angle connectors. On the
other hand, applying the equations or tables given by the codes of practices for designing stud
shear connectors with high strength concrete give conservative values compared with the
proportional load. Thus, the use of these design equations and tables, provided by the codes of
practices or specifications, may need further modification to satisfy the economy
requirements. To provide more clarification to this point, the following parametric study is
carried out.
Table 2: Design forces for the (HSC) test specimens
Design forces Exp. limits
BS 5950
P
Rd
[ton]
ECP 2001
& AISC
P
Ad
[ton]
EC4
Equations
P
Rd
[ton]
P
u
,
e
x
p

[
t
o
n
]

P
p
,
e
x
p

[
t
o
n
]

C
o
n
c
r
e
t
e

s
t
r
e
n
g
t
h

[
k
g
/
c
m
2
]

T
y
p
e

o
f

s
l
a
b

T
y
p
e

o
f

c
o
n
n
e
c
t
o
r

S
p
e
c
i
m
e
n

N
o
.

N.A. 5.57 13.42 19.30 14 555 P2
N.A. 5.57 14.6 20 14.5 630
1 Angle
P3
N.A.

4.18 N.A.

18.50 12.5 560 P5
N.A. 4.18 N.A. 18.60 13.5 850
1 Channel
P6
8.2 3.03 5.15 11.77 8 600 1 Stud 16 P12
N.A. 4.74 8.05 16.25 10 650 1 Stud 20 P15
13.9 5.73 9.74 17.50 12 700 1 P16
N.A. N.A. 8.77 11.48 8 650 2 P18
N.A. N.A. 9.74 5.85 3.8 630 2
Stud 22
P20
*
Not Applicable,
1
Without sheeting,
2
Parallel sheeting,
3
Transverse sheeting.
P2
P3
P12
P15
P16
P18
P20
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
Experimental ultimate load
Experimental Proportional load
Design resistance of EC4

Fig. 9: Evaluation of the values P
u,exp
, P
p,exp
and P
Rd
of EC4
E05ST28 - 8
4 PARAMETRIC STUDY
The parametric study was conducted, in this research, using the "stud shear connectors" type
by taking into consideration the effect of the following variables:
1. The value of the yield stress of the weld collar used to fix the stud shear connector to
upper flange of the steel I-beam; (F
y
= 6.75 and 3.6 t/cm
2
).
2. The value of the concrete compressive strength using either normal or high strength
concrete; (250, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 and 1000 kg/cm
2
).
3. The stud shear connector diameter; (16, 20 and 25 mm).
4.1 Effect Of Concrete Compressive Strength
In (Fig. 10), the ultimate load, carried by the studs in each group of model diameter 16, 20
and 25 mm, is demonstrated. This figure shows that the ultimate load carried by the stud, of
such diameters, is increased with the increase in the value of the concrete compressive
strength. The relationship between the ultimate load of stud shear connectors and the value of
the concrete cube strength used in the push-out test is shown in (Fig. 11). In this curve, the
relationship is acting as a power function in the region of normal concrete strengths, similar to
the function used by the EC4 (P
Rd
= 0.29 u d
2
(f
ck
E
c
) /
v
), while it acts as a linear function
in the region of the medium and high strength concrete. This may encourage to consider a
linear relationship in the region of medium and high strength concrete.
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200
Stud diameter 16
mm
Stud diameter 20
mm

Fig.10: Ultimate load for different stud diameters
The values of the proportional and ultimate loads and corresponding slips are tabulated in
(Table 3) for the 16 mm stud diameter, for the other diameters see [4]. From (Tables 3) and
the others obtained in [4], the ratio of the proportional and the ultimate load, (P
p,max
/ P
u
), can
be calculated. These average ratios are found to be (0.69, 0.69 and 0.73) for the stud shear
connectors of diameter 16, 20 and 25 mm, respectively. In order to propose a design table, a
safety factor () is taken equals to 1.5. The design resistance (P
Rd
), according to this proposed
table will be (P
u
/ ). Figure 12 shows the position of the suggested design values for the 16-
mm stud diameters against the finite element results for proportional and ultimate load. It can
be clearly noticed that the suggested results are located in the safe side of the curves. Other
diameters can be revised in [4].
4.2 Effect of Stud Shear Connector Diameter
The effect of the diameter of stud shear connector upon the strength and behavior of shear
connection was studied by the same groups of models discussed in the previous section, also,
with the respect of weld yield stress of (6.75 t/cm
2
). Fig. 13 represents the ultimate load
versus the cross-sectional area of the stud shear connector for the normal and high strength
Concrete compressive strength [kg/cm
2
]
U
l
t
i
m
a
t
e

l
o
a
d

[
t
o
n
]

E05ST28 - 9
l
o
a
d

[
t
o
n
]

concrete. From this curve, it can be recognized that the increase in the cross-sectional area
increases the ultimate load carried by the connector.

0
10
20
30
40
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200


Fig.11: Proposed curve of relationship between P
u
and cube strength
0
5
10
15
20
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200
Proposed design load
Proportional load
Ultimate load


Fig.12: Proposed design resistance for 16 mm-stud
4.3 Comparison Between Both Values of Weld Yield Stress
In the first part of the parametric study, the weld used was of (F
y
= 6.75 t/cm
2
) while it was of
(F
y
= 3.60 t/cm
2
) in the second one. This range of the yield stress of welds is taken as the
upper and the lower limits of the yield stresses at which the international codes of practices
are interested. In the following, comparison will take place by studying the effect of the yield
stress of welds on the strength of the stud with addition to the study of the change of the stud
diameter under the two cases of the yield stress of welds. (Table 4) is constructed using the
load versus slip curves observed from the finite element study for the case of 16 mm stud
diameter. In this table, the proportional and ultimate loads, from both cases of parametric
studies, are tabulated in addition to the proportional and ultimate ratios between them. The
load ratios tabulated in this table is the values observed from first part of the study over the
corresponding values from the second parametric study. The average proportional and
ultimate load ratios are calculated for the finite element models. The average proportional
load ratios are about 1.26, 1.27 and 1.28 for the 16, 20 and 25 mm-stud shear connectors
models, respectively. The ultimate load ratios calculated are equal to 1.16, 1.17 and 1.2 for
f (f
cu
) f (f
cu
)
n

Normal concrete Medium and high concrete
EC4 and BS5450

Concrete compressive strength [kg/cm
2
]
U
l
t
i
m
a
t
e

l
o
a
d

[
t
o
n
]

Concrete compressive strength [kg/cm2]
E05ST28 - 10
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
0 1 2 3 4 5 6
Cross-sectional area of stud shear connector [cm
2
]
P
u

[
t
o
n
]

1000 kg/cm
2

800 kg/cm
2

700 kg/cm
2

600 kg/cm
2

500 kg/cm
2
400 kg/cm
2

300 kg/cm
2

250 kg/cm
2

the same groups of models, respectively. From these ratios, the designer may understand the
importance of using a yield stress of welds as much bigger as possible to benefit from the
increase in the proportional load, which may be considered as the upper limit for the design
resistance of connector, by using this high stress of weld. In (Fig. 14), the load-slip
relationship for 16 mm-stud shear connector with concrete of (1000 kg/cm
2
) cube strength in
the two cases of weld yield stresses values, is given as an example. From this figure it can be
recognized that the effect of the high yield stress of welds appears as increase in both the
proportional and ultimate loads. The stiffness of the connector is same as it is in the lower
yield stress of welds. This increase in the elastic zone between the two welding grades is
considerable importance, from our point of view, it is recommended to use the higher yield
stress of welds as possible. It can be seen also that the maximum slip of stud increases by
using lower values of the yield stress of used welds.
Table 3: Theoretical limitations for stud 16 mm diameter

























Fig. 13: Ultimate load for different stud cross-sections
As a general conclusion from the results of this parametric study, is the proposed method of
evaluating the design resistance of stud shear connectors. It is to use a table technique as used
in the BS5450. The proposed values of the design resistance may be suggested as shown in
Table 5, in case of yield stress equals (6.75 t/cm
2
) for the welds. It was found that the ratio of
the ultimate to proportional limit (P
u
/ P
p,max
) is ranging from (1.31 to 1.45). Thus, it can be
proposed that the design resistance (P
Rd
) for stud shear connectors to be as follows:
P
Rd
= (P
u
/ 1.5) < P
p,max
(3)
S
t
u
d

d
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

[
m
m
]

C
u
b
i
c

s
t
r
e
n
g
t
h

[
k
g
/
c
m
2
]

P
p
,
m
a
x
[
t
o
n
]

P
u

[
t
o
n
]

P
p
,
m
a
x


/

P
u

s
p
,
m
a
x

[
m
m
]

s
u

[
m
m
]

250 5.5 8 0.69 0.238 2.8089
300 6 8.75 0.69 0.2248 4.4567
400 7 9.75 0.72 0.2047 3.994
500 7.5 11 0.68 0.2332 4.2555
600 8 12 0.67 0.177 4.217
700 9 13 0.69 0.1991 4.6285
800 9.5 13.5 0.7 0.1935 3.9991
16
1000 10.5 15 0.7 0.1793 3.9894
E05ST28 - 11
L
o
a
d

[
t
o
n
]

Table 4: Theoretical limitations for stud 16 mm diameter
F
y
= 6. 75 [ t / cm
2
] F
y
=3. 60 [t/cm
2
]
S
t
u
d

d
i
a
m
e
t
e
r

[
m
m
]

C
u
b
i
c

s
t
r
e
n
g
t
h

[
k
g
/
c
m
2
]

P
p
,
m
a
x
[
t
o
n
]

(
1
)

P
u

[
t
o
n
]

(
2
)

P
p
,
m
a
x
[
t
o
n
]

(
3
)

P
u

[
t
o
n
]

(
4
)

P
p
,
m
a
x

r
a
t
i
o

(
1
)
/
(
3
)

250 5.5 8 4 6.75 1.375
300 6 8.75 5 7.5 1.2
400 7 9.75 5.5 8.5 1.273
500 7.5 11 6 9.25 1.25
600 8 12 6.5 10.5 1.23
700 9 13 7 11 1.286
800 9.5 13.5 7.5 11.5 1.267
16
1000 10.5 15 8.5 13.5 1.271
0
4
8
12
16
0 2 4 6 8 10


Fig.14: Load-slip relationship for 16 mm-stud with 1000 kg/cm
2
concrete cube strength

Table 5: Suggested design resistance of stud connectors in [ton]












5 CONCLUSIONS
The main goal of this thesis is to investigate the strength and the behavior of the shear
connectors of composite beams using the high strength concrete. From this investigation, and
Stud diameter [mm] Concrete cube
strength
[kg/cm
2
] 16 20 25
250 5.3 8.3 11.3
300 5.8 8.8 12.7
400 6.5 9.7 14
500 7.3 10.7 14.7
600 8 11.7 16
700 8.7 12.5 17
800 9 13.2 18
1000 10 14.7 20
Slip [mm]
6.75 t/cm
2
yeild stress of welds
3.60 t/cm
2
yeild stress of welds
E05ST28 - 12
based on the theoretical and experimental results of push-out models, the following
conclusions can be drawn:
1. The non-uniform height of the weld collar or the irregularity of weld size at the base of
the connector has an effect in the strength of the shear connector in practice by reducing
the expected theoretical design load, and experimentally describes the scatter in test
results and curves.
2. Increasing the yield stress of the weld collar increases the maximum load capacity of the
stud shear connector due to the concentration of the high stresses in small height relative
to the height of the stud shear connector.
3. The test evaluation method, as expressed in the EC4 and BS5450, is considered the most
suitable yet accurate method for the design of shear connectors.
4. The relationship between the ultimate loads of stud connectors and the value of the
concrete cubic strength was found to be in a linear form in case of medium and high
strength concrete, f
cu
_ 400 kg/cm
2
.
5. Design table proposed in this paper is formed to be a good estimation for the design of
stud shear connectors.

6 REFERENCES
1. Abd-Rabou, S.M. and Dabaon, M.A., "Comparison Between Theoretical and
Experimental Investigation of Composite Beams with Spiral Shear Connectors",
Mansoura Engineering Journal, Vol. 20,No. 1, PP. 22-37, March, 1995.
2. Ghorab, M. N., Gaawan, S. M., Abo Hashesh, A. and Amin, A. M., "Fatigue Behavior of
Stud Shear Connectors", AICSGE 5, PP. MS-73-87, December, 2003.
3. Hegger, J., Goralski, C., Sherif, A. and Kerkeni, N., "Shear Stud Connectors for
Composite Structures of High-Strength Steel and Concrete", ICPCM- A New Era of
Building, Cairo, Egypt, PP. 1011-1020, Feb.,2003.
4. Abbas, M. F., "Behavior of Shear Connectors in Composite Beams using Normal and
High Strength Concrete", MSC thesis, Tanta University, 2004.
5. ANSYS Element Reference Manual, version 5.4, 000853. Ninth Edition, SAS IP, Ink.
6. Ting, E. S., Johnson, H. A. and Pendyala, R. S., "Compressive Strength Testing of Very-
High Strength Concrete", Proceeding of the 17th Conference on Our World in Concrete
and Structures, Singapore, PP. 217-226, Aug., 1992.
7. DD ENV 1994-1-1, Eurocode 4, "Design of Composite Steel and Concrete Structures",
Part 1.1, General Rules and Rules for Buildings, English version, British Standard
Institution, London, 1994.
8. BS 5950: Part 3: Section 3.1 "Code of Practice for Design of Simple and Continuous
Composite Beams", British Standard Institution, London, 1990.
9. AISC:, 'Allowable Stress Design and Plastic Design, Specification for Structural Steel
Building, American Institute of Steel Construction, Chicago, 1989.
10. ECP 2001: 'Egyptian Code of Practice for Steel Construction and Bridges (Allowable
Stress Design), Code No. 205, Cairo, Egypt, 2001.