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Thursday, sepTember 27, 2012 www.somd.

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Thursday, September 27, 2012
2 The County Times
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education
Annabelle Allen, 4, excitedly pats the head of a freshly shorn sheep on Friday night at
the St. Marys County Fair.
Nearly 450 people attended a special opening day event at Bowles Farm Corn
Maze for MedStar St. Marys Hospital associates, physicians, volunteers and
family members. This years maze design pays tribute to the hospitals 100 year
anniversary.
entertainment
Octobers First Friday celebration on Leonardtown
Square has been dubbed Pink Friday to recognize
and support breast cancer awareness month.
Were not putting this money
in a sock or a box somewhere.
We have a plan for this fund balance.
We will take care of this money.
- County Commissioner President Jack Russell
Also Inside
4 County News
12 Education
16 Crime
17 Letters
18 Money
20 Feature Story
22 Obituaries
25 Community
28 Community Calendar
30 Entertainment
31 Entertainment Calendar
32 Classifieds
33 Business Directory
34 Senior
35 Columns
36 Games
37 Newsmaker
38 Sports
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Thursday, sepTember 27, 2012 www.somd.com
Story Page 20
Photos By Frank Marquart
On T he Cover
Thursday, September 27, 2012
3 The County Times
MCKAYS WRAP B 8.24.12 X X X X

ORGANIZATION TOTAL
ST MARYS SCHOOL BRYANTOWN $76,265.32
ST JOHNS CHURCH & SCHOOL $67,224.06
VICTORY BAPTIST ACADEMY $61,339.45
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH $39,171.71
FATHER ANDREW WHITE SCHOOL $30,916.42
LETTIE DENT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $28,519.40
MT ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH $28,222.72
T C MARTIN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $22,816.26
MOTHER CATHERINE SPALDING SCHOOL $20,575.81
KINGS CHRISTIAN ACADEMY $16,698.65
HUGHESVILLE VFD LADIES AUXILIARY $16,369.51
WHITE MARSH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $14,385.04
HOSPICE OF ST MARYS $13,704.67
ST. MARYS COUNTY LIBRARY $13,520.69
ST MARYS RYKEN HIGH SCHOOL $13,025.01
BENJAMIN BANNEKER ELEMENTARY PTA $11,751.14
ALL FAITH EPISCOPAL CHURCH $10,196.43
SPECIAL OLYMPICS OF ST MARYS $10,016.14
MARGARET BRENT MIDDLE SCHOOL $9,869.03
TRI COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER $9,727.83
LEONARDTOWN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PTA $9,550.29
LITTLE FLOWER SCHOOL $9,413.58
CHOPTICON HIGH SCHOOL BAND BOOSTERS $8,861.57
CHOPTICON HIGH SCHOOL $8,736.28
AMERICAN RED CROSS OF SO MD CHAPTER $8,492.18
HOLLYWOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $8,482.24
GRACE BRETHREN CHRISTIAN SCHOOL $8,390.89
MECHANICSVILLE VOL RESCUE SQUAD $7,814.23
MECHANICSVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $7,746.56
HOLLYWOOD VOL RESCUE SQUAD $6,474.69
ST MICHAELS SCHOOL $6,397.93
ST PAULS LUTHERAN CHURCH $5,736.36
THE CENTER FOR LIFE ENRICHMENT $5,583.62
DYNARD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $5,469.85
DUCKS UNLIMITED ST MARYS CO CHAPTER $5,361.27
CARE NET PREGNANCY CENTER OF SO MD $5,261.59
ST ANNES ANGLICAN CHURCH $4,863.94
SO MD CHILD CARE RESOURCE CENTER $4,540.80
GREAT MILLS ATHLETIC BOOSTERS $4,501.95
LEONARDTOWN MIDDLE SCHOOL $4,352.33
GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER ELEM SCHOOL $4,305.64
ST MARYS ANIMAL WELFARE LEAGUE $4,132.49
SPRING RIDGE MIDDLE SCHOOL $4,097.86
ST DOMINICS CHURCH SODALITY $4,077.55
HOLLYWOOD UNITED METHODIST CHURCH $4,055.52

ORGANIZATION TOTAL
CALVERTON SCHOOL $4,050.52
ST MARYS COUNTY OFFICE ON AGING $3,991.87
OAKVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $3,867.38
PINEY POINT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $3,662.48
SO MD FOOD BANK CATHOLIC CHARITIES $3,367.53
ST MARYS HOSPITAL $3,305.60
ARC OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND $3,289.52
RIDGE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $3,246.83
DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTION $3,080.69
ST. MARYS HOME FOR THE ELDERLY, INC. $3,043.22
PARK HALL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $2,994.96
HOLLYWOOD WORSHIP CENTER $2,948.41
LUCKY ONES SPCA $2,902.38
HOLY ANGELS SACRED HEART SCHOOL $2,736.08
LEONARDTOWN HIGH SCHOOL $2,684.02
IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY CHURCH $2,565.84
ST GEORGES EPISCOPAL CHURCH $2,384.07
CHRISTMAS IN APRIL ST MARYS $2,278.57
LEONARD HALL JUNIOR NAVAL ACADEMY $2,185.97
CHAPTICO CHARGERS 4-H CLUB $2,169.30
GREENVIEW KNOLLS ELEMENTARY $2,049.91
HUGHESVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH $1,949.00
SOTTERLEY FOUNDATION $1,934.15
BENEDICT LADIES AUXILIARY $1,756.66
CHAMBER ORCHESTRA OF SO MD $1,737.61
ST MARYS HELPING HANDS $1,658.34
GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL $1,576.25
HOSPICE OF CHARLES COUNTY $1,547.34
HOLY FACE CHURCH $1,521.87
THE 7:30 CLUB AT IMMACULATE CONCEPTION $1,423.36
SECOND DISTRICT VOLUNTEER FIRE & RESCUE $1,371.21
LEXINGTON PARK ELEMENTARY $1,369.78
LEXINGTON PARK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH $1,359.05
WALDEN SIERRA, INC. $1,340.56
AMERICAN KIDNEY FOUNDATION $1,276.99
CITIZENS SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION $1,265.25
AMERICAN RED CROSS OF CHARLES COUNTY $1,188.72
CHESAPEAKE CHARTER SCHOOL ALLIANCE $1,103.17
CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH $1,101.07
BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF SO MD $1,087.55
PATUXENT ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY $1,047.31
FAMILY LIFE VICTORY CENTER $1,018.40
TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH & SCHOOL-NEWPORT $1,002.12
FREEDOMS REIN FILLIES & COLTS 4 H $997.75
GOLDEN RETRIEVER RESCUE OF SO MARYLAND $967.64

ORGANIZATION TOTAL
GIRL SCOUT UNIT 10-2/190-1370 $850.71
ST. MARYS NURSING CENTER INC. $849.22
PATUXENT HABITAT FOR HUMANITY $836.53
UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY OF SO MD $802.45
WILD THINGS 4-H CLUB $769.88
TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH ST MARYS PARISH $747.11
LEXINGTON PARK RESCUE SQUAD $743.75
ST PAULS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH $726.20
LEONARDTOWN HIGH SCHOOL BAND BOOSTERS $713.03
TRICO CORPORATION $687.58
ALTERNATIVES FOR YOUTH & FAMILIES $686.04
LEONARDTOWN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $680.61
YOUNG LIFE ST. MARYS $671.19
SUMMERSEAT FARM $645.88
TOWN CREEK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $642.69
ST MARYS CHURCH & SCHOOL OF PISCATAWAY $632.71
GOOD SAMARITAN LUTHERAN CHURCH $619.51
MARGARET BRENT HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOC $608.41
THREE OAKS HOMELESS SHELTER CENTER $598.93
CALLAWAY BAPTIST CHURCH $590.95
UNITED WAY OF CHARLES CO INC $573.70
FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH $561.22
Dr JAMES A FORREST CAREER & TECH CENTER $555.00
GOSPEL TABERNACLE OF PRAYER CHURCH $523.50
CENTER FOR CHILDREN $495.92
MILTON SOMERS MIDDLE SCHOOL $492.48
ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH $486.14
LEONARDTOWN VOLUNTEER RESCUE SQUAD $481.93
HOLLYWOOD OPTIMIST CLUB $468.13
BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION $468.06
UNITED WAY OF ST MARYS COUNTY INC $465.48
MINORITY BUSINESS ALLIANCE $458.90
MARCH OF DIMES $420.24
STARMAKER LEARNING CENTER $407.67
FIRST SAINTS COMMUNITY CHURCH $384.53
INSTITUTE FOR HUMAN GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT $374.07
GREAT EXPECTATIONS GRAYHOUND RESCUE $371.20
GREEN HOLLY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL $356.02
WOMENS CENTER OF SOUTHERN MD $353.27
GREENWELL FOUNDATION $334.97
ST MARYS COLLEGE OF MARYLAND $334.47
ST. CECELIA PARISH $330.66
HOPE OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND $299.51
CATHOLIC DAUGHTERS OF AMERICA $288.46
ST JOHNS ST VINCENT DEPAUL SOCIETY $274.02

ORGANIZATION TOTAL
FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF ST. MARYS $270.00
CALVERT HIGH SCHOOL $240.71
TRI-COUNTY YOUTH SERVICES BUREAU $239.79
SO. MD CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING $235.46
NATIONAL ACTIVE & RETIRED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES (NARFE) $230.71
ST MARYS NURSING CENTER INC $220.23
ALL SAINTS EPISCOPAL CHURCH $198.21
LEONARDTOWN HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 2006 $197.72
GREAT MILLS HS BAND BOOSTERS $196.71
CHESAPEAKE BAY AQUATIC CLUB $184.34
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 9-99218 FSNE $184.00
DENTSVILLE EMS & AUXILIARY INC $175.59
COMMUNITY SUPPORT CENTER $172.07
THE CATHERINE FOUNDATION $166.37
PASTORAL COUNSELING CENTER $158.05
POTOMAC RIVER ASSOCIATION $157.70
MECHANICSVILLE OPTOMIST CLUB $154.75
OUR LADY OF THE WAYSIDE CHURCH $153.86
BROWNIE TROOP #3541 $151.60
CHARLOTTE HALL LIBRARY $148.55
OPIS ST. MARYS HOSPITAL $145.68
BETHESDA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH $140.37
MECHANICVILLE ASSEMBLY OF GOD $139.08
PRIVATE JANE PERKINS OCR $134.19
CUB SCOUT PACK 420 $130.09
QUAD COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION $125.34
ANGLICAN MISSION OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND $123.76
THE LEXINGTON PARK CHURCH OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN $121.82
KNIGHTS OF ST JOHNS LADIES AUXILIARY $121.12
SO. MD MOTHERS OF MULTIPLES $120.87
BAY DISTRICT VOL FIRE DEPARTMENT $113.28
KIWANIS CLUB OF ST MARYS COUNTY $111.22
NEWTOWNE PLAYERS $111.19
ESPERANZA MIDDLE SCHOOL $109.71
CUB SCOUT PACK 1634 $109.26
WALLS OF JASPER $108.54
PATUXENT HIGH SCHOOL $107.59
SCHOLARSHIP FUND OF VA. TECH ALUMNI ASSOC. $106.72
ST MARYS CARING, INC. $106.50
ST. MARYS COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS $105.09
CYSTIC FIBROSIS FOUNDATION & GREAT STRIDES LEONARDTOWN WALK AT THE WHARF $104.98
PARK HALL TRUE HOLINESS CHURCH $103.41
GIRL SCOUT TROOP #1767 $100.00
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION OF THE CHESAPEAKE $99.59
LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF MARYLAND EDUCATION FUND $93.80

ORGANIZATION TOTAL
HISTORIC ST. MARYS CITY FOUNDATION $93.41
OAKVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PTA $91.12
SO MD TRI-CO. COMMUNITY ACTION COMMITTEE $85.94
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY RFL-STMR $82.78
HUGHESVILLE HURRICANES $81.72
PARENTS WITHOUT PARTNERS CHAPTER 1301 $75.59
ST MARYS NURSING CENTER FOUNDATION INC $71.16
CRAZY CRITTERS 4-H CLUB $60.50
DISCOVER U CHILDRENS MUSEUM $59.25
MILL CREEK MIDDLE SCHOOL $55.59
OPTIMIST CLUB OF HOLLYWOOD $50.00
I.B.P.O. ELKS LODGE 1120 $50.00
GIRL SCOUT TROOP #4549 $50.00
ROOTS OF MANKIND CORP $45.57
THE ARC OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND $45.53
ST MARYS COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY $42.76
PARK HALL PTA $39.63
AFFILIATED SANTE GROUP $39.52
ORPHANED WILDLIFE RESCUE CENTER $38.88
OLDFIELDS CHAPEL ST. AGNES GUILD $38.87
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY RELAY FOR LIFE TEAM SAY CHEESE $34.04
EVERGREEN PTO $33.85
BOY SCOUT TROOP 420 $31.40
FOOD STAMP NUTRITION PROGRAM $28.13
COLLEGE OF SOUTHERN MARYLAND FOUNDATION, INC $25.71
SUBURBAN WILDLIFE RESCUE AND REHABILITATION INC $20.00
ST. PETERS SCHOOL $20.00
ON OUR OWN OF ST. MARYS INC $19.90
THE LIFE CHANGING HEALING CHURCH $16.72
SO MD CENTER FOR L.I.F.E. $15.00
LADIES AUX. OF FLEET RESCUE ASSOCIATION #93 $15.00
HCA OF SO MD $10.00
THE AUXILIARY OF THE LEONARDTOWN VOL FIRE DEPT $10.00
SPRING DELL CENTER, INC $10.00
SMILE SCHOLARSHIP FUND $10.00
BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF SO. MD $10.00
COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF CHARLES COUNTY $10.00
COSMIC SYMPHONY $10.00
POINT LOOKOUT LIGHTHOUSE PRESERVATION SOCIETY INC $0.00
PATUXENT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH $0.00
CHARLES COUNTY LITERACY COUNCIL INC $0.00
GRAND TOTAL
$799,342.92
Congratulations Community Rewards Recipients 1999-2012
MCKAYS WRAP C 8.24.12 X X X X
Our $60,000 Community Rewards Giveaway allows local non-profit groups the opportunity to earn a share of
$60,000 based on your Gold Card purchases. Simply sign up for the program - then use your Gold Card every time
you shop! Your Gold Card purchases will be credited to the non-profit group you designate. At the end of the program,
McKays will donate $60,000 to registered groups based on the percentage of Gold Card purchases credited to them.
Sign-up at www.mycommunityrewards.com and
let us support your favorite non-profit organization!
Your purchases will be credited to your favorite non-profit group
beginning October 1, 2012 through April 30, 2013.
Watch for ways to earn DOUBLE CONTRIBUTIONS throughout the year!
Registration is quick and easy - just visit
www.mckayssupermarkets.com
www.mycommunityrewards.com
or the courtesy desk at any of our five stores.
Non-profit groups can register their organization starting September 1st
Shoppers can register their Gold Card starting October 1st
Sign-up at www.mycommunityrewards.com
and let us support your favorite non-proft organization!
Our $60,000 Community Rewards Giveaway allows local non-proft groups the opportunity to earn a share of $60,000 based on your
Gold Card purchases. Simply sign up for the program - then use your Gold Card every time you shop! Your Gold Card purchases will
be credited to the non-proft group you designate. At the end of the program, McKays will donate $60,000 to registered groups based
on the percentage of Gold Card purchases credited to them.
Your purchases will be credited to your favorite non-proft group beginning October 1, 2012
through April 30, 2013. Watch for ways to earn DOUBLE CONTRIBUTIONS throughout the year!
Registration is quick and easy - just visit www.mckayssupermarkets.com
www.mycommunityrewards.com or the courtesy desk at any of our four stores.
Non-proft groups can register their organization starting September 1st
shoppers can register their Gold Card starting October 1st.
THANK YOU TO ALL THE SCHOOLS, CHURCHES, FIRE DEPARTMENTS, RESCUE SQUADS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS THROUGHOUT SOUTHERN MARYLAND WHO PARTICIPATED
IN THE 2012 60,000 GOLD CARD GIVEAWAY ...AND THANKS TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS WHO SUPPORTED THEIR FAVORITE CHARITY BY SHOPPING & SAVING AT MCKAY'S.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
4 The County Times
Marks Electronics Inc
Sales Service Installation
Pick - Up & Delivery
TV VCR Camcorder Wide Screen TV Antennas
Desktop and Laptop Computers Car Stereos Video Games
Monitors Home Stereos CD/DVD Players
MARKS ELECTRONICS HAS MOVED TO THE
HICKORY HILLS SHOPPING CENTER NEXT TO
ALLEGRO MUSIC AND NICOLLETTI'S PIZZA
301-863-8466
www.marksrepairs.com
markselectronics@yahoo.com
Your Electronics Sales & Service Center
MEET REDSKINS SUPER BOWL CHAMPIONS
CHARLIE BROWN, RICKY SANDERS, THE
FIRST LADIES OF FOOTBALL, SPIGGY OF
THE HOGETTES, AND THE ROCKIN ELVIS!
This Year at the
Calvert County Fair:
Join The Fun aT 3 p.m. on SaTurdaY!
Taylor Gas Company, Inc
21541 Great Mills Road
Lexington Park, MD 20653
(301) 862-1000 or 1-855-764-(4GAS) 4427
Thursday, September 27, 2012
5 The County Times
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
Dan Bongi-
no, Republican
candidate for U.S.
Senate, took the
time to talk to St.
Marys College
of Maryland stu-
dents about poli-
tics and voting,
though he knew
he was not likely
to get votes from
any of the stu-
dents there.
St. Marys College is well known as
a bastion of liberal thought in a nominally
conservative county.
Ive heard people say that they dont
do politics, well politics does you, Bongino
said. You dont get a choice.
Speaking to a political science class,
the students were intent listeners, though
Bongino seemed surprised that none of
them raised their hands when asked if they
thought that taxing the wealthy was a good
way to turn the economy around.
Bongino said he was the only person in
the race against incumbent Senator Ben Car-
din who was not a millionaire.
Im the only guy in the race who grew
up poor, Bongino said of his New York City
upbringing. I was a city kid.
Bongino went after issues like educa-
tion and health care, saying rising costs in
both were because of government misman-
agement of tax dollars, which constricts
choice and produces bad results.
Pete Burnes, a student in the class
confned to a wheelchair, said that despite
Bonginos analysis of national health care
systems like the one in Britain, he would
choose the British model over the practices
of private health care systems.
Bongino said he agreed that some
practices of insurance companies were
bad.
Ill take the British algorithm over
the insurance companies any day, Burnes
said.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
ews
Bowles Farms 2012
Corn Maze & Pumpkin Farm
Southern MDs Largest Corn Maze
& Pumpkin Harvest is BACK!!!
Come see why getting lost is so much family fun
OPENING DATES: SEPTEMBEr 22ND TO OCTOBEr 28Th, 2012
Hours Of Operation
Mon Fri: By Appointment Only
Saturday: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Sunday: 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM
Rates
Admission: $10.00
3 and Under FREE
Group Rates Available (15 or more)
Admission To Te Farm Includes
Corn Maze, Petting Zoo, Wagon Rides, Train Ride, Giant Slide,
Mini Straw Maze, Childrens Corn Box, Childrens Barrel Rides,
Straw Mountain, Corn Maze Express, Special Weekend Events
Ofce: 301-475-2139 Email: bowlesfarms@rcn.com
Located at the intersection of Route 234 and Pincushion Road in Clements, MD
For More Details Visit Us At: www.bowlesfarms.com
Host Your: Team Building
Event or Birthday Party Here!!
Decorating Supplies:
Mums, Corn Stalks, Straw,
Gourds, and Indian Corn
Food & Refreshments On-Site
Large Covered Picnic Area
Air-Conditioned/Heated Restrooms
We have acres and acres of
pumpkins available for a
small additional fee.
Corn Maze Express
Cupcake Shop
Take a taste of
fall home with you.
Sept. 29th and 30th:
In honor of St. Marys
Hospitals 100 year
celebration, all St. Marys
Hospital employees
will receive $2.00 OFF
admission. (ID Required)
Sunday, Sept 30th
The RoboBees, the local award
winning FIRST Robotics Team
will be demonstrating their
120 pound robot, Yow Sting,
along with other hands on
activities. Noon to 6 pm.
Bongino Dishes on
Issues at College
County Picks New
Economic Dev. Director
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
After months of leaving the position
vacant, the Board of County Commis-
sioners announced a new director for the
Department of Economic and Community
Development, Steven J. Anderson, who
headed up a similar agency in Illinois be-
fore coming to St. Marys County.
Commissioner Todd Morgan (R-Great
Mills) said the board chose unanimously to
hire Stevens, who is set to start Oct. 9.
This guy, I really believe, is a good
match for St. Marys County, Morgan
said. He has vision.
Morgan said the months it took to fll
the void after Bob Schaller was removed
from his position in county government
were necessary as it was important to fnd
the right person for the job.
Sometimes haste makes waste,
Morgan said.
Stevens headed up the Lake County
Partners, Inc. in Libertyville, Ill., a not-for-
proft group that focused on targeted eco-
nomic development, which included bring-
ing in businesses like Motorola and FedEx
among others, according to information on
Anderson from St. Marys County.
The county also touted Stevens con-
tact with the military at the Naval Station
Great Lakes.
Morgan said Stevens was impressive
in his interview with commissioners.
He did a real good job, Morgan said.
He had a lot of depth and breadth in his
background.
Barry Burton, Lake County Admin-
istrator, declined to talk about Andersons
time in Illinois but confrmed that he re-
signed from Lake County Partners last
year.
He declined to say why Anderson
resigned.
Anderson also served for six years as
the vice president of business development
for the St. Louis County Economic Council
in St. Louis, Missouri from 2002 to 2008.
Anderson holds a law degree from
the Whittier College School of Law and a
bachelors degree in political science and
history from the University of Missouri.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Photo by Guy Leonard
GOP U.S. Senate candidate Dan Bongino engages students at St. Marys Col-
lege of Maryland on a range of political issues.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
6 The County Times
ews
UniStar Files
Appeal in
Calvert Cliffs
3 Case
Make PINK Your Color
301-475-6399 PHONE
l
medstarstmarys.org
As women, we all know there
is never a good time for our
mammogram.
We put it off, cancel it or simply never
schedule one. Mammograms are a nuisance
and can be a little uncomfortable. Well make
that appointment one of these days.
What were doing is compromising our health.
Stop procrastinating. Call MedStar St. Marys
Hospital today to schedule your mammogram
in a comfortable space dedicated to women.
Then, keep that appointment. We promise to
reward you.
Have your annual mammogram during Breast
Cancer Awareness Month this October and
youll receive a free gift to keep your pinkies
pretty.
*
To schedule your mammogram with
MedStar St. Marys, call 301-475-6399.
This special gift from MedStar St. Marys
includes a manicure kit with a fun new nail color
(Pink-A-Doodle), graciously donated by O
l
P
l
I in
recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness Month! *While supplies last
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
UniStar, the nuclear reactor operator seek-
ing to build a new unit at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear
Power Plant in Lusby has fled for an appeal
before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission
to review a decision by the Atomic Safety and
Licensing Board (ASLB) earlier this summer
that denied their application due to the fact that
UniStar, which is foreign owned, has no U.S.
partner.
Under federal law an operator seeking a
license to run a reactor must have a national
partner in order to be approved.
UniStar, which is owned by EDF (Electric-
ite De France), is French-owned.
The ASLB decision of Aug. 30 gave UniS-
tar 60 days to fnd a U.S. partner or they would
effectively shelve the application.
In the documents fled Sept. 24, Unistar
asks for guidance from the federal government
on just how much foreign versus domestic own-
ership must be involved in the deal to help en-
sure success.
To appropriately structure participation
in new reactor projects, UniStar and prospec-
tive investors need to understand in advance
what levels of foreign investment will be found
acceptable and what specifc negation actions
will be required, the UniStar fling reads. The
commission now has an opportunity to provide
policy direction on key issues arising under the
agencys foreign ownership, control or domina-
tion (FOCD) requirements, including the issue
of UniStars indirect foreign ownership and the
standard for acceptable FOCD negation action
plans.
The deal to construct a new reactor began
to falter back in 2010 when Constellation En-
ergy Group backed out of the partnership due
to the high costs of seeking federal loan guaran-
tees to fnance the project.
UniStar bought out the majority share in
the project that Constellation, which runs the
current Calvert Cliffs reactors, had and pro-
ceeded in the application process alone, reas-
suring offcials that they would actively seek a
U.S. partner.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Thursday, September 27, 2012
7 The County Times
ews
Bowles Farm, Hospital
Celebrate Centennial
Its Oktoberfest!!
www.RuddyDuckBrewery.com
410-FYI-DUCK
(410-394-3825)
Dowell Rd and Route 4
SOLOMONS, MARYLAND
Saturday, October 13
3rd Annual Ruddy Duck Bus Trip to
OKTOBERFEST in Timonium, MD
sponsored by Maryland's
Brewer's Assocation.
For only $52 you get a chartered
coach to and from Oktoberfest,
admission to the event and all live
entertainment, sampling glass,
and sampling tokens!!
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Renovations to
Close Museum
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
The Calvert Marine Museum will be closed for the months of January and Febru-
ary to allow for renovations to the building that will maximize foor space.
In the interim, grant money from the Southern Maryland Heritage Area Consor-
tium will allow museum staff to take some of the museum out into the public.
Were not an ivory tower museum were the publics museum, said museum
deputy director Sherrod Sturrock. This was the initiative to get the program running.
The plan now is to take some of their educational materials and go to schools and
talk to students about all things maritime.
That includes some of the wildlife at the museum including terrapins and horse-
shoe crabs so students can learn about them.
Its not as good as being here but its better than nothing, Sturrock said.
The renovations, which are being paid for by a combination of county, state and
private funds, will focus on mainly the public areas in the museum such as the lobby,
auditorium and the gift shop which Sturrock described as totally cramped and out
of space.
None of the actual exhibits will be touched, she said, but the renovations will be
done in such a way as to increase space for visitors to move about without actually
increasing the outside footprint of the building.
The cost of the renovations includes $750,000 in county construction money
backed up by matching donations. A state bond bill is also helping to fund the con-
struction project, Sturrock said.
But the museum is still looking for more donations to complete all the work they
want to do, Sturrock said.
Were constantly working on this, she said.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Photo courtesy MedStar St. Marys Hospital
MedStar St. Marys Hospital associates, physi-
cians, volunteers and family members participated in
the launch of the 2012 Corn Maze season at Bowles
Farms on Friday. This years maze design pays tribute
to the hospitals 100 year anniversary. Nearly 450 at-
tended the event. Food was available for purchase and
the farm provided trolley rides and other activities
throughout the night. It was such a fun way to cel-
ebrate our centennial year, Hospital President Chris-
tine Wray said in a press release. We really appreci-
ate and enjoy the terrifc maze design that the Bowles
family created to honor our 100 year anniversary and
that the entire community can enjoy this fall. In the
photo is Wray, left, with Tina Bowles, Nancy Wallace
and Tommy Bowles.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
8 The County Times
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State of The County: State Hurting County
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
The Board of Commissioners told at-
tendees at the annual State of the County
luncheon Tuesday that the county is doing
well fscally, with a multi-million dollar fund
balance being used to invest in needed infra-
structure improvements at a time when many
other counties are struggling to pay the bills.
Offcials did warn that some of the countys
future is out of their hands now as environ-
mental mandates and land use decisions from
the state come down.
Moreover commissioners are worried
about the possibility of sequestration cuts at
the national level that will likely drastically
reduce military spending here at Naval Air
Station Patuxent River.
A lot of these cuts could have devastat-
ing affects on Pax River, said Commissioner
President Jack Russell (D- St. George Island).
No one knows how much this will affect us.
Russell said the fund balance put the
county in good position to deal with infra-
structure improvements needed to survive the
next round of base realignment and closure
(BRAC) proceedings.
Were not putting this money in a sock
or a box somewhere, Russell said. We have a
plan for this fund balance. We will take care
of this money.
Commissioner Todd Morgan (R-Great
Mills) called local unemployment not that
bad.
Are we perfect? No. But economically
were holding our own.
Morgan said the entire board is against
the states Watershed Implementation Plan
designed to limit pollutants and clean up the
Chesapeake Bay as far too expensive and
onerous to complete by 2017 and 2025.
Its an unfunded mandate being shoved
down our throats, Morgan said. Were not
happy about it.
Commissioner Daniel Morris (R-Me-
chanicsville) agreed with Morgan saying the
mandates made little sense other than to be
motivated by something other than empiri-
cal data.
Nobody will show us the science be-
hind these unfunded mandates, Morris said.
They wont show us what works.
All the commissioners expressed an in-
terest in running again in 2014, responding to
a question from the audience.
Commissioner Lawrence D. Jarboe (R-
Golden Beach) said because he is term limited
he cannot seek another commissioner term
but he still plans to run for state senate.
Morris was the most on the fence about
whether he would seek another run, though he
said he would not seek anything above where
he is now.
Ill be lucky to get reelected, he joked.
I wont run for any higher offce.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Fenwick Street Used Books and Music will hold a book sign-
ing with Niki Baker, author of A Promise Kept, on First Friday,
Oct. 5 from 5 to 7 p.m.
Niki Baker was born in Hawaii of multiracial parents and
adopted at 3 months into a second generation Japanese family.
Baker started off life a little differently. As a child, learning prob-
lems kept tripping up her belief in herself, but her fathers frm conviction she could
succeed was the catalyst that kept her going along with a faith in God.
Eventually she became a special education teacher and a teacher of the deaf; teach-
ing Hawaii, Seattle, Yarinacocha, Peru (w/Wycliffe Bible Translators), Georgia, Ala-
bama and Maryland, a press release states.
Her husbands job at Naval Air Station Patuxent River brought their family to St.
Marys County 21 years ago. All three of her children graduated from Leonardtown
High School.
Baker retired from 200 years of teaching at Calvert County Public Schools in
2011. Instead of being in the classroom, she volunteers at HOPE in Lexington Park and
teaches at St. Marys Detention Center through Prison Ministry and at her church, Our
Fathers House.
About A Promise Kept
As a teenager standing in the rice paddies in Japan, Kimi, wanted to know the God
above all the gods for she needed help making a life changing decision. God promised
she would know Him but sometimes there is an evitable gap of time between the giving
of a promise and the performance of the promise. Its in this time gap that God does His
best work in our lives. Her choices determined the direction her heart would go and the
choices of her adopted daughter brought these choices closer to Him. Sometimes we are
unaware how we infuence those around us and His hands are in all things. It was close
to 57 years from the cold waters of the rice paddy to actually meeting this God Kimi
desired to know, yet it was a promise kept.
Fenwick Street Used Books & Music is located at 41655A Fenwick Street, Leonar-
dtown, MD 20650. Call 301 475 2859 for more info.
Local Author
Sets Book Signing
Thursday, September 27, 2012
9 The County Times
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Architzel Praised as
Dunaway Takes NAVAIR Command
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
Vice Adm. David Architzel, who recent-
ly retired as commander of the Naval Air Sys-
tems Command (NAVAIR), turned over com-
mand of the $40 billion-a-year acquisition
business to Vice Adm. David Dunaway on
Sept. 20, bringing to a close a distinguished
military career with his retirement.
Architzel, originally an S-3 Viking pilot
tasked with hunting submarines, was widely
praised for streamlining the way NAVAIR
does business, ensuring the best weapons and
aviations systems get to the feet while fnd-
ing signifcant cost savings.
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jona-
than Greenert said Architzels leadership pro-
pelled NAVAIR to being one of the best-run
activities in the Navy.
For systems that cost billions of dol-
lars, like our helicopters, we got 20 percent
savings, Greenert said of Architzels tenure.
Hes had an encyclopedia of accomplish-
ments, hes had an unprecedented portfolio.
Sean Stackley, Assistant Secretary of the
Navy for Research, Development and Acqui-
sition, said the retirement ceremony was all
the more important since Architzel was the
last active duty member of the U.S. Naval
Academy Class of 1973.
Dunaway, whose aviator call sign is
Decoy, is also a graduate of the Test Pilot
School at Patuxent River Naval Air Station
and a fghter pilot.
He pledged to be a steward of taxpayer
dollars as well as maintain Architzels record
of achievement. He said maintaining a strong
Navy and Marine Corps are critical to main-
taining the United States as a free country.
We are always the ones who respond
frst for that Im willing to give whatever it
takes, Dunaway said.
Architzel, whose career spanned 40
years, said his achievements could not have
been possible without the personnel under his
command for the past two years.
They are the fabric of NAVAIR, he
said. Its been my honor to serve with you
these past several years.
In the end its the people who get the job
done, he said.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Photo by Guy Leonard
Vice Adm. David Architzel shakes hands with Gunny Sgt. Trenton Littlejohn after the admirals
retirement ceremony honoring a career of four decades.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
10 The County Times
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Staff Writer
CareNet Pregnancy Center is search-
ing for a new executive director to lead
the center through the next few years.
The search comes on the heels of
current Executive Director Cheryl Keens
departure after 16 years with the center.
She said she began volunteering a couple
months before the executive director po-
sition opened and she decided to apply.
It was a clear call from God, she
said.
She didnt think she was the most
qualifed person for the job, but she got a
call back with a job offer.
Actually, I was a little surprised
when they hired me, she said.
During her time at CareNet, Keen
has seen the center grow from a single
small offce serving approximately 40
clients per month with an annual budget
of about $40,000 to a large offce and two
satellite offces that serves more then 300
clients per month with a budget of ap-
proximately $390,000. They also began
offering sonogram services, a mobile
center to travel to county fairs and other
events and an increased amount of pro-
gramming. There is also an STD clinic
planned to open in the Lexington Park
location.
She hopes her successor can contin-
ue to grow the center. She compared her
situation to a relay race, with her being
a runner at the end of her leg and ready
to pass the baton onto someone fresh and
ready to run. Even with everything shes
accomplished, Keen doesnt feel shes
been alone. Shes had a solid and growing
network of volunteers and co-workers to
lean on, and even feels a little blessed.
I feel like God has done amazing
things and Ive been along for the
ride, she said.
Now the center is looking
for qualifed candidates for the
position of Executive Director.
The executive director has full
responsibility for the administra-
tive, development, public rela-
tions, and training of staff and
volunteers at three pregnancy
center locations.
Candidates must have at
least a bachelors degree and be
able to demonstrate a vigorous
and growing personal relation-
ship with Jesus Christ as well
as a strong commitment to the
sanctity of human life. Keen said
she is looking for somebody with
experience in ministry, leading
groups of staff and volunteers is
critical and experience in preg-
nancy center operations is a plus.
For a complete job descrip-
tion or to submit resume, contact
Keen at director@carenetsomd.
org.
sarahmiller@countytimes.net Cheryl Keen Photo by Sarah Miller
HoeDown for CancerCare
On Saturday, Connie Fuksa and friends
will be hosting a Southern Maryland Hoe-
Down to raise funds for Cancercare.
Cancercare is a national non-proft or-
ganization that helps cancer patients and
their families with the incidental expenses
when dealing with cancer such as medical
co-payments, counseling, travel expenses
and childcare.
The beneft will include cornhole
tournaments, horseshoe tournaments, cow-
pie bingo, a K9 demonstration, childrens
games, food will be served by various food
vendors, there will be all types of resale
vendors, crafters, a beer garden and special
performances by The Sam Grow Band and
the Port Tobacco Pickers. This going to be
a great event for all ages, a press release
states.
The HoeDown will be held at Serenity
Farm in Benedict MD on Saturday Sept. 29
from 1-9 p.m. and will be held rain or shine.
Tickets are $15 per person per adult and
children 12 and under are free.
You can contact Connie Fuksa at
301-643-2100 or email conniefuksa63@
gmail.com to purchase tickets or for more
information.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
11 The County Times
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Ryken to Receive Visit from Korean Sister School
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By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Tenth grade students from South Korea will visit St.
Marys Ryken High School on Friday as part of an ongoing
biannual cultural exchange program.
Rykens Director of Communications Denise Krume-
nacker says the international program is designed to open
the students eyes to what kids their age from other parts of
the world are experiencing. The visits from Gimhae Foreign
Language School, Rykens sister school in South Korea, allow
Ryken students to enjoy something unique and meet students
from different areas of the globe, she said.
Theyre growing up in an increasingly global com-
munity, Krumenacker explained. Its good for them to see
things outside of their own backyard.
Over 135 kids and faculty members from Gimhae
School will pair up with Ryken students and walk through the
campus between three venues featuring different activities
the auditorium, library and gymnasium.
In the auditorium, Krumenacker said Rykens band will
play the South Korean national anthem.
The visiting students will then entertain their hosts using
pop performances a popular trend among Korean teenag-
ers. The performance is expected to consist of dancing and
lip-syncing to popular Korean songs. The Gimhae students
will also play a brief percussion concert.
Last time they were phenomenal, Krumenacker said
of the percussion performance the Gimhae students put on
in 2010.
The library will feature a discussion group where all
eight Korean full time international transfer students attend-
ing Ryken will inform the Gimhae visitors what its like to be
a student in the USA.
According to Ryken international programs director
Amy Cricchi, some typical questions include favorite teach-
ers, why they chose to transfer to Ryken and day-to-day life
in America.
Which myth about America has ended up being untrue
is a very popular topic, Krumacker said.
A dance and chorus performance by the schools per-
forming arts club will take place in the gym and conclude the
half-day visit.
Overall, Krumenacker hopes the visit will share the
ideas and viewpoints of another culture with both groups
of students.
Ryken participates in several international programs,
and even sent some students to Germany in July.
While the Gimhae students are always the ones traveling
to the states, Ryken offcials have begun considering offering
their students international trips to South Korea as well.
Were starting to think along those lines, Krumen-
acker stated.
The Korean students will be in America for the next
week, and Krumenacker said they will also some be touring
some colleges in the DC Metro area during their visit.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Spotlight On
Gimhae Students perform
in the auditorium of St. Marys Ryken.
During the 2010 visit, Sophomores Cierra Raum and Delaney Mad-
den stand with the Gimhae Foreign Language School students they
were paired with, Gu Yeung Mo and Gweon Sook Won.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
13 The County Times
Schools Needs $8.3M From County by 2014
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By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
School offcials informed St. Marys
County Commissioners on Tuesday of their
need for an additional $2.5 million of county
funding by fscal year 2014 bringing the
total to $8.3 million citing a solar energy
project, construction plan for a new elemen-
tary school and change in state funds.
After a Southern Maryland Electric
Cooperative rebate of $244,000, the county
would be responsible for approximately
$234,000 by FY 2014 for the solar project.
St. Marys County Schools Superinten-
dent Michael Martirano said the energy proj-
ect would save county residents money in the
long run because the school system will be
utilizing more solar power.
Commissioner Larry Jarboe agreed
with Martirano and stressed how solar
funding teaches kids the importance of be-
ing energy effcient while also saving adults
tax dollars but he questioned if the schools
were sure the project would be seen through
from beginning to end.
Theres a very large push to continue
this project [from Gov. Martin OMalley],
coordinating supervisor of capital planning
Kimberly Howe said in response to Jarboes
concerns.
The school system also needs more
money up front to complete the new el-
ementary school by 2014, and would like to
not have to wait an additional third year for
funding if the contractors are able to com-
plete the building in two years.
Martirano said the schools are overpop-
ulated already, a 2.2 percent growth change
is expected and the new school needs to be
completed as soon as possible. There are six
schools in the system that are over 107 per-
cent capacity.
We are rapidly approaching 1,800 new
students in the school system, he said.
Commissioner Dan Morris noted that
the data provided to them by planning and
zoning offcials was much different from
the sky is falling data provided by the
Board of Education, but Martirano argued
the zoning data had already taken into ac-
count the completion of a new elementary
school.
Despite a lot of variable factors such
as politics cited by the commissioners,
Martirano concluded one constant is that St.
Marys continues to be a growing attractive
community, and while new schools are go-
ing to be needed as soon as possible, its also
necessary to start planning for the long-term.
Martirano and Deputy Superintendent
Brad Clements proposed a creative way of
adding a middle school which is expected to
be needed by 2016. In the scenario, a high
school would be built but initially serve as
a middle school only featuring grades six
through nine. The next year it would feature
seven through 10 and continue on that yearly
plan until fnally becoming a conventional
grades 9-12 high school. This way, there
would be no need to build a middle school
and a high school one building would serve
as a short-term and long-term solution.
Its a way of managing the community
and dealing with redistricting at the same
time, Clements said.
The amenities would be built between
2016 and 2020, because there is no need for
football and baseball felds right away if the
building is serving as a middle school.
State funds for school projects have
seen a recent percentage change, meaning
the school board will now lean more heavily
on the countys taxpayers to complete some
projects if they are to be fnished by FY 2014.
The schools wish to shift money from
three year to two year funding to meet con-
tractor needs, and fnish the projects on time.
As long as the state stays on a two-year
plan, Clements said the school system wants
to stay on track. If the state decides to give its
funding on a different basis, then the school
system will have to alter its hopes.
The meeting concluded with county ad-
ministrator John Savich saying they needed
to take some time and consider all the num-
bers, see where the needs are, and come up
with something digestible for the taxpayer
alexpanos@countytimes.net
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By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
St. Marys College of Maryland is
receiving a $1 million donation from the
Patuxent Partnership, the college an-
nounced Wednesday, in order to become
one of a select few liberal arts colleges to
have an applied physics program.
The money will be used to hire new
staff, expand labs and develop new co-op-
erative and internship programs, the press
release states.
The investment is anticipated to near-
ly double graduates of the physics program
to 12, which would put SMCM in the top
fve percent of colleges in the country with
physics graduates
Richard Platt, SMCM associate dean
of faculty, said the large donation all of
which is to be used in the applied physics
program is just a section of the overall
physics department.
The funds will help expand the de-
partments current programs as well as
physics curriculum offered by the college.
The new line supported by the gift
will be in applied physics, he said.
The establishment of an applied
physics program will provide new and
unique opportunities for our campus, and
a gateway to a world in need of individu-
als who have cultivated their capacity to
think, St. Marys College President Joseph
Urgo said in a release.
Executive director of Patuxent Part-
nership Bonnie Green has been in strong
favor of the initiative, which the press re-
lease states will help the college fulfll its
promise as the states honors college.
She believes the investment will help
strengthen relationships between SMCM
and Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft
Division.
The Patuxent Partnership is a local
nonproft organization which works with
government, industry and academia on ini-
tiatives in science and technology.
The Partnerships mission is to sup-
port STEM education, the Navy and con-
tractor community and to foster related
research opportunities, Green said.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Pax Partnership
Donates $1M to College
Physics Program
Thursday, September 27, 2012
14 The County Times
Spotlight On
County SAT Scores
Above Average
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Students in St. Marys County Pub-
lic Schools tested above the Maryland and
national averages in all three sections of
the Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) in
2012. The average combined test score was
52 points higher than the Maryland average,
and 41 points higher than the average nation-
al score.
I am particularly pleased that our
students have exceeded the performance
averages at the state and national levels,
Superintendent Michael Martirano stated in
a press release adding he believes the stu-
dents understand the importance of the ex-
ams and made an effort to put their best foot
forward.
Chopticon High School seniors had
above average scores in reading, 536, writ-
ing, 514, and mathematics, 549. They also
posted a composite average of 1599 over
100 points above the average level.
Leonardtown High had a composite av-
erage score of 1557, scoring 523 in reading,
500 in writing and 534 in math.
Great Mills High School fnished with
a reported 1475 composite average, marking
the third year in a row they have seen an in-
crease. Great Mills seniors exceeded Mary-
lands average mathematical score by posting
a 511 average. They scored below average in
reading and writing, posting a 494 and 470
respectively.
The College Board reported 50 percent
of seniors in the school system took the exam,
including over a whopping 63 percent at
Leonardtown.
The SAT is typically taken by high
school juniors and seniors as a tool for col-
leges to determine academic potential.
According to a press release, the math-
ematics section has placed a greater empha-
sis on linear functions, manipulations with
exponents and properties of tangent lines.
The reading section includes short and long
passages with corresponding questions. The
writing section focuses on multiple-choice
questions and essays.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
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Thursday, September 27, 2012
15 The County Times
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Tickets can be purchased at www.hospiceofstmarys.org
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Brinsfeld Funeral Home, P.A.
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Thursday, September 27, 2012
16 The County Times
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
Andrew Carter, 26, who was arrested
more than two years ago for the murder of
Antonio Nathanial Pollard, pleaded guilty
to second-degree murder Monday just days
after refusing another plea deal offered by
prosecutors in the case.
Assistant States Attorney Daniel White
said Carters plea does not bring an end to
the case as the state is still pursing charges
against others they believe were accessories
to the August 2010 murder; one such per-
son is James Sheehan, who sources close to
the investigation believe helped dispose of
the handgun used in the slaying, which was
never recovered.
Mr. Sheehans trial is set for November
as an accessory after the fact, White told
The County Times.
White said the state will seek a stiff pen-
alty for the murder.
I think he was angling for a plea agree-
ment that never came, White said. I think
he was waiting for a lesser charge.
Were going to be asking for as much
[prison time] as we can get.
The shooting occurred at the apartment
of Carters girlfriend, Tierra Brooks, located
in Lexwood Court, but there were apparently
no signs of confict or a struggle found in the
apartment.
Prosecutors are also unsure why Pollard,
who was a food service worker at St. Marys
College of Maryland, was in the apartment as
he was considered an outsider compared to
those who were already there.
Along with Carter there were two other
men in the apartment Jonathan Nelson and
Robert Thomas according to the prosecu-
tion, but all involved, including Brooks, were
deliberately not helpful in the investigation of
Pollards murder.
White said he had to swear out arrest
warrants on some involved just to ensure
they would show up Monday for the sched-
uled trial.
White said that the actual circumstances
surrounding Pollards murder are still a mys-
tery but the medical evidence is clear.
White said that Pollard was shot with a
handgun but not at close range, with the bullet
hitting him in the eye, killing him instantly.
There was no damage to the victims
eyelid, White said, leading investigators to
believe that Pollard saw his eminent death
but it was so quick that he had no chance to
defend himself or escape.
Investigators believe the weapon used
was a .22 caliber handgun.
White said one of the men in the apart-
ment at the time, Jonathan Nelson, told police
he witnessed Carter shoot Pollard.
Nelson told police that Carter just said
F it. and shot him, White said.
One theory exists, White said, that the
other men were sent to fnd Carter by Tra-
vis Nelson, who is currently imprisoned,
because he did not like Carter being with
Brooks, with whom he had a child.
After the killing, Carter is known by
investigators to have absconded to Baltimore
with another girlfriend, Jasmin Brown, and
a man who gave him a car ride, were he was
later found by U.S. Marshals.
Brown told police that Carter admitted
to shooting a man in the head at about 4:30
a.m. Aug. 28 claiming it was self-defense
because he was outnumbered, her recorded
police interview read.
Apparently Carter did not know Pol-
lard, according to transcripts of witness
statements.
Police initially found no wallet or other
identifcation on Pollard but a person who
was later arrested for an unrelated crime was
found to have Pollards identifcation, pros-
ecutors said.
Carter faces up to 30 years of im-
prisonment for the second-degree murder
conviction.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Punishment
Crime
&

Philip H. Dorsey III
Attorney at Law
- SERIOUS ACCIDENT, INJURY -
LEONARDTOWN: 301-475-5000
TOLL FREE: 1-800-660-3493
EMAIL: phild@dorseylaw.net
www.dorseylaw.net
Personal Injury
Wrongful Death
Auto/Truck Crashes
Pharmacy & Drug Injuries
Workers Compensation
Medical Malpractice
Defendant Takes Last Minute Plea in 2010 Murder
Police Arrest Man For
7-11 Robbery
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
A man arrested and
charged with the robbery of a
Mechanicsville convenience
store Sept. 16 has been re-
leased on $5,000 bail, but
has been ordered to obey all
laws and to stay away from
the store he is accused of
robbing.
According to District Court docu-
ments fled by Cpl. Robert Merritt of the
Bureau of Criminal Investigations, police
responded to a report of an armed robbery
at the 7-11 convenience store on Three
Notch Road and learned that the suspect
had entered the store at about 1a.m. and got
some coffee.
When the suspect, later identifed as
Daniel Kamperin of Charlotte Hall, came
up to the counter to pay for the coffee he
threw the coffee into the face of the at-
tendant after they had opened the cash
register.
Kamperin then jumped the
counter, charging documents stated,
and struggled with the cashier until
he produced a hammer and held it
up and threatened to hit her with it.
Kamperin then took some
cash from the register and fed the
scene, police say.
Video surveillance caught the
altercation on the tape and police
used it to gather information on
possible suspects.
Five days after the robbery police con-
tacted Kamperin who, having been read his
Miranda rights, waved them and told police
that he was the one who committed the rob-
bery, charging documents stated.
During the confession the defendant
provided details of the crime only known
to the perpetrator and the victim, Merritt
wrote in charging documents.
Court papers stated that Kamperin is
an apprentice electrician with a salary of
$17 an hour.
guyleonard@countytimes.net
Arrest Made in
Book Store Robbery
At 9:20 p.m. Sept. 13, police units responded to
Plaza Books in Lexington Park for a report of an armed
robbery. Responding offcers determined two male
subjects entered the store, armed with handguns and
demanded money from the victim. The victim provid-
ed one suspect with proceeds from the business. The
second suspect stole property and both suspects fed the
store on foot.
Detectives from the St. Marys County Bureau of
Criminal Investigations responded to the store and de-
tectives identifed one suspect as Dontevious T. Dorsey,
19, of Lexington Park, and an arrest warrant was obtained. On Sept. 25, patrol
units located Dorsey and placed him under arrest. Dorsey was charged with
armed robbery, frst-degree assault, theft between $1,000 and $10,000 and incar-
cerated in the St. Marys County Detention Center under a $10,000 bond. The
second suspect remains at large.
Dorsey
Kamperin
Thursday, September 27, 2012
17 The County Times
To The Editor
Legal Notice
P.O. Box 250 Hollywood, Maryland 20636
News, Advertising, Circulation, Classifeds: 301-373-4125
James Manning McKay - Founder
Eric McKay - Associate Publisher..................................ericmckay@countytimes.net
Tobie Pulliam - Offce Manager..............................tobiepulliam@countytimes.net
Sean Rice - Editor....................................................................seanrice@countytimes.net
Angie Stalcup - Graphic Artist.......................................angiestalcup@countytimes.net
Sarah Miller- Reporter - Community..............................sarahmiller @countytimes.net
Guy Leonard - Reporter - Government, Crime...............guyleonard@countytimes.net
Alex Panos - Reporter - Education, Entertainment.........alexpanos@countytimes.net
Sales Representatives......................................................................sales@countytimes.net
Obamas Policies Hastening
Armageddon?
No Thanks to the Far Left
Indoctrination
Subliminal Messaging?
IN THE MATTER OF MARY ROSALIE BUSH
FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO MARY ROSALIE HOLT
In the Circuit Court for St. Marys County, Maryland
Case No.: 18-C-12-001112

The above Petitioner has fled a Petition for Change of Name
in which she seeks to change her name from Mary Rosalie Bush to
Mary Rosalie Holt. The petitioner is seeking a name change for the
following reason:
I was divorced June 25, 2005 and I now wish to be restored to
my maiden name.
Any person may fle an objection to the Petition on or before the
14
th
day of October, 2012. The objection must be supported by an af-
fdavit and served upon the Petitioner in accordance with Maryland
Rule 1-321. Failure to fle an objection or affdavit within the time
allowed may result in a judgment by default or the granting of the
relief sought.
A copy of this Notice shall be published one time in a news-
paper of general circulation in the county at least ffteen (15) days
before the deadline to fle an objection.
JOAN W. WILLIAMS,
Clerk of the Circuit Court for
St. Marys County Maryland
09-27-12
Anybody that is paying attention knows that
President Obama's domestic policies are destroying
America, pushing us deeper into debt with high un-
employment and high energy prices, Socialism with
more big government dependency, and weakness
because we can not be a military super power if we
are not a strong economic super power.
But now it is also obvious that Obama has
failed America, and Israel, with his Middle East
policies that could accelerate the coming Armaged-
don. Obama has supported the overthrow of brutal
dictators only for them to be replaced by radicals
like the Muslim Brotherhood, and we continue to
give foreign aid money to Muslim nations that hate
us and are attacking our embassies and killing our
people. America's support for Israel has eroded un-
der Obama, and Obama shows lack of resolve to
stop Iran from getting nuclear weapons.
To allow Iran to get nuclear weapons only ac-
celerates the coming Armageddon because Iran has
vowed to destroy Israel. Even without support from
America, Israel will be forced to go it alone to at-
tack Iran's nuclear facilities sooner rather than later
for their own survival. However, with the buildup of
sophisticated weapons by the Arab nations, Israel
may be forced to use their own nuclear weapons as
all of the Arab Muslim nations unite against Israel,
again bringing on the Armageddon. This could be
a real "mess"!
If Obama would show resolve and give Iran an
ultimatum to stop their nuclear weapons program
now, or face a joint overwhelming military attack
from America and Israel using our advanced con-
ventional weapons, Iran would stop.
Obama shows weakness and his policies are
not only bad for America, but his policies are bad for
the world. Time is of the essence. Vote for Romney/
Ryan.
Joe Wible Sr.
Leonardtown, MD
I read with interest the dichotomy of the two
letters on the same page in the Sept. 20 issue of The
County Times.
Joe Wible Sr. in his "Wake Up America" let-
ter goes through a litany of over twenty reasons he
thinks Obama is leading America into decline but
can write of only one good thing about his prefer-
ence - that Romney, "is a smart businessman".
Compare that with Neil Covey's, "Return Hoy-
er to Congress" letter. Neil relates the wonderful
things Hoyer has done for St. Mary's County and the
nation without saying anything bad about Hoyer's
opponent or even using his name. Thank you Neil
for a well - written. "classy" letter.
One other thing. I noticed that the headline
for the "Wake Up America" letter was written on a
blue background and the headline for "Return Hoy-
er to Congress" was on a red background. Was
that some subliminal message from the "County
Times"?
Benn Morgan
Mechanicsville, MD
On Sept. 19, the citizens of St. Marys Coun-
ty were regaled with an article by Patricia Dun-
lap, president of the League of Women Voters,
whose letterhead states they are a non-partisan
organization.
There is absolutely nothing non-partisan about
this organization, and they are masters of manipu-
lation if they tell you they are. None of the par-
ticipants in this orgy they have invited you to, are
non-partisan.
And the guest speaker, Kathryn Ruud, Lin-
guist whose subject is Protecting our Democracy;
Understanding American Political talk in the age
of Infotainment has quite a resume.
She has studied Hitler in Munich and uses his
hate speech in connection with Glen Beck and Rush
Limbaugh. Please do not take my word for this. I
highly recommend that you do yourselves a favor
before considering attending this far left indoctri-
nation, and Google: Who is Kathryn Ruud and
What Does she represent
The frst title that comes up is Interviews/Ar-
ticles | Stop Polarizing Talk. Click on to that title
and read the full article. There are also lots of other
articles and information sites for this person that
you may wish to acquaint yourself with.
The far left loves to acquaint you with their
diversity code word for indoctrination, the
new hire of the St. Marys Public School System,
who will instruct your children in how to talk to
individuals. What is happening to us as a society?
M.L. Rose
Great Mills, MD
Hollywood Volunteer Fire Department
Open House
Sunday, October 7, 2012
11 am 3 pm


.
Other Activities
Include:
911 Simulator
Crafts
Meet a Firefighter
Visit from Sparky
Apparatus Tours
Ridge VFD
Smoke Trailer Demo
Jr. Firefighter
Obstacle Course
Moonbounce
Refreshments
Free kids bike raffle
Door prizes
The members of the Hol l ywood Vol unteer Fi re
Department and Ladi es Auxi l i ary
i nvi te you to attend an
Open House.

Thi s event wi l l be hel d at our stati on i n
conjuncti on wi th Nati onal Fi re Preventi on Week.

Thi s year s theme for Fi re Preventi on Week i s
Have 2 Ways Out.

Bri ng your fami l y and fri ends for a fun and
i nformati ve afternoon wi th your l ocal
fi refi ghters.

We l l have l ots of l earni ng opportuni ti es, fi re
truck tours, a Juni or Fi refi ghter Obstacl e
Course and a free ki ds bi ke raffl e!

Li ght refreshments wi l l be served and Sparky
the Fi re Dog wi l l al so be on hand for photo
opportuni ti es! !!

For mor e i nf or mat i on, cont act Mi ke Sul l i van @ 301- 373- 2900
or vi si t our websi t e www. hvf d7. com




Thursday, September 27, 2012
18 The County Times
Money
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Suite 200, P.O. Box 187
Leonardtown, MD 20650
Tel: 301-475-7935
www.steverichardson.wfadv.com
Hotel Celebrates Grand Opening
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Lexington Park Comfort Inn and
Suites, which opened July 4, has ex-
perienced great success in its frst few
months in business.
In fact, of over 1,600 Comfort Inn
and Suites nationwide, this one is rated
in the top ten percent, according to Jim
Adams, a Brand Performance Consul-
tant for Choice Hotels International.
The hotel celebrated an offcial
grand opening last Friday with lo-
cal contractors, community members,
county offcials and corporate power
staff, by hosting a self-guided tour for
the public.
The tour had employees at each
stop to explain all the amenities, and
featured eight different areas including a
spacious lounge and dining area, honey-
moon suite and rooms with a king or two
queen size beds, 32 inch high defnition
televisions and wireless Internet.
The hotels ftness room contains
several cardio machines and select
weight training equipment. Customers
also have full access to nearby Maximum
Fitness health club during the length of
their stay.
Hotel patrons also receive dry clean-
ing services from Wow Cleaners in St.
Marys Square in addition to an onsite
laundry room with a washer and dryer.
Training, dedication and support
of our staff allows us to create a superb
product, Comfort Inn General Manager
Sharon McLeod-Hare told The County
Times when asked what separates the
Comfort Inn from several other hotels in
the area also citing a close proximity to
Naval Air Station Patuxent River as a key
factor.
She said the hotels target customer
is business travelers to the Naval base
and surrounding contractors, but they
also feature a variety of weekend services
which attracts all sorts of customers.
Its because of that a lot of custom-
ers are repeat business, she continued,
and also keep coming back because of the
hotels top-notch amenities and quality
customer service.
The tour was preceded by a ribbon-
cutting ceremony and an introductory
meet-and-greet between owners PC and
Upesh Patel and the community.
All of Route 235 is being trans-
formed with this magnifcent building,
said Robin Finnacom, President of the
Community Development Corporation.
But it was Leon Thomas, Choice
Hotels operations performance trainer,
who stole the show during the introduc-
tion, when he predicted the Comfort Inns
bright future. He was blown away by
McLeod-Hares enthusiasm and excite-
ment for a typically mundane hotel cer-
tifcation class.
I said wow this is going to be a
great hotel, Thomas said in a booming
voice which echoed throughout the lobby.
The Comfort Inn and Suites is lo-
cated at 21885 Three Notch Road, Lex-
ington Park. Call 301-863-1051 for more
information.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Chesapeake Auction House
St. Leonard, MD 20685 410-586-1161 chesapeakeauctionhouse.com
Antique & Collectible Auction
Friday, Sept. 28th - 6 p.m.
Consignments Now Being
Accepted for Upcoming Gun Auction
Comfort Inn and Suites owner P.C. Patel cuts the cermonial ribbon of his hotel on Route 235, which cel-
ebrated its offcial grand opening last Friday. The hotel has been open since early July.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
19 The County Times
Piano every Friday and Saturday night
Jazz cabaret/dancing on special evenings
3-course prix-fxe dinner menu
$23.95 available until 6 pmdaily and
all night on Wednesdays!
$8 lunch &beverage special daily
Sunday brunch la carte items
Le Salon (private room) available
SOMDWinner of
Best Restaurant
Best Fine Dining
Restaurant
Best Dessert
Classic Country French Dining
in a casual, relaxing atmosphere.
T 301 475 5775
22660 WASHINGTON ST. 2ND FLOOR.
LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650
SCULPTURE - OILS -
WATERCOLORS - JEWELRY -
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MUCH MORE!
WATCH ARTISTS CREATE
PURCHASE ART - TAKE A CLASS
North End Gallery
in Historic Leonardtown, MD
301.475.3130
www.northendgallery.org
Monday-Saturday 10-5
First Fridays 10-8, Sunday 12-4
41658 Fenwick St. Leonardtown, MD 20650
301-475-8040
Fax: 301-475-8658
COMIC BOOKS,
GAMES
AND STUFF
22745 Washington St
Leonardtown, MD 20650
Open 7 Days A Week
Ice Cream
Sundaes
Hot Dogs and Sausages
Overstuffed Subs
Smoothies
Gamer Grub
Hot/Cold Drinks
Creative Custom Framing & Art
301-904-2532
MD Antiques Center ~ Bldg. 2 ~ 26005 Point Lookout Rd
~Leonardtown, MD 20650
Hours:
Tuesday ~ Friday: 10 a.m. ~ 5 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m. ~ 2 p.m.
Antiques
Breton House
22795 Washington Street,
Leonardtown
Open 10-5 Wed. - Sat.
Sundays 11-4
Also by appointment,
301-690-2074
Open late for
First Fridays of the month
Friday, Oct. 5th, 2012 5 to 8 PM
leonardtownfirstfridays.com
BELLAMUSICSCHOOL41635Fenwick
Street. Meet themusiciansthat lovetoteach
youmusic! BellaMusicSchool will beon
theSquare.
BIGLARRYSCOMICBOOKCAFE-
22745WashingtonStreet. Enjoyapinktreat
andagreat discount! Tryoneof 40delicious
flavorsof HersheysPremiumIceCream
ormaybea100%Fruit Smoothie! EAT,
DRINK, ANDBESUPERthisFirst Friday!
BREWINGGROUNDS- 41658Fenwick
Street. Stopbyforyourfavoritecoffee
beverageorsmoothie. BrewingGroundsis
proudtosupport LexieTraderandTeamL
TownduringtheSusanGKomen3day, 60
milechallengeinDC. 10%of PinkFriday
proceedswill gotothiscause. Donations
alsoaccepted.
CAFEDESARTISTES- 41655Fenwick
Street. EnjoytheseOctoberFirst Friday
Specials: 20%discount onpinkwinesby
thebottle, includingSlackWineryLush
BlushandLouisLaurent RoseDanjou.
HillingerSeccoRoseSparklingbythe
glassspecial. All pairingperfectlywithour
featureddinnerspecial of SalmonEncroute
withcouscous, sauteedspinachandPINK
beurreblanc! EnjoyDavidKalil onpiano.
Leonardtownsoriginal neighborhoodbistro
withFrenchCountryCharm, acasual and
friendlyatmosphere, finefoodandexcellent
service. Creative, comfortingdishesareClas-
sicFrenchwithanAmericanflairandpair
perfectlywiththegreat varietyof winesfrom
LeonardtowntoFrance, andal frescodining
availableonourquaint patiosidewalk!
FENWICKSTREETUSEDBOOKSand
MUSIC- 41655AFenwickStreet- Author
signing! Niki Baker, originallyfromHawaii,
haslivedinSouthernMarylandforquite
sometime. Herbook, APromiseKept, is
nowavailable. JoinusFirst Fridayforabook
signingwithNiki from5to7PM.
FUZZYFARMERSMARKET22696
WashingtonStreet. TheartistsatFuzzys
will donateall theproceedsonPinkitems
purchasedonPinkFriday10/5. Thisincludes
scarves, mitts, shawls, soaps, etc. Indulge
yourselfwithgoatsmilksoap, uniquejewelry,
handmadeitemandluxuriousscarvesand
shawls. Fill yourhomewithhandpainted
accentsaswell asfabuloustextilesandpottery.
Youll seehowweupcyclediscardedobjects
intofabulousandfunbags, jewelryandmore.
Visitustofindoutwhatourcooperativeof
local womenartistsandfarmersaredreaming
upandcreatingnext!
GOODEARTHNATURALFOODS-
41675ParkAve. ForeverEdenFounders
andSistersWandaandWynneBriscoewill
haveameetandgreetatTheGoodEarth.
Wanda, abreastcancersurvivorandthe
inspirationforForeverEdenwill discussher
journeytowellnessandwill haveadvance
copiesofhernewbookavailable. Wynne, the
handcrafteroftheForeverEdenproducts
will havesamplesavailableanddiscussthe
importanceofhealthyskincare, especially
duringCancerAwarenessMonth. Thesisters
goal throughouttheyearistoworktogether
intheeducationandpreventionofCancerby
promotinghealthandwellness. Learnmoreat
www.myforevereden.com.
NORTHENDGALLERY- 41652Fenwick
Street. OctoberbringstheshowInside-
Outsidewhichisthecollaborationof three
artists: LeeRussell, afindwoodworker;
KarenRussell, awatercolorist; andLinda
Epstein, anoil painter. ThetitleInside-
Outsidecoverssomanypossibilities. For
painters, it canrefertowhat theymaysee
outsidethat theybringinsidetopaint. For
thewoodworkerit might refertothefact
that thetreesfromoutsideareturnedinto
finefurnitureforuseinside. Theshowruns
fromOct 2- Oct 29withaFirst Fridayre-
ceptiononOct 5. NorthEndGalleryoffers
uniquegiftsfrom32of SouthernMarylands
best artistsand
artisans. Treat
yourself or
someoneyou
lovetoahand
madetreasure
fromyour
community.
OLDETOWNESTITCHERY41610
FenwickStreet (next toTowneFlorist).
301-475-0005
THINKPINK! Inrecognitionandsupport
of Breast CancerAwarenessmonth, were
havingaPINKsale! Anynot already
reducedfabricsthat arepinkorcontainpink
will beonsalefor20%off onbothFriday,
10/5andSaturday, 10/6. Stopbyandmake
apinkflowerpinonPINKFRIDAY; wear
oneinsupport of thoseyouknowthat
arecurrentlyfightingbreast cancer. Enjoy
pinkrefreshmentsandtakeadvantageof
ourgreat salewhileLeonardtownturns
thetownpink! Ourgoal istoassist youin
makingthequilt of yourdreams. Weoffer
classesfrombeginnertoadvancedandeven
kidssewingandquiltingclasses. Westock
fabric, books, patternsandnotionsfrom
manycompaniesaswell assellingfinished
quilts, bagsandtablerunners. Ourstaff
workshardtooffersuggestionswhenasked,
encouragement whenneeded, andfriendly
serviceat all times.
PORTOFLEONARDTOWNWINERY-
off Route5at 23190NewtowneNeckRoad.
EnjoymusicfromFractal Folk, SOMDs
premierjazz-folkfusionbandfrom5:30pm
- 8:30pm. Browsethephotographicart of
DeanSoulelesinthetastingroom, andtry
oneof ourawardwinningwinesfeaturing
ourRosewinesWicomico(Dry) andChap-
tico(sweet) at 25%off all weekend10/5
- 10/7. Wewill donate$2foreverybottleof
anyRose duringthemonthof Octoberto
support theSisterswithBracatudeasthey
walkintheAmericanCancerSocietyMak-
ingStridesagainst Breast CancerWalk. The
WineryisopenfromNoonto9PMonFirst
Fridaysforwinetastingsof awardwinning
wines. Local wine, art andlocal musicmake
foragreat time! Formoreinformationand
instant updates, seeourwebsiteorlikeuson
Facebook. Call 301-690-2192.
QUALITYSTREETKITCHENS- 41675
FenwickStreet. Winetastingsandspecials!
Learnabout ourtastyculinaryclassesand
itemsforyourkitchen. 100%of PinkFridays
proceedswill benefit Hospiceof St. Marys.
S-KAPESALONANDSPA-- Fenwick
Street - TheSaloncanhelpyouget inthe
pinkwithrefreshments, apinkshopping
shelf, complimentarypolishchanges, and
make-upapplications, hairstyling, seated
chairmassageandPinksinglehairapplica-
tionsforadonationtoBreast CancerAware-
nessandTheSisterswithBracatude.
ST. MARYSMACARONIKID- Look
forusontheSquarewithourfunFREE
craft tableforkids! Learnabout otherkid
friendlyeventsinSt. Marysandsignup
forourfreeweeklye-newsletter. St. Marys
Macaroni Kidisafreeweeklye-newsletter
andwebsiteofferingall thekidandfamily
friendlyeventsinthecounty. www.stmarys.
macaronikid.com
THEFRONTPORCH-22770Washington
Street. EnjoyTheFront Porchspecials
onPINKFriday. HappyHourDrink
Specialsfrom3PMto6PM: $2off all House
SpecialtyDrinksandMartinis. Appetizers
of theDay: TexasCloakedShrimp, jumbo
shirt withasliceof jalepenodowntheback,
wrappedinbaconthengrilledandfinished
withatouchof BBQsauce. MusselsDiablo,
freshmusselsstewedinaspicymarinara
sauce. Entrees: SlowRoastedPrimeRib,
slowroastedtil PINKinthemiddle, served
withaujus. SeafoodStuffedCrepes, crab
andshrimpwithasoft herbcheeserolledin
acrepethentoppedwithaseafoodcream
sauce. Drinkof theDay: PINKFlirtini Set
withintheSterlingHouse, weoffercreative
AmericanCuisineinacasual diningand
cozyatmosphere. Themenuincludesa
broadselectionof starters, soups, sand-
wiches, salads, andentrees. Weofferdaily
specials, featureseasonal ingredients, local
produce, andboast aneverchangingdessert
menu. Thebackroomat TheFront Porch
showcasesover40varietiesof wine, while
ourbarpresentsSpecialtyDrinks, Boutique
Beer, alongwithtraditional cocktails.
Bella Music School
Big Larrys Comic
Book Caf
Brewing Grounds
Caf des Artistes
Chez Nous
Craft Guild Shop
Colleens Dream
College of
Southern Maryland
Crazy for Ewe
Fenwick Street Used
Books and Music
Fuzzy Farmers Market
Good Earth Natural Foods
The Shops of Maryland
Antiques Center
Creekside Gallery
Kevins Corner Kaf
Leonardtown Arts Center
Leonardtown Galleria
Leonardtown Grill
Lynns Caf and Catering
Montparnasse Gallery
and Gifts
North End Gallery
Ogas Asian Cuisine
Olde Town Pub
Olde Towne Stitchery
Port of Leonardtown
Winery
Rustic River Bar and Grill
Quality Street Kitchens
Shelbys Creative Framing
St. Marys Macaroni Kid
The Farmers Daughter
Cupcakes
The Front Porch
Treadles Studio
Ye Olde Towne Caf
First Friday is made
possible by these businesses
and other LBA members:
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month!
Join the LBA in Leonardtown as First Friday becomes PINK Friday!
The LBA is proud to support the Sisters with Bracatiude as they help to fight breast cancer in the American Cancer
Societys Making Strides against Breast Cancer Walk. Show your support! Dress Pink and make a donation at LBA
businesses throughout Leonardtown and on the Square on Pink Friday and during the month of October.
-Share on the Square- featuring Med Star St. Marys Hospital Health Connections providing valuable information about
Breast Cancer Awareness and Mammograms. The American Cancer Society and The Sisters with Bracatude.
Learn how the ACS supports the Look Good Feel Better program at Med Star St. Marys Hospital.
- Free Kids Activities - Lively Cajun Music with The Piney Point Playboys - Pink Specials All Throughout Town -
BURRIS OLDE TOWNE INSURANCE
DANIEL W. BURRIS, CIC, PROPRIETOR
Auto Home Business Life
22720 WASHINGTON STREET P.O. BOX 707
LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650
(301) 475-3151 Toll Free: (800) 872-8010 Fax: (301) 475-9029
danburris@danburris.com danburris.com
ERIE
INSURANCE
GROUP
BURRIS OLDE TOWNE INSURANCE
DANIEL W. BURRIS, CIC, PROPRIETOR
Auto Home Business Life
22720 WASHINGTON STREET P.O. BOX 707
LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650
(301) 475-3151 Toll Free: (800) 872-8010 Fax: (301) 475-9029
danburris@danburris.com danburris.com
ERIE
INSURANCE
GROUP
BURRIS OLDE TOWNE INSURANCE
DANIEL W. BURRIS, CIC, PROPRIETOR
Auto Home Business Life
22720 WASHINGTON STREET P.O. BOX 707
LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650
(301) 475-3151 Toll Free: (800) 872-8010 Fax: (301) 475-9029
danburris@danburris.com danburris.com
ERIE
INSURANCE
GROUP
Jane's Path by Linda M. Epstein
Thursday, September 27, 2012
20 The County Times
First Friday Turns Pink Friday
STORY
ENTERPRISES
&
A
T
Proudly Made
In The U.S.A.
Tommy Alvey:
lifetime Resident
Distributor
military veteran
Also AvAilAble AT:
Coltons Point marina
Guy brothers marine
Hodges Tire & Auto
Hollywood Auto Tech
st. marys
Automotive
Tall Timbers marine
smith & son small
engine Repair
40581 Bishop Road Mechanicsville, MD 20659
Phone: 301-475-8446
Cell: 240-538-1761 Fax: 301-475-8561
DeliveRy AnD
insTAllATion AvAilAble
Leonardtown To Hold Rally for Cancer Walk
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Octobers First Friday celebration
on Leonardtown Square has been dubbed
Pink Friday to recognize and support
breast cancer awareness month. The square
will be covered in pink decorations and lo-
cal businesses will all be offering unique
pink specials, with some of the proceeds go-
ing to support local breast cancer patients.
The Oct. 5 event is a rally for the
American Cancer Societys Making Strides
Against Breast Cancer Walk on Oct. 7 in
Wildewood being led by The Sisters with
Bracatude three local sisters who all car-
ry a gene that makes them more susceptible
to breast cancer.
Its important for the LBA (Leon-
ardtown Business Association) to get in-
volved in local community efforts, said
First Friday committee chairperson Carol
Picon. These are local ladies and a local
program.
From food and drink to dcor and
clothing, the square will be packed with
pink activities on Oct. 5.
Good Earth Natural Foods is hosting a
meet and greet with Forever Eden Founders
Wanda and Wynne Brisco. Wanda will be
on hand promoting her new book and dis-
cussing her journey as a breast cancer sur-
vivor. Meanwhile Wynne will be distribut-
ing samples of Forever Eden products, and
explaining the importance of maintaining
healthy skin.
Port of Leonardtown Winery will fea-
ture music from Fractal Folk and is donat-
ing $2 for every bottle of Rose sold on Pink
Friday and the entire month of October
in support of The Sisters with Bracatude.
House specialty drinks and martinis like
the Pink Flirtini will all be $2 off at The
Front Porch.
Caf de Artistes will give a 20 per-
cent discount on all pink wines sold by the
bottle, such as Slack Winerys Lush Blush
and Lous Laurent Danjou, and is featur-
ing pink salmon as the evenings special.
Patrons will also enjoy music from pianist
David Kalil as they dine on their pink meal.
Quality Street Kitchens and the Brew-
ing Grounds are donating portions of their
proceeds on Pink Friday to Cancer Aware-
ness causes.
S-Kape Salon is planning to serve
pink beverages to go along with an eve-
ning of pink pampering. After making
a donation to the Sisters with Bracatude,
customers will be able to receive pink hair
applications, complimentary nail polish
applications and seated chair massages.
The Olde Towne Stitchery Shop is en-
couraging people to stop by and create pink
fower pins to wear throughout the night.
All pink fabrics, and other select fabrics
containing pink, in the shop will be avail-
able or purchase at 20 percent off.
Fuzzy Farmers is donating all money
received from pink items such as scarves
and headbands on Pink Friday to the Sisters
with Bracatude, and Fenwick Street Used
Books and Music is having a book signing
featuring A Promise Kept by Niki Baker.
Picon said the First Friday is going to
spread awareness for the Making Strides
Walk on Oct. 7.
The walk next Sunday is being di-
rected by three sisters who are natives of
St. Marys County Terri Wheeler, Mary
Friess and Beth Yates who all carry a
gene that increases the likely hood they will
obtain breast cancer. All three are breast
cancer survivors and currently work in
Leonardtown.
While Making Strides Against Breast
Cancer is in its twentieth year, Wheeler said
this is the frst time the walk will be held in
St. Marys County.
The sisters will also be onsite in Leon-
ardtown next Friday to share their story and
The Sisters with Bracatude are Terri Wheeler, left, Mary Friess and Beth Yates.
Photo By Frank Marquart
Thursday, September 27, 2012
21 The County Times
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thank everyone for the tremendous amounts of support.
I was really taken back, Wheeler told The County
Times about when she learned of the LBAs plans to rally
behind the walk. I thought it was wonderful being
able to do it [host an event] in our own community is
much more satisfying [than walking in DC].
Along with gaining awareness for Wheeler, her fel-
low Sisters with Bracatude and the Making Strides walk,
the LBA is also hosting the event to promote programs
for MedStar St. Marys Hospital.
The hospital will have a table set up at First Friday
to provide information on breast health and the two
programs available for underserved women in Southern
Maryland, MedStar liaison Tami Gaido said.
They will have a display table set up with informa-
tion, and hands-on breast self-exam teaching models
with examples of abnormalities.
MedStar St. Marys Hospital partners with orga-
nizations such as the American Cancer Society to pro-
vide screening and assistance to the Southern Maryland
community. They hope to encourage women to take
measures to ensure good health during First Friday, and
funding typically goes to programs for local community
members.
Wheeler said she would like to see the proceeds go
to Look Good Feel Good, a program to help women
deal with the effects cancer treatments have on the skin,
and the Road to Recovery which pairs current cancer
patients up with survivors serving as mentors.
Through events like Pink Friday, Guido said the
hospital continues to serve the community everyday by
providing health education and information.
Trained educators from Health Connections also
visit area schools, community organizations, churches
and businesses to speak about a variety of health and
wellness topics, Gaido explained.
Aside from the serious topic of breast cancer and
the importance of raising awareness, Picon is looking
forward to a light family evening in the square. Live
Cajun music will be performed and people can walk
around and gain exposure to the Leonardtown business
community.
It will be a very family focused event, she said,
and explained why she believes Leonardtown is a
quaint and focused community.
Leonardtown is historical in nature she said,
there are no large box stores here, everything is owned
by local residents.
She also called the town old school, and claimed
most people are on a handshake and a frst name basis
with the owners in Leonardtown. People can also park
their car in one place, yet manage do a variety of things
in Leonardtown, she said.
The town is community focused, Picon contin-
ued, because community members emphasize support-
ing each other. First Friday exclusively uses local bands
and businesses during the event.
We live, work and play here, Picon said, and buy
local, play local and support local.
The First Friday committee will be on hand in
Leonardtown accepting applications from local resi-
dents wishing to participate in the walk. First Friday be-
gins at 5 p.m. and registration for the walk Oct. 7 begins
at 7 p.m.
For additional details or to pre-register for the
walk, call 410- 721-4304. For more information on the
programs being offered by MedStar call 301-475-4391.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Photo By Frank Marquart
Thursday, September 27, 2012
22 The County Times
Joseph Bankins, 69
Joseph Aloy-
sius Joe Boy
Bankins of Me-
chanicsville, MD
departed this life
peacefully on
Thursday, Septem-
ber 20, 2012 at the
age of 69 at Wash-
ington Hospital
Center. He battled
coronary heart
disease since 1998
and never once
complained.
Joseph, fondly known to family and
friends as Joe Boy, was born on June
15, 1943 in Oakville, Maryland to the late
James Bernard Bankins and Annie Eliza-
beth Young Bankins.
He was educated at St. Josephs Ele-
mentary School and Banneker High School.
Throughout his life, Joseph was a dedicated
lifelong Catholic having served as an al-
tar boy at St. Joseph Catholic Church in
Morganza, Maryland, from the age of six
through the eighth grade along with his
brother, Bernard.
Joseph was united in Marriage to the
love of his life Alice Olaine Baker Bankins
on August 20, 1966. He was a devoted and
loving husband for 46 years. The couple
was blessed with two wonderful children,
Sonya and Joseph Joey II. He was the
proud PoP PoP to fve grandchildren,
Nyla, Makhi, Jahzaria, Ryan and Zoie, all
of whom meant the world to him.
For most of his career, Joseph worked
in construction. He was especially known
to contractors for his expertise and willing-
ness to assist and explain construction work
to beginners. He was a mentor to many.
Joseph was also a member of the Laborers
Union Local 832. Later in his career, he left
the union and worked for non-union con-
tractors in various positions including that
of General Foreman. He retired in 2003
after continuing complications associated
with his heart.
Like his father, Joseph was an avid wa-
terman. He enjoyed fshing, crabbing, and
oystering. There are no waterways in St.
Marys County that were unfamiliar to him.
When he caught the big rockfsh that didnt
get away, you defnitely knew about it. He
would go to the Medleys and exercise his
bragging rights with the guys. He would
catch so many fsh that he held a Joes
Backyard Annual Fish Fry for seven con-
secutive years open to family, friends and
neighbors. This function became an event
because it graduated from 100 to over 500
guests. He was also known for his famous
oyster stew that everyone loved.
Throughout his life, Joseph was quite
a jokester. He inherited his fathers and his
uncle Joes talent for telling the big one
that everyone would believe. He passed the
talent down to his younger brother Tommy,
his granddaughter Nyla and his grandson
Ryan. His favorite hobbies were bowling,
gardening, watching the Dallas Cowboys
beat the Washington Redskins, hanging
with the fellows and of course hand danc-
ing. He even acquired the name Twinkle
Toes. In addition, we cannot leave out
his million-dollar smile inherited from his
mother. He never failed to let those he truly
loved know his feelings by frequently using
his three simple words I Love You.
Joseph leaves to cherish his memory,
his beloved wife of 46 years Alice Olaine
Bankins; children Sonya Antoinette
Bankins and Joseph Aloysius (Zettica)
Bankins, II; grandchildren Nyla Divine
Bankins, Makhi Nhiyir Best, Jahzaria Ayan
Bankins, Ryan Sebastian Bankins and Zoie
Danae Bankins; sisters and brothers: E.
Marie (Edward) Kennedy; J. Bernard (Cor-
rine) Bankins; Agnes T. Bankins; Cecilia J.
Bankins; Veronica M. Bankins; A. Berna-
dette (William-deceased) Thomas; Gloria
J. (Jerry) Fitzgerald; Thomas E. Bankins;
J. Monique (Mark) Spencer and Joseph
Jody (Linda) Bankins; fve aunts: Mary
E. Somerville, Nellie L. Wade, A. Marie
Goldring , Victoria Bond and Susie Mae
Mason. He was a devoted and caring uncle
to many nieces and nephews, godchildren
and a loving brother to his many brothers-
in-law and sisters in-law. Joseph is also sur-
vived by a host of other relatives and friends
whose lives he lovingly touched. In addi-
tion to his parents, Joseph was preceded in
death by his sisters, Mary Florine Bankins
and Rose Elizabeth Bankins Holly.
Family will receive friends for Josephs
Life Celebration on Thursday, September
27, 2012 from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. in the
Brinsfeld Funeral Home, 22955 Hollywood
Road, Leonardtown, MD 20650. Prayers
will be recited at 7 p.m. A Mass of Chris-
tian Burial will be celebrated by Reverend
Keith Woods on Friday, September 28, 2012
at 10 a.m. at St. Josephs Catholic Church,
29119 Point Lookout Road, Morganza, MD
20660. Interment will follow in Queen of
Peace Cemetery, Helen, MD.
Condolences to the family may be
made at www.brinsfeldfuneral.com.
Arrangements by the Brinsfeld Funer-
al Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.
Pearl Beatty, 84
Pearl Mad-
eline Beatty, 84,
of Bushwood,
MD passed away
surrounded by
her loving family
on September 16,
2012 in La Plata,
MD. Born on
April 13, 1928 she
was the daughter
of the late John
Clement and Mary
Pearl (Butler) Dy-
son. Pearl was the loving wife of Warren
Alexander Beatty whom she married on
June 21, 1947 in Washington, DC. Pearl is
survived by her children: Madeline Louise
Montgomery of Palm Coast. FL, Brenda
Joyce Green (Timothy) of Clinton, MD,
Antonio Terrence Beatty of Suitland, MD,
6 grand children, and 6 great great grand-
children, siblings: Elizabeth, Loretta, and
Richard C. and daughter in law Pamela M.
Beatty. Pearl is preceded in death by a son
Darnell C. Beatty and son-in law Albert
Montgomery, siblings: Alfred, Thomas,
Isaac, Lillian, Josephine, Gertrude and
Louise.
Mrs. Beatty graduated from Banneker
High School in 1945, and attended Bowie
State College, she moved from Princes
Georges County to St. Marys in 1988.
Pearl worked as a secretary for the Depart-
ment of Navy for 20 plus years retiring in
April 1988.
The family received friends on Satur-
day, September 22, 2012 in the Mattingley-
Gardiner Funeral Home, Leonardtown,
MD. A Mass of Christian Burial was held
on Saturday, September 22, 2012 in Sacred
Heart Catholic Church, Bushwood, MD
with Fr. Francis Early. Interment followed
in the church cemetery.
Joseph Clarkson, 75
Joseph Jody
Herman Clarkson,
75, of Valley Lee,
MD, passed away
on Sunday, Sep-
tember 23, 2012 at
St. Marys Hospital
in Leonardtown,
MD.
Jody was born
on July 5, 1937 in
New York to the
late Clifford An-
thony Clarkson
and Eleanor Rosemary (Easton) Clarkson.
Jody served in the US Army and was
honorably discharged. He lived in St.
Marys County for over 40 years, coming
here from Washington, DC. He enjoyed
his work as a Vet Tech and retired from the
National Zoo in Washington, DC and from
St. Marys Animal Hospital. He married
his wife Nona Lorene on May 10, 1990.
Together they enjoyed many camping trips
over the years. Jody also enjoyed hunting
and fshing and held a passion for animals.
He was a member of the Elks Lodge.
Jody is survived by his wife Nona Lo-
rene Clarkson of Valley Lee, MD; children
Clifford Anthony of Texas; Frank Joseph
Clarkson; Victoria Clarkson of Upper Marl-
boro, MD; Robin Darlene Little (William)
of Lexington Park, Md; Gerald Dean Skal-
by of Canada; Daniel Keith Skalby (Joann)
of Lusby, MD; Roy Neil Hines of Lexington
Park, MD; Teresa Mae Pace of Hunting-
town, MD; and Peggy Ann Hines of Tex-
as; brother Larry Clarkson of Virginia, 18
Grandchildren and 10 Great Grandchildren.
Graveside services will be held on
Thursday, September 27, 2012, at 2 p.m. in
Charles Memorial Gardens, Leonardtown,
MD.
In Lieu of fowers, donations may be
made to the Valley Lee Second District Vol-
unteer Fire Department.
Condolences to the family may be
made at www.brinsfeldfuneral.com.
Arrangements by the Brinsfeld Funer-
al Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.
Agnes Combs, 85
Agnes Marie
(Gee) Combs 85,
of Leonardtown,
MD, passed away
on September 20,
2012 in Leonard-
town, MD. Born
on July 10, 1927
in Leonardtown,
MD she was the
daughter of the late
Charles Benjamin
and Ida Pillsbury
Morgan. She was
married to Thomas N. Combs on May 1,
1947 at Holy Face in Callaway, MD and
who preceded her in death on April 8, 2010.
Gee is survived by her children Thom-
as N. Combs, Jr. (Sudy) of Callaway, MD,
Bennie Combs (Bernadette) of Chaptico,
MD and Glenda White (Jeremy) of Lex-
ington Park, MD; her six grandchildren,
Shelly Wathen (Danny) Thomas Combs
III, Ashley Combs, Dane Hanson (Han-
nah), Brad Combs and Amy Hanson; Five
great-grandchildren; Olivia Buzzurro, Bos-
ton Hester, Brock Hester, Lorelei Hanson,
and Adilyn Wathen, as well as her sibling
Dolores Lynch of Compton, MD. Marie is
preceded in death siblings; Helen Fenhagen,
Bernard Morgan, Mabel Meyer, Aloysius
(Dish) Morgan, Victoria Schaller, Eloise
Adams and Theda Nelson.
She was a homemaker and worked in
the cafeteria in Leonardtown Middle School
until she retired. Marie enjoyed her family
and loved music she would play her piano
or keyboard and sing every chance she got.
She also enjoyed playing cards and praying
the rosary.
The family received friends on Mon-
day, September 24, 2012 with prayers re-
cited in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral
Home, Leonardtown, MD. A Mass of
Christian burial was celebrated on Tues-
day, September 25, 2012 in St. Francis
Xavier Catholic Church with Father Brian
Sanderfoot offciating. Interment followed
in the church cemetery. Pallbearers were:
Tommy Combs, III, Dane Hanson, Brad
Combs, Amy Hanson, Danny Wathen, and
Chris Hester. Contributions may be made
to the Michael J. Fox Parkinsons Founda-
tion www.michaeljfox.org.
Kevin Flanary, 53
Kevin Thom-
as Flanary, 53, of
Tall Timbers, MD,
peacefully depart-
ed from this world
that he so enriched
on September 22,
2012.
He was born
March 22, 1959 in
Leonardtown, MD
to the late James V.
Flanary and Doro-
thy Mae Carpenter
Flanary of Lexington Park, MD.
Kevin graduated from Great Mills
High School in 1976. He pursued an early
interest in martial arts to the highest lev-
els. At eighteen, his prowess and hard work
were rewarded with the black belt from
the Headquarters of the Okinawa Sorin-
ryu Matsumara Orthodox Karate-Do. He
joined the U.S. Air Force and served from
1977 to 1980 as an Aircraft Maintenance
Specialist. After completing his military
service, he worked for Northwest Airlines
and Sikorsky Helicopter, among others, uti-
lizing the skills he gained in the Air Force.
On October 22, 1987, he married the love
of his life, Germaine Burns Flanary. They
will always be a part of each other.
He was never afraid of hard work, but
he knew how to take it easy. His favorite
methods of relaxation were barbequing and
spending time with loved ones and friends,
watching NASCAR and other sports, lis-
tening to music, and watching movies, par-
ticularly those of Toshiro Mifune and Bruce
Lee.
After a long battle, extreme physi-
cal challenges made it impossible for him
to continue working. His response was to
work even harder, demonstrating how he
faced adversity with grace and abundant
good humor. Kevin didnt know the mean-
ing of the word quit. He was never stronger
than he was in his last years.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
23 The County Times
www.brinsfeldfuneral.com
Brinsfeld Funeral Home, P.A.
22955 Hollywood Road
Leonardtown, Maryland 20650
(301) 475-5588
Brinsfeld-Echols Funeral Home, P.A.
30195 Three Notch Road
Charlotte Hall, Maryland 20650
(301) 472-4400
Caring for the Past
Planning for the Future
Traditional Funerals, Cremation Services, Memorial Church Services,
Direct Burials, Monuments, Unlimited with Commitment Through After Care.
FAMILY-OWNED & OPERATED
FOR FIVE GENERATIONS
Kevin was a man of great physical
strength with a proud list of accomplish-
ments in martial arts. He was a student and
a teacher, and will be remembered fondly
by the friends who taught him and those
who learned from him. More importantly,
he was a man of astounding inner strength,
who successfully lived out a philosophy of
kindness, benevolence, and unselfshness,
gaining a world of respect and affection
from his family and friends. He was an in-
spiration to many. His memory is a gift to
all who knew him.
In addition to his wife and his moth-
er, Kevin is survived by his sisters, JoAnn
Barclift (Curt) of Tall Timbers, MD and
Debra Flanary Ford of Pompano Beach, FL;
his brother, Robert Flanary (Anne) of Port
St. Lucie, FL; his step-sons, Jim Busillo
(Adria) of Oxford, PA and Matthew Busillo
(Stephanie) of Lincoln University, PA; three
grandchildren, Avery, Jayden and MacK-
enzie Busillo; his nephew, Jacob, his great-
nephew, Tyler and his cat, Sam. He is also
survived by two dear friends, who were
like family to him, Brother Tom Crane and
Kevin Garvey. In addition to his father, he
is preceded in death by his brother, Brian
Flanary and his nephew, Antonio Flanary.
Memorial Contributions may be made
to Tri-County Animal Shelter, 6707 Animal
Shelter Road, Hughesville, MD 20637 and
Second District Volunteer Rescue Squad,
P.O. Box 1, Valley Lee, MD 20692.
A Memorial Service will be held at a
later date.
Condolences to the family may be
made at www.brinsfeldfuneral.com.
Arrangements by the Brinsfeld Funer-
al Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.
Francis Hewitt, 83
Francis Em-
manuel Hewitt, 83,
of Callaway, MD,
died on Septem-
ber 23, 2012 at St.
Marys Hospital,
Leonardtown, MD.
He was born
November 7, 1928
in Valley Lee, MD
to the late Irving
Graves Hewitt
and Edith Cecilia
Combs Hewitt.
Francis was a lifelong resident of St.
Marys County. He was a graduate of Little
Flower School and Charlotte Hall Military
Academy. He proudly served his country
in the National Guard from 1949 to 1951.
On December 21, 1947, he met the love of
his life while decorating Holy Face Church
for Christmas. On April 20, 1950, he mar-
ried his beloved wife, Mary Lillian Johnson
Hewitt, at St. Aloysius Catholic Church
in Leonardtown, MD. Together, they cel-
ebrated 62 years of true love. He was co-
owner of Hewitt Lumber & Supply Com-
pany in Lexington Park and Callaway until
retirement in 1993. He and his wife owned
Joseph B Payne & Associates, a person-
nel form business. Francis was a devoted,
life-long member of Holy Face Catholic
Church, where he served on many commit-
tees through the years. He was also active
in many clubs and organizations, including
the Lions Club of Lexington Park, Knights
of Columbus Council 265, Elks Club Coun-
cil 2092, the Moose Lodge, Board of Di-
rectors for SMECO, Advisory Board for
Maryland National Bank and the St. Marys
County Planning Commission. His hob-
bies included his many tractors, including
the Kubota, Cub and Bolens; his collection
of antique tools, collection of brass, garden-
ing, and politics and current events and card
playing. He loved being with people, and
was always kind and compassionate. How-
ever, his greatest love was his family.
In addition to his wife, he is survived
by his children, William Francis Hewitt
of Callaway, MD and Judith Victoria H.
Sterling (Dr. Blair Wood) of Dameron,
MD; his sisters, Mary Alma Hampton
of Leonardtown, MD and Joan Victoria
Burroughs (Ben) of Mechanicsville, MD;
eight grandchildren, William Sterling III,
Thomas Sterling, Christina Sterling, Scott
Paul, Molly Ridgell, Amy Hewitt, Heather
Elaine Hewitt, and William Francis Hewitt
II; one great-grandchild, John Baylen Dean;
his brothers-in-law, Joseph H. Johnson of
Lexington Park, MD and Leonard Eugene
Johnson (Cathy) of Arnold, MD. In addi-
tion to his parents, he was also preceded in
death by his son, Robert Irving Hewitt, his
grandson, Christopher Hewitt; his brother,
Preston Ignatius Hewitt; his son-in-law,
William Sterling, Jr.; and his brother-in-law,
Paul Hampton.
Family received friends for Francis
Life Celebration on Wednesday, Septem-
ber 26, 2012, at Holy Face Catholic Church,
20408 Point Lookout Road, Great Mills,
MD 20634. Prayers were recited by Rev-
erend Joseph Calis. A Mass of Christian
Burial will be held on Thursday, Septem-
ber 27, 2012 at 11 a.m. at Holy Face Catho-
lic Church. Interment will follow.
Serving as pallbearers will be the
Grandchildren.
Ann Kalmus, 77
Ann The-
resa Kalmus, 77,
of Wildewood in
California, MD,
passed away on
Monday, Septem-
ber 17, 2012 sur-
rounded by family
at her home.
Ann was
born on December
5, 1934 in Hitchin,
England to the late
Dominic F. Kane and Rachel (Stratton)
Kane.
Ann was a local real estate agent until
her retirement in 2010. She enjoyed spend-
ing time with her family. Ann enjoyed trav-
eling, raising, breeding and showing her
dogs, Elvis music, gardening, knitting, and
going to church.
Ann is survived by her fve sons, Paul
Kalmus (Mary), John Kalmus, Stephen
Kalmus (Sandy), Mark Kalmus, Raymond
Kalmus (Jodie); her fve daughters, Joann
McKeown (Steve), Carolyn Choporis
(Paul), Mary Dudley (Tony), Sheila Mat-
thews (Matt), and Cindy Crispell (Steve);
her siblings that reside in England, brother
Anthony Kane, sisters, Sheila Holden,
Mary Sprague and Nora Stewarther, and
her twenty-fve grandchildren and fourteen
great grandchildren.
Family received friends for Anns
Life Celebration on Tuesday, September
25, 2012, at St. Aloysius Catholic Church,
22800 Washington Street, Leonardtown,
MD 20650. Prayers were recited. A Mass of
Christian Burial was celebrated by Rever-
end John Dakes on Wednesday, September
26, 2012 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church.
Interment followed in St. Johns Church
Cemetery, Hollywood, MD.
In lieu of fowers, donations may be
made to Hospice of St. Marys, P.O. Box
625, Leonardtown, MD 20650 or an Ani-
mal Rescue League.
Condolences to the family may be
made at www.brinsfeldfuneral.com.
Arrangements by the Brinsfeld Funer-
al Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.
Nancy Miller, 77
Nancy Ger-
trude Miller,
77, of Orange,
California passed
away on Sunday,
July 9, 2012. She
died as a result
of two strokes.
Nancy was born
in Maddox, Md.
on November 28,
1934 to Francis
Edgar Thompson
and Lessie Knott
Thompson. She spent her youth working
in the family store. She graduated form
Margaret Brent High School in 1952. Nan-
cy was married to the late August James
(Jimmie) Miller for 53 years. She raised
her family in Southern Maryland and then
moved to Southern California in 1974.
Nancy retired from the Count of Or-
ange after 20 years. When she retired,
Nancy enjoyed Bingo, attending church and
volunteering at St. Josephs Hospital in Or-
ange. Her family would like to thank Dr.
Kelly Tucker and staff of Orange, Ca. and
to Drs. Peter Hoagland, Jaski, Walter Dem-
bitsky and staff of Sharp Memorial Hospi-
tal in San Diego for installing the L.V.A.D.
(Heartmate II) that saved her life 4 years
ago and allowed her to spend that time with
her loved ones.
Nancy loved life and lived everyday to
its fullest. She was every ones Energizer
Bunny and will be sorely missed. Nancy
is survived by her sister, Doris Thompson
Ward, her daughters Sybil Miller, Teri Kind
and her son Gus Miller Jr., two stepsons,
Jim and Alan Miller, 4 nieces, 2 nephews,
7 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren.
She was predeceased by her brother, Law-
rence Thompson of Wayside, Md. Nancy
said that she wanted to come home when
she died, so her family made sure to grant
her dying wish. Nancys inurnment was
private held on Sunday September 23rd at
Christ Episcopal Church in Chaptico with
the Rev. Christopher Wilkins in attendance
along with many family members and
friends.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
24 The County Times
Robert Robbins, Sr., 73
Robert Kent
Robbins, Sr., 73 of
Bushwood, MD
and formerly of
Millville, passed
away on Tuesday,
September 18,
2012 at the Taylor
Farm Assisted Liv-
ing Facility.
Robert was
born on April 6,
1939 in Elkton,
MD to the late John O. and Marie (Justis)
Robbins.
Robert was a graduate of Millville
High School. In 1965, Robert began his
career at the ACME Market where he was
employed for over thirty years. He started
out as a meat cutter and later managed the
meat department.
Robert was a Mason of the Masonic
Shekinah Lodge No. 58, and he was a mem-
ber of the Second United Methodist Church
in Millville. Robert was passionate about
animals and enjoyed spending time fshing
and gardening.
Robert is survived by his daughter,
Staci Miller (Ray) of Kingston, PA; his sis-
ters, Shirley Taylor (Sherman) of Millville,
Joan Ritchie (Dale) of Leonardtown, MD,
Cindy Spinnato of Millville; his brother,
John Robbins (Roseanna) of Tampa Bay,
FL; his grandchildren, Amanda, Stephen,
Joshua, and Michael; and his loving nieces
and nephews.
Funeral services were conducted on
Saturday, September 22, 2012 in the Chris-
ty Funeral Home, 11 W. Broad Street, Mill-
ville. There was a viewing on Saturday in
the funeral home. Burial will be in Green-
wood Memorial Park, Millville.
Arrangements are by the Brinsfeld
Funeral Home, P.A. Leonardtown, MD.
Condolences to the family may be
made to www.brinsfeldfuneral.com or to
www.christyfuneralservice.com.
James Schuhart, 88
James (Jim)
Henry Schuhart,
88, of Chaptico,
MD, passed away
surrounded by
his loving family
on September 18,
2012 in Chaptico,
MD. Born on De-
cember 24, 1923 in
Chaptico, MD, he
was the son of the
late William E. and
Nellie (Long) Schuhart. James is survived
by his loving wife Joan C. Schuhart whom
he married on June 16, 1973 in La Plata,
MD. James is survived by his children:
Carol Bianchini (Pat) of Ellicott City, MD.,
Debbie Dorsey (John) of Mechanicsville,
MD, Laurie Westerfeld of Chaptico, MD.,
James Westerfeld of Poplarville, MS, Wiley
Schuhart David Schuhart of MD, 7 grand
children, and 2 great grandchildren. James
is survived by his siblings: George Hamil-
ton Schuhart of Bel Alton, MD, and Daniel
Webster Schuhart of Clinton, MD. He is
preceded in death by his siblings: Elizabeth
Ann Fowler of Mechanicsville, MD., Mary
Margaret Bosma of College Park, MD, Wil-
liam Edward Schuhart of Hyattsville, MD.,
Mable Elsie Trapp of Towson, MD., John
Oscar Schuhart of Chaptico, MD., Virginia
Mary Groff of Eastern Shore, MD., and An-
nie Mae Wallace of Baton Rouge, MS.
James was a bus driver for James
Woodburn Buses of St. Marys County,
MD and he was a farmer. James enjoyed
farming, tobacco, and soybeans, crabbing,
and oystering.
The family received friends on Friday,
September 21, 2012 with prayers recited in
the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home,
Leonardtown, MD. A Memorial Service
was held on Saturday, September 22, 2012
in Christ Episcopal Church, Chaptico, MD
with Father Wilkins offciating. Interment
was private. Contributions may be made to
Hospice House of St. Marys, P.O. Box 625
Leonardtown, MD 20650.
Rita Trossbach, 69
Rita Char-
lene Trossbach,
69, of Dameron,
MD, passed away
on September 20,
2012 at St. Marys
Hospital, Leonar-
dtown, MD.
She was born
May 18, 1943 in
Washington D.C.
to the late John El-
wood Wathen Sr.
and Mary Cath-
erine Quade.
Rita is a longtime resident of St.
Marys County. She is a graduate of Mar-
garet Brent High School. On July 21, 1962,
she married her late husband, Joseph JB
Sonny Trossbach. She worked for the
United States Post Offce and retired as the
Dameron Postmaster in 2011. She was an
active member of St. Michaels Church,
the Knights of Columbus Bells, Council
2065, and the St. Michaels Ladies of Char-
ity. Rita was the long time coordinator for
the St. Michaels Fall dinner, and was well
known for her coleslaw at the Knights of
Columbus monthly dinners. She enjoyed
cooking, gardening, playing games and
cards, and bingo. Most of all, she loved her
family and treasured her grandchildren.
She is survived by her children, Joseph
Sonny Trossbach (Nikki) of Dameron,
MD and Thomas Tom Trossbach (Abby)
of Dameron, MD; her grandchildren, Tes-
sie, J.C., Mary and Travis Trossbach; her
sister, Catherine Kitty Hill of Avenue,
MD; and her brothers, John Johnny Wa-
then (Becky) of St. Inigoes, MD; Michael
Wathen (Jeannie) of Chaptico, MD, and
Charles Happy Wathen (Mary) of Me-
chanicsville, MD. In addition to her par-
ents and husband, she is also preceded in
death by her sister Jean Wathen.
Family received friends for Ritas
Life Celebration on Sunday, September 23,
2012, at the St. Michaels Church, 16555
Three Notch Road, Ridge, MD. Prayers
were recited by Reverend Lee Fangmeyer.
A Mass of Christian Burial was held on
Monday, September 24, 2012 at St. Mi-
chaels Church. Interment followed in the
church cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be made
to Archangel Scholarship Foundation, P.O.
Box 259, Ridge, MD 20680 and Ridge Vol-
unteer Rescue Squad , P.O. Box 456, Ridge,
MD 20680.
Condolences to the family may be
made at www.brinsfeldfuneral.com.
Arrangements by the Brinsfeld Funer-
al Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.
Michael Veitch, 64
Michael Mor-
ton Veitch, 64 of
Lexington Park,
MD died Septem-
ber 18, 2012 at his
home surrounded
by his family.
Born April
30, 1948 in Wash-
ington, DC, he
was the son of the
late Dr. Fletcher P.
Veitch and the late
Marian Morton Veitch.
He is survived by his wife, Pamela Jen
Veitch; his three sons, Gavin Veitch (Mari-
anne) and grand-baby Callan Isabelle of
Mechanicsville, VA, Kyle Veitch (Nicole)
of Athens, GA and Brett Veitch of Athens,
GA; and a brother, Fletcher P. Veitch (Patri-
cia) of Points, WV.
A graduate of DeMatha Catholic High
School in 1966, he graduated from the Uni-
versity of Maryland in 1970 with a Bach-
elor of Science Degree in Microbiology. He
attended the University of New Hampshire
for one year and came back to Maryland to
work at the University of Maryland Vet-
erinary Science Department. On June 9,
1973 he married Pamela Veitch at Sotterley
Plantation in Hollywood where his mother
Marian was a docent for 25 years. He was
accepted into Veterinary School at the Uni-
versity of Georgia in 1974 and graduated
Magna Cum Laude with a Doctor of Veter-
inary Medicine degree in 1978. Dr. Veitch
began his Veterinary career at Tidewater
Veterinary Hospital in Charlotte Hall, MD
working under Dr. Bud Virts and Dr. Clar-
ence Little who were both instrumental in
his career. He reconnected with Dr. David
G. Langford (Diane) and the two became
partners and friends and founded Three
Notch Veterinary Hospital in Hollywood,
MD where Dr. Veitch continued to work for
33 years providing compassionate care for
sick and injured animals.
During that time he served in many
community activities including Board
of Directors/U.S. Navy League, Patux-
ent River Chapter, Board of Directors, St.
Marys Hospital where he served as Vice
President for 3 years and chaired many
committees. He served as an offcer on the
board of St. Marys Youth Lacrosse Club
for 10 years and was instrumental with oth-
ers in bringing the sport of boys and girls
Lacrosse to the Public High Schools of St.
Marys County.
Dr. Veitch spent all his summers while
growing up at his family cottage and prop-
erty on the Chesapeake Bay called Green
Gates located in Hermanville, MD. It
was there that he developed the love for the
bay and nature. He had a wide variety of
interests including boating, fshing, snow
skiing, scuba diving, mountain biking,
golf, woodworking, music and playing gui-
tar and anything else he could do with his
hands.
Dr. Veitch was a lifelong member of
the American Veterinary Medical Associa-
tion and several other professional groups.
He was co-chairman of the Northern New
England Veterinary Alpine Symposium
held at the Balsams in Dixville Notch, NH
for 20 yearsproviding continuing educa-
tion for Veterinarians.
Pam, his wife of 39 years remembers
Mike as the most amazing husband, father
and friend. Many Caribbean trips, trips to
Australia, Bali, scuba diving, dinner par-
ties with friends and laughing in the pool
bonded the two for life. He was perfect in
every way, even though he couldnt dance!
An Im Still Awake Wake was held
for his family and close friends in August
and at his request no Memorial Service will
be held.
Condolences to the family may be
made at www.brinsfeldfuneral.com.
Memorial contributions may be made
to Hospice of St. Marys, P.O. Box 625,
Leonardtown, MD 20650.
Arrangements made by the Brinsfeld
Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.
Carrie Welch, 91
Carrie Eliza-
beth Welch, 91 of
St. Inigoes, MD
passed away on
September 22,
2012 at St. Marys
Hospital.
Carrie was
born on August 5,
1921 in Newport,
MD to the late
Samuel Wilson
Ryce and Mary
Etta (Della) Ryce.
Carrie lived in St. Inigoes, MD all
of her life where she and her husband
farmed the land at their home on Beach-
ville Road. She enjoyed spending time
playing cards and working on crossword
puzzles.
Carrie is survived by her children,
Brenda M. Sellers of Mechanicsville,
MD, Lloyd J. Welch (Sue) of Cobb Island,
MD, Ronald F. Welch (Joan) of St. Ini-
goes, MD; twelve grandchildren; many
great grandchildren; and one great-great
grandchild. In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by her hus-
band, Earl Joseph Welch, and her chil-
dren, Claudia Dale Welch Rolfe and Earl
Wayne Welch.
Family will receive friends for Car-
ries Life Celebration on Thursday, Sep-
tember 27, 2012 from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
at St. Michaels Catholic Church, 16566
Three Notch Road, Ridge, Maryland
20680. A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated by Father Lee Fangmeyer at
11 a.m. Interment will follow in St. Mi-
chaels Catholic Church Cemetery.
In lieu of fowers, donations may be
made to St. Michaels Catholic Church,
P.O. Box 429, Ridge, Maryland 20680 or
the Ridge Volunteer Rescue Squad, P.O.
Box 456, Ridge, MD 20680.
Condolences to the family may be
made at www.brinsfeldfuneral.com.
Arrangements by the Brinsfeld Fu-
neral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
25 The County Times
Charlene from the Apple Basket is hosting this event at the
BARN SALE
SAtuRdAy, SEptEmBER 29
th

& SuNdAy, SEptEmBER 30
th
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Flat Iron Farm 301-481-6958
45846 Highway to Heaven Lane Great Mills, MD
85 Pieces of Antique
Furniture & Other
Specialty Items
Community
RiverFest Returns
Registration is now open for marching units, individuals and organizations wishing to participate
in the annual Veterans Day Parade in Leonardtown. Parade entries can include marching units, foats,
bands, schools, scouts, clubs, cheerleaders, bikes, vintage cars, horses or other entries.
The parade will begin at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11 at Ryken High School, and proceed on Fen-
wick Street to the Town Square. What a great opportunity to honor our veterans and promote your
group.
For information and to request a 2012 Veterans Day Parade Entry Form, log on to the Town
of Leonardtowns website at www.leonardtown.somd.com and click on Veterans Day Parade Entry
Form.
Forms are due to the Parade Chairman by Oct. 15, 2012.
Veterans Day Parade
Entries Now Being Accepted
Celebrate our waterways at RiverFest with free activities, entertain-
ment, and learning about the environment. The eighth annual event will
take place at Historic St. Marys City (HSMC) on Oct. 13 from 11 a.m. until
5 p.m.
Step onboard a tall ship, paddle a kayak, and help skipper a small sail-
boat. Try tonging for oysters or tying sailors knots. Join former State
Senator Bernie Fowler for the annual Wade-In, an informal measure of
water quality. Non-stop music will set the beat as you visit informative ex-
hibits. Make some new fne-feathered and fnned friends. Discover things
you can do in your own backyard that help preserve our unique landscape.
Take home a free Conservation at Home booklet for more opportunities to
save waterways. Join a paddle-in organized by Fresco Adventures.
Contact Marcia at fun@frescoadventure.com or (301) 352-5272; kayak
and lunch are included in the fee.
Vendors will be on site offering snacks, beverages, and meals for sale
throughout the day.
A preliminary list of scheduled performances and activities follows:
Noon Indian Summer
1 p.m. Magpie
2 p.m. Chesapeake Charter School Chorus
3 p.m. Wade-in & Spring Ridge Rhythm Club
3 p.m. Joe Norris
4 p.m. Don Kenefck

Paddle in or drive in to Historic St. Marys City (47414 Old State House Road, St. Marys City), rain or
shine, for a day of free fun and learning.
Be sure to save time to explore the living history exhibits at HSMC. During RiverFest, admission is
free.
RiverFest is sponsored by the St. Marys Watershed Association, Historic St. Marys City, and the
generosity of local businesses. Learn more at http://smrwa.org/riverfest.html.
Photo courtesy of Historic St. Marys City
Thursday, September 27, 2012
26 The County Times
Pet Valu is opening a new store in Leonardtown on Saturday, Oct. 6 and holding
a grand opening event.
The festivities begin at 9
a.m. Pet parents are invited to
bring along their animals for
refreshments, raffe prices, and
discounts on store items. The
frst 100 customers to make a
purchase will receive a compli-
mentary gift bag.
Of course the stars of the
day will be the pets. Animal
rescue groups will be at the
store with dogs and cats in need
of a loving home. Maybe you'll
even lend a paw and think about
adopting a new family member,
a press release states.
Pet Valu is a specialty re-
tailer that sells high quality pet
supplies at reasonable prices.
With more than 400 stores in the
U.S. and Canada, the company
sells premium pet foods, toys,
and accessories.
The new Pet Valu store is
located at The Shops at Breton
Bay on 40845 Merchants Lane
Suite 100, Leonardtown, MD
20650. All pets are welcome
but must be leashed. For more
information, please visit www.
petvalu.com.
Community
Pawsitive Passage
26325 Pt Lookout Rd
Leonardtown, MD 20650
PawsitivePassage.com
301-475-0446
Pet Valu Opens in
Leonardtown
Reservations Opening for
Holiday Madrigal Dinners
Pet of the Week
Hello, I am Zayla. I am about 3 years
old. Female, spay, micro chipped. I
chirp when I speak. I am the sweetest
little girl you will ever meet. Please
contact St. Marys Animal Welfare
League at cndy_dixon@yahoo.com or
410-610-3067.
Start your holiday season in style at
a colonial Madrigal Dinner. Historic St.
Marys City will host the 41st annual series
of celebrations featuring feasting, frolick-
ing, and song in the State House on Dec. 7,
8, 9, 14, 15, and 16.
Holiday revelers have feasted through
the ages. In the colony, delicacies arrived
with the tobacco feet towards the end of
the year and cool weather signaled time
for butchering meat and decanting bever-
ages that had fermented since the harvest.
The notion of adding music to the meal was
introduced to England from Italy, and the
16th-century lords and ladies of the land en-
joyed great madrigal feasts.
Todays madrigal dinners feature
other customs that were probably familiar
to the colonists. The burning of a Yule log,
a common practice by the Middle Ages,
was thought to bring good luck in the New
Year. Plants that magically remained green
through the bleakest times have held a spe-
cial signifcance since Ancient Rome. In
15th- and 16th- century England, musicians
sang carols to introduce the Christmas story
to those who were unable to read.
All of these traditions are part of
HSMCs Madrigal Dinners. Enjoy delec-
table fare from Expressions of St. Marys,
lavish decorations designed and installed by
the Mistress Brent Garden Club, and beauti-
ful harmonies by St. Maries Musica.
Join the Lord and Lady of the Manor
in the Great Hall at 6 p.m. on Fridays and
Saturdays. In response to guests sugges-
tions, this years Sunday dinners will begin
at 3 p.m.
Admission is $85 for the general public
($80 Friends members). Reservations are
required and will be accepted beginning
Oct. 2. Contact Muffn at 240-895-4991
or events@stmaryscity.org soon to insure
your place at the feast.
Photo courtesy of Historic St. Marys City
Servers prepare to present the Yule Log during
HSMCs holiday Madrigal Dinner.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
27 The County Times
Community
Scenes From The County Fair
College, Marine Museum Promote Museum Education
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
In an effort to stir up community in-
terest about museum history, and recruit
students to its museum studies program,
St. Marys College of Maryland hosted a
series of lectures this week educating stu-
dents and the public on some of the worlds
history during its second annual museum
studies week.
This years theme, Apocalypse, was
chosen due to Mayan predictions that the
world will end in 2012.
Of course, the belief that the Maya
predicted the end of the world would hap-
pen in 2012 is, itself, a misinterpretation,
said SMCM Assistant Professor of History
and Museum Studies Program Coordina-
tor Kenneth Cohen.
Thats the fun of the whole theme
our speakers are all talking about challeng-
es of interpreting the apocalypse.
Tuesdays lecture, led by Colonial
Williamsburg Foundation archeologist
Andrew Edwards, featured a discussion
about people who dug-up a graveyard in
Virginia because they believed an old tomb
carried secrets of the year 2000.
Yesterday, Ross McPhee of the Amer-
ican Museum of Natural History led a talk
about how museums interpret and defne
extinction.
In the second year of museum stud-
ies week, Cohen says the college has put a
greater emphasis on appealing to a larger
audience.
Last year, we really focused on our
students, Cohen said. But this year, were
trying to widen our audience and pick top-
ics that will interest the whole community.
Ultimately, Cohen added, he hopes
the talks will ignite a lot of interest and
discussion among the audience, leading
to a desire to visit the local institutions in
Southern Maryland.
St. Marys College professor Cristin
Cash is slated to conclude the presentations
today with a lecture on the Maya, 2012 and
the rapidly approaching, predicted end of
the world. Cohen believes the potential end
of the world is a topic compelling enough
to intrigue many people.
Is any more topic more important?
he asked. People should come to fnd out
if the world is more likely to end this year
that next year!
The lecture today at St. Marys Col-
lege of Maryland is scheduled to begin at
4:15 p.m. in the Cole Cinema and is free to
the public.
Calvert County Marine Museum is
offering free admission Saturday in recog-
nition of Museum Day.
Traci Cimini, Calvert Marine Muse-
ums public relations offcial, believes Mu-
seum Day is a great event because it allows
a chance for smaller museums to offer free
admission as the larger Smithsonian chain
of museums in Washington DC do on a
regular basis.
She says the museum continues to
participate in free museum day because
she hopes it encourages people who have
never been to Solomons or visited the
museum to stop in.
Over 1,400 museums and 350,000
people nation-wide took part in museum
day last year.
Were happy to participate with
them, Cimini said.
In order to get into Calvert Marine
Museum free of charge, patrons are re-
quired to frst visit smithsonian.com/mu-
seumday and download a Museum Day
Admission Card.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Mike Haas, left, and James
DeMauro, right, draw attention to
themselves by stopping to pose in
the middle of the fairgrounds.
Tyler Gorman, 3, of Hollywood
rides the crocodiles during the
St. Marys County Fair on
Friday night.
A large crowd turned out Saturday
morning to catch the annual fair
parade as children scrambled to
catch candy that was tossed from
the parade marchers.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
28 The County Times
Thursday, Sept. 27
Understanding American Political
Talk
Leonardtown High School (23995 Point
Lookout Road, Leonardtown) 6:30 p.m.
Kathryn Ruud, linguist will discuss
understanding American political talk at
Leonardtown High School. Sponsored by
the League of Women Voters of St. Marys
County, the College of Southern Mary-
land, St. Marys College for the Study of
Democracy and the NAACP of St. Marys
County, free and open to the general
public.
Quarter Throwdown
Mechanicsville Volunteer Rescue Squad
(28120 Old Flora Corner Road, Mechan-
icsville) 6 p.m.
Vendors Include: Ditty Bug Designs,
Damsel In Defense, Thirty-One Bags,
Origami Owl, Lilley Pad, Discovery Toys,
Keepsake & Country Friends, Tastefully
Simple, Tupperware, Dove Chocolate,
Gourmet Cupboard, Princess House, Park
Lane, Avon, Miche Bags, Celebrating
Home, Scentsy, Pampered Chef. Lots of
varieties - all items are brand new, unused,
quality items! Auction begins at 7 p.m.
Paddles are $3 each. Concessions will be
available. For more information or reser-
vations, call Melissa at 410-474-2958
Friday, Sept. 28
Home Spun Coffee House Open Mic
Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach
Fowler Road, Chaptico) 7 p.m.
The Southern Maryland Traditional
Music and Dance Home Spun Coffee
House will sponsor an Open Mic. This is
a great event with many varieties of mu-
sic and lots of friendship, so if you havent
been to an SMTMD event before, this is
a great time to start! The doors open at
7 p.m., and the music starts at 7:30 p.m.
The Admission Fee for this event is only
$5, and performers are admitted free.
Light refreshments will be provided. For
additional information, or to sign up to
perform, please contact John Garner at
carthagena@wildblue.net or call John at
301-904-4987. Visit www.smtmd.org for
directions and more information.
Back to School Basket Bingo
St. Johns School Monsignor Harris Cen-
ter (43950 St. Johns Road, Hollywood)
6 p.m.
Admission is $20, which includes a
pack of cards for 20 games and a door prize
ticket; additional cards will be available at
$5 per pack. Children must purchase an
admission ticket and be accompanied by a
paying adult. The prizes will include flled
Longaberger baskets. There will also be a
Chinese auction, pull tabs, door prizes and
a 50/50 raffe. Food will be available for
sale as well. For more information or res-
ervations e-mail Lindagreer@gmail.com
or Phyllis at 301-373-5871.
Saturday, Sept 29
Regional Day to Serve
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-
day Saints Brings Together Mid-Atlantic
States to Declare Sept. 29, 2012 as Region-
al Day to Serve Washington, D.C. The re-
gional Day to Serve is focused on feeding
the hungry; and they are inviting all faith-
based organizations, community groups,
civic organizations, and citizens to join
them in this unprecedented regional event.
In Maryland, the Census Bureau re-
ported that there are more than 530,000
Marylanders living below the federal pov-
erty level and one in six Marylanders were
unable to afford enough food in 2011. All
LDS churches in Calvert County are join-
ing in this cause and have been distribut-
ing digital fyers to promote it.
The Humanitarian Services Depart-
ment of the LDS Church based in Salt
Lake City, Utah will donate semi-truck-
loads of food totaling about $200,000 to
the states major food organizations and
around 150,000 members representing 317
congregations will be participating in local
projects to collect food for community pan-
tries, and to provide other support. These
activities will take place in the month
of September, which is Hunger Action
Month, and will culminate in major food
collection efforts on the Day to Serve. The
major food organization partners for this
event include Capital Area Food Bank in
Washington, D.C., Maryland Food Bank,
the Federation of Virginia Food Banks,
and Mountaineer Food Bank and Hunting-
ton Area Food Bank in West Virginia.
As local projects are organized and
identifed they will be added to dayto-
serve.org where anyone who is interested
can locate a project in their community
and volunteer to help. For more informa-
tion please contact Alexander Eubanks at
301-751-7499.
Southern Maryland Doll Show
Damons Ballroom at Clarion Inn (45 St.
Patricks Drive, Waldorf) 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
The Southern Maryland Doll Club
is holding its 30th Annual Doll Show and
Sale. The doll club is a not-for-proft orga-
nization. Admission is $4 for adults and $1
for children under the age of 12.
5th Year Poker Run to Aid Wounded
Marines
Toots Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Road,
Hollywood) 11 a.m.
Registration will start at 11 a.m. with
the ride beginning at noon. There is a $25
entry fee with a $250 prize for the best
poker hand. T-shirts will be provided for
riders. All motorcycles welcomed. The f-
nal stop is a party with live music at Toots
Bar in Hollywood. All proceeds from the
event will go to Marines Helping Marines,
an organization dedicated to helping in-
jured Marines after being wounded in our
defense. For more information, call Billy
Breslin at 301-904-5412.
5K Walk/Run
St. Marys Ryken School (22600 Camp
Calvert Road, Leonardtown) 8:30 a.m.
Father Andrew White School is host-
ing their annual 5K Walk/Run. Start time
is 8:30am on the campus of St. Marys
Ryken High School. The beautiful course
will take you up and down some hills and
through the back roads of downtown Leon-
ardtown. The cost is $30 for same day
registration. Registration begins at 7 a.m.
at the SMR stadium entrance. There will
be prizes for the top 3 in the male and fe-
male age groups. Please contact christam-
hayes@gmail.com for more information.
Multi-Family Yard Sale
Seventh District Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment and Rescue Squad (45245 Drayden
Road, Avenue) 7-11 a.m.
SDVFD&RSA Multi-Family Yard
Sale at the Firehouse. Snacks and drinks
will be available for purchase. For more
information call Darlene at 240-434-1095
Sunday, Sept. 30
African American Civil War Memo-
rial & Museum
Sotterley Plantation Barn (44300 Sotter-
ley Lane, Hollywood) 3 p.m.
Sotterley Plantation is proud to part-
ner with The Boeing Company in an-
nouncing the upcoming 2012 Speaker Se-
ries presentation entitled African Ameri-
can Civil War Memorial and Museum by
Frank Smith, Ph.D. Fulflling a lifelong
dream to honor African Americans who
fought for freedom as United States Col-
ored Troops during the Civil War, he is the
founder and president of this signifcant
Washington, D.C., memorial and museum.
The United States Colored Troops made
up over 10 percent of the Union or North-
ern Army even though they were prohibit-
ed from joining until July 1862, 15 months
into the war. They comprised 25 percent
of the Union Navy. Yet, only one percent
of the Northern population was African
American. Clearly overrepresented in the
military, African Americans played a de-
cisive role in the Civil War. African Amer-
icans fought in every major campaign and
battle during the last two years of the war
earning 25 Medals of Honor. Abraham
Lincoln, recognizing their contributions,
declared, Without the military help of the
black freedmen, the war against the South
could not have been won. This event is
free to the public. Advance reservations
are required due to limited seating. Call
301-373-2280 for more information or to
make your reservation.
Monday, Oct. 1
St. Petersburg Vocal Ensemble
St. Paul UMC (11000 HG Trueman Road,
Lusby) 7:30 p.m.
The St. Petersburg Vocal Ensemble
will be performing Russian folk tunes and
Old Slavonic church music. No admission
fee.
Tuesday, Oct. 2
Inside-Outside at North End
Gallery
North End Gallery (41652 Fenwick Street,
Leonardtown) - 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
October brings the show Inside-
Outside which is the collaboration of
three artists.: Lee Russell, a fne wood-
worker, Karen Russell , a watercolorist
and Linda Epstein, an oil painter. The title
Inside - Outside covers so many possi-
bilities. For the painters it can refer to what
they may see outside that they bring inside
to paint. For the woodworker it might refer
to the fact that the trees from out side are
turned into fne furniture for use inside.
www.somd.com
Your Online Community for
Charles, Calvert, and St. Marys Counties
Over 250,000
Southern Marylanders
cant be wrong!
New to the area? Lifelong resident?
Stop by and see what
Southern Maryland Online
has to offer!
Stay abreast of local happenings
Check our highly popular classifeds
Speak your mind in the forums
Enter our contests and
win terrifc prizes
Thursday, September 27, 2012
29 The County Times
The show runs from October 2 until Oc-
tober 28 with the First Friday reception on
October 5th from 5-8 p.m. For more infor-
mation, call 301-475-3130 or visit www.
northendgallery.org.
Wednesday, Oct. 3
Luncheon to Recognize Local Busi-
nesses Committed To Hiring Employ-
ees with Disabilities
Leonardtown Wharf 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Several Local businesses will be
recognized for their continued commit-
ment to hiring employees with disabilities.
Come learn about the St. Marys County
Commission for People with Disabilities
and how local businesses are employing
disabled employees to help their commu-
nity and their businesses thrive. Business
owners will be honored for their dedica-
tion to community members with dis-
abilities. For questions about the event or
for information about the Commission for
People with Disabilities, contact Ursula
Harris at 301-475-4200, ext. 1684, or by
email at Ursuala.Harris@stmarysmd.com.
Thursday, Oct. 4
Pulled Pork Sliders
VFW 2632 (23282 Three Notch Road,
California) 5:30 p.m.
We hope you will join us this Thurs-
day night for PORK SLIDERS! The VFW
is a great place to unwind and relax after
a hard day at work; so come on by and
bring your friends, family and co-workers
to the VFW, because you are ALWAYS
welcome.
Our pulled pork mini sandwiches are
delicious; they are served on a potato roll
with coleslaw -- order one for yourself or
a bunch to share, youll get one for $2, 4
for $7 or 8 for $12 - order fries for an addi-
tional $2. Eat at the Post with a cold one or
take some home to the gang! Served from
5:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Nature Time at Greenwell
Greenwell State Park (25420 Rosedale
Manor Lane, Hollywood) 10 a.m.
This weeks theme: Discovery Day
Enjoy the wonders of nature at Green-
well State Park through games, crafts, sto-
ries, movement, and exploration. Nature
Time is a program for children and their
families/caregivers. Recreation, educa-
tion, and conservation all play a part in the
activities.
Paralympic Experience
Great Mills High School and Swimming
Pool (21130 Great Mills Road, Great
Mills) 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
The St. Marys County Department
of Recreation and Parks and Paralympic
Sport Southern MD are pleased to an-
nounce the frst annual Paralympic Experi-
ence. Attendees can learn about Paralym-
pic Sport Club - Southern MD, its current
and future programs. They will also learn
about the Paralympic movement and hear
frst - hand experiences from a Paralympic
Athlete. Activities begin with registration
and a presentation in the Great Mills High
School auditorium. Participants will then
head next door to the Great Mills Swim-
ming Pool where they will experience
the various sports designed for individu-
als with physical and visual disabilities,
including cycling, archery/shooting and
swimming! Anyone wishing to attend this
event must register and are encouraged to
pre-register online or in person through
the Department of Recreation and Parks.
For more information, contact Christina
Bishop at the St. Marys County Depart-
ment of Recreation and Parks at 301-475-
4200, ext. 1802.
Friday, Oct. 5
First Fridays in Leonardtown
Leonardtown Square 5 p.m.
First Fridays are a great time to ex-
perience downtown Leonardtown! On the
frst Friday of every month from 5 p.m. -
8 p.m., downtown historic Leonardtown
Square and the new Leonardtown Arts
Center, as well as uptown Leonardtown,
including Breton Marketplace, Shoppes at
Breton Bay, the Maryland Antiques Center
complex, Port of Leonardtown Winery and
others host an evening of entertainment
where people gather to enjoy art, music,
food, and the company of others. Hear live
bands as you stroll through town, enjoy ex-
cellent restaurants, meet local artists, and
browse through unique shops.
Check www.leonardtownfrstfridays.
com often for updated information, spe-
cials, and giveaways! For more informa-
tion, call 301-475-9791.
Bay Montessori School Tour and
Observation
Bay Montessori School (20525 Willows
Road, Lexington Park) 9 a.m.
Come to a prospective parent meeting
to hear what Montessori is all about. You
will tour our campus and observe a class
in action.
Saturday, Oct. 6
Casino Fundraiser for Special
Olympics
Hollywood Volunteer Fire Department
(24801 Three Notch Road, Hollywood)
12 p.m.
Special Olympics St. Marys County
is hosting a Casino fundraiser. Please
contact Mary Lu Bucci at 301-373-3469
or somdsmc@md.metrocast.net for more
information.
Vendor Show
Hollywood Volunteer Rescue Squad
(23469 Rescue Lane, Hollywood) - 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Hollywood Volunteer Rescue Squad
Auxiliary is hosting a vendor show. Table
rental is $30 per table. For more informa-
tion or to rent a table, call Diana Gunther at
301-536-0619. Table space is limited. Only
one table per company.
IN 2012, MORE THAN
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The Parishes of Holy Angels (Avenue), Sacred Heart (Bushwood), Our Lady of the Wayside
(Chaptico), Immaculate Conception (Mechanicsville) and Saint Josephs (Morganza)
invite you to join us at Saint Josephs Church for our
Adoration and Ceremonies Held In
Saint Josephs Catholic Church
Monday, 1 october
adoration of the exposed blessed Sacrament begins at 7:00 a.m.
noon angelus and recitation of the rosary
6:00 6:45 p.m. confessions
7:00 p.m. evening Prayer and Sermon
10:30 p.m. night Prayer and close of adoration at 11:00 p.m.
tueSday, 2 october
adoration of the exposed blessed Sacrament begins at 7:00 a.m.
noon angelus and recitation of the rosary
1:00 - 1:45 p.m. - confessions
6:30 p.m. benediction of the blessed Sacrament
7:00 p.m. closing Mass
the Most reverend Martin Holley, celebrant
Auxiliary Bishop of Washington
Sunday, 30 SePteMber
adoration of the exposed blessed Sacrament after the 10:00 a.m. Mass
noon angelus and recitation of the rosary
6:00 p.m. Mass
7:00 p.m. evening Prayer and Sermon
10:30 p.m. night Prayer and close of adoration at 11:00 p.m.
daily Mass on Monday and tuesday will be celebrated at:
Holy angels church - 7:30 a.m.
Sacred Heart church - 7:00 a.m.
our Lady of the Wayside church - 7:30 a.m.
Immaculate conception church - 7:30 a.m.
Forty HourS devotIon
Sunday, 30 September to tuesday, 2 october
29119 Point Lookout Road
Morganza, Maryland 20660
301-475-3293
A light reception will follow the Mass in Saint Josephs Parish Hall
Thursday, September 27, 2012
30 The County Times
Aqua Squares Offers Fun
Way to Stay Active
By Sarah Miller
Staff Writer
With a more than 40-year history, the Aqua Squares
have been offering Southern Maryland a venue for fun
and fellowship, all while getting some exercise.
Aqua Squares has a storied history. While the group
currently meets weekly at the Southern Community Cen-
ter in Lusby (though they occasionally move venues as
needed), they started on the Benedict Pier in 1971 as a
Monday dances and lessons for beginners.
Members of the Pax Hoedowners, from St. Marys
County, and the Square Dealers, of Deale in Anne Arun-
del County, helped in the beginning. This beginning
group decided that the club would be known as the Aqua
Squares, the history of the club on www.aquasquare-
dancers.org states.
The club moved to Huntington Methodist Church
in the spring of 1972. They moved to the Calvert High
School Field House in 1975 and various other locations,
including the multi-purpose room at Appeal Elemen-
tary School, before coming to the Southern Community
Center.
On Aug. 12, 1973, the Aqua Squares became mem-
bers of Washington Area Square Dancers Co-operative
Association and in September 1977, the club adopted by-
laws and elected offcers.
Gloria Schulz is another part of the history of the
club. She was one of the founding members of the group
and can still be found dancing in squares at the commu-
nity center on Friday nights. She and her husband, along
with another couple, decided they wanted to get involved
in square dancing. Forty years later she is still active and
looks forward to remaining so.
I like it a lot, she said.
Schulz is not the only longtime member of the
group. Mary Ann Rymer has been in Aqua Squares since
1991 and was even president of the group for two years.
She said she started coming to the club at the suggestion
of her friends.
I always loved to dance, so it wasnt hard to con-
vince me, she said.
She said the group works together to host open hous-
es, provide refreshments and help with dance lessons.
We just take turns doing things, she said.
Rymer said Aqua Squares is a source of fun, fel-
lowship and good exercise.
Pam Schmale has been in the group for two years,
and said she and her daughter became interested in
square dancing when they saw an exhibition in Harp-
ers Ferry. When they got home, they looked up places
locally to take lessons and dance.
Aqua Squares President Elaine Reilly has been in
the group for fve years. She said she frst joined for
mind and body exercise.
Square dancers travel between three and fve miles
a night, according to various pedometers used during
dances caller Gary Felton has attended.
Felton has been calling square dances for the past
40 years and has been dancing even
longer.
It takes about 20 years to make a
competent caller, Felton said.
For anybody wanting to get in-
volved in Aqua Squares, lessons begin
this Friday for $24 per month.
Nobody is too old or young to get
into square dancing. Reilly said the
oldest dancer last year was 86 and the
youngest 10. It is also open to singles,
couples and families, making square
dancing an activity anybody can enjoy.
For more information, includ-
ing lesson dates and times, visit www.
aquasquaredancers.org.
Lessons begin Sept. 28 at 7 p.m. in
the Southern Community Center.
sarahmiller@countytimes.net
Thursday, September 27, 2012
31 The County Times
W
h
a
t

s
G
o
i
n
g

O
n
In Entertainment
Thursday, Sept. 27
Calvert County Fair
Calvert County Fairgrounds (140 Calvert
Fair Dr. Prince Frederick) 9 a.m.
No Limit Poker Tourney and Cash Game
Counseling Service of Hollywood (24930
Old 3 Notch Rd. Hollywood) 7 p.m.
Newtowne Players Performance:
Steel Magnolias
Three Notch Theatre (21744 South Coral
Drive, Lexington Park) 8 p.m.
Live Music: GrooveSpan Trio
Running Hare Vineyard (150 Adelina
Road, Prince Frederick) 5 p.m.
Live Music: Dominic Fragman and
Mixed Business
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell
Road, Dowell) 7:30 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 28
Calvert County Fair
Calvert County Fairgrounds (140 Calvert
Fair Dr. Prince Frederick) 9 a.m.
Live Music: Four of a Kind
Mechanicsville Moose Lodge (27636
Mechanicsville Road, Mechanicsville)
Live Music: County Memories
Veras White Sands Beach Club (1200
White Sands Drive, Lusby) 9:30 p.m.
Live Music: John Luskey Band
La Plata Town Hall (305 Queen Anne
Street, La Plata) 7 p.m.
Newtowne Players Performance:
Steel Magnolias
Three Notch Theatre (21744 South Coral
Drive, Lexington Park) 8 p.m.
Live Music: Dominic Fragman and
Mixed Business
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell
Road, Dowell) 8 p.m.
Live Music: Alien Audio
The Blue Dog Saloon (7940 Port Tobac-
co Road, Port Tobacco) 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 29
Calvert County Fair
Calvert County Fairgrounds (140 Calvert
Fair Dr. Prince Frederick) 9 a.m.
Live Music: Fran Scuderi
Running Hare Vineyard (150 Adelina
Road, Prince Frederick) 12 p.m.
Live Music: Colliders
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell
Road, Dowell) 8 p.m.
Newtowne Players Performance:
Steel Magnolias
Three Notch Theatre (21744 South Coral
Drive, Lexington Park) 8 p.m.
Live Music: GrooveSpan Duo
Back Creek Bistro (14415 Dowell Road,
Dowell) 6:30 p.m.
Live Music: Dee Jay Brittney
The Blue Dog Saloon (7940 Port Tobac-
co Road, Port Tobacco) 9 p.m.
Live Music: Stiff Richard
Cryers Back Road Inn (22094 New-
towne Neck Road, Leonardtown) 8
p.m.
Live Music: Gretchen Richie
Cafe Des Artistes (41655 Fenwick Street,
Leonardtown) 7:30 p.m.
Live Music: One Louder
Veras White Sands Beach Club (1200
White Sands Drive, Lusby) 9:30 p.m.
Live Music: R & R Train
Gridiron Grill (20855 Callaway Village
Way, Callaway) 9 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 30
Calvert County Fair
Calvert County Fairgrounds (140 Calvert
Fair Dr. Prince Frederick) 9 a.m.
Live Music: Cheap Trick and
Blondie
Calvert Marine Museum (14200 Solo-
mons Island Rd., Solomons) 7:30 p.m.
Newtowne Players Performance:
Steel Magnolias
Three Notch Theatre (21744 South Coral
Drive, Lexington Park) 3 p.m.
Live Music: Gerry Swarbrick
Running Hare Vineyard (150 Adelina
Road, Prince Frederick) 12 p.m.
Live Music: Eric Horner
3075 Livingston Rd, Bryans Road 9
a.m.
Monday, Oct. 1
Zumba Fitness
Callaway Baptist Church (20960 Point
Lookout Road, Callaway) 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 2
Live Music: Acoustic Solo
Performance
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell
Road, Dowell) 7:30 p.m.
Live Music: Fair Warning
DB McMillans (23415 Three Notch
Road, California) 5 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 3
Family Night with Super MagicMan
Reggie Rice
Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell
Road, Dowell) 6 p.m.
Live Music: Mason Sebastian
DB McMillans (23415 Three Notch
Road, California) 5 p.m.
Free Beginner Line Dance Lessons
Hotel Charles (15110 Burnt Store Road,
Hughesville) 7 p.m.
The County Times is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or
band information for our entertainment section, e-mail alexpanos@countytimes.net.
Oakville
5 minutes North of Hollywood
41170 Oakville Road
Mechanicsville 20659
301-373-9245 800-451-1427
Charlotte Hall
30315 Three Notch Rd,
Charlotte Hall 20622
301-884-5292
800-558-5292
Prince Frederick
1700 Solomons Island Rd,
Prince Frederick 20678
410-535-3664
1-866-535-3664
Wentworth Nursery
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8-7, Sat. 8-6, Sun. 9-6
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7:30-6, Sat. 7:30-5
Sales good thru October 7, 2012
Now Is The TIme To schedule
Fall laNdscapINg & lawN ReNovaTIoNs
vIsIT www.weNTwoRThNuRseRy.com To schedule a coNsulTaTIoN
8 in. Mums
5 for
$
30
00
Pumpkins
All sizes available
Fall Color
with Permanent
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Corn Stalk Bunches
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$
9
99
ea.
Indian Corn Bunches
Starting at
$
4
99
SuperSak of 50
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$
22
50
ea.
When you Buy 2 or more
SuperSak of 50
Only
$
22
50
ea.
When you Buy 2 or more
4 in. Pansies
18 per tray
$
1
25
ea.
8 in. Cabbage
5 for
$
30
00
Wentworth FALL
Project Festival
Come In and
Pick-Up our 36 Page Project
Flyer Featuring Valuable
Project Coupons.
Fall Seminar & Event Schedule
Saturday, September 29th
Oakville 9:00am How to Build a Paver Patio
Charlotte Hall 11:00am Upgrade & Infill Your Landscape with Permanent Fall Color
Prince Frederick 2:00pm Upgrade & Infill Your Landscape with Permanent Fall Color
Saturday, October 6th
Oakville 9:00am How to Build a Firepit or Outdoor Fireplace
Charlotte Hall 11:00am Grow Your Own Fruit Trees & Berries
Prince Frederick 2:00pm Grow Your Own Fruit Trees & Berries
Saturday, October 13th
Oakville 9:00am How to Build a Garden Wall or Seat Wall
Charlotte Hall 11:00am Camoflage by Planting Living Screens, Windbreaks & Hedging
Prince Frederick 2:00pm Camoflage by Planting Living Screens, Windbreaks & Hedging
Thursday, September 27, 2012
32 The County Times
Real Estate
For
Lease
Real Estate Rentals Employment
Experienced Veterinary Technician
Needed in Waldorf. We are looking for
a motivated team player to join our team
as a veterinary technician. We are a 4
doctor small animal practice with 2 exotic
docotors on staff. We are hiring for a full
time position and we offer paid vacation,
health benefts (partially paid) and 5 paid
holidays. We are looking to hire someone
with at least 1-2 years experience in a
small animal practice. This position will
rotate through shifts beginning as early as
6:30am and the lastest shift ends around
8pm.Our techinicians provide client
education, administer vaccines and other
injections, take blood samples,place IV
catheters, run lab work, take radiographs,
assist in surgery,and restrain animals
safely, amongst many other tasks. Please
visit www.scah.us to check us out.
Please send resumes and applications
to Tonya by fax 301-645-9336 or email
stcanimalhospital@comcast.net.
Vehicles
For Sale: 96 F150 XLT 5.0L
AUTOMATIC. 136k Miles. Runs
great. Very clean, two-tone. Power
locks and windows. Cold A/C. If
interested, please call or text (240) 538-
1914 for details or pictures.
1997 Cadillac Deville. Runs good,
parting out or whole, moving - must sell.
Call for more information, 202-709-0405.
Price: $2000.
Yard Sales
Why advertise your
goods and services
in SOMD Publishing?
Readers are actively
looking for your listing.
Our newspapers are also
online for everyone to see!
Potential buyers can
clip and save your ad.
NOW HIRING?
GOT A LAWNMOWER TO SELL?
AN APARTMENT FOR RENT?
A HOME TO SELL?
People still turn to the Classifeds frst.
Calvert Gazette
Everything Calvert County
So the next time
you want something
seen fast, get it in
writing...get it in
the Classifeds!
To Place Your Ad Call Cindi @
301-373-4125 countytimes.somd.com
The County Times
Serving St. Marys
I have clients looking
for waterfront, lots,
acreage & homes. Call
1-800-MR LISTER
(Billy)
ftzgeraldrealty.net
Placing An Ad
Publication Days
Important Information
Email your ad to: classifeds@countytimes.net or
Call: 301-373-4125 or Fax: 301-373-4128. Liner Ads (No
artwork or special type) Charged by the line with the 4 line
minimum. Display Ads (Ads with artwork, logos, or special
type) Charged by the inch with the 2 inch minimum. All
private party ads must be paid before ad is run.
The County Times will not be held responsible for any ads omitted
for any reason. The County Times reserves the right to edit or reject
any classifed ad not meeting the standards of The County Times. It is
your responsiblity to check the ad on its frst publication and call us if
a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notifed after the
frst day of the frst publication ran.
The County Times is published each Thursday.
Deadlines are Tuesday at 12 noon
Offce hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm
CLASSIFIEDS
TEL: 301-373-4125 FAX: 301-373-4128 classifeds@countytimes.net
$775/month + $775 security deposit.
A/C, DW and laundry in unit. Trash
& water included. Off-street parking.
22756 Lawrence Ave. in the Lawrence
Ave. Apt. Building. Call Mike for
tour & details @ 301-475-8384 or
paragonprop@verizon.net.
FOR RENT: 1 BR Apartment
located within walking distance
of the center of Leonardtown.
Furnished unit in elevator building
located on the Square in Leonardtown.
Available Dec. 2012. Newly built.
Easy access to parking, banks, post
offce, restaurants and public
transportation. Call Mike for tour
& details @ 301-475-8384 or
paragonprop@verizon.net.
FOR LEASE: 1700 sq. ft. of
built-out, Class A offce space.
$850/month + $850 security deposit.
A/C, DW and laundry in unit.
Trash & water included.
Off-street parking. 22665 Van Wert
Lane in the Henderson Building. Call
Mike for tour & details @ 301-475-8384
or paragonprop@verizon.net.
FOR RENT: 2 BR Apartment
located within walking distance
of the center of Leonardtown.
Huge Yard Sale Friday & Saturday
Sept. 28 - 29th, 2012 7:00 a.m. - till
Across From Banneker School
H.H. Items Tools Furniture
Yard & Garden Lots More
Rain or Shine
Thursday, September 27, 2012
33 The County Times
46924 Shangri-La Drive Lexington Park, MD 20653
301-863-9497
www.coletravel.biz
Let me plan your next vacation!
Theresa Windsor
theresa@coletravel.biz
TEL: 301-373-4125 FAX: 301-373-4128 bizdirect@countytimes.net
Prime Rib Seafood Sunday Brunch
Banquet & Meeting Facili ties
23418 Three Notch Road California, MD 20619
www.lennys.net
301-737-0777
www.somd.com
Your Online Community For Charles,
Calvert, and St. Marys Counties
301-481-3348 dickiepulliam@gmail.com
Pulliam Paint
Contractor LLC
& Power Washing
Dickie Pulliam Owner/Operator
25
Years in
Business
301-866-0777
Pub & Grill
23415 Three Notch Road
California Maryland
255 Days Till St. Patricks Day
www.dbmcmillans.com
Entertainment All Day Est. 1982 Lic #12999
Heating & Air Conditioning
THE HEAT PUMP PEOPLE
30457 Potomac Way
Charlotte Hall, MD 20622
Phone: 301-884-5011
snheatingac.com
Cross & Wood
AssoCiAtes, inC.
Serving Te Great Southern Maryland Counties since 1994
Employer/Employee Primary Resource Consultants
Group & Individual
Health, Dental, Vision, AFLAC, Life, Long Term Care,
Short & Long Term Disability,
Employer & Employee Benefts Planning
Phone 301-884-5900
1-800 524-2381
12685 Amberleigh Lane
La Plata, MD 20646
Phone 301-934-4680
Fax 301-884-0398
28231 Tree Notch Rd, #101
Mechanicsville, MD 20659
DireCTory
Business
Advertise
in Our
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in BOtH
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At GreAt
disCOunts!
Contact Cindi:
301-373-4125
sales@
countytimes.net
Thursday, September 27, 2012
34 The County Times
SENIOR LIVING
St. Marys Department of Aging
Programs and Activities
Lofer Senior Activity Center 301-737-5670, ext. 1652; Garvey Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050
Northern Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4002, ext. 1001; Ridge Nutrition Site, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050.
Visit the Department of Agings website at www.stmarysmd.com/aging for the most up-to date information.
2nd Annual Barn Party at the St. Marys
County Fairgrounds
Kick off the autumn season with a good old fash-
ioned barn party planned by the Garvey Senior Activ-
ity Center to be held at the St. Marys County Fair-
grounds on Friday, October 12 from 10 a.m. 2 p.m.
Enjoy country music and food in a country setting.
Tap your feet while listening to live country music
by the Billy Hill Band, twirl your partner around the
dance foor, and enjoy a catered pork barbeque meal.
Tickets are priced at $8.00 and are available for pur-
chase at all senior activity center locations. For more
information, call 301.475.4200, ext. 1062.
Practice Your Tai Chi for Arthritis with
New Friends
If youve learned the core AND advanced move-
ments of the Tai Chi for Arthritis program and would
like to practice it with others who have done so, the
Weisman Room at Loffer Senior Activity Center is
available for this purpose on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days from 9:00 -10:00 a.m. Although there is not an
ongoing instructor at these sessions, materials will be
available that should assist your practice. Participants
can help and encourage each other while improving
health, balance and form. For more information, call
301.737.5670, ext. 1658.
Pumpkin Craft at Loffer Senior Activity
Center
Take a craft pumpkin, paint it white and add some
colorful leaves to it for a splendid autumn centerpiece.
Thats what will be happening at Loffer on Friday,
October 12 at 10 a.m. Cost is $5.00 and can be paid
to the instructor on the day of the craft. If you would
like to join in the fun, you can sign up by calling
301.737.5670, ext. 1658 or stop by the front offce by
Wednesday, October 10.
Bowling League Needs More Subs and
Players
The senior bowling league meets the 2nd and
4th Thursdays of each month at Esperanza Lanes on
Three Notch Rd. Cost is $13 per person each session
for 3 games and includes shoe and ball rental. There
are three vacancies for someone age 50+. It doesnt
matter what your skill level is; we are more about fun
than anything else. We could also use some new subs.
Subs bowl for free! For more information, call Shellie
at 301.737.5670, ext. 1655.
Yoga for People with Cancer and Other
Chronic and Life Threatening Illnesses
This program offered at the Garvey Senior Activ-
ity Center on Wednesdays, October 3 - December 19
from 9:30 - 10:30 a.m., will focus on ways to adapt a
personal yoga practice to meet the needs specifc to a
variety of conditions and diseases including cancer,
heart disease, back problems, stress disorders, asth-
ma, arthritis, diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. Individ-
uals will learn safe and comfortable movements and
breathing practices along with other yoga relaxation
techniques.
This class is open for participants ages 50 and
above. Registration must be done in advance and
payment is due at the time of registration. Cost is
$36.00 payable to the instructor. Space is limited. Call
301.475.4200, ext. 1050.
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Thursday, September 27, 2012
35 The County Times
By Linda Reno
Contributing Writer
Those legislators who agreed to take the oath were released except
the nine arrested in Frederick (including Clark Durant) were not asked
to take the oath and were marched under guard of a company of Wis-
consin military to one of the cars, and an armed guard seated with each
of them. Whilst the balance of the car was flled with soldiers.
These prisoners were taken to Fort McHenry then to Annapolis
where they were placed on a steamboat and taken to Fort Lafayette
(New York). From New York they were moved to Fort Warren in Boston. No formal charges
were ever placed against the men. They were arrested under suspicion of being disloyal.
On the 16th of September, 1861, an order was issued to release Durant from confne-
ment on his taking the oath of allegiance which he refused to do. In early December a letter
was sent to Secretary of State Seward by Thomas H. Gardiner and Thomas Sewell, Jr. ask-
ing him to intervene in having Mr. Durant released saying he has never been guilty of any
disloyal acts.
On December 18 another letter was written to Seward, this time by William J. Blakis-
tone of Friendly Hall (St. Marys County) in which he said:
Mrs. M. E. Durant, wife of Clarke J. Durant, Esq., of St. Marys County, Md., has ad-
dressed a letter to me soliciting my kind offces in behalf of her husband. She assures me
her husband has done no act of disloyalty to the Government; that he was at home attending
upon her in her illness at the time the Wallis resolutions were before the Legislature. I am
also credibly informed that his affairs are much deranged by his absence and that his wifes
health is still very delicate. It is under these circumstances I have taken the liberty to address
you.
Whilst my sympathies are ever alive to the sufferings of my fellow beings particularly
unprotected females, and in this case one who is a descendant of a revolutionary soldier
long an intimate and personal friend, I could in no wise permit my sympathies in the slightest
degree to induce me to do anything that might militate against the integrity and welfare of
my country. Should there be no evidence that he has been guilty of treasonable acts against
the Government or giving aid and comfort to the enemy within your knowledge of which I
am ignorant might I not be excused for recommending his release upon such terms as your
superior wisdom may suggest?
Durant was still unwilling to sign the standard oath then in use and he would ultimately
win what must have been for him no small victory. In April 1862 he and fve of his fellow
prisoners was released upon their giving their written paroles to render no aid or comfort
to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States.
Clark Durant died February 23, 1876 and is buried at St. Andrews Episcopal Church as
are his wives and children.
A Journey Through Time A Journey Through Time
The Chronicle
Wanderings
Sand and Sun
Clark Durant (continued)
By Shelby Oppermann
Contributing Writer
Thank you for sending me all the great egg recipes, I think I will try the
frst one I received called The Ultimate Deviled Egg recipe from wander-
ing with mindless aim Dan for this Sundays church refreshments. Thanks
Dan! Adding the crabmeat and all the other ingredients sounds delicious
cant wait to try it. If Im lucky there might be some left over for our Red-
skins get together after church.
I should have tried the recipe out this past weekend when we went to
North Carolinas Outer Banks; Kitty Hawk specifcally. My husbands neph-
ew/Godson, Warren was turning 40 and several family members and his
friends came to share the festivities with him. His wifes family has owned a
large cottage on the Oceanfront since the late 1940s. Their cottage has gone
through many changes over the years due to beach erosion and hurricanes. It
was neat to see pictures of the original saltbox style house built on the sand.
And we were told the house was pretty far from the ocean at that time. Not so
anymore. The house is now built up on stilts like most all of the other houses,
and has lost a large porch and freplace over the years. Large dunes have
been built in front of the houses to help buffer the houses. But its lovely,
warm, and cozy inside. Its the kind of house I love: everything casual, sand
and saltwater welcome. The ocean is now only 50 to 75 feet away from the
back steps depending on the tide.
Now I know why everyone gets those OBX stickers on their cars. As a
young teen my Mother and I took a days adventure from our camper site
in Virginia Beach to travel down the coast for a few hours. All that really
stuck in my mind was all the houses on stilts. This was a late fall trip back in
the early 70s. Everything just seemed pretty deserted to me, and I couldnt
imagine ever having fun at a place like this. Virginia Beach was excitement
from the time you woke up until went to sleep, and that was just the K.O.A.
campground.
I loved the Virginia Beach boardwalk, the lights, arcades, the sand, the
sun, and especially The Peppermint Beach Lounge for teens, and Giovannis
Italian Restaurant. Oh, and there was my ultimate faves: air hockey and
miniature golf. I believe I have written about them before. So, I naturally
thought that the bright lights/big city type of beach is what I loved, but after
staying in Kitty Hawk for a few short days, I realized how nice a relatively
private beach can be. The town of Kitty Hawk had everything
the city had anyway. If we had more time I would have liked
to explore the area more.
On Saturday evening, after a full day on the beach where
everyone was surf fshing, swimming, or lounging, we headed
out to eat dinner at a popular diner style restaurant called The
Kill Devil Hills Diner. I thought there would only be a few
eateries, but as we drove there seemed to be a few restaurants
on every block with lots of neon and bright colors. The Out-
er Banks seemed to have things that both my husband and I
would love. He likes bright lights a little more than I do, and
he loves the ocean more than me. My top preference would
be a secluded lake-side cabin for a long-term vacation. Kitty
Hawk covered it all.
Owning a cabin there is a treasured experience; every-
one seems fully aware that things could change in a heart-
beat. With this in mind, I tried to imprint everything about the
cottage and beach onto my mind. This is a good thing to do
anyway just in your normal daily routine; to be present in the
moment as we hear all the time. I will remember our weekend
getaway, treasure what we had, and hope that I and the rest of
the family get to enjoy the pleasures of sand and sun for a long
time to come.
To each new days adventure,
Shelby
Please send your comments or ideas to: shelbys.wander-
ings@yahoo.com
Aimless
Mind
of an
ST. MARY
'
S COUNTY ENGRAVED RIFLE
Only 25 Will Be Made!
Artwork engraved
here on buttstock.
To Order Call 1-877-484-0179
www.historicalarmory.com/county-editions
For more information visit,
Only
$
511.99! (H001 reg. $561.99)
One week only- $50 off each rifle!
H004 Goldenboy .22LR $799.99* (reg. $849.99)
H009B .30/30 $1399.99* (reg. $1449.99)
*Plus S&H
-Also available as a set-
Engraved on aordable, American-made,
stock Henry ries, the St. Mary's County
Maryland Historical Edition Rie combines
meticulous research, original artwork, and nely
detailed engraving to celebrate the history of
St. Mary's County. e project is limited to
25 edition numbers. Personalization available.
H001
Scan with Smartphone
2012 Historical Armory, Inc.
Thursday, September 27, 2012
36 The County Times
44. From a distance
46. Bleats
47. London Games 2012
53. Let the body fall heavily
54. Collect a large group
55. Aba ____ Honeymoon
57. Give over
58. Glue & plaster painting
prep
59. Middle East chieftain
60. Removed ruthlessly
61. AKA bromeosin
62. A dissenting clique

CLUES DOWN
1. Formerly the ECM
2. A native nursemaid in
India
3. Ribosomal ribonucleic
acid
4. Ironies
5. Peaceable
6. Between
7. Cessation of activity
8. Little House actor
Merlin
9. Lying in one plane
Last Weeks Puzzle Solutions
e
r
K
i
d
d
i
e
K
o
r
n
CLUES ACROSS
1. Auricles
5. Sharpening strap
10. Supplemented with
diffculty
14. Jaguarundi
15. 7 Year Itch Tom
16. European defense
organization
17. Camber
18. Kittiwake genus
19. 3rd largest French city
20. Used for instant long
locks
23. Harangue
24. Grabs
25. Formally withdraw
membership
28. Magnitude relations
32. El Dorado High School
33. Porzana carolina
34. Earl Grey or green
35. Dogs tail action
36. Friends (French)
38. Lessen the force of
39. Dermaptera
42. Views
10. Joins the military
11. Knock out
12. British School
13. Puts on clothing
21. Radioactivity unit
22. Helps little frms
25. Podetiums
26. Fluid accumulation in
tissues
27. Backed seat for one
29. From farm state
30. Speak
31. Gurus
37. Deluged
38. In addition to
40. Oldest Yoruba town
41. A place to shelter cars
42. __ and Delilah
43. Toothpaste tube cover
45. __ and Juliet
46. Mussel beards
47. Prevents harm to creatures
48. Gorse genus
49. A method of doing
50. Young Scottish woman
51. Latticework lead bar
52. Invests in little enterprises
56. The products of human
creativity
Thursday, September 27, 2012
37 The County Times
ewsmakers
High Style Comes to Southern Maryland
Adult Community
Lexington Park Active
Special!!!!
1 bedrooms for $999
21895 Pegg Road Lexington Park, MD 20653 (240) 725-0111
Must sign lease by
October 31, 2012
By Corrin M. Howe
Staff Writer
Anissa Swanzy, owner and designer of
SKD Studios in Lusby says, Our custom-
ers are the people who want to redesign their
space for $100,000 or $10,000. We can do it
all.
SKD Studios is hidden in Lusby
Commons Shopping Center, behind the
Starbucks.
I dont know why people from St.
Marys wont come over the bridge and
compare our prices and designs with our
competitors. If they were willing to drive the
fve miles, they could fnd we can beat our
competition.
Swanzys passion for design and quality
products is apparent within minutes of sit-
ting across from her counter in a barstool-
high directors chair. Displayed prominently
on the wall is her mission statement: Our
promise to you is a product you will love, on
a budget you can afford in a timeframe you
can expect.
We are the best kept secret in Mary-
land and we dont want to be any more.
Swanzy said. We want people to know that
they dont have to go to Annapolis or D.C. for
their design. We are a local design studio.
Furthermore, she wants potential cli-
ents to know that she will work with anyone.
Well work with our licensed contractors on
your project. Well work with you if youre
doing it yourself. Well work with your Uncle
Bob, if hes a contractor. We want people to
know that we arent only interested in the
$100,000 jobs. We want the $8,000 jobs too.
She used to go to peoples homes to
give them free estimates, but found she was
spending gas money and several hours of her
time working with people to redefne a space
only to have them take her work and go with
someone else.
I was basically giving them free design
advice. Not even my competition was doing
that. If someone wants to bring in measure-
ments and get a plan, I can do that for free,
just like my competition.
But those willing to pay $125 for her
to come out to the house and create a plan,
she will credit the cost back if they use her
services, even if they decide to do the work
themselves.
Some of the advantages of using a de-
signer over a hardware store with a design
program, include:
Access to resources all over the world
that are only available to members of the
trade;
Knowledge and experience with de-
signers who know how to stretch at budget
and know where to spend dollars for the
wow factor.;
Design the room with the adjoining
rooms in mind;
Avoid design faws which often come
with inexperienced sale personnel using the
design computer software.
I had a guy come in. He was looking
to compare a design from Lowes, I told him
that he was never going to be able to open
his cabinet door because the microwave oven
stuck out too far on his current plan.
Another drawback to designs from na-
tional chains for do-it-yourself clients is
that the plans only address cabinets and ap-
pliances. They dont consider all the other
layers which pull a space together things
like lighting, back splashes, paint colors,
fooring, tiles, fxtures, etc.
The kitchen is the most important
room in the house. I dont understand how
they can design it without considering the
adjoining rooms. I can do it all. I can bleed
in the colors from the other rooms and think
about a back splash, Swanzy said.
Not only that, but Swanzy promises to
be there with her clients when the project
hits the inevitable unexpected circumstances
the quartz countertop arrives with a huge
stain or the manufacturer sends the wrong
cabinets.
If you call me, youll fnd that Im al-
ready on top of it. And if youll trust me and
give us a chance, youll fnd that this isnt our
frst rodeo. We have a good track record. Be-
lieve me. We feel your pain when weve torn
up your kitchen and youve eaten nothing but
grilled cheese or microwaved food for two
months.
Swanzy has gone through this so much
that she even prepares her clients up front.
I tell them trust us, there is going to come
a time when you dont want to see my face
or the contractor ever again, but in the end,
if you push forward, it will be the space we
promised and it will be exquisite.
She laughs, There is a reason why DIY
Network and HG-TV dont allow people into
the house while they are remodeling. Its
because people start to second guess. They
dont understand that its all about the layers.
By layers Swanzy means the paint,
then the fooring, fxtures, cabinets, and all
the way down to the vase of fowers set on
the kitchen counter to pull the entire room
together. She said she recently suggested
painting a dining room a bright orange and
the client started getting nervous. In the end,
the client admitted she wished she had gone
with an even brighter orange.
In the future, she hopes to have a big-
ger shop, one that can showcase some of the
work they can do, such as lighting, window
treatments, key furniture pieces and more.
What she wont have is 50 faucets and 30
sinks on display.
Every job is unique. We are not a cook-
ie cutter design studio. We go in and look at
the space, learn about the clients, their styles,
and how they will use the space. We are not
your average show room. We are not going
to slap cabinets on the wall. We are going to
help people redesign their space.
The most important things Swanzy
wants people to know about SKD Studios
are that they are located in Lusby, tucked
away in a corner by the Starbucks, they work
with do-it-yourself clients, they are just as
interested in the small jobs as the big jobs,
and they design more than kitchens and
bathrooms.
Swanzy invites people to stop by the
studio or email anissa@skdstudios.com,
check out www.skdstudios.com or call
443-404-5686.
Anissa Swanzy Photos By Frank Marquart
Thursday, September 27, 2012
38 The County Times
Sp rts
MIROCK Superbike Series This Weekend!
Southern Maryland Football
Looking Back at Week No. 4
On Friday, September 28th, MIR
will host a Test & Tune. This event is
open to all Streetcars, racecars, street
bikes, drag bikes, and junior dragsters.
This will be a full night of time runs,
grudge racing, and testing with no gam-
bler eliminations. The test & tune will
be from 6:30pm to 11:30pm. Admission
is just $10 to watch or $20 to race.
On Saturday and Sunday, Septem-
ber 29-30th, MIR will host the last MI-
ROCK Superbike event of the season
at MIR with the Fast by Gast Fall Na-
tionals. Over 500 race bikes will pour
into MIR for an action packed weekend
of motorcycle drag racing. The event
will feature the wild Mickey Thompson
Tires Pro Mod class, the 200mph Ori-
ent Express Pro Street class, the DME
Racing Real Street class, the Trac King
Clutches Top Sportsman class, the
House of Speed Crazy 8s class, FBR
Shop 5.60 Index, Fast by Gast Pro E.T.
class, Brocks Performance Street E.T.
class, and the Psychobike.com Grudge
Class. The event will also include a
manufacturers midway, a huge street-
bike corral, great food, cold beer, and
a $1,200 bikini contest on Sunday. So
invite all your friends and head to MIR
for an exciting weekend of MIROCK
Superbike drag racing. On Saturday the
gates will open at 9am, with time runs
starting at 10am. Pro Qualifying is at
1pm, 4pm, and 7pm. Pro ET and Street
ET eliminations will start on Saturday
at 3pm. After Saturdays ET elimina-
tions the Afterdark Underground will
begin with 2 hours of smack talking
and grudge racing. On Sunday the gates
will open at 8am, with time runs start-
ing at 9am; so get here early. Elimina-
tions for all classes will start at 12noon
and the bikini contest kicks off at 4pm!
All Spectators and crew are $20 per day
or a two pass is $35, and kids 6-11 are
only $5 per day. For full details on the
MIROCK series visit mirockracing.
com
For more detailed information on
these events call the 24-Hour Dragline
Hotline at 301-884-RACE or visit us at
www.mirdrag.com
By Alex Panos
Staff Writer
Leonardtown High School (2-2) won
its second straight game last week, beat-
ing Thomas Stone 28-14.
After Stone took an early 7-0 frst
quarter lead, the Raiders were able to tie
it up 14 a piece at the half before shutting
out the Cougars to fnish the game.
Stephen Stewart got the ball 22 times
and came through with 95 yards. The
Raiders caught just three passes during
the contest, two of which were hauled in
by Corey Dennee for 43 yards. Brandon
Brock led the way on defense with 18
tackles, and Jed Law recorded two sacks.
Up next for the Raiders are the Chop-
ticon Braves (1-3), coming off a loss to
Sussex Central 48-21.
Braves quarterback Kevin McVerry
threw for 240 yards including a 64-yard
reception by Andrew Collar and 88 re-
ceiving yards by Braxton Powell. Kyle
Barber handled most of the work on the
ground carrying the ball 25 times and
scoring two touchdowns. The Braves and
Raiders will meet on Friday in Morganza
at 6 p.m.
Great Mills High School (0-5) re-
mains winless after being defeated by the
McDonough Rams 41-0. The Rams led
21-0 at the end of one and never looked
back. In addition to a high-octane offense,
punter LaQuan Renaud made it even
tougher on the Hornets with booming 40-
yard kicks and pinning them inside the 20
yard line on his only two attempts. The
Rams also recorded 9.5 sacks during the
game. The Hornets will look to bounce
back on Friday against Potomac at 6 p.m.
in Great Mills.
St. Marys Ryken (1-3) battled St.
Albans to the end, but gave up 14 points
in the fourth quarter to lose 35-21. St.
Albans quarterback Mike McCurdy was
seemingly unstoppable on Saturday, re-
cording 328 yards to go along with four
touchdowns. The Bulldogs also picked
the knights off twice, both coming from
Matt Sniezek who also led the offensive
aerial attack catching 8 balls for 185 yards
and three touchdowns. The Knights have
another road game on Saturday in Alex-
andria, Va. against Bishop Ireton. Game
time is set for 1:30 p.m.
alexpanos@countytimes.net
Photo By Jessica Woodburn
Photo By Jessica Woodburn
Thursday, September 27, 2012
39 The County Times
1
8
6
1
6
4
9
$25
OFF
Native
Trees
Fall Is For Planting!
Spring Bulbs, Pansies and Mums
STOCK UP NOW!!!
Shade, Evergreen
and Flowering Trees
20%-50%
OFF
Bird Bath,
Statuary and
Fountains
40% OFF
Selected Perennials Selected Perennials Selected Perennials
50% OFF 50% OFF 50% OFF
Greenery Custom Mix Grass Seed
Specially formulated for
Southern MD
Grows in sun or shade
Fine leaf dark green color
Far superior to K-31
Tri Fescue blend in quanities
From 5-50lbs.
50% OFF
Select Shrubs
S pirea, Forsythia, Japanese
Holly, Azalea and More
Nursery &
Landscaping Center
MERVELL DEAN ROAD
HOLLYWOOD MD
www.thegreenerynursery.net
BULK MULCH AND COMPOST
DESIGN SERVICE FOR THE DO-IT-YOURSELFER
Landscaping Service
Design & Installation
301-373-2596
Garden Shop
301-373-2573
MONDAY - FRIDAY 9-6
SATURDAY 9-5 SUNDAY 10-4
C
a
r
t
C
r
u
z at Leon
a
r
d
t
o
w
n
2nd Annual Golf Cart Parade
Sunday, October 14, 2012 - 1 pm til 5 pm
We will have trophies in
diferent categories, such as
best appearing, 2nd best
appearing, best scheme,
best theme, best paint
job, worst paint job,
longest distance,
shortest distance,
most original,
best dressed.
Some 15 trophies
will be awarded.
Enjoy a day in Leonardtown
View the antique tractors on parade presented by the Southern Maryland Antique Tractor Association
and then head on over to the L.V.F.D for an old fashioned, world famous oyster scald.
Food and beverage for sale! Music, rafe, and a family fun day!
Trophies awarded one hour afer the parade & provided by BUSY CORNER BUGGIES
FOR MORE INFO CONTACT ROGER MATTINGLY 301-475-5966
OR EMAIL ROGR69@VERIZON.NET
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT LEONARDTOWN VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT INC.
Registration at the Leonardtown Volunteer Fire Department from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Registration Fee $10.00 per Golf Cart
Antique tractor parade will start at 1 p.m. and followed by the Golf Cart Parade. Te parade
route will be on the square in downtown Leonardtown. Trophies for the golf cart parade will be
awarded 1 hour afer the parade at the Leonardtown Fire House on Lawrence Avenue.
Decorate your Golf
Cart for any theme
you choose.
Hot dogs,
hamburgers, sodas
and beer available!
Trailer and truck
parking available.
By Keith McGuire
Contributing Writer
Under the category of
having a blast, this autumn is becoming the
best on record for me. When I dropped the
boat in the water last Thursday at Buzzs
Marina, I wasnt sure if I wanted to believe
my own reports because fsh will often make
liars out of good, honest people particularly
when there are different witnesses in the mix.
One of the things that I love most about
fshing is that every day is different. Differ-
ent fsh species move through the area at dif-
ferent times of the year, and move from place
to place throughout the Bay depending on
conditions including water quality, currents
and natural bait sources. The challenge, of
course, is to fnd them.
Naturally, I set out to fnd the fsh where
I caught them the week before. Just as natu-
rally, they werent there. I explored the inlet
at St. Jeromes Creek, the artifcial Wood-
row Wilson Bridge reef at Point No Point,
all around Point Lookout and into the mouth
of the Potomac River up to Smith Creek. Ev-
erything caught on The Ordinary Angler was
small and could not be kept, including a few
small red drum one of my favorites and
several small stripers. It was time to look
elsewhere.
I motored over to the Eastern Shore Is-
lands and found speckled trout, redfsh and
stripers in good numbers there. By
casting 3/8 ounce jig heads with vari-
ous 4 plastics in current passing close
to points of land and other structures,
my fshing partner and I managed to
boat enough keepers to call it a great
day. Motoring back across the Bay to
St. Jeromes Creek, we found schools
of breaking bluefsh and stripers.
We actually saw Spanish mackerel
in the mix, but didnt catch any. We
kept enough fsh for a couple of good
meals including specks, a 19 puppy
drum, and one rockfsh before fnish-
ing for the day.
Almost all species of fsh are
still here in good numbers. Spot will
be moving on soon, so if you want to
try live-lining, do it now before they
leave altogether. White perch and
croakers continue to be caught by
people who target them. White perch
are of a decent size (10 inches and big-
ger), but the bigger croakers are beginning to
diminish in numbers. There are more and
more reports of folks catching small founder.
I expect that keepers will be reported soon.
Folks who troll can expect to fnd good
numbers of bluefsh and an occasional Span-
ish mackerel, based on last weeks results.
The mackerel will move out very soon as
temperatures cool and the days get shorter.
Stripers will begin their fall patterns soon, so
a few of the bigger migrating fsh should be
catchable in the coming weeks. In the mean
time, light tackle anglers are catching stripers
with jigs and top-water lures with regularity
in the rivers and around structure on the Bay.
There are a few species of fsh being
caught that are a little unusual for this area.
The most abundant, or course, are the little
redfsh; but other fsh like sea mullet, sheeps-
head, small sea bass, and even big red drum
are also surprising some anglers. I dont
know if its true, but unusual catches like
these create optimism that conditions in the
Bay are improving. I hope so.
If you have a great day or catch some-
thing unusual, take a picture and send your
report to me at riverdancekeith@gmail.com.
Keith fshes weekly from his boat, The
Ordinary Angler, during the season, and
spends his free time supporting local conser-
vation organizations.
Sp rts
Take a Jacket
Angler Angler
The Ordinary
Photo Courtesy of Buzzs Marina
Thursday, September 27, 2012
40 The County Times
For more information, go to www.BlessingoftheFleetMD.com
The 45th
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
12:00 Gates Open To Te Public
FreeAdmissionToSt.ClementsIslandMuseum
FreeBoatRidesToSt.ClementsIsland
FreeTourOfTeBlackistoneLighthouse
EnjoyFreeToursOnTeTallShipTeMarylandDove
St.ClementsIslandPier
AllFoodAndServiceAreasOpen
MasterOfCeremoniesForTeFestivalWesRyce
KicksTingsOf-MainStage
CarnivalRides,RockClimbingWall&KidsArea
AllOpenAtNoon
ALL SATURDAY EVENTS SPONSORED
BY BUD LIGHT & BUDWEISER
12:30-1:45 Hot Tub Limo Band-MainStage
1:00 Wine Tasting Tent Open
LocalVineyardsincluding
StillCreekVineyardsofAvenue,Md.
TeBeginningOfWineGrowingInSaintMarysCounty
TeHistoryOfTePortOfLeonardtownWinery
2:15-3:30 Hot Tub Limo Band-MainStage
2:30 Kids Tractor Pull Contest-NearTeKidsStage
SeveralAgeGroups,GreatPrizes
3:00 Blue Sky Puppet Show-KidsStage
4:00 Justin Crenshaw Band-MainStageBlueSkyPuppet
Show-KidsStage
4:30-6:00 Come Meet PinchTeMarylandBlueCrabs
BaseballTeamMascot
OnAndAroundTeGrounds
GetAutographsAndPicturesWithPinch
DrawingForBoysAndGirlsBikeGiveaway-MainStage
GetYourTicketsNearTeInformationBooth
5:00 Last Boat RideFromTeMainlandToSt.ClementsIsland
Blue Sky Puppet Show-KidsStage
5:30-6:15 Justin Crenshaw Band -MainStage
5:30 1st Annual Blessing Of Te Fleet Poker Run
LookForTeD.C.Ramblers Motorcycle Club
NearTeMainStage
Over75MotorcyclesWillBeOnDisplayOnBayviewDrive
WinningPokerHandSelectedAndPrizesAwarded
6:00 Last Boat RideFromSt.ClementsIslandToMainland
6:45-8:00 No Green JellyBeenz Band-MainStage
8:00-8:30 Fireworks Display
EnjoyTeGreatestFireworksShowInSouthernMaryland
LocatedNearTeWaterfrontArea
8:30-9:45 No Green JellyBeenz Band-MainStage
10:00 Festival Closes For Te Day
10:30 Roman Catholic Mass-WaterfrontStage
Celebrant:MostReverendMartinD.
Holley,AuxiliaryBishop, ArchdioceseOfWashington.D.C.
BlessingOfTeBoatsImmediatelyFollowingMass
11:30 Opening Ceremonies:
RemarksFromTeSt.MarysCountyCommissioners
FreeAdmissionToSt.ClementsIslandMuseum
FreeBoatRidesToSt.ClementsIsland
FreeTourOfTeBlackistoneLighthouse
AllMorningActivitiesAtTeWaterfrontStage
EnjoyFreeToursOnTeTallShipTeMarylandDove
AtTeSt.ClementsIslandPier
OysterTongConstructionTroughoutTeDayByJimFrank
11:45 2012Waterman Of Te Year Award To Bobby Mckay Of Ridge,
Maryland-WaterfrontStage
PresentedByDelegateJohnF.Wood,Jr.
ReunionOfPastWatermanOfTeYearWinners
SUNDAY EVENTS SPONSORED BY
MEDSTAR ST. MARYS HOSPITAL
12:00 NationalAnthem&Parade-WaterfrontStage
NationalAnthemPerformedByLoisBeverage
ParadeBeginsAtNoon,MichaelBarbour,Director
Master Of Ceremonies For Festival Wes Ryce- MainStage
ReptileWorldOnTeKidsStage.
CarnivalRides,RockClimbingWallAndTeKidsAreaOpen.
12:30-1:15 Piranhas Band-MainStage
1:00 Wine Tasting Tent Open
LocalVineyardsincluding
StillCreekVineyardsofAvenue,Md.
TeBeginningOfWineGrowingInSaintMarysCounty
TeHistoryOfTePortOfLeonardtownWinery
1:00 Magic Show-KidsStage
SuperMagicMan,ReggieRicePerforms
1:45-2:30 Piranhas Band-MainStage.
2:00 Kids Tractor Pull Contest-NearTeKidsStage
SeveralAgeGroups,GreatPrizes
3:00-5:00Sam Grow Band-MainStage
3:00 MagicShow -KidsStage
SuperMagicMan,ReggieRicePerforms
4:00 Reptile World-KidsStage
5:00 Drawing Of Rafes And Prizes Awarded
1st Prize:ACustomizedGolfCartBy:
Te7thDistrictOptimistClub
JimmysAutoBody
GuyAutoParts(Napa)
MidAtlanticCustomBuggies
2nd Prize:FishingTripFor6PeopleBy:BowesFishing
3rd Prize:ASouthernMarylandStufedHamBy:
MurphysTown&Country
DrawingForBoysAndGirlsBikes-MainStage

5:00FESTIVAL CLOSES
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 2012
AvailableTroughoutTeFestivalFacePainting
PonyRidesPettingZooOysterTongConstructing
ByJimFrankFrankTrossbachsToyJohnDeereDisplay
AlpacasByMooreOrLessFarmCarnivalAttractions
WorkboatSkifConstruction
ByMasterBoatBuilderRalphLawrence