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W.

Irving Twombly
FLYING TO EUROPE

President of the Aeronautical Society.

I Believe

the Time Is Coming in the Near


Future

Able

When We Will Be
to

New York

Cross Direct From


to

London Without a Stop Between Sunrise and Sunset," Declares the


INoted bxpert in inscribing

a Remarkable Air Boat.

are no insurmountable diffi- and 'throw overboard all useless material, such as wings, aero motor, propeller, etc., ccmvertlns the macnine into - : ent time. In fact, if the expedition a : motor driven lifet boat. We must build a machine with the \u25a0were seriously undertaken by practical. (greatest amount of lifting surface, the level headed men there is more than least amount of head resistance, and so I en even chance it would successful. strongly wired and braced thai there j #ehave .heard a great deal of ?discussion ] will be no chance of anything going become an established fact, and has wrong while In flight. Then, most lm-j ?since been highly, Indorsed by M. ; Eiffel during the past live years about cross! pcrtaait of all, we must provide a motor of Paris, after; a series ,of J long - and ing the ocean, by aeroplane and .several -, of ample poweT drive the ?machine' conclusive experiments. of our most prominent flyers have ser- ?j il. full speed for the entire trip I be- I y-' Of equal importance -tto i the \\ flying iously considered the undertaking, but ! lieve there would be nothing .experi- machine is ; the pilot or pilots who will as a matter of fact, it is only within mental in building such a machine or guide her. Once we have built a mathe past year that a type of machine motor to-day, and I base my judgment | chine that will fly safely across the has been evolved that would stand any solely upon actual development to date. Atlantic the success ;or failure of the Mr. ; Curtias has agreed to build such i venture will depend entirely upon the chance of reaching the other side without assistance. under conditions to be skill, training, -v ingenuity;;:. endurance ja machine I refer to the hydro-aieroplane, or named by him, and I have no doubt j and, bulldog stick of our pilots. flying boat. It will be as evident to the there are other experienced and respon-. j We should\u25a0 have two \ pilots because" layman as to the engineer that a cross- I sible r.-'.; aeroplane manufacturers who! it would be impossible' f<sr one man to Atlantic flying machine must be able' would undertake such a contract under stand the continuous nervous and physical strain ,of such ,a - trip. Both to alight upon and arise from the water reasonable conditions easily and safely at all times; it is also I would advocate for this "purpose the j men should ,be thoroughly trained and ! evident that the boat or hydroplane I double biplane ;or following.:, surface experienced -.navigators and air ; nilots. must be practically unsankable and i type of flying boat as most nearly fu \u03b3-j able to map ; and lay out their course able to ride a heavy sea. filling our requirements. .; In this type as \u25a0an experienced navigator would lay Our pilots must be ? safeguarded They must In lof aeroplane we have, if properly de- ; the course of this vessel. every way possible so that no unneces- I signed and built, a high]}- i efficient,! have unlimited nerve, tempered by good sary risks art taken. We must not. only jrigid and compact machine with - a j judgment, and a determination to ' succonstruct a machine that will fly safely maximum of lifting surface and \u25a0a j ceed that 'Would never admit defeat. '\u25a0' with her two pilots and sufficient: fuel jminimum of head resistance inherently .The machine should be fitted with and supplies for the entire trip, but in i stable. -;-" \u25a0 %'\u25a0 [' \u25a0' \u25a0/". ).j ."' .'V ."\u25a0- ..-'' \u25a0 .:'-.--- dual control, which can be shifted to case of damage which would disable - \u25a0 There is nothing new or experi- I either pilot instantly, .on signal. In her as a flying machine and which i mental about 'this type of machine,- as case of damage machine can be brought could not be repaired while, resting on lit was first proposed by the late Prof, j o the water and run as a ; motor boat! the water, we must be able to cut loose Langley long before human flight had or allowed to float while the necessary '.-'.:'\u25a0\u25a0'\u25a0 '\u25a0\u25a0'\u25a0:\u25a0'\u25a0. .'.'.. .\u25a0/." ':l' \u25a0 ; -\- -'.! ". : -~-

THERE

> culties to overcome' in crossing the Atlantic *by aeroplane at the pres-

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alterations'; or repairs : are being made., TLe Aero Club of- America' in li>l2
adopted a set of rules and regulations , to govern a cross-Atlaatic flight which stipulates that the pilot or pilots "shall not receive outside assistance of ; any kind. This means that they would not be permitted -to take on fuel,' oil or provisions. 'IThis leaves opan \. to us, if we comply with -these rules, two overwater routes. First, from New York direct to Ireland, a distance of approximately
3,000

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miles, and second, from St. John's, N. P., to Ireland, a distance of \u25a0' about 2,000 miles. '.' ?'"'' .,These rules, however, were drawn to 'cover a $100,000 prize ? for a crossAtlantic flight,- and would undoubtedly \u25a0be modified 'r if they were < seriously Job;

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jected to and assurances given that such : a flight? would actually be undertaJcen. The fact that theorize was insured by Lloyd's for $1,000 last year while the premium this year ;is $2,000 " * ..";'\u25a0 is significant. ,' : ILet us \u25a0 consider \u25a0first N a course from -New YorkIto Ireland. We : must cover approximately 3,000 miles without renewal ofI fuel or other supplies, : mating our speed at 100 miles per hour, and v. figuring on the most economical and efficient ; motor yet built\u25a0 for this ~

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work, we would need to carry ,-about \u25a0'3,000 (pounds of gasoline, two pilots ;weighing ; 300 pounds, : a ? auxiliary motor, ?; water propeller and shaft 100 pounds, *proyisions 100 pounds,! weight of machine completely ; equipped i with a 150-hoTse-poYver motor 1,700 j pounds'; ?, total weight ready to fly 5,200

the following surface biplane type a of 1,120 square feet of lifting surface. Figuring a lift of five-pounds per square foot, this would enable us to carry a total load of 5,600 pounds, a leeway of 400 pounds.: To (get: this surface- ?we = must have two top planes 43 feet long by 7 feet wide and two bot.pounds. i .' ? \u25a0 " tom planes -35 feet long by 7 feet wide, Tiiis would ?*require In a machine of j set at an angle of. about six degrees.

".total

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MOST

COSTLY ANIMAL in the ZOO

of dwarf hippo, in three living the hoof .is as specimens, which the N*e<w York Zootoglcal Society now proudly trots out being worth $30 a pound, which is cerat the Bronx Park as three of the rarest tainly going some for meat. w At thi3 rate,- the eight hundred odd zoological specimens in the world.
quoted #in- Africa

LIVE

* pygmy i hippopotamus

meat :on

pounds

would represent a total value of Hagenbeek of Haoraurg, cost $15,000. " $24,000. They doa't look it, though, to the As a matter of fact, three pygmy casual observer. hippopotami ;at the Bronx \u25a0\u25a0 Zoo, pur- : You see a small runt of - r&: fourchased less than a year ago from nundred-pound "bull" hippo sullenly

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nosing uoout in the straw in a pen by himself, and two youngsters of about two hundred pounds eaCh, disporting themselves like amphibious puppies in an adjacent tank.

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