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Second Giving of the Law Dr.

David Battle

The

name of the book comes from its title in the Septuagint which means, Second Law. Ancient tradition states that Moses wrote it with the help of others, particularly Joshua.

Standard

Critical Reconstructions:

Julius Wellhausen: Source Criticism Martin Noth: Tradition Criticism

Reconstructed

the history of Israel Gave prominence to Abrahamic traditions, such as the promise of land.
Hexateuch (Six books) Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers,

Deuteronomy, and Joshua.

Scott Frost, Southern Wesleyan University

Martin

Noth (1902-1968)

Distinguished the D source from the JEP

sources. Tetrateuch:
Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers

Sets

the stage for the Historical Books. History:

The way of death The way of life


Deuteronomistic
Former

Joshua, Judges, Samuel Kings

and Latter Prophets:

Prophetic History: (Deuteronomistic History) Writing Prophets: Major* and Minor Prophets

Main

Characters:

Moses and Joshua


Theme:

Moses exhorts the people of Israel to follow the way of life and to shun the path of death.

Conflict:

Moses cannot enter the promise land, but must get the people ready.
Transfer of leadership.

New generation comes of age.

Second

giving of the law by Moses

Preparing a new generation to enter the land. The Ten Commandments: Deuteronomy 5

The Shema: Deut 6:4-9


Deuteronomy

has an oratory tone or set in the form of a speech. Deuteronomy also follows a treaty format.

First

Speech of Moses (Deut. 1:6-4:43)


Speech of Moses (Deut. 4:44-26:19)

Second

Third
Song

Speech of Moses (Deut. 27:1-30:30)


of Moses (Deuteronomy 32)

Blessing
Death

of Moses (Deuteronomy 33)

of Moses (Deuteronomy 34)

Preamble

(Deut 1:1-5) Historical Prologue (Deut 1:6-4:43) Stipulations of the Covenant (Deut 4:44-26:19)
The Great Commandments (Deut 4:44-11:32)
Supplementary Requirements (Deuteronomy 12-26)
Ratification;

Covenant Curses and Blessing (Deuteronomy 27-30) Leadership Succession under the Covenant (Deuteronomy 31-34)
Taken from NIV Study Bible

The

Deuteronomistic Code

Re-presentation of the Covenant Ten Commandments (Deut. 5:1-21//Exod. 20:1-17) Shema (Deut. 6:4-6)

Torah

as Law

Social Concerns of Deuteronomy (see handout) Note that the Old Testament law regulates common practices found among ancient near eastern cultures.

Torah

as Law

Old Testament laws are comparable to other

ancient near eastern laws.


Code of Hammurapi (BC 1700s)

Deut 24:7 Law 14 says, If a seignior has stolen the young son of a(nother) seignior, he shall be put to death
Code of Hammurapi in the Louvre, Picture University of North Carolina Pembroke

Torah

as Law

Old Testament laws are different from other

ancient near eastern laws in that it disregards a persons class. While the text is patriarchal, it does seek to limit patriarchal authority and to affirm the dignity of women.

Torah

as instruction

Deut 4:5-8 Practicing the law makes Gods people wise.

Practicing the law shows the nearness of God to

His people. Practicing the law distinguishes Gods people from the world.

How

should Christians apply the Old Testament law?


to application

Barriers

Law was given to an Iron Age, tribal culture. Law was given to a specific people group and nation. Law was designed for a specific geographic region.

Approaches Covenantalist (most traditional) Ceremonial and Civil Law do not apply. Moral Law applies. Seventh Day Adventist Moral and much of the dietary laws apply. Dispensationalist Only those laws repeated in the New Testament are still in force. Revelatory None of the law applies directly. Every law reveals the character of the Lawgiver and as such applies.