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Meeting

Coyote News Briefs

Housing meeting, topic of West Central Electric Cooperative holds 63rd annual meeting October 3 new business discussion
by Karlee Barnes The October City Council meeting was held Thursday, October 4 instead of the usual first Monday of the month. In attendance included council members: David Geisler, Mike Jost, Joe Connot, Jay Drayer, Arnie Waddell and Wayne Esmay. Also present were Krysti Barnes, Ray Erikson, Jerry Hatheway and Karlee Barnes. The agenda and minutes were looked over and approved. Geisler was the only request for a building permit at this months meeting. The permit was to tear down his rental house on Second Street and add an addition to the east side of his house. Geisler also requested a building permit for a five unit storage shed on the west side of the Super 8 motel, south of the Pioneer Auto Museum. No issues were presented in the public area. Vouchers were next on the agenda. The only issue the board had was a bill for Corkys Auto totaling $649. It was quickly resolved that the bill included two months worth of charges. Esmay motioned on the vouchers and the meeting proceeded. Sheriff John Weber was absent for the first part of the meeting, as the Jones County Ambulance meeting was scheduled for the same day in preparation for the arrival of the new ambulance as well as the annual pancake feed during pheasant hunting opening weekend. Hatheway presented the street report, opening the conversation with news that the new dozer had arrived. Its a pretty nice dozer. Its a little different than our old one, so it will take some getting used to. The new dozer did not come with a service manual. Hatheway mentioned that he would call a Caterpillar equipment provider to see if the city could buy one. He also mentioned searching online for a downloadable version. It was brought to the attention of the board that the new dump truck, purchased in the summer from Watertown, S.D., was also without a manual. Mayor Geisler said, we need to have a manual for every piece of equipment we own. Hatheway told the board that his research indicated that it would be almost $500 for a dump truck manual from Caterpillar. The board agreed that if a cheaper manual could not be found, then it would be feasible to pay the amount. The next topic of discussion during the street report included the tearing down of old structures in town. Geisler told the board that Hatheway and Jim Newbold did a great job of tearing down his rental house and cleaning up the mess. Hatheway said that was the third structure they have torn down recently. The board gave the okay to start working on the drainage issues behind Mike Barness house on South Main Street. Geisler told Hatheway to get the material ordered and Hatheway said he needs to address the issues of the sewer and the phone lines. Ray Erikson presented the water report next. In September, Erikson attended the South Dakota Waste Water Association meeting and reported he learned that all copper fittings and brass needed to comply with the no lead regulations. This will be enforced starting in 2014. Erikson said that there is a very small amount of lead in brass, anywhere from 5 percent to .25 percent. The new valve was installed at the lagoon, with the states approval.

SERVING THE AREA SINCE 1904

MURDO

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF JONES COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA.

ote Coy
A PUBLICATION
One bright point, said Reed, was that the TransCanada Keystone XL Pipeline will, by far, be the cooperatives main customer. Trans- Canada has already paid $9.5 million for the cooperative to increase its infrastructure. Reed mentioned that the cooperatives two way automated communication computer program is helping to control a stable output of energy. Bar coding will help with real-time inventory. Cell phone notifications to members will also save costs and efforts, especially since landlines may be out during a power outage. Vic Simmons of Rushmore Electric presented an update for the states electric cooperatives. He said, in order to keep up with future demand, more power plants must be built relatively soon. The cooperatives of South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana and Wyoming have a $2.9 billion construction program. Costs are going up, a great percentage being a direct result of requirements under the Clean Air Act. Cooperatives must be able to provide the generation and transmission of electricity needed to meet maximum usage at any given instance. Demand side management, also called load control, can be positively affected by individuals by running major appliances in off-peak times. Customers/members are encouraged to help with electrical load bearing by running major appliances at night or in the times that are not peak times for electrical use. The cooperative, by using a customer-requested connection system, can temporarily turn off hot water heaters if variable peak load times require it.

$1.00
Includes tax

OF RAVELLETTE PUBLICATIONS, INC.

Number 41 Volume 106 October 11, 2012

On Wed., Oct. 24, youth will help with the bazaar at the church, Following the bazaar youth will go door to door in Murdo and Draper for Trick or Treat, So Others Can Eat, asking for non-perishable food items, to help stock the local food pantry.

Jones County 4-H

Ambulance needs EMTs

On Wed., Oct. 10 at 6:30 p.m., the Jones County 4-H Club will be holding an informational meeting at the Dan Parish Technology Center. The meeting will be for parents and kids interested in joining 4-H. Anyone interested, but unable to attend the meeting can contact the Jones County extension Office at 605669-7101.

The 63rd annual WCEC held in Philip drew in a large crowd. Approximately 300 members attended the meeting. Steve Reed, West Central Electric Cooperative CEO addresses cooperative members at the WCEC annual meeting held October 3. Courtesy photos by Del Bartels The 63rd annual West Central Electric Cooperative meeting, held in Philip, Wednesday, October 3, was a warning of diminishing income, an increasing need for more power plants, an environmental condemnation of coal-powered plants and an awareness of peak power requirements. Approximately 250 guests and West Central Electric personnel gathered in the Philip Fine Arts Building. The official business meeting was followed by a roast beef supper provided by the Philip Volunteer Fire Department. The evenings entertainment was the Jim Szana Trio jazz group. Door prizes included beef certificates, small appliances and grand prizes of a color television, a patio barbecue and a tabletop barbecue. During the meeting, the Philip chapter of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America provided child care. The opening prayer was given by Father Kevin Achbach and the national anthem was sung by the Philip High School honor choir. West Central Electric is a rural cooperative serving members in Haakon, Jackson, Jones, Lyman and Stanley counties. The cooperative maintains around 3,573 miles of line in an area of more than 7,000 square miles, serving approximately 3,660 members. The cooperatives monthly newsletter, Cooperative Connections, includes energy saving programs, current events and issues about the cooperative, along with local, state and national news and information. Almost 40 people are employed by West Central Electric. West Central Electric officers presented the projected future of the cooperative. Chief Executive Officer Steve Reed said, One thing about electricity, a warm winter is not necessarily a good thing. He pointed out that less usage equated into less sales, but with the same operating costs and with increasing peak requirements. The cooperative is nine percent down from the previous year, even with the hot summers high air conditioner needs. We believe this years weather pattern is an anomaly, said Reed. After stressing that costs are going up, he added, Coal is all of a sudden the bad guy in the environmental debate, even though almost 57 percent of the areas electricity in 2011 came from coal operated plants. Hydropower fulfilled 22 percent of the needs, renewables (wind) nine percent, nuclear two percent, natural gas half of a percent, and purchases from other areas was close to 10 percent. Reed announced that the customer billing due date will be on the 20th of each month, to assist with the cooperatives own payment due dates. And, in 2013 a three dollar charge increase will be implemented. Customers who require less than 500 feet of hookup will not be charged, but for over 500 feet the cooperative member will be charged an aid fee. Reed said that it costs $12,000 to build a 1,500 foot hook-up.

The Jones County Ambulance is looking to expand their EMT members and would like to have anyone who might be interested in becoming an EMT to let them know. They would like to host a training class but first need candidates that are willing to take the course. Anyone with an interest or anyone with questions that the ambulance crew could answer are asked to call and leave a message at 669-3125 or to call Tammy Van Dam at 530-7553.

Exercise room reminder

The exercise room at the Tech Center is open Mon.Fri. from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. If you have a key card, the room is open additionally from 57 a.m. and 510 p.m., Mon.Fri. It is also open on Sat. from 5 a.m.5 p.m. and on Sun. from 16 p.m. Patrons need to be out of the building one hour after the doors are locked; no later than 11 p.m. on weekdays. If you have any questions or would like a key card, contact the high school office.

Al-Anon

Open AA meetings

For AlAnon meetings call 669-2596 for time and place. Thursdays 8:00 p.m. at the East Commons. Call 530-0371 or 280-7642.

New sound system for Murdo Auditorium

PTO and Turner Youth Foundation present check


Wyatt Walker from the Turner Youth Foundation presents Larry Ball with a check for $2,000 to be used for a new sound system for the Murdo Auditorium. Photo by Karlee Barnes Jones County School District. Larry Ball is waiting to hear back from a few other community organizations before the new sound system is decided on and purchased. Ball said, It is time to get serious about the sound system. The current sound system in place in

Murdo WCEC employees Susie Rankin and Jeff Birkeland hand out informational brochures and visit with cooperative members.

Erikson also has been getting ready for the cold weather by draining water lines and irrigation systems that will not be used during the winter months. He said the pool was winterized except for the draining of the irrigation system. He also needed to put anti freeze in the drains. He has also been blowing out sprinkler systems around town with an air compressor. Tis the season! said Erikson. Waddell questioned if Erikson had been taking care of private residences irrigation systems, and Erikson confirmed that he had, for a fee. He charges a $100 per hour, minimum of one hour. The finance report was abbreviated, as finance officer, Krysti Barnes, had surgery the previous week and had been unable to spend much time in the office. Barnes said that a Safe Route to School grant was available for sidewalks between the schools, as the grade school kids often walk to the high school, not only every day for lunch, but also for other various events. Geisler asked Erikson to check out the utilities on the street before possible work on a new sidewalk will begin. Next included discussion about the plans for a new sound system at the Murdo Auditorium. Reports from Larry Ball estimated the costs to be anywhere from $7,500 to $20,000. The $7,500 estimate was for the sound system only, installation not included. A call to the company who provided the sound system for the Turner Community Center provided a quote of $12,890. This would include installation, warranties, training, wireless features, 18 loud speakers and hand held microphones. The board discussed that the Murdo Chamber of Commerce had said they would contribute $2,000$5,000, the city would contribute $2,400 and the Turner Youth Foundation would contribute $2,000. The board agreed to increase their contribution if need be. All agreed that the sound system currently in place in the auditorium was not adequate. The Turner Youth Foundation had reported that they were satisfied with the customer support that they have experienced thus far with their sound system. Water deposits were then discussed, and Connot suggested the city implementing an automatic billing method. Barnes will look into it. Old business once again included the Ingalls building. The city attorney attempted to send the owners a summons to appear in court. Several attempts at serving the papers were avoided by the owners. Another option will be to go through the court system to get the papers served, although it will take some extra time. New business was next on the agenda. Barnes told the board that several rural Jones County residents would be willing to pay a fee to utilize the city dumpsters in town. An estimated $20 per month fee was discussed for the 13 people who had expressed interest. Jewell Bork had suggested to Barnes that the city look in to having a housing meeting to bring somebody in to discuss housing projects and investments in housing. The meeting is projected for some time after the first of the year and will include the city, county and the chamber. Waddell said that Murdo really needs to have this meeting. Barnes suggested a projected January meeting. Geisler agreed, but reminded the board that they needed to schedule the meeting so it did not interfere with winter sporting events.

by Karlee Barnes The Turner Youth Foundation and the Jones County PTO, pictured, are two of the community organizations who have committed to contributing to the sound system. Others committed include: the City of Murdo, the Class of 2012, the Lions Club, and the

the auditorium has been insufficient for some time. Ball said he hopes that they can move on the project before winter. The school hopes to have the sound system in place even before major fall events held in the auditorium, such as the school play and basketball games. Ball said a few quotes have been discussed, and that finalizing the purchase should happen soon.

October is Breast Cancer awareness month

Jones County News


East Side News
by Janet Louder 669-2696
Bill, Ellen and Barry Valburg made a trip to Valentine, Neb., to the dentist Thursday. Word has been received that Dale Valburg of British Columbia died October 1 from complications following heart surgery. Dale is a former Jones County resident. Sympathy is extended to his family. Mike Herr of Bismarck, N.D., arrived at the Valburg Ranch Saturday to visit his daughter and family. We extend our sympathy to the family of Joyce Dykema. Funeral services were held Friday at the Murdo UMC with Pastor Hazen officiating. There was a wonderful turnout of family and friends to pay their last respects. Following the service her daughters passed out popcorn balls, as Joyce was well known for the good popcorn balls she made. Lunch and a time of fellowship was held in the church hall. After lunch Joyce was taken to the Black Hills National Cemetery to be buried with her husband, Boyd. Troy Iversen of Lismore, Minn., has been spending time here. On Thursday wife Jody and boys Mason and Conner arrived at Wanda and Gerald Mathews for the weekend. They returned home on Sunday. Mike and Joni Hunt hosted a birthday party Sunday afternoon for mom/grandma June Nix's ? birthday. Helping her celebrate were hubby Richard; her brother Russell and Mary Pierce of Yankton; Jill and Andy Rankin, Riley and Peyton; Ashley Hunt and Jimmy Olsen; Eric Nix; Brett and Lori Nix and boys; Scott Nix and Lara Joseph; Molly and Mason Nix. All enjoyed birthday cake and ice cream. Happy birthday, June! Sunday evening Richard and June Nix and Russell and Mary Pierce took in the PHL bazaar. Russell is a former Draperite and retired pastor. Dorothy and Brad Louder visited Dwight in Kadoka on Friday. They also visited Deanna Byrd and daughter Kristi. Helen Louder and Virginia Louder spent last Friday in Pierre. Virginia kept an appointment and then they met Sharon Ferry for lunch. Wow! What a great turnout Sunday evening for the PHL bazaar and supper. A roast beef, turkey and stuffing supper was served topped off with pie. I must say there were two tables of very good looking pies. There was a table with rugs, white elephants, grab bags, lots of interesting articles and also a table with yummy baked goods all calories were removed. At seven o'clock they drew for the quilts and decorated fry pan that were being raffled. And talk about lucky! Don Heib's name was drawn out for the big quilt made by Velma Scott, and then they drew for the baby quilt made by Velma and lucky Don's name was drawn for that. He didn't luck out in the drawing for the fry pan painted by Wanda Mathews; maybe he didn't have a ticket on that. Glenna Moore was the lucky one there. Congratulations to both. There was a lot of tickets sold and we appreciate all who bought just sorry you all couldn't win. My name was in the boxes but nobody called my name either. As I said it was a great turnout. We had people from Lyman County, Hughes County, all over Jones County and they were here from California, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. See how far they will travel for PHL cookin'! We had good local help and was so nice when out of towners helped. PHL member Shelli Terwilliger came from Rapid City. Brent and Donna Dowling and family of Pierre and Jared and Bonnie Dowling and family really pitched in for the clean up. We appreciated David and Robert Styles helping set up tables and chairs along with PHL members on Saturday. All in all a great success and I can guess there are lots of tired women today but another bazaar well done! Lots of comments saying it was a good supper which is always nice to hear. Last but not least, Dwight and Sheila Hurst dug and furnished the spuds for the supper so nice of them and they were really appreciated. Ray and Shirley Vik attended the memorial service in Rapid City Friday for Methodist minister Rev. Richard Ward. He was Draper's minister in the early sixties. Rev. Ward (80) passed away September 26 in Aberdeen. He was buried at Mountain Meadow Cemetery in the Black Hills. On Friday afternoon Ray and Shirley Vik traveled to Ft. Meade to visit Roger Vik, who is much improved and hoping to go home soon. Last Thursday Eldon and Esther Magnuson, along with Chad and Heather Whitney and boys, were on hand for the junior high football game in Presho Lyman vs. Jones County. Grandson/son Alec was part of the team. They later had supper together at a cafe in Presho. I talked to Joyce Hammond on Saturday. She is planning to fly to Texas on October 16 to be with son Steve. Steve will be undergoing cancer surgery on October 19 at a Dallas hospital. Our prayers are with him. Charlie and Susan Hamer of Kennebec spent Sunday at Dorothy and Brad Louder's. That evening the group attended the PHL bazaar. Eleanor Miller and Karen Authier of Pierre visited Margaret and Greg Rankin Sunday afternoon. The group had supper together at the PHL bazaar. Happy birthday to our (used to be) neighbor Kia Miller on Monday. Kia is a student at USD, Vermillion. Eldon and Esther Magnuson, Terri Pelle, Chad and Heather Whitney, Gunnar and Bodie were on hand Saturday to watch Alec play football with the Jones County team at Philip. Chad and Gunnar rode the bus home; the others joined Terri for lunch. The Draper Lutheran Church celebrated their 103rd birthday Saturday evening with church followed with a barbeque/potluck supper. Pam and Gary Gall of Scotland spent the weekend in Spearfish with Patti and Wade Dowling and mom Melva Vik. The Galls spent Saturday with dad Roger Vik at Ft. Meade. That evening the Dowlings hosted a chili supper at their home. Those enjoying the evening were: Melva; the Galls; Grandma Ruth Winters; Melva's sisters Linda Sumners and Sherri Ferdinand and friend Don and her son, Rynald and friend. The Galls visited Roger on Sunday on their way home. Melva visited in the afternoon. Patti spent time with him on Monday. Sending get well wishes, Roger. Delores Volmer and Bev Johnson from Presho attended the PHL bazaar Sunday evening. Delores got in a visit with brother Eldon and Esther Magnuson. Bob and Susie Rankin left for Tulsa on Thursday. While there Sandy Zibell of Wann met them. The Rankins flew back into Rapid on Saturday and met Ray and Janice Pike for lunch before coming home. Saturday was Janice's birthday so guess that's how she celebrated. Happy birthday, Janice. Willard and Florence Christian and son Dennis spent Sunday with Harvey Christian while Lila Mae was helping with the bazaar. She spent Monday with him at the Golden Living Center in Pierre. Annette, Emerson and Evan Knapp of Denver, Colo., spent the weekend in town at aunt Karen Miller's. They got to see nephew/cousin Skyler Miller's football game with other family members including Bev Mix from Lusk, Wyoming. Donna Kinsley and friend Myrtle Robbins attended an Assembly of God women's seminar in Pierre on Friday and Saturday.

Murdo Coyote October 11, 2012

Page 2

Cross country team attends regions

Newspapers are legal documents that protect citizens


by Mike MacLaren Paying for baseball umpires is more important than protecting your property from foreclosure. That is in essence what elected officials across the country are saying as they push for cost saving legislation to allow government to post notices of legal actions on government-run websites. Baseball umpires? ... You cant be serious, you say. I am serious; Im also worried. You should be too. Heres why: Government officials say such legislation saves money that could be spent on police and fire fighters. But there are government programs that cost more than publishing these notices, such as umpires for city baseball leagues. Its a fact: the City of Niles (MI) spends more each year for baseball umpires than for publishing legal notices in the local newspaper. But theres a larger issue at stake. These public notices are legal documents. News-on-paper notices give citizens an independent, authentic and verifiable record of what their government has done. If questions arise regarding ordinances, actions or any other municipal decision, courts will not accept a copy they want the original document as proof. This news-on-paper publication requirement was put in place to protect public and municipal officials so that theres no question that a document had been doctored. Requiring legal notices to be published in a venue independent of government is a form of insurance for taxpayers. How can you get beyond the shadow of doubt proof of the contents of a legal document from a website that can be altered with a click of a mouse, or hacked? Heck, even the Pentagons computers have been hacked. When was the last time you visited your local government website? Is it something you do weekly? By contrast, according to American Opinion Research: Newspapers are the number one source for local/community news; seventy percent of Michigan adults read a print newspaper on an average Sunday; eighty-seven percent of Michigan adults (6.7 million) read a Michigan newspaper during an average seven-day period; ninetyfive percent of 18-29 year-olds read a newspaper each week in Michigan. Newspapers deliver an ongoing information stream, so that if one person misses a property-rezoning announcement, others can alert them that a nearby wooded lot could become an adult video store. Let me be clear: Under the guise of saving money, such pull public notices out of a newspapers and post them on a government web site legislation will make it easier for municipalities to have special meetings, make assessments and other important decisions with nearly no knowledge or input from the community. Yes, newspapers charge to publish these notices. More often than not, they are done at cost. But without these notices, more than a few community newspapers face the specter of shutting down. So on top of posting these public notices where the public wont notice, there may be no local paper to report on the results of the actions. And let me be clear about something else: government officials across the country have thankless jobs. Most of the ones Ive worked with are industrious and wellintentioned people. I sincerely

Jones County Cross Country Pictured, left to right: Jessie Harrison, Skylar Green, Rachel Buxcel and Kalli Hespe. The Jones County High School cross country team participated in the Region cross country meet in Philip on Wednesday, October 10. At printing time, the results were not yet available. Photo by Karlee Barnes

Caring and Sharing raises money for Jones County cancer victims

doubt that they realized how this legislation could cause a crack in the cornerstone of communities across the country. But the truth is that these bills will hurt you and every other citizen across this nation. So, government officials: Thank you for all the thankless work you do. It is a lot. And thank you for reconsidering your support of this legislation. Because the taxpayers you work for deserve better.

Murdo Area Chamber of Commerces

Pineapple Recipe Contest


Fix your favorite pineapple recipe and bring it to the Chambers booth to enter it in the contest

ts Adul s Kid & ome Welc

Sauce ~ Cookies ~ Pie ~ Bread ~ Bars ~ Etc.


You bring it well try it!

Lions Clubs Fall Fling Saturday, October 27 Murdo Auditorium juLocal


Event to be held at the annual

dges!

Chamber Bucks to be awarded for top three places ($100, $75 & $50) Need to be present to win Entries taken from 6:30 to 7 p.m. Winner announced at 8:00 p.m. Remember: take home pans/dishes

Walking for cancer victims Walkers spent the crisp fall Sunday, October 7 afternoon walking laps around the track in support of Jones County residents who have been affected by cancer. The Jones County Caring and Sharing cancer support group sponsored the second annual Caring and Sharing walk, in which approximately 25 people participated. Photos by Karlee Barnes

Murdo Coyote Murdo, SD


Published Every Thursday
P.O. Box 465 Murdo, SD 57559-0465 Phone: (605) 669-2271 FAX: (605) 669-2744 E-mail: mcoyote@gwtc.net Don Ravellette, Publisher Karlee Barnes, Reporter/Photographer/Sales Lonna Jackson Typesetter/Office
Local subscriptions include the towns and rural routes of Murdo, Draper, Vivian, Presho, White River, Okaton, Belvidere, Kadoka and Midland

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Collecting beads Sup-

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Local News
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porters who participated by walking each bought a necklace for $5.00 and each time they completed a lap around the track, they stopped to add a bead to their necklace. Ella Fuhrer, Margie Peters, Pastor Ray Greenseth and Amber Sylva are pictured at left picking out beads from the colorful assortment. Along with the funds raised from the necklaces, total donations for the cause added up to $2,100. All funds raised during the event will benefit Jones County residents. Anyone who was unable to participate in the walk, but would still like to donate can contact Pastor Rick Hazen, Pastor Ray Greenseth or Ella Fuhrer, Caring and Sharing treasurer.

Your newspaper will be there for you


youre going without worrying about battery life or Wi-Fi connections. Some say newspapers are dying, that people get their news today from the Internet, TV and radio. But where do the Internet, TV and radio get their news? From the newsrooms of Americas newspapers, large and small, which still encompass the nations largest newsgathering force. Other information providers may add opinion, pictures or sound, but most of the time, the facts begin in the newsrooms of newspapers, where journalists are there for you, cultivating sources, combing through records, asking tough questions. A few generations back, TV and radio were supposed to be the death of newspapers. Instead, they were catalysts for newspapers to dig further, to offer context, analysis, perspective and storytelling that the electronic media couldnt deliver. TV and radio didnt kill newspapers; they made them deeper, smarter and more thoughtful. For about a generation now, the Internet has supposedly been driving newspapers into extinction.

Murdo Coyote
Joyce F. Dykema

Murdo Coyote October 11, 2012

Page 3

by Ron Dzwonkowski Your newspaper will be there for you. A simple statement, but lets break it down a bit. Your newspaper Thats right, all yours, assembled just for you, tailored to where you live, emphasizing the things that affect you, keeping track of the people and players in your community. Your newspaper is put together by people in a newsroom that was built for you, where people work to supply information that matters to you, from the details of that crash you passed by on Tuesday to biographies of the candidates for your school board to notices of whats on sale at your local supermarket. Will be there for you. Be where? On your porch, in your mail, at your convenience store and, yeah, sometimes in your bushes. But also at your township hall, inside your local police department, attending your city council meeting, watching your elections. It will be where you cant, paying attention, keeping watch, asking questions, making the record public. And you can take it wherever

Mount Rushmore Memories receives NAI award


Mount Rushmore Memories, published by the Mount Rushmore Bookstores at Mount Rushmore National Memorial, won First Place in the Long Book category in the 2012 National Association of Interpretation (NAI) Association Competition. NAI is an organization dedicated to advancing the profession of heritage interpretation, currently serving about 5,000 members in the United States, Canada, and over thirty other nations. Individual members include those who work at parks, museums, nature centers, zoos, botanical gardens, aquariums, historical and cultural sites, commercial tour companies, and theme parks. Mount Rushmore Memories recently won an Independent Publisher Book Award in the Mid-West Regional Nonfiction category, an Association of Partners for Public Lands Media and Partnership Award in the General Interest Publications book category and was a finalist in the 2011 Fore-

Nope. Its just given their newsrooms another platform to deliver journalism that now includes videos, interactive graphics and access to informational archives built for years by Guess which medium? Unlike websites and bloggers, newspapers are fixtures in their communities. Most of them were around long before personal computers and smart-phone apps, chronicling life, dissecting trends and exposing things that needed some air. And unlike less-established media, their newsrooms operate with standards and ethics intended to assure the credibility of the information they deliver. They dont just make the record; they protect it, too. Its a responsibility, a trust, a duty. And while newspapers and their newsrooms have always broken stories, the Internet has now enabled them to cover breaking news, too, with reporting that goes directly up on-line just as soon as it meets those newsroom standards. So the evolution continues. But the mission remains the same: To be there. For you. Because its your newspaper.

Obituaries
house at Halloween, with lights and siren (and you know who you are) for her popcorn balls. Joyce also made the best bread and chocolate fudge and she often shared her baked goods with family and friends. Crocheting was a pastime for Joyce and she enjoyed sharing her handiwork. Joyce loved going to bowling tournaments except for the times her partners angered her and embarrassed her (and you know who you are). Joyce had many talents and she used these in several of the jobs she performed throughout the years. She especially like working at Deans Market where she could be found by the sound of her whistle. She always said there was no song she just liked to whistle. Joyce has done everything from driving combines at harvest, driving semi-trucks long haul, to milking cows, ironing, baking doughnuts, and loved painting apartments. You would often find Joyce whistling, whether she was at work or at play. This reflected Joyces love for life. Joyce will be missed by her family and many friends. Survivors include three daughters Sherry Philips and her husband Bill of Murdo, Lora Gibbs and her husband Brett of Audobon, Iowa, and Cindy Jost and her husband Mike of Murdo; four grandchildren, Brooke and Susie Jost, and Georgie and Billy Gibbs; one brother Kenny Finck of Newell; five sisters Irene Brink of Murdo, Alice Stroppel and her husband George of Midland, Betty Block and her husband Dick of Midland, Ironis Poppe of Pierre, and Norma Oldenberg and her husband Jim of Philip; and a host of other relatives and friends. Joyce was preceded in death by her husband Herman on May 13, 2006; two brothers Robert Finck and Emil Finck, and one sister Bonna Lindquist. Visitation was held one hour preceding the services on Friday at the church. Funeral services were held on Friday, October 5, at the Methodist Church in Murdo, with Pastor Rick Hazen officiating. Graveside services were held on Friday at the Black Hills National Cemetery near Sturgis. A memorial has been established.

Joyce Finck Dykema was born to Waldo and Clara (Jordan) Finck on February 12, 1933 in Okaton, South Dakota. Joyce married Herman Boyd Dykema on November 27, 1953, and to this union three daughters were born, Sherry, Cindy and Lora. Joyce loved life and was known for her fun personality. Joyce especially loved to tease the kids and they loved to tease her back. Those same kids, and you know who you are, would scare her knowing how jumpy she was. Adults and kids alike made a special stop at Joyces

Would you recognize?

Ed and Margaret Roghair in front of the teacherage for the school in Okaton in 1941.

by Pastor Ray Greenseth, Messiah/St. Paul Lutheran Churches A cheerful heart is good medicine, but a crushed spirit dries up the bones. Proverbs 17:22

A Prescription for Good Health


another way: Finally, brothers (and sisters) whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, what ever is lovely, whatever is admirable --- if anything is excellent or praiseworthy --think about such things. Whatever you learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me --put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you. (Philippians 4:8-9) We pray; Dear Lord Heavenly Father, through faith in Jesus Christ, we have every reason for a cheerful heart. Thank You. Amen.

Pray

Word's Book of the Year Awards program in the Regional category. Mount Rushmore Memories is a collection of 120 memories about Mount Rushmore National Memorial edited by Jean L.S. Patrick of Mitchell, S.D., and Society Communications Director Debbie M. Ketel and designed by Amanda Summers Design of Arizona. The book retails for $14.99 and is available at the Mount Rushmore Bookstores at the park, online, by calling 1-605-574-3142 or at other bookstores in the area. As a committee of the Mount Rushmore Society, the mission of the Mount Rushmore Bookstores is to support and assist the National Park Service with educational, historical and interpretive activities at Mount Rushmore. As a 501 ( c ) 3 nonprofit organization, this committee raises funds for the park through the operation of three bookstores at the memorial, an audio tour outlet, membership program and publishing department.

Margaret Roghair

A psychologist at Harvard University discovered that watching uplifting movies helps raise the body's production of antibodies. IN contrast, watching films with lots of violence and evil causes the number of antibodies to drop. Since antibodies help fight off infection, it seems important that we focus on what's good, as opposed to what's evil. In his book of wisdom, Solomon reminds us that a cheerful heart is good medicine, but a

crushed spirit dries up the bones. It's not easy to always be cheerful in a world where sin runs rampant. We see what sin does in our live s and in the lives of others. We ask with St. Paul: Who will rescue me from this body of death/ But we exclaim with thanksgiving as did Paul, Thanks be to God --- through Jesus Christ our Lord...the law of the Spirit of life set me free from the law of sin and death. (Romans 7:24-25, 8:2) What kinds of things do you watch on TV or at the movie theater? Things that cheer you or that crush you? St. Paul summarizes the truth of Solomon in

Fire marshals office to reinstate training grants


The South Dakota Fire Marshals Office is reinstating the Firefighter Essentials Grant Program, which will help fund 13 training programs across the state. Fire Marshal Paul Merriman said the program was eliminated for lack of funds in 2010. To reinstate the program, a portion of the revenue from the Fire Safe Cigarette fund is being set aside. The money will help defray expenses such as books, manuals and instructor fees that fire departments will incur when they host a Firefighter Essentials class. The Fire Marshals Office is committing $750 to each of 13 classes. It is vital for our firefighters to remain current in training and education, Merriman said. Were pleased to be able to reinstate some funding for these classes. The funding is from fees paid by cigarette manufacturers to the fire safety standard act fund, created by the 2009 Legislature. The fund provides revenue to administer the fire-safe cigarette law, as well as to support fire safety and education programs. Fire Departments interested in receiving a training grant are asked to contact the State Fire Marshals Office at (605) 773-3562.

Margaret Alice (Peggy) Roghair was born to Frank Henry and Crystal Swearingen Bowder October 14, 1916 in Timber Lake. She was the third of seven children. She died in Coos Bay, Ore., September 20, 2012. With a two-year certificate from Northern State Teachers College, she began teaching primary school in Okaton in 1940. There she met

Ed Roghair the oldest brother of two of her elementary students, Ted and Bob. On June 8, 1941, Ed and Margaret they were married. Margaret was a farm wife and had four children. In 1957, the family moved to McMinnville, Oregon. Margaret was a substitute teacher and church secretary. She worked in the Linfield College Library and completed her B.S. degree there. She was a writer, editor and experimental cook, publishing articles and recipes. In McMinnville, she was active in the First Presbyterian Church, and the Yamhill County Fair and Historical Society. She and Ed are honored in the new Yamhill County Historical Society Museum where the volunteer break room is named after them. Following her husbands death in 2006, Margaret moved to the Baycrest Village care facility in Coos Bay. Margaret is survived by one sister, Frances Storm of Aberdeen; and sisters- and brothers-in-law

Marjorie Bowder of Salem, OR; Harriett Noteboom of Kadoka; Gertrude (John E.) Vander Schaaf of Orange City, IA; Theodore Roghair of Crestwood, KY and Robert (Bessie) Roghair of Okaton. She is survived by her children, James E. (Elizabeth) of Santa Fe, NM; Gene (Lucinda) of Grass Valley, CA; Crystal Shoji (Gene) of Coos Bay, OR; and Wallace (Jeri) of Portland, OR; grandchildren Nicholas, David, Jonathan and Taylor Roghair and Chris Shoji; and numerous nieces and nephews and their offspring. Memorial Services and interment will be held at McMinnville, Oregon, (where Ed is buried) during Thanksgiving weekend. In lieu of flowers contributions may be sent to the First Presbyterian Church, 390 NE 2nd St., McMinnville, OR 97128 or the Yamhill County Historical Museum, Box 484, Lafayette, OR 97127.

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Catholic Church of St. Martin 502 E. Second St., Murdo, S.D. Father Gary Oreshoski Saturday Mass: 6 p.m. St. Anthonys Catholic Church Draper, S.D. Father Gary Oreshoski Sunday Mass: 8:30 a.m. Draper United Methodist Church Pastor Rick Hazen Sunday Worship: 11 a.m.

Two Minutes With the Bible


Seated In Heaven by Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
God sees every believer in Christ as already in heaven. See what the Bible says about this: BUT GOD, WHO IS RICH IN MERCY, FOR HIS GREAT LOVE WHEREWITH HE LOVED US, EVEN WHEN WE WERE DEAD IN SINS, HATH QUICKENED US TOGETHER WITH CHRIST (BY GRACE YE ARE SAVED), AND HATH RAISED US UP TOGETHER AND MADE US SIT TOGETHER IN HEAVENLY PLACES IN CHRIST JESUS: THAT IN THE AGES TO COME HE MIGHT SHOW THE EXCEEDING RICHES OF HIS GRACE IN HIS KINDNESS TOWARD US THROUGH CHRIST JESUS (Eph. 2:4-7). Most sincere believers, poorly taught in the Word, are concerned about getting to heaven, but as far as God is concerned they are already there. They have been made accepted in the Beloved (Eph. 1:6). God has given them a position in Christ. We are well aware that most of Gods people know little about this experientially, but God says that as far as He is concerned, they are already in heaven, and this is what matters. As Christ took our place on Calvarys cross, God now sees us in Christ, at His own right hand, the place of favor and honor. This is why the Apostle Paul says to believers in Christ: IF YE THEN BE RISEN WITH CHRIST, SEEK THOSE THINGS WHICH ARE ABOVE, WHERE CHRIST SITTETH ON THE RIGHT HAND OF GOD. SET YOUR AFFECTION ON THINGS ABOVE, NOT ON THINGS ON THE EARTH. FOR YE ARE DEAD, AND YOUR LIFE IS HID WITH CHRIST IN GOD (Col. 3:1-3). And all this by the free grace of God: WHO HATH SAVED US, AND CALLED US WITH AN HOLY CALLING, NOT ACCORDING TO OUR WORKS, BUT ACCORDING TO HIS OWN PURPOSE AND GRACE, WHICH WAS GIVEN US IN CHRIST JESUS BEFORE THE WORLD BEGAN (II Tim. 1:9). Our hearts go out to those of our readers who have not yet received this gift of the grace of God. Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved (Acts 16:31).

Murdo United Methodist Church Pastor Rick Hazen Corner of E. 2nd and Jefferson Ave. Sunday Worship: 9:30 a.m. and Fellowship Time Sunday School: 10:30 a.m. United Methodist Women: 1st Wednesday at 2 p.m. ALL WELCOME! Okaton Evangelical Free Church Okaton I90 Exit 183 Pastor Gary McCubbin 6058372233 (Kadoka) Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. (CT) Sunday School: 10:30 a.m. (CT)

Messiah Lutheran Church 308 Cedar, Murdo, S.D. Pastor Ray Greenseth Sunday Worship: 9 a.m. Sunday School: 10 a.m. Bible Study: Tuesday 7 a.m. Thursday 9:30 a.m. Midweek: Wednesday 3:15 p.m. St. Pauls Lutheran Church Draper, S.D. Pastor Ray Greenseth Sunday Worship: 11 a.m. Bible Study: Wednesday 9 a.m.

Midwest Coop
6692601

Community Bible Church 410 Washington, Murdo, S.D. Pastor Alvin Gwin 6692600 Sunday Worship: 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Wed. Night Bible Study: 7 p.m.

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Extension News
Pocket gophers and moles have similarities, and distinct differences. Both animals spend the majority of their time below ground, and cause homeowners headaches with their burrowing activity. Pocket gophers also cause problems for farmers and ranchers, particularly in hayfields, where the dirt mounds they create interferes with hay harvest. Determining which pest is involved is important in implementing a control method, and the best way to do so is by the signs that can be seen above ground. Often, the only visible sign of pocket gophers is the mounds they construct as they return below ground after their occasional visits into the open air. Pocket gopher mounds are generally fan or kidney-shaped, as opposed to the smaller, usually round mounds made by moles. Pocket gopher burrows are typically deep enough to remain largely undetected from the soil surface, whereas at least some of the burrows moles create show up as undulating, raised runways. Pocket gophers are rodents, and therefore plant feeders, not only causing damage and being a nuisance because of their mound building habits, but cause some Pocket Gophers vs. Moles and Their Control

Murdo Coyote

Murdo Coyote October 11, 2012

Page 4

Bob Fanning (605) 842-1267


direct loss by feeding on the roots of plants, somewhat on aboveground vegetation, and pulling vegetation into their tunnels from below. They are also known to damage plastic water lines and electrical cables by chewing on them. Moles on the other hand, are not rodents, but insectivores. Their diet consists mainly of the insects, grubs, and worms they find in the soil. Moles are thought to damage roots and tubers by feeding on them, but rodents usually are to blame. Although moles remove damaging insects from lawns and gardens, their burrowing habits are not viewed favorably. Due to the moles exclusive diet of insects, toxic grain baits are seldom effective, although two poisons are federally registered for use on them. Pocket gophers however, being herbivores, can be controlled with poison baits. The baits can be applied in burrows by hand on a small scale, or with a mechanical burrow builder if dealing with a field scale infestation. Fumigants are possible methods of controlling both pocket gophers and moles, but they have been known to close off burrows so the fumigant cannot get to them. The fumigant may also move too slowly through the burrow system to be effective. Carbon monoxide

Lookin Around
Syd Iwan
Dead skunk in the middle of the road. You got yer dead skunk in the middle of the road. Stinkin to high Heaven! So go the lyrics of a song written and performed by Loudon Wainwright. It is especially appropriate right now since skunks appear to have had a banner year. Not only are they dead in the middle of the road but also on the shoulder and even on some city streets. I dont know how many carcasses Ive seen, but there have been a lot. This is not hard to believe since skunks often have multiple offspring. They are similar to cats as far as reproduction goes, and you know having four kittens in a batch is fairly common. Sometimes there are more that that. Therefore, if you have ten female skunks around, they could multiply themselves to forty by fall. I think thats what happened this year. There must have been many large batches and few stillborns. This, too, is the season you are most apt to see the results of the years production since they are all drifting around looking for cozy winter quarters. Culverts under roads are quite popular. Buildings are too. Just the other day, Wally asked if Id like to help him move three dead skunks from under his house. I said that, alas, I had a very busy schedule for both the morning and afternoon and couldnt possibly provide assistance. What a pity I couldnt help. Over the years, Ive dispatched a whole lot of skunks. They particularly adore the cat food I usually have sitting out in dishes in the barn. Whats more, the cats just accept them as kin without making a fuss. Let a coon come in the barn and eat cat food, and the cats get nervous. You can tell right away that something is wrong when you walk in the barn and the cats are all sitting on high places looking nervously around. This is a signal to grab your gun, walk carefully, and check the rafters for ringed tails. Cats give no warning about skunks, though, so youd just better keep your wits about you in the barn, especially after dark. Ive never been actually sprayed by a striped kitty, but it has been a near thing many times. Early spring and fall are the times one should be especially careful. Its not bad enough that these striped beasts have potent stink glands, but, what is worse, they are the most common carrier of rabies in this area. As far as I know, we have never had rabies on the place, but that doesnt mean it couldnt happen. Any critter including cats that acts strangely needs to be closely watched. The only thing worse than a rabid skunk, as far as Im concerned, would be a rabid bat. You could probably outrun a skunk, but bats would be quite a bit trickier to avoid. We sometimes get bats in the barn too, and I really hate that. I go in and out just as quickly as possible when they are there. According to recent statistics, not many bats actually have rabies, but I dont trust them anyway, the nasty things. If they were loveable creatures, they wouldnt be commonly displayed in conjunction with the scariest time of year, namely Halloween. It is also almost impossible to chase a skunk out of a building before shooting it. They wont go even if there are lots of doors, and theyre all open. For one thing, you have to stay a goodly distance away so you cant really force the issue. Long ago I gave up trying to get them outside and now just shoot them where they stand. Then I quickly exit the building and wait at least a day before going back, picking up the smelly beast with a pitchfork, and disposing of it a considerable distance away down a draw. The only redeeming feature about skunks might be that they are fairly pretty. They usually have glossy black hair punctuated by a big white stripe or two. Their beauty, though, could be compared to that of creeping jenny which also is somewhat pretty. Neither one can be fully appreciated when you know what problems they can cause. My favorite story in this regard, however, might be the one from schooldays in town. It was spring and a lilac was blooming outside the window. Mom said, Open the window so you can smell the lilacs. I did open the window but just as a skunk walked by. I told Mom, I dont think I care much for the smell of lilacs. She came to my room right away to check this out, smelled the skunk, and got a terrible fit of the giggles. So in conclusion, Its dead. Its in the middle. Dead skunk in the middle of the road. Its dead. Its in the middle, and stinkin to high, high Heaven.

from automobile exhaust can be effective due to its greater volume and pressure. Fumigating can also be quite time-consuming and labor intensive. Due to their somewhat solitary nature, and the fact that one pocket gopher or one mole can construct an extensive burrow system, trapping is considered very successful for both pests. For pocket gophers, trapping is best for small areas and animals not controlled with a poisoning control program. Because of somewhat different habits and size, different traps are intended for each pest. Both gopher traps and mole traps can be purchased at many hardware stores. There are also cultural and other methods of minimizing damage from both pocket gophers and moles. More information on preventing and stopping damage from pocket gophers, moles and other wildlife can be obtained from the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management: http://icwdm. org/ or contacting your Regional Extension Center. 10/16-18/2012 SDSU Extension Annual Conference, Brookings, SD 11/27-28/2012 Ag Horizons Conference, Pierre, SD Calendar

National 4-H week October 7-13


quarters, USDA within the Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service; 3,500 Cooperative Extension educators (called program advisors in SD) associated with 106 land-grant universities; National 4-H Council; 4-H associations and foundations; and trained youth and adult volunteers. This is how SDSU, South Dakotas only land grant university benefits the 4-H program. Youth learn leadership, citizenship and life skills through more than 1,000 projects with topics varied as public speaking, photography, community service, rocketry, livestock and graphic design. Learn by doing is the fundamental 4-H ideal. Youth are encouraged to experiment, innovate and think independently. 4-H programs are offered

4-H is one of the largest youth development programs in America with more than 6.5 million youth, ages five-19. It is the only development program with direct access to technological advances from university research. 4-H is operated and supported by a shared leadership of public and private partners including National 4-H Head-

*Up to $6,500 in Rebates

Closeouts on 2012 F-250 & F-350 Super Dutys

through community clubs, schoolbased, after- school and camp settings, and U.S. military installations worldwide. Studies show that 4-H members do better in school, are more motivated to help others, feel safe to try new things, achieve a sense of self-esteem, and develop lasting friendships. More than 60 million young people across American have been 4-H members since 4-H began in 1902. Famous alumni include Al Gore, Faith Hill and David Letterman. Also, 14 governors, 33 university presidents, 31 CEOs and four astronauts are 4-H alumni. Here is what Jacob Birkeland, area 4-H member, has to say about 4-H. Jacob Birkeland is 11 and this is his third year in 4-H. His favorite 4-H experience is being in Shooting Sports and competing at the State 4-H Shoot in Ft. Pierre. His two favorite project areas are Shooting Sports and Wood Science. Jacob says his dad was in 4-H and his favorite part of 4-H was going to club meetings and doing activities and projects with friends. Jacob says that 4-H is benefiting his community because his club does community service projects like the City Park/5th Street Cleanup Project and they have also planted trees by the North Dam and City Park. He states we try to do something to give back to our community. To encourage other families to get involved in 4H, Jacobs advice is 4-H is fun and you can learn a lot. You just need to get involved in 4-H. To find out more about the fun and learning experiences in 4-H, visit or call your local 4-H Youth Program Advisor at the 4-H office in the Jones Co. courthouse at 605.669.7101 or visit with a current 4-H leader or club member.

Western Jr. Livestock Show celebrates 75 years


In the last 45 years Jackie Maude hasn't missed a single Western Jr. Livestock show. She first attended the event as a 13-year-old 4-H member showing cattle. A few years later, she met her husband, Marion in the show ring. When their 4-H careers came to an end, the couple joined the ranks of volunteers to have organized Western Jr. Livestock Show for the last 75 years. October 10 to 13 Maude and her family will again turn out to help run the event which takes place in at the Central States Fair Grounds in Rapid City. Its a great show and has become a tradition for our family, said Maude, who ranches near Hermosa, S.D., with her husband and son, Charles and daughter, Elizabeth. Maude has been busy getting ready for the event since early May. She serves as secretary/manager of the Western Jr. Livestock Show. In this role, she collects entries, lines up judges, facilities and helps organize the more than 50 volunteers who put on the event. Peter Nielson, SDSU Extension 4-H Youth Program Director says it is volunteers like Maude that make the Western Jr. Livestock Show the premier event and a cornerstone in western South Dakota 4-H tradition. The Western Jr. Livestock Show blends the best of what volunteer management is within 4H, Nielson said. It is because of the efforts of volunteers and Extension professionals that this show celebrates such a rich history and bright future. During the four-day livestock show, more than 220 4-H members will compete in several showmanship and market and breeding shows for beef, sheep, swine and goats. They can also compete in livestock or meat judging contests. The 4-H members attending represent 44 counties in South Dakota, Wyoming and Nebraska. Like many who participate in Western Jr., Maude says her family has developed many lifelong friends through their involvement. Each year we look forward to seeing old friends and making new ones, she said. For many families, Western Jr. is their yearly vacation. I always tell people when they register for the first time that this is a friendly show. This year there will be several reunion events to celebrate the show's 75 years. A hog roast will be held October 11 in the evening. Also there will be an Alumni Showmanship Contest and an ice cream social with a short program to celebrate the Golden Diamond Anniversary of both the Western Jr. Livestock Show and Western 4H Family and Consumer Science Show on Friday evening. Former and current participants, sponsors and volunteers past and present are all invited to attend the celebration over the weekend. Alumni are encouraged to bring in previous exhibits, photos and memories to share and display over the weekend.

Murdo Ford
Murdo FordMercury 605-669-2391 Terry Van Dam 605-669-2918 Jim Butt 605-381-2007 Travis Van Dam 406-239-8020

www.murdo-ford.com

Local News Correspondent to write the Murdo local news column for the Murdo Coyote. Call 669.2271 if interested.

WANTED:

Vote Larry Lucas - Experienced Legislator

National Fire Prevention week: October 7-13

Fire prevention week focuses on planning safe escapes


National Fire Prevention Week is a good time for families to sit down and plan at least two ways to safely escape a burning structure, State Fire Marshal Paul Merriman says. National Fire Prevention Week is October 7-13, 2012. This years theme is Have 2 Ways Out. Merriman says the theme is a reminder that a good fire safety plan includes more than one exit strategy from a burning home. Fire can be unpredictable, and it moves more quickly than most people realize, Merriman said. Having an escape plan with at least two ways out is essential to protect your family in the event of a fire in your home. And the escape plan should be reviewed from time to time. Fire Prevention Week is a good time to do that. Statistics from the National Fire Protection Association say that in 2010, firefighters in the United States responded to nearly 370,000 home structure fires.

Those fires caused 13,350 civilian injuries and 2,640 civilian deaths, as well as $6.9 billion in direct damage. Merriman recommends a number of precautionary actions for families to take. They are as follows. Make a map of their home, marking each door or window that could be used as an exit from each room. Agree on a meeting place outside the home where family members can make contact after escaping from the house. Practice the plan at least twice a year, with everyone in the home involved in the practice. Make sure to have smoke alarms in the home and make sure the batteries are fresh. Firefighters in South Dakota do a great job. Fire Prevention Week is a time to recognize that, Merriman said. Its also a good time to remember that each of us is responsible for our own safety and the safety of our loved ones in the event of a fire.

For Feeding South Dakota YES on HB 1206 For Livestock Producers NO to tax straw used for bedding - HB 1116

IN 2012 REP LUCAS VOTED: For Local Control in our public schools NO on HB 1234 For Religious Freedom excluding mandated abortion coverage in health care plans - HB 1185

Breakfast Fundraiser
Saturday & Sunday, October 20 & 21 Pheasant Opener 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. ~ Ambulance Shed
(end of Main Street, Murdo)

Omelets Pancakes Country Style Potatoes Link Sausages

Stop by and see the new ambulance and enjoy breakfast!

the record and vote Lucas for District 26 Senate


Paid for by Lucas for Senate

Free-will donation with $5 minimum


The money raised will be put toward the new ambulance

The Clinical View


The lady was a 35-year old mother of three in the prime of her life and perfectly healthy. She had noticed over the past several days that her vision in her right eye was blurred and there seemed to be flashing lights in her right eye. She also noticed that the eye was somewhat sore and when she did her morning run, it became substantially more painful. She came to the clinic because of these symptoms. She was correctly diagnosed as having multiple sclerosis. She was started on a substantial dose of cortisone given intravenously and over a weeks time the condition improved and the symptoms resolved completely. She read about multiple sclerosis and came back with multiple questions and substantial anxiety about the prognosis of this diagnosis. She had read that 90 percent of patients that have multiple sclerosis will follow a so called relapsing-remitting course. The symptoms may recur at any given time after this first episode. It might not be for a year. It might not be for 4 years. The results of the relapse may leave some residual neurological deficit or it may completely remit as it did on this first episode. The over all course of multiple sclerosis is usually long A new treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

Murdo Coyote

Murdo Coyote October 11, 2012

Dr. P.E. Hoffsten


amounting to 20 years or more. But the hallmark of multiple sclerosis is its unpredictability in regard to how fast it will progress and how severe the neurological deficits will become. Obviously, this makes any treatment program that is offered very difficult to evaluate. It will require a large number of people followed for many years before one could make a meaningful comment regarding the effect that a treatment really made a difference. To this time, an acute episode such as the lady above had is best treated with cortisone as was done. But over many years time, the medical profession has searched for methods to prevent relapses that contribute to progression of the disease. Now it seems that perhaps there is a new quite unique and substantially more effective medication available to prevent relapses. This new product is called dimethyl fumarate. It is abbreviated as BG-12. There were 2 back to back articles that appeared in the New England Journal of Medicine for September 20th of 2012. Both articles showed that there was a substantial decrease in the incidence of relapses, that there were fewer abnormalities seen on the MRI scans of these peoples brains, and there was less neurologic loss following the relapse. These are

Jones County FSA News


David Klingberg
mation at 605-669-2404 Ext. 2.
CRP REMOVAL OF BALES EXTENDED TO NOVEMBER 15, 2012

Page 5

very favorable results. Fortunately, this product (BG-12) has been used for more than 30 years to treat psoriasis. As a matter of fact, it was incidentally found to be effective for multiple sclerosis by treating several patients that had both psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. It was noticed that when the psoriasis was treated with BG-12, their multiple sclerosis seemed to go into remission. The two large scale articles in the New England Journal of Medicine occurred 20 years later after a long collection of cases and follow up of many years time. This is another serendipitous observation by healthcare professionals caring for one disease and then a second disease seems to get better with response to the given medication. This product is not available to treat multiple sclerosis as approved by the FAA yet. But it is available to treat psoriasis. Some physicians are starting to use it for multiple sclerosis in light of its marked effectiveness and very low side effect profile. This is a calculated risk however and whether or not the long term effectiveness of BG-12 for multiple sclerosis will be upheld over 20 years is going to take another 20 years. Be that as it may, the situation appears very favorable at this time.

USDA Farm Service Agency's (FSA) Emergency Conservation Program (ECP) provides emergency funding and technical assistance for farmers and ranchers to rehabilitate farmland damaged by natural disasters and for carrying out emergency water conservation measures in periods of severe drought. Funding for ECP is appropriated by Congress which has not been approved at this time. ECP program participants receive cost-share assistance of up to 75 percent of the cost to implement approved emergency conservation practices, as determined by county FSA committees. As mentioned above, there is no funding for the ECP practices at this time. Filing an application is still the first step to get cost share for pipeline projects or reimbursed for water hauling completed this summer. Contact the Jones County FSA Office for additional infor-

JONES COUNTY IS APPROVED FOR EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM (ECP) SIGNUP ENDS 10/24/12

Due to continuing drought conditions, fire dangers, harvesting pressures, lack of hay movers, etc, an extension has been granted to remove bales from CRP acreages to November 15, 2012. When a crop is affected by a natural disaster, producers must notify the FSA office where their farm records are maintained and complete Part B, (the Notice of Loss portion) of Form CCC-576, Notice of Loss and Application for Payment. This must be completed within 15 calendar days of the natural disaster occurrence or the date the damage to the crop or loss of production became apparent. To receive NAP benefits, producers must complete Form CCC576, Notice of Loss and Applica2012 NAP NOTICE OF LOSS AND PRODUCTION

tion for Payment, Parts D, E, and F as applicable, and certify in Part G, no later than the immediately subsequent crop year acreage reporting date for the crop. The CCC-576 requires acceptable appraisal information. Producers must provide evidence of production and note whether the crop was marketable, unmarketable, salvaged or used differently than intended. Producers must annually provide (if not appraised) the quantity of all harvested production of the crop in which the producer held an interest during the crop year. We will be sending out the NAP Yields form which lists your acres and a spot for you to record your production. The deadline for reporting this production is not until July 15, 2013, but report the production now while the records are handy and newly calculated. Oct. 24: ECP Sign up deadline Nov. 15: 2013 acreage reporting date for all perennial forage and winter wheat Nov. 15: Deadline for CRP bales to be removed from CRP Feel free to call the office if you ever have questions on any of our programs 605-669-2404 Ext. 2.
DATES TO REMEMBER/DEADLINES:

South Dakota Lottery celebrates 25 years


While the South Dakota Lottery officially turned 25 years old on September 30, 2012, lottery officials commemorated the event with Governor Dennis Daugaard by posing for a photo on the State Capitol steps on September 28, 2012. Current members of the state Lottery Commission along with Lottery executive director Norm Lingle and Department of Revenue Secretary Andy Gerlach presented the Governor with a commemorative check for $2.13 billion, the amount raised by the Lottery for the State of South Dakota since it began selling tickets in 1987. Revenue raised through the sale of scratch tickets, lotto tickets and video lottery play helps fund education, lowers property taxes, and develops natural resources. For more information on the South Dakota Lotterys 25th Anniversary, visit the Lottery website at www.lottery.sd.gov or their Facebook page.

Heres your change! Leronda Bryan counts change back to Hannah Brost as Hannahs grandmother, Linda Brost looks on. Photos by Karlee Barnes

Pictured in the photo are: (Front Row) Andy Gerlach, Secretary, Department of Revenue; Governor Dennis Daugaard; Bob Hartford, Chairman, Lottery Commission; Norm Lingle, Executive Director, South Dakota Lottery. (Back Row) Kory Menken, Lottery Commission; Doyle Estes, Vice Chairman, Lottery Commission; Brent Dykstra, Lottery Commission; Jim Peterson, Lottery Commission; Roger Novotny, Lottery Commission; and Dick Werner, Lottery Commission.

Visiting with friends

local ladies catch up on visiting at the Draper Bazaar.

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the meal that the Draper Auxiliary provides for the bazaar, as well as to visit with friends and family.

Full house The 2012 Draper Bazaar was a success as people traveled far and wide to sample

Equal Housing Opportunity

now accepts credit cards. Call 605-669-2271 and pay your subscription or ad with your credit card.

Murdo Coyote

The

Fast & Easy!!

Murdo Coyote
Close game The Coyote defense works together to push a Wall Eagle ball carrier out of bounds in the first quarter of the October 5 game. The Coyotes put up a good fight, but lost the game after a late fourth quarter touchdown and two-point conversion by the Eagles. The ending score was 36-38, Wall. The Coyotes are in action again October 12 at home for parents night, where they will take on Lower Brule. Photo by Karlee Barnes

Murdo Coyote October 11, 2012

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What is good sportsmanship?


Good sportsmanship occurs when teammates, opponents, coaches and officials treat each other with respect. Kids learn the basics of sportsmanship from the adults in their lives, especially their parents and their coaches. Kids who see adults behaving in a sportsmanlike way gradually come to understand that the real winners in sports are those who know how to persevere and to behave with dignity whether they win or lose a game. Parents can help their kids understand that good sportsmanship includes both small gestures and heroic efforts. It starts with something as simple as shaking hands with opponents before a game and includes acknowledging good plays made by others and accepting bad calls gracefully. Displaying good sportsmanship is not always easy. It can be tough to congratulate the opposing team after losing a close or important game. But the kids who learn how to do it will benefit in many ways. Kids who bully or taunt others on the playing field are not likely to change their behavior when in the classroom or in social situations. In the same way, a child who practices good sportsmanship is likely to carry the respect and appreciation of other people into every other aspect of life. Good sports are winners. Ask first or second graders who won a game, and they may answer, I think it was a tie. It is likely the question is not of any real interest at that age. Kids may be more eager to talk about the hits they got or the catches they almost made. But as they move into older and more competitive leagues, kids become more focused on winning. They often forget to have fun. Without constant reminders and good examples, they may also forget what behavior is appropriate before, during and after a sporting event. Kids who have coaches who care only about being in first place and say that anything goes as long as they win, pick up the message that it is okay to be ruthless on the field. If parents constantly pressure them to play better or secondguess their every move, kids get the message that they are only as good as their last good play and they will try anything to make one. Adults who emphasize good sportsmanship, however, see winning as just one of several goals they would like their kids to achieve. They help young athletes take pride in their accomplishments and in their improving skills, so that the kids see themselves as winners, even if the scoreboard does not show the numbers going in their favor. The best coaches and parents encourage their kids to play fair, to have fun and to concentrate on helping the team while polishing their own skills. Fostering good sportsmanship. Remember the saying Actions speak louder than words? That is especially true when it comes to teaching your kids the basics of good sportsmanship. Your behavior during practices and games will influence them more than any pep talk or lecture you give them. Here are some suggestions on how to build sportsmanship in your kids: Unless you are coaching your childs team, you need to remember that you are the parent. Shout words of encouragement, not directions, from the sidelines (there is a difference). If you are your kid's coach, dont expect too much out of your own child. Dont be harder on him or her than on anyone else on the team, but dont play favorites either. Keep your comments positive. Do not bad-mouth coaches, players or game officials. If you have a serious concern about the way that games or practices are being conducted, or if you are upset about other parents behavior, discuss it privately with the coach or with a league official. After a competition, it is important not to dwell on who won or lost. Instead, try asking, How did you feel you did during the game? If your child feels weak at a particular skill, like throwing or catching, offer to work on it together before the next game. Applaud good plays no matter who makes them. Set a good example with your courteous behavior toward the parents of kids on the other team. Congratulate them when their kids win. Remember that it is your kids, not you, who are playing. Dont push them into a sport because it is what you enjoyed. As kids get older, let them choose what sports they want to play and decide the level of commitment they want to make. Keep your perspective. It is just a game. Even if the team loses every game of the season, it is unlikely to ruin your child's life or chances of success. Look for examples of good sportsmanship in professional athletes and point them out to your kids. Talk about the bad examples, too, and why they upset you. Finally, do not forget to have fun. Even if your child isnt the star, enjoy the game while you are thinking of all the benefits your child is gaining new skills, new friends, and attitudes that can help all through life. Reviewed by Steve Sanders, PhD.

Public Notices
2012 Constitutional Amendments
The following amendments to the State Constitution are submitted to the voters by the Legislature. The amendments will not become effective unless approved by majority vote. except in cases of impeachment, and members of the Legislature shall receive no other pay or perquisites except salary and mileage. majority vote.

Murdo Coyote October 11, 2012

Page 7

Referred Law 14
Title: An Act to establish the Large Project Development Fund. Attorney General Explanation: The referred law establishes the Large Project Development Fund. Beginning January 1, 2013, 22% of contractors excise tax revenues would be transferred from the state general fund to the Large Project Development Fund. The South Dakota Board of Economic Development would use Large Project Development Fund monies to provide grants for the construction of large economic development projects within the state. To be eligible, a project must have a cost exceeding $5 million. Examples of eligible projects include laboratories and facilities for testing, manufacturing, power generation, power transmission, agricultural processing, and wind energy. Examples of ineligible projects include retail establishments; residential housing; and facilities for lodging, health care services and the raising or feeding of livestock. A vote Yes is for the establishment of the Large Project Development Fund. A vote No is against the referred law. Full Text of Referred Law 14: Section 1. That 1-16G-1.2 be amended to read as follows: 1-16G-1.2. The Board of Economic Development may take title by foreclosure to any property given as security if the acquisition is necessary to protect any economic development grant or loan or any large project development grant made under pursuant to the provisions of this chapter, and may sell, transfer, or convey any such property to any responsible buyer. Any sale of property hereunder pursuant to the provisions of this chapter shall be performed in a commercially reasonable manner. If the sale, transfer, or conveyance cannot be effected with reasonable promptness, the board may, in order to prevent financial loss and sustain employment, lease the property to a responsible tenant or tenants. All sale proceeds or lease payments received by the board pursuant to this section shall be deposited in the fund from which the original grant or loan was made. Section 2. That 1-16G-8 be amended to read as follows: 1-16G-8. The Board of Economic Development shall promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 1-26 concerning the following: (1) The existing barriers to economic growth and development in the state; (2) Developing investment in research and development in high technology industries; (3) The submission of business plans prior to the approval of economic development grants or loans or large project development grants. Business plans shall include the products or services to be offered by the applicant, job descriptions with attendant salary or wage information by job category, educational requirements by job category, methods of accounting, financing other than that provided by the economic development grant or loan or a large project development grant, and marketing, sales, merchandising, and other disciplines proposed to be used for business growth and expansion; (4) The cooperation between agencies of state government and applicant businesses for nonfinancial services including loan packaging, marketing assistance, research assistance, and assistance with finding solutions for complying with environmental, energy, health, safety, and other federal, state, and local laws and regulations; (5) Regular performance monitoring and reporting systems for participating businesses to assure compliance with their business plans and, terms of repayment of an economic development loan and compliance with terms of an economic development grant or a large project development grant; (6) Establish eligibility criteria for grants and loans; (7) Establish application procedures for grants and loans, including a requirement that grant and loan applications be signed under penalty of perjury; (8) Establish criteria to determine which applicants will receive grants or loans; (9) Govern the use of proceeds of grants and loans; (10) Establish criteria for the terms and conditions upon which loans shall be made, including matching requirements, interest rates, repayment terms, and the terms of security given to secure such loans; and (11) Establish criteria for the terms and conditions upon which grants shall be made, including permitted uses, performance criteria, and matching requirements; and (12) Establish criteria for the terms and conditions upon which grants shall be repaid for noncompliance with the terms and conditions upon which the grant was made. Section 3. That 1-16G-16.1 amended to read as follows: be

Initiated Measure 15
Title: An initiated measure to increase state general sales and use taxes for additional K-12 public education and Medicaid funding Attorney General Explanation: The initiated measure increases the state general sales and use tax rate from 4% to 5%. The additional tax revenue will be split evenly between K-12 public education and Medicaid. The education funds will be provided to school districts based on enrollment, to be spent on improving education as school boards determine. The Medicaid funds will be spent only on payments to Medicaid providers and related state expenses. The additional funds cannot replace or reduce state funding levels set for fiscal year 2012 relating to existing Medicaid and K-12 public education programs, including state aid to education. Currently, state aid is to be adjusted annually by 3% or the rate of inflation, whichever is less. Under the measure, this annual adjustment cannot exceed the growth rate in state general fund revenues. Any resulting shortfall in state aid will be made up in subsequent years. A vote Yes is for the proposed law. A vote No is against the proposed law. Full Text of Initiated Measure 15: 1. Commencing January 1, 2013, twenty percent of the monies collected pursuant to the South Dakota sales and use taxes imposed by SDCL chapters 10-45 and 10-46 shall be placed in a special fund known as the Moving South Dakota Forward fund. The monies in the Moving South Dakota Forward fund shall be allocated into the following two subfunds within the Moving South Dakota Forward fund (1) fifty percent shall be allocated to the Moving K-12 Education Forward subfund; and (2) fifty percent shall be allocated to the Moving Healthcare Forward subfund. 2. Monies allocated in Section 1 of this initiated measure shall be disbursed as follows: (1) Monies in the Moving K-12 Education Forward sub-fund are continuously appropriated to the public school districts of South Dakota, to be distributed pro rata based upon each school districts relative share of fall enrollment as defined in SDCL chapter 13-13, compared to the fall enrollment of all school districts. Funds deposited in the Moving K-12 Education Forward subfund in the preceding calendar quarter shall be distributed, provided above, to the public school districts of South Dakota by the first business day of February, May, August, and November of each year, commencing May 1, 2013. Funds received by a school district form the Moving K-12 Education Forward subfund shall be used at the sole discretion of the public school districts governing board for the purpose of improving public education; (2) Eighty percent of the monies in the Moving Healthcare Forward subfund shall be spent only for the purpose of funding payments to providers to the South Dakota Medicaid program, which are incurred due to increases in expenses related to the reimbursement rates paid to service providers per unit of service in excess of such reimbursement rates in effect as of July 1, 2011; and (3) Twenty percent of the monies in the Moving Health Care Forward subfund shall be spent only for the purpose of funding expenses related to payments to providers to the South Dakota Medicaid Program, which are incurred due to increases in the case load volume experienced by the South Dakota Medicaid program from the case levels as of July 1, 2011. 3. No monies deposited in the Moving K12 Education Forward subfund may be spent in any way, either directly or indirectly, to reduce, supplant, or replace appropriations for any state K-12 education program in existence for state fiscal year 2012, including specifically the state aid to education and special education programs established in SDCL chapters 13-13 and 13-37. The per student allocation in SDCL chapter 13-13 and the per student allocation for each specified disability in SDCL chapter 13-37 shalll be adjusted by the annual application of their respective index factors, as set forth in SDCL subdivisions 13-13-10.1(3) and 13-37-35.1(6), as in effect on July 1, 2011. However, the index factor adjustment shall, in no case, exceed the actual percentage growth in state general fund revenues for the most recently completed fiscal year. If the percentage growth in state general fund revenues is less than the index factor sin any year, the difference shall be made up in the immediately following years to the extent the percentage growth in state general fund revenues exceeds the index factors. 4. No monies deposited in the Moving Health Care Forward subfund may be spent in any way, either directly or indirectly, to reduce, supplant, or replace state appropriations for any state Medicaid program in existence for state fiscal year 2012. 5. Effective January 1, 2013, any sales or use tax imposed at a rate of four percent by the provisions of SDCL chapters 10-45 or 10-46 are hereby increased by one percent each to a total rate of five percent each.

Constitutional Amendment O
Title: An Amendment to the South Dakota Constitution changing the method for distributions from the cement plant trust fund. Attorney General Explanation: In 2001, the $238 million in proceeds from the sale of the state cement plant were placed in a constitutionally created trust fund. Currently, the Constitution requires a yearly transfer of $12 million from the cement plant trust fund to the state general fund. In addition, under certain circumstances the Legislature must authorize distributions of cement plant trust fund earnings for the support of education. Amendment O replaces the existing method for cement trust fund distributions. The amendment would require a yearly transfer of 4% of the market value of the cement plant trust fund to the state general fund for the support of education. A vote Yes is for changing the method for distributions from the cement plant trust fund. A vote No will leave the Constitution as it is. Full Text of Constitutional Amendment O: That Article XIII, section 20 of the Constitution of the State of South Dakota, be amended to read as follows: 20. The net proceeds derived from the sale of state cement enterprises shall be deposited by the South Dakota Cement Commission in a trust fund hereby created to benefit the citizens of South Dakota. The South Dakota Investment Council or its successor shall invest the trust fund in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and other financial instruments as provided by law. Each fiscal year beginning in fiscal year 2001, a transfer of twelve million dollars shall be made from the trust fund to the state general fund as provided by law. That Article XIII, section 21 of the Constitution of the State of South Dakota, be amended to read as follows: 21. Except as provided in Article XIII, section 20 of the Constitution of the State of South Dakota, the original principal of the trust fund shall forever remain inviolate. However, the The Legislature shall, by appropriation, make distributions from the difference between the twelve million dollar annual general fund transfer and five percent of the market value of the trust fund for the support of education, but not for the replacement of state aid to general education or special education, if the increase in the market value of the trust fund in that fiscal year was sufficient to maintain the original principal of the trust fund after such distributions. Beginning with fiscal year 2006, the market value of the trust fund shall be determined by adding the market value of the trust fund at the end of the sixteen most recent calendar quarters, and dividing that sum by sixteen transfer from the trust fund to the state general fund four percent of the lesser of the average market value of the trust fund determined by adding the market value of the trust fund at the end of the sixteen most recent calendar quarters as of December thirtyfirst of that year and dividing that sum by sixteen, or the market value of the trust fund at the end of that calendar year for the support of education in South Dakota. The transfer shall be made prior to June thirtieth of the subsequent calendar year.

project development fund. Such costs may be incurred and paid up to ten percent of the loan or grant balance with a majority vote of the board of economic development. Costs in excess of ten percent shall be approved by a two-thirds vote of the board. Such services are not subject to state bid laws so long as such services are procured in a commercially acceptable manner. Section 4. That chapter 1-16G be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: Terms used in this Act Mean: (1) "Large project," a project with a total project cost exceeding five million dollars; and (2) "Project cost," the amount paid in money, credits, property, or other money's worth for a project. Section 5. That chapter 1-16G be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: For the purposes of this Act, the term, project, means a new building or structure or the expansion of an existing building or structure, the construction of which is subject to the contractor's excise tax imposed by chapters 10-46A or 10-46B. A project includes laboratory and testing facilities, manufacturing facilities, power generation facilities, power transmission facilities, agricultural processing facilities, and wind energy facilities. A project does not include any building or structure: (1) Used predominantly for the sale of products at retail, other than the sale of electricity at retail, to individual consumers; (2) Used predominantly for residential housing or transient lodging; (3) Used predominantly to provide health care services; (4) Constructed for raising or feeding of livestock; or (5) That is not subject to ad valorem real property taxation or equivalent taxes measured by gross receipts. Section 6. That chapter 1-16G be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: There is established in the state treasury a fund to be known as the large project development fund for the purpose of making grants for large project development. Section 7. That chapter 1-16G be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: The Board of Economic Development may make grants from the large project development fund for the purpose of promoting large project development in South Dakota. Section 8. That chapter 1-16G be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: All money in the fund is hereby appropriated for the purpose of making grants as provided in this Act. Any repayment of grants from the large project development fund and any interest thereon shall be receipted into the large project development fund. Section 9. That chapter 1-16G be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: The Board of Economic Development may accept and expend for the purposes of sections 6 and 7 of this Act, inclusive, any funds obtained from federal sources, gifts, contributions, or any source if such acceptance and expenditure is approved in accordance with 4-8B-10. Section 10. That chapter 1-16G be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: There is hereby continuously appropriated to the large project development fund the amount of twenty-two percent of all deposits into the general fund of the contractors' excise tax imposed by chapter 10-46A and the alternate contractors' excise tax imposed by chapter 10-46B. Transfers from the general fund to the large project development fund pursuant to this provision shall be made on a monthly basis by the Bureau of Finance and Management. Section 11. The provisions of section 10 of this Act are effective on January 1, 2013.

resulting in re-allocation of its merit bonus funds to other participating school districts. Fourth, the referred law mandates a uniform statewide system for evaluating teachers and principals, including a rating system. Fifth, the referred law eliminates state requirements for continuing contracts (tenure) for teachers who do not achieve tenure by July 1, 2016. School boards may, in their discretion, choose to offer continuing contracts to non-tenured teachers. A vote Yes is to enact the education reform act. A vote No is against the referred law. Full Text of Referred Law 16: Section 1. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: Beginning in the 2013-2014 academic year, there is hereby established the South Dakota critical teaching needs scholarship program. The purpose of the program is to encourage South Dakota's high school graduates to obtain their postsecondary education in South Dakota for teaching, to remain in the state upon completion of their education, and to contribute to the state and its citizens by working in a critical need teaching area. Section 2. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: The South Dakota critical teaching needs scholarship program shall be administered by the Critical Teaching Needs Scholarship Board which is hereby established. The board shall consist of five members appointed by the Governor for a term of five years, except that the initial appointments shall be for periods of one, two, three, four, and five years. A majority of the board shall be present either personally or by teleconference to constitute a quorum. The Department of Education shall provide necessary support services to the board. Section 3. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: From the total pool of applicants, the Critical Teaching Needs Scholarship Board shall award no more than one hundred critical teaching needs scholarships for each academic year. The board shall award scholarships based on the requirements of sections 5 and 6 of this Act, the filling of critical teaching needs areas, and other academic and personal characteristics of each applicant as determined by the board. Notwithstanding the provisions of this section, if the board rescinds a scholarship that has been awarded, the board may award the amount of the rescinded scholarship to an alternate. Section 4. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: All accredited South Dakota public and nonpublic postsecondary institutions which offer a baccalaureate degree in elementary or secondary education are eligible to participate in the scholarship program. Each institution may choose whether to participate in the program and may limit the number of scholarship recipients the institution will accept in each academic year. Section 5. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: In order to be eligible for a critical teaching needs scholarship, a student shall: (1) Agree, in writing, to stay in South Dakota and work in a critical teaching needs area for five years after graduation from a participating postsecondary institution; (2) Agree, through a promissory note, that failure to abide by the provisions of subdivision (1) will result in the scholarship being converted into an interest bearing loan; (3) Attend a participating South Dakota postsecondary institution as an undergraduate junior or senior and be accepted in an elementary or secondary education program at the institution that will prepare the student to work in a critical need teaching area; and (4) Be a United States citizen or lawful permanent resident. For purposes of subdivision (3), a junior is a student who has earned sixty credit hours prior to the beginning of the third year of instruction, and a senior is a student who has earned ninety credit hours prior to the fourth year of instruction. A student is eligible to participate in the South Dakota critical teaching needs scholarship program for the equivalent of two academic years (four consecutive spring and fall terms) or until the attainment of a baccalaureate degree in elementary or secondary education in a critical teaching needs area, whichever comes first. However, the Critical Teaching Needs Scholarship Board may grant exceptions to the continuous enrollment requirements for good cause. Scholarships are not provided for summer session students enrolled in traditional four year programs. Section 6. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: In addition to the eligibility criteria identified in section 5 of this Act, the Critical LEGALS CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

Constitutional Amendment M
Title: An Amendment to the South Dakota Constitution regarding certain provisions relating to corporations. Attorney General Explanation: The Constitution currently contains certain restrictions on the Legislatures authority to enact laws regarding corporations. For example, corporate directors must be elected by cumulative voting, in which a shareholder may choose to cast all votes for a single candidate or spread the votes among two or more candidates. Corporate stock or bonds may only be issued for money, labor or property received by the corporation. Corporate stock or debt may not be increased without prior notice to and consent of current stockholders. Constitutional Amendment M removes these restrictions, and allows the Legislature to: (1) authorize alternative methods of voting in elections for corporate directors; (2) expand the types of contributions a corporation may receive for the issuance of stock or bonds; and (3) establish procedures governing the increase of corporate stock or debt. A vote Yes will remove the constitutional restrictions. A vote No will leave the Constitution as it is. Full Text of Constitutional Amendment M: That Article XVII, section 1 of the Constitution of the State of South Dakota, be amended to read as follows: 1. No corporation shall be created or have its charter extended, changed or amended by special laws, except those for charitable, educational, penal or reformatory purposes, which are to be and remain under the patronage and control of the state; but the Legislature shall provide, by general laws, for the organization of all corporations hereafter to be created. The Legislature shall have the authority to enact laws governing the operation and dissolution of corporations. That Article XVII, section 5 of the Constitution of the State of South Dakota, be amended to read as follows: 5. In all elections for directors or managers of a corporation, each member or shareholder may cast the whole number of his votes for one candidate, or distribute them upon two or more candidates, as he may prefer votes in the manner consistent with laws enacted by the Legislature. That Article XVII, section 8 of the Constitution of the State of South Dakota, be amended to read as follows: 8. No corporation shall issue stocks or bonds except for money, labor done, or money or property actually received, or for the reasonable value of other contribution to the corporation; and all fictitious increase of stock or indebtedness shall be void. The stock and indebtedness of corporations shall not be increased except in pursuance of general law, nor without the consent of the persons holding the larger amount in value of the stock first obtained, at a meeting to be held after sixty days notice given in pursuance of law the manner consistent with laws enacted by the Legislature.

Constitutional Amendment N
Title: An Amendment to the South Dakota Constitution repealing certain reimbursement restrictions for travel by legislators to and from a legislative session. Attorney General Explanation: The Constitution fixes the mileage reimbursement rate for legislators at five cents per mile for their travel to and from a legislative session. Constitutional Amendment N repeals this constitutional limitation and allows legislator travel reimbursement to be set by the Legislature. A vote Yes will eliminate the fixed travel reimbursement rate. A vote No will leave the Constitution as it is. Full Text of Constitutional Amendment N: That Article III, section 6 of the Constitution of the State of South Dakota, be amended to read as follows: 6. The terms of office of the members of the Legislature shall be two years; they legislators shall receive for their services the salary fixed by law under the provisions of 2 of article XXI of this Constitution, and five cents for every mile of necessary travel in going to and returning from the place of meeting of the Legislature on the most usual route. No person may serve more than four consecutive terms or a total of eight consecutive years in the senate and more than four consecutive terms or a total of eight consecutive years in the house of representatives. However, this restriction does not apply to partial terms to which a legislator may be appointed. A regular session of the Legislature shall be held each year and shall not exceed forty legislative days, excluding Sundays, holidays and legislative recess,

Constitutional Amendment P
Title: An Amendment to the South Dakota Constitution adding balanced budget requirements. Attorney General Explanation: While the constitution currently restricts the State from incurring debt, it does not expressly require the State to have a balanced budget. Amendment P requires the Governor to propose a balanced budget. In addition, Amendment P prohibits legislative appropriations from exceeding anticipated revenues and existing available funds. The amendment is not intended to affect other constitutional provisions A vote Yes will include balanced budget requirements in the Constitution. A vote No will leave the Constitution as it is. Full Text of Constitutional Amendment P: That Article XII of the Constitution of the State of South Dakota, be amended by adding a NEW SECTION to read as follows: 7. The Governor shall propose a budget in which expenditures or appropriations may not exceed anticipated revenue and existing funds available for expenditure or appropriation. Appropriations by the Legislature may not exceed anticipated revenue and existing funds available for expenditure or appropriation. Nothing in this section is intended to limit, restrict, expand, modify, or otherwise affect any other provision of this Constitution, including Article XIII.

Referred Law 16
Title: An education reform act to establish a teacher scholarship program; create a program for math and science teacher bonuses; create a program for teacher merit bonuses; mandate a uniform teacher and principal evaluation system; and eliminate state requirements for teacher tenure. Attorney General Explanation: Referred Law 16 is an education reform act with five key components. First, it establishes a scholarship program for eligible college students who commit to teach in South Dakota in critical need subject areas. Second, the referred law creates a program to provide state-funded annual bonuses for eligible math and science teachers. Third, the referred law develops a separate Top Teachers bonus program. This program provides annual statefunded merit bonuses for up to 20% of each school districts full-time certified teachers, as awarded by the local school boards. Alternatively, a school board may enact its own program for teacher bonuses, using these state-provided funds. A school board may opt out of these merit bonus programs altogether,

2012 Initiated Measure


The following initiated measure was proposed by petition for submission to the voters. This initiated measure will not become effective unless approved by

2012 Referred Laws


The following laws were adopted by the Legislature and referred to the voters by petition. These laws will not become effective unless approved by majority vote.

1-16G-16.1. The Board of Economic Development may use the revolving economic development and initiative fund for the purpose of paying taxes and liens and for the procuring of legal services and other services necessary to protect, recover, maintain, and liquidate the assets of the revolving economic development and initiative fund and the large

Public Notices
LEGALS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 Teaching Needs Scholarship Board may require applicants to submit a written essay or other information by which to judge the academic and personal qualifications of the applicant. Section 7. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: The amount of the annual scholarship shall equal the tuition and generally applicable fees for thirty credit hours at a South Dakota public postsecondary institution as of July 1, 2013. The scholarship amount paid to a recipient attending a participating nonpublic postsecondary institution shall equal the amount paid to a recipient attending a public postsecondary institution. One-half of the annual scholarship shall be paid to public postsecondary institutions on behalf of eligible students there enrolled or directly to eligible students enrolled at nonpublic postsecondary institutions at the beginning of the fall semester, and the other half shall be paid at the beginning of the spring semester. If, in any year, the total funds available to fund the critical teaching needs scholarships are insufficient to permit each eligible recipient to receive the full amount provided in this section, the available moneys shall be prorated and distributed to each recipient in proportion to the entitlement contemplated by this section. The total amount of the scholarship may not exceed the amount stipulated in this section. Section 8. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: In order to maintain eligibility for the critical teaching needs scholarship program, a student shall: (1) Maintain a cumulative 2.8 grade point average on a 4.0 scale. The student shall complete consecutive spring and fall terms in order to remain eligible for continuation of the scholarship program from term to term; satisfactory academic (2) Make progress towards a degree by earning thirty credit hours per year; (3) Attend and graduate from a participating South Dakota postsecondary institution with an elementary or secondary education degree which qualifies the student to teach in a critical teaching needs area in South Dakota; and (4) Upon graduation, stay in South Dakota and teach in a critical teaching needs area for five years. If factors beyond the control of a student who has been awarded a critical teaching needs scholarship prevent the student from meeting any of the requirements in subdivisions (1) to (3), the Critical Teaching Needs Scholarship Board may temporarily waive the requirements of those subdivisions. The board may rescind a scholarship award if the student does not maintain eligibility as prescribed in those subdivisions. Failure to fulfill the requirements of subdivision (4) shall result in the critical teaching needs scholarship being converted into an interest bearing loan. The board shall set the rate of interest, as allowed by law. The five years of employment referenced in subdivision (4) shall be fulfilled consecutively unless the board waives this requirement for good cause, and the five years of employment may be fulfilled at more than one school district in South Dakota. Section 9. That chapter 13-55 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: The Department of Education may receive gifts, donations, grants, or endowments for the purposes of sections 1 to 8, inclusive, of this Act. Section 10. The Board of Education may promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 1-26 to define areas of critical teaching need for the purposes of sections 1 to 8, inclusive, of this Act, to establish application requirements for the critical teaching needs scholarship, and to further accomplish the purposes of sections 1 to 8, inclusive, of this Act. Section 11. Beginning in the 2014-2015 school year, there is hereby created the math and science teacher incentive program within the Department of Education to provide funds to public school districts for the purpose of providing rewards to attract certified teachers who teach in math and science subject areas in middle school and high school or who are certified with a math or science specialist endorsement which they are utilizing for any grade, kindergarten through twelve. By January 31, 2014, the South Dakota Board of Education shall promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 1-26 establishing which courses qualify as math and science courses for purposes of the program. For purposes of this Act, math and science courses are those courses established by the Board of Education pursuant to this section. For purposes of this Act, middle school is a school consisting of any combination of two or more consecutive grades, five to eight, inclusive, and high school is a school consisting of any combination of three or more consecutive grades, including ninth grade to twelfth grade, inclusive. Section 12. Participation in the math and science teacher incentive program is voluntary for teachers, and incentive rewards are to supplement but not replace what a teacher receives under a contract between the teacher and the school district or a collective bargaining agreement between a district and the district's teachers. No collective bargaining agreement between a district and the district's teachers may limit the ability of a teacher to qualify for or receive an incentive reward. Nothing in sections 11 to 16, inclusive, of this Act is intended to create a contractual right or property right in the math and science teacher incentive program. Section 13. The Department of Education shall provide application forms for teachers wishing to participate in the math and science teacher incentive program. A teacher wishing to participate in the program shall complete and sign the form and provide the form to the business office of the school district by the close of business on October first to be eligible for the program for that school year. A teacher wishing to participate shall submit a new application for each school year. Completed applications are a public record pursuant to chapter 1-27, but personal information in the applications may be redacted as allowed by that chapter. Section 14. To be eligible for the math and science teacher incentive program, a teacher shall fulfill the following requirements: (1) Comply with section 13 of this Act; (2) Receive a distinguished rating or proficient rating, as referenced in section 38 of this Act, on the teacher's most recent evaluation; (3) Teach math or science courses in middle school or high school for at least fifty percent of a full-time equivalent position's assignments submitted in the annual teacher data collection pursuant to 13-3-51, and any rules promulgated pursuant thereto, and be currently certified with a middle school or high school endorsement to teach each course, or utilize a math or science specialist endorsement for any grade, kindergarten through twelve; and (4) Be in full-time status for the entire school year. Nothing in subdivision (3) shall entitle any teacher to receive more than the amount stipulated in section 16 of this Act. Section 15. By September first of each year, the school board of each district shall submit to the Department of Education a copy of the application of each teacher eligible for the math and science teacher incentive program for the previous school year pursuant to the requirements of this Act. The Department of Education may require additional information from the district as necessary to verify each teacher's eligibility for the reward. The department may refuse to issue a reward for any teacher for whom the information required by this section is not provided by the deadline. Section 16. The amount of the reward under the math and science teacher incentive program is two thousand eight hundred fifty dollars per eligible teacher to be distributed as described in this section. No later than October first of each year, at the same time that foundation program state aid is distributed to school districts pursuant to 13-13-10.1 to 13-13-41, inclusive, the secretary of the Department of Education shall distribute funds for the math and science teacher incentive program for teachers that qualify pursuant to this Act. These funds shall be distributed in lump sum payments. Subject to the requirements of this Act, the department shall pay to the school district two thousand eight hundred fifty dollars per eligible teacher in that district. Within thirty days of receipt from the department, the school district shall distribute the funds as follows: (1) Two thousand five hundred dollars shall be paid to each eligible teacher in the district; and (2) Three hundred fifty dollars may be retained by the district to pay the district's share of applicable federal taxes, the district's share of contribution to the South Dakota Retirement System, and administrative costs. Section 17. Beginning in the 2014-2015 school year, there is hereby created the top teachers reward program within the Department of Education to provide funds to public school districts for the purpose of providing top teacher rewards for certified teachers. Section 18. Participation in the top teachers reward program is voluntary for teachers, and such rewards shall supplement but not replace what a teacher receives under a contract between the teacher and the school district or a collective bargaining agreement between a district and the district's teachers. No collective bargaining agreement between a district and the district's teachers may limit the ability of a teacher to qualify for or receive a top teacher reward. Nothing in sections 17 to 25, inclusive, of this Act is intended to create a contractual right or property right in the top teachers reward program. Section 19. In each school year, up to twenty percent of each school district's full-time equivalent certified teaching positions, as measured by the district's annual teacher data collection pursuant to 13-3-51 and any rules promulgated pursuant to that section, shall be eligible to receive a top teacher reward, subject to the requirements of this Act. The Department of Education shall multiply the number of full-time equivalent certified teaching positions in the district by twenty percent. If this calculation results in a fraction, the maximum number of eligible positions may not exceed the next lowest whole number. If there are fewer than five full-time equivalent certified teaching positions in a school district, the maximum number of eligible positions shall be one. Section 20. No later than May first of each year, at the same time that foundation program state aid is distributed to a school district pursuant to 13-13-10.1 to 13-13-41, inclusive, the secretary of the Department of Education shall inform each school district of the number of eligible positions in that district for the current school year, based on the calculation in section 19 of this Act, and distribute to each school district five thousand seven hundred dollars per eligible position. These funds shall be distributed in lump sum payments. The school district shall retain these funds until distribution pursuant to section 21 of this Act. Section 21. No later than September first of each year, the school district shall distribute the funds received pursuant to section 20 of this Act as follows: (1) Five thousand dollars shall be paid to each teacher selected for a top teacher reward pursuant to section 24 of this Act for the previous school year; and (2) Seven hundred dollars may be retained by the district to pay the district's share of applicable federal taxes, the district's share of contribution to the South Dakota Retirement System, and administrative costs. Any funds received pursuant to section 20 of this Act which are not distributed according to this section shall be returned to the Department of Education within thirty days. Section 22. The Department of Education shall provide application forms for teachers wishing to participate in the top teachers reward program. A teacher wishing to participate in the program shall complete and sign the form and provide the form to the business office of the school district by the close of business on October first to be eligible for the program for that school year. A teacher wishing to participate shall submit a new application for each school year. Completed applications are a public record pursuant to chapter 1-27, but personal information in the applications may be redacted pursuant to that chapter. Section 23. A participating teacher shall be full-time and receive a distinguished rating, as referenced in section 38 of this Act, on the teacher's most recent evaluation to be eligible for a top teacher reward. In addition, a distinguished teacher's selection for the reward may be based on consideration of the following factors as determined by the school board: 1) Mentoring of less experienced teachers; (2) Curriculum development; (3) Assessment development; (4) Data analysis; (5) Service to the local district, state, or national committees or task forces; (6) Leadership in a professional learning community; (7) National board certification; (8) Other leadership activities or recognitions; and (9) Other additional criteria as determined by the school board. Section 24. No later than August first of each year, the school board of each school district shall determine which participating teachers, if any, are selected to receive top teacher rewards for the previous school year according to the criteria in section 23 of this Act. The number of teachers selected may not exceed the number of eligible positions referenced in sections 19 and 20 of this Act. Section 25. Department of Education may require each school district to provide any information necessary to verify the district's compliance with sections 20 to 24, inclusive, of this Act. Upon a finding of noncompliance, the department may require the district to return any funds distributed contrary to the requirements of this Act. Section 26. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this Act, public school districts may opt out of the top teacher reward program by providing written notice to the Department of Education. The notice shall be approved by a majority of the school board and signed by the school board president. The department shall provide forms for this purpose. Beginning in 2014, the notice shall be postmarked no earlier than January first, and no later than January thirty-first, of each year in order to be effective for the next school year. The district shall provide a separate form for each school year for which the district desires to opt out. If a school district fails to follow the requirements of this section, the attempt to opt out is void, and the district shall comply with the requirements of the top teacher reward program. If a district opts out pursuant to this section, the teachers employed in the district are not eligible to participate in the top teacher reward program. The district shall provide written notice to each certified teacher of the teacher's ineligibility for the program before executing a teaching contract with the teacher for the school year for which the opt out is effective. School districts may not opt out of the math and science teacher incentive program established pursuant to this Act. Section 27. If a school district opts out pursuant to section 26 of this Act, all funds which the district would have been eligible to receive for the top teacher program pursuant to this Act shall be redistributed as follows: (1) To obtain the redistribution amount, the Department of Education shall calculate the number of positions that would have been eligible for the top teacher reward program in each opt out district pursuant to section 19 of this Act, and multiply that calculation by five thousand seven hundred dollars; (2) No later than May first of each year, at the same time that foundation program state aid is distributed to a school district pursuant to 13-13-10.1 to 1313-41, inclusive, the department shall allocate the redistribution amount, on a pro rata basis, to each public school district that did not opt out of the top teacher reward program or is participating in a local teacher reward program pursuant to sections 28 to 35, inclusive, of this Act. Each district's pro rata share of the redistribution amount shall be based on the number of full-time equivalent certified teacher positions in the district, as measured by the district's annual teacher data collection pursuant to 13-3-51 and any rules promulgated pursuant to that section; and (3) No later than September first of each year, the redistribution amount received by each district pursuant to subdivision (2) shall be distributed equally among all teachers receiving top teacher rewards in the district pursuant to sections 17 to 25, inclusive, of this Act, or among all teachers receiving local teacher rewards pursuant to sections 28 to 35, inclusive, of this Act, but each district may withhold an amount necessary to pay the district's share of applicable federal taxes, the district's share of contributions to the South Dakota Retirement System, and administrative costs. Any funds not distributed according to this subdivision shall be returned to the Department of Education within thirty days. Section 28. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, a public school district may create a local teacher reward plan to act as a substitute for the top teacher reward program beginning in the 2014-2015 school year. If the local teacher reward plan is developed in compliance with sections 28 to 35, inclusive, of this Act, the district may utilize the local teacher reward plan to provide the district with the flexibility to use the funds that would otherwise be provided to the district through the top teachers reward program. Participation in the local teacher reward plan is voluntary. Rewards shall supplement but not replace what a teacher receives under a contract between the teacher and the school district or a collective bargaining agreement between a district and the district's teachers. No collective bargaining agreement between a district and the district's teachers may limit the ability of a teacher to qualify for or receive a local teacher reward. Nothing in sections 28 to 35, inclusive, of this Act, is intended to create a contractual right or property right in local teacher rewards. Teachers in the district may not participate in the top teacher reward program for any school year for which the district has adopted a local teacher reward plan. The district shall provide written notice to each certified teacher of the teacher's ineligibility for the top teacher reward program and provide a copy of the district's local teacher reward plan to each certified teacher before executing a teaching contract with the teacher for the school year for which the local teacher reward plan is effective. Section 29. The local teacher reward plan shall reward certified teachers in the district based upon one or more of the following criteria: (1) Demonstrating an impact on student achievement; (2) Demonstrating teacher leadership; or (3) Market based needs of the school district based upon critical teaching area needs of the school district. Section 30. There is hereby established the Local Teacher Reward Plan Advisory Council. The council shall provide input in developing one or more model local teacher reward plan applications based upon the criteria in section 29 of this Act. The work group shall be appointed by the secretary of education and consist of the following members: (1) A combination of six principals and superintendents: two from an elementary school, two from a middle school, and two from a high school; (2) Six teachers: two from an elementary school, two from a middle school, and two from a high school; and (3) Three school board members: one from a small school district, one from a medium-sized school district, and one from a large school district. Section 31. The Board of Education shall promulgate rules, pursuant to chapter 1-26, establishing the application form for the local teacher reward plan, further guidelines for district applications based on the criteria in section 29 of this Act, a system to monitor whether each participating school district is complying with the local teacher reward plan, and penalties for noncompliance. Section 32. There is hereby established the Local Teacher Reward Plan Oversight Board. The board shall consist of the following members: (1) One member of the Senate appointed by the president pro tempore of the Senate; (2) One member of the House of Representatives appointed by the speaker of the House of Representatives; (3) Two representatives of the business community appointed by the Governor; (4) One representative of an educational association appointed by the Governor; (5) One current or former teacher appointed by the Governor; and (6) The secretary of the Department of Education. Section 33. A school district shall submit the local teacher reward plan application to the Department of Education no later than January thirty-first of each year, beginning in 2014, to be eligible to apply the local teacher reward plan to the upcoming school year. By March fifteenth of each year, the Local Teacher Reward Plan Oversight

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Board shall review all applications to determine compliance with this Act, and any rules promulgated thereto. The board may request additional information from the district as part of the review of the application. By April first of each year, the board shall inform each district whether the district's local teacher reward plan has been approved for the upcoming school year. If the application is denied, the district may adopt a model plan established pursuant to section 30 of this Act or opt out pursuant to sections 26 and 27 of this Act. Section 34. If a district's local teacher reward plan is approved, the Department of Education shall calculate the number of positions in the district that would have been eligible for the top teacher reward program pursuant to section 19 of this Act and multiply that calculation by five thousand seven hundred dollars. No later than May first of each year, at the same time that foundation program state aid is distributed to the district pursuant to 13-13-10.1 to 13-13-41, inclusive, the secretary of the Department of Education shall distribute this amount to the district in a lump sum payment. Section 35. No later than September first of each year, the district shall distribute the funds received pursuant to section 34 of this Act to each certified teacher selected for a reward under the local teacher reward program for the previous school year, but the district may withhold an amount necessary to pay the district's share of applicable federal taxes, the district's share of contributions to the South Dakota Retirement System, and administrative costs. Any funds not distributed according to this section shall be returned to the Department of Education within thirty days. Section 36. A teacher may apply for both the math and science teacher incentive program and the top teachers reward program established pursuant to this Act or both the math and science teacher incentive program and the local teacher reward plan established pursuant to this Act. Section 37. That 13-42-34 be amended to read as follows: 13-42-34. Any public school district seeking state accreditation shall evaluate the performance of each certified teacher in years one through to three, inclusive, not less than annually, and each certified teacher in the fourth contract year or beyond, not less than every other year. Each For the 2012-2013 school year and the 2013-2014 school year, each school district shall may adopt procedures for evaluating the performance of certified teachers employed by the school district that: (1) Are based on the minimum professional performance standards established by the Board of Education pursuant to 13-42-33; (2) Require multiple measures; (3) Serve as the basis for programs to increase professional growth and development of certified teachers; and (4) Include a plan of assistance for any certified teacher, who is in the fourth or subsequent year of teaching, and whose performance does not meet the school district's performance standards. Section 38. That 13-42-34 be amended to read as follows: 13-42-34. Any public school district seeking state accreditation shall evaluate the performance of each certified teacher in years one through three not less than annually, and each certified teacher in the fourth contract year or beyond, not less than every other year. Beginning in the 2014-2015 school year, each certified teacher shall be evaluated on an annual basis. Each school district shall adopt the model evaluation instrument required by section 40 of this Act and procedures for evaluating the performance of certified teachers employed by the school district that: (1) Are based on the minimum professional performance standards established by the Board of Education pursuant to 13-42-33; (2) Require multiple measures of performance as follows: (a) Fifty percent of the evaluation of a teacher shall be based on quantitative measures of student growth, based on a single year or multiple years of data. This quantitative data shall be based on reports of student performance on state validated assessments established pursuant to 13-3-55. For those teachers in grades and subjects for which there is no state-validated assessment for the quantitative portion of the evaluation, teachers shall demonstrate success in improving student achievement using objective measures, which can include portfolio assessments, end-of-course exams, or other district approved assessments which demonstrate student growth; and (b) Fifty percent of the evaluation of a teacher shall be based on qualitative, observable, evidence-based characteristics of good teaching and classroom practices as further defined in the model evaluation instrument referenced in section 40 of this Act. Districts may collect additional evidence using any of the following if not required by the model evaluation instrument: (i) Classroom drop-ins; (ii) Parent surveys; (iii) Student surveys; (iv) Portfolios; or (v) Peer review; (3) Serve as the basis for programs to

increase professional growth and development of certified teachers; and (4) Include a plan of assistance for any certified teacher, who is in the fourth or subsequent year of teaching, and whose performance does not meet the school district's performance standards; and (5) Are based on the following four-tier rating system: (a) Distinguished; (b) Proficient; (c) Basic; and (d) Unsatisfactory. Section 39. The provisions of section 38 of this Act are effective July 1, 2014. Section 40. That 13-42-35 be amended to read as follows: 13-42-35. A work group appointed by the secretary of education shall provide input in developing the standards for defining the four-tier rating system required by section 38 of this Act and shall develop in developing a model evaluation instrument that may shall be used by school districts for the 20142015 school year and subsequent school years. The work group shall consist of the following members: (1) Six teachers: two from an elementary school, two from a middle school, and two from a high school; (2) Three principals: one from an elementary school, one from a middle school, and one from a high school; (3) Two superintendents; (4) Two school board members; (5) Four parents who have students in various levels of the K-12 system: (6) One representative of the South Dakota Education Association; (7) One representative of the School Administrators of South Dakota; and (8) One representative of the Associated School Boards of South Dakota. Section 41. That chapter 13-42 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: Pursuant to chapter 1-26, the South Dakota Board of Education shall promulgate rules establishing standards for defining the four-tier rating system required by section 38 of this Act and adopting the model evaluation instrument referenced in section 40 of this Act. Section 42. That chapter 3-18 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: Beginning with the 2014-2015 school year, the procedures for evaluation and the model evaluation instrument referenced in sections 38 to 41, inclusive, of this Act may not be the subject of any collective bargaining agreement between a district and the district's teachers. Section 43. The Board of Education shall promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 1-26 to establish minimum professional performance standards for certified principals in South Dakota public schools, and to establish best practices for the evaluation of the performance of certified principals that shall be used by individual school districts. The South Dakota Board of Education shall promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 1-26 establishing standards for defining the four-tier rating system required by section 44 of this Act and adopting the model evaluation instrument referenced in section 45 of this Act. Section 44. Beginning in the 2014-2015 school year, any public school district seeking state accreditation shall evaluate the performance of each certified principal not less than every other year. Each school district shall adopt the model evaluation instrument required by section 45 of this Act and procedures for evaluating the performance of certified principals employed by the school district that: (1) Are based on the minimum professional performance standards established by the Board of Education pursuant to section 43 of this Act; (2) Require multiple measures of performance; (3) Serve as the basis for programs to increase professional growth and development of certified principals; (4) Include a plan of assistance for any certified principal whose performance does not meet the school district's performance standards; and (5) Are based on the following four-tier rating system: (a) Distinguished; (b) Proficient; (c) Basic; and (d) Unsatisfactory. Section 45. A work group appointed by the secretary of education shall provide input in developing the standards referenced in section 43 of this Act, the fourtier rating system required by section 44 of this Act, and in developing a model instrument for principal evaluation that shall be used by school districts for the 2014-2015 school year and each school year thereafter. The work group shall consist of the following members: LEGALS CONTINUED ON PAGE 9

Public Notices
LEGALS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 (1) Six principals: two from an elementary school, two from a middle school, and two from a high school; (2) Three teachers: one from an elementary school, one from a middle school, and one from a high school; (3) Two superintendents; (4) Two school board members; (5) Four parents who have students in various levels of the K-12 system; (6) One representative of the South Dakota Education Association; (7) One representative of the School Administrators of South Dakota; and (8) One representative of the Associated School Boards of South Dakota. Section 46. All persons conducting teacher or principal evaluations required by sections 38 to 45, inclusive, of this Act shall participate in training conducted by the Department of Education before conducting the evaluations. Section 47. That chapter 13-43 be amended by adding thereto a NEW SECTION to read as follows: For purposes of this chapter, the term, tenured teacher, means a teacher who is in or beyond the fourth consecutive term of employment as a teacher with the school district prior to July 1, 2016. If, prior to July 1, 2016, the school district and the teacher have entered into a contract pursuant to 13-43-4 and 13-435 for the teacher's fourth consecutive term of employment with the district or a subsequent consecutive term of employment with the district, then that teacher is a tenured teacher for purposes of this chapter. The term, nontenured teacher, means a teacher who is not yet in or beyond the fourth consecutive term of employment as a teacher with the school district prior to July 1, 2016. Any teacher who is not in or beyond the fourth consecutive term of employment with the school district prior to July 1, 2016, need not acquire continuing contract status under this chapter. Nothing in this section or section 53 of this Act prohibits a school district from choosing to provide continuing contract to a nontenured teacher beyond what is provided for in this chapter. Section 48. That 13-43-6 be amended to read as follows: 13-43-6. The contract shall specify the date at or about which the school shall begin, the term of employment, the wages per month, and the time of payment thereof; such of wages. The contract shall be signed in duplicate and one copy filed in the office of the business manager and the other retained by the teacher. Such The contract may be issued covering any period of years, not to exceed three employment up to one year, over which a teacher holds a certificate which will shall remain valid without renewal. Section 49. That 13-43-6.1 amended to read as follows: be Section 56. That repealed. 13-3-74 be utive officer shall notify the tenured teacher and the school board in writing of the recommendation to not renew the teacher's contract. Acceptance by the a tenured or nontenured teacher of an offer from the district to enter into a new contract with the teacher shall be in the manner specified in the offer. Failure of the teacher to accept the offer in the manner specified constitutes the termination of the existing contract between the teacher and the district at the end of its term. Section 52. That 13-43-6.4 amended to read as follows: be trict is complying with the plan as submitted to the board. Section 61. That repealed. 13-3-83.1 be

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Proceedings of the Jones County Commissioners


Regular Session October 2, 2012 The Board of Commissioners met for a regular meeting with Monte Anker, Helen Louder and Pressler Seymour present. Chairman Louder called the meeting to order. Minutes from the previous meeting were read, signed and approved by the Board. All motions are unanimous unless otherwise stated. CLAIMS APPROVED: Salaries of regular employees and officials, $13,263.58; Debra J. Byrd, Deputy Treasurer, $887.97; Travis Hendricks, Weed Board Supervisor, $141.52; Joyce Hurst, Deputy Register of Deeds, Deputy Director of Equalization, $1,877.36; Richard Sylva, Jr., Deputy Sheriff, $1,065.04; Jill Venard, 4-H office staff, $827.49; Kerri Venard, Deputy Auditor/Road Secretary, $1,893.44; American Family Life Assurance, cancer & intensive care insurance, $364.41; Boston Mutual Life Insurance, life insurance, $168.64; Dakotacare, group health insurance, $12,632.92; Electronic Federal Tax Payment System, social security & withholding, $7,992.24; SD Retirement, retirement, $4,285.95; AT&T Mobility, cell phone bill, $176.07; Best Western of Huron, State Fair lodging, $147.00; Brimark Inn, convention lodging, $300.00; City of Murdo, water bill, $308.74; Corkys Auto Supply, supplies, $37.13; Election Systems & Software, General Election ballots and coding, $235.04; Farmers Union Oil Company, gas, $491.19; Golden West Telecommunications, phone bill, $511.99; Heartland Waste, 2 months garbage removal, $100.00; Inmans Water Technologies, R.O. rent, $21.30; Lexis Nexis (Matthew Bender), SDCL court rules, $64.99; McLeods Printing & Office Supply, tax notices, $82.70; Murdo Coyote, publications, $143.09; Murdo Family Foods, supplies, $9.16; National Association of Counties (NACO), dues, $400.00; Noble Ink & Toner, ink cartridge, $32.99; Office Products Center, office supplies, $18.98; Postmaster, stamps, $110.00; Rough Country Spraying, equipment rental and mileage, $278.07; Rural Health Care, subsidy, $500.00; Schmidt, Schroyer, Moreno, Lee & Bachand, P.C., QMHP evaluation, $11.35; Kerri Venard, postage reimbursement, $7.59; Terri Volmer, mileage, meal reimbursement, $227.04; Carrie Weller, Jones Countys share of August expenses, $132.24 and September expenses, $161.23; West Central Electric, electricity, $807.43. ROAD & BRIDGE: All Pro Towing & Repair, LLC, batteries, $409.90; AT&T, cell phone bill, $136.01; City of Murdo, water bill, $16.12; Corkys Auto Supply, supplies, $206.11; Farmers Union Oil Company, tire repair, gas, diesel, $12,513.12; General Equipment & Supplies, Inc., parts, $710.59; Golden West Telecommunications, phone bill, $32.56; Grossenburg Implement, parts, $528.41; Hullinger Brothers Murdo Amoco, gas, $463.34; Keiths Repair, supplies, $14.00; Morris, Inc., square tubing, $11.26; Murdo Family Foods, supplies, $10.49; Powerplan, repair loader, $1,003.62; Bruce Royer, parts, $108.10; Sheehan Mack, parts, $107.29; West Central Electric, electricity, $117.08; W.W. Tire, tires & tubes, $583.26; Ronnie Lebeda, labor, $2,378.91; John Feddersen, seasonal, $114.13; Melvin Feddersen, part-time labor, $1,879.25; Milton Feddersen, part-time labor, $1,022.97; Chester McKenzie, labor, $1,573.76; Levi Newsam, labor, $2,498.97. CARE OF THE POOR: Cheryl Iversen, WIC Secretary, $83.63. 911 FUND: Centurylink, monthly charge, $84.16. SALARY & MILEAGE: Monte Anker, $396.27, mileage, $8.88; Helen Louder, $372.19, mileage, $14.80; Pressler Seymour, $396.27, mileage, $162.80. FEES COLLECTED FOR THE COUNTY: Clerk of Courts, $286.60; Register of Deeds, $1,266.19; Sheriff, $171.60. Auditors account with the treasurer is as follows: Cash, $500.00; Checking & Savings, $478,120.18; CDs, $1,294,791.65; TOTALING: $1,773,411.83. Terri Volmers building permit report for September- 3. Members of the Jones County Sportsmans Club, Mike McKernan, Lawrence Roghair and Greg Miller, met with the Board to ask if Jones County would sell some land in the area of the old ambulance shed rather than a 99-year lease. The club will have that area surveyed and then discuss it further with the Board. Rob Fines, consultant for Northern Tier Consulting, LLC, and Nicole Prince,

13-43-6.4. Notwithstanding 13-436.1 to 13-43-6.2 and 13-43-6.3, inclusive, if a teacher's contract is not renewed due to a reduction in staff, only written notice is required, which shall be provided by the school board to the teacher by April fifteenth. Section 53. That 13-43-6.6 amended to read as follows: be

13-3-83.1. Once all the school districts with approved applications have received their funding pursuant to 133-73, the Department of Education may set aside from any funds remaining, a sum not to exceed one hundred thousand dollars from the teacher compensation assistance program appropriation for the purpose of providing grants to educational cooperatives and multi-district centers that employ teachers for public schools. The South Dakota Board of Education may promulgate rules, pursuant to chapter 1-26, to establish the granting process. Section 62. The following groups shall, no later than January 15, 2013, provide a progress report to the Legislature outlining the work accomplished: (1) The Critical Teaching Needs Scholarship Board, established in section 2 of this Act; (2) The Local Teacher Reward Plan Advisory Council established in section 30 of this Act; (3) The Local Teacher Reward Plan Oversight Board established in section 32 of this Act; (4) The teacher evaluation work group appointed pursuant to section 40 of this Act; and (5) The principal evaluation work group appointed pursuant to section 45 of this Act. Section 63. Sections 47 to 53, inclusive, of this Act are effective on July 1, 2016. Section 64. There is hereby established the South Dakota Education Reform Advisory Council. The council shall advise upon the implementation of this Act, and shall examine further education reform issues including: (1) The advantages and disadvantages of initiatives designed to provide for increased compensation for teachers; (2) Future teaching areas of critical need, and solutions to recruit, retain, and train teachers in these critical need areas; and (3) Other ideas to improve student achievement. The council shall report its initial findings to the Legislature and the Governor no later than December 1, 2012. Section 65. The South Dakota Education Reform Advisory Council established in section 64 of this Act shall consist of the following members: (1) Three members of the Senate, including at least one member of each political party, appointed by the president pro tempore of the Senate; (2) Three members of the House of Representatives, including a member of each political party, appointed by the speaker of the House; (3) The secretary of the Department of Education, who will serve as chair; (4) Three superintendents, jointly appointed by the president pro tempore of the Senate and the speaker of the House; (5) Three principals, one each from an elementary school, a middle school, and a high school, jointly appointed by the president pro tempore of the Senate and the speaker of the House; (6) Five teachers, jointly appointed by the president pro tempore of the Senate and the speaker of the House; (7) Three school board members, jointly appointed by the president pro tempore of the Senate and the speaker of the House; (8) One member of the Board of Regents, selected by the board; (9) One representative of the postsecondary technical institutes, selected by the presidents of the respective institutions; (10) One representative selected by the School Administrators of South Dakota; (11) One representative selected by the South Dakota Education Association; and (12) One representative selected by the Associated School Boards of South Dakota. Published October 11, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $760.63.

State Hazard Mitigation Officer, met with the Board to discuss the development of a Pre-Disaster Mitigation Plan to result in a FEMA-approval Plan that will meet the requirements of 44 CFR Part 201. As a result of this discussion, it was moved by Seymour and seconded by Louder to approve and for the Chairman to sign the contract with Northern Tier Consulting, LLC, to develop a new PDM plan for Jones County. The plan helps Jones County and its residents with FEMA disasters (flood-fire-tornadoes, etc). Upon a request from TransCanada for zoning changes in use for two pipe yards and one contractor yard, it was moved by Anker and seconded by Louder to make temporary zoning changes from Agricultural to Commercial for these purposes. All three sites will return to original use when the pipeline construction is complete. Legal descriptions and site locations are on file at the Auditors office. At the request of Golden West Telecommunications, it was moved by Anker and seconded by Louder to approve and for the Chairman to sign a right-of-way permit for Golden West to lay a cable for a cell tower in Westover Township. It was moved by Seymour and seconded by Anker to enter into executive session to discuss personnel. Executive session lasted for ten minutes. It was moved and carried to adjourn. Helen Louder, Chairman Monte Anker, Member Pressler S. Seymour, Member ATTEST: John Brunskill, County Auditor Published October 11, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $62.06.

Voter registration for the General Election to be held on November 6, 2012, will close on October 22, 2012. Failure to register by this date will cause forfeiture of voting rights for this election. If you are in doubt about whether you are registered, check the Voter Information Portal at www.sdsos.gov or call the county auditor at 605-669-7100. Registration may be completed during regular business hours at the county auditors office, municipal finance office, secretary of states office and those locations which provide drivers licenses, SNAP, TANF, WIC, military recruitment, and assistance to the disabled as provided by the Department of Human Services. You may contact the county auditor to request a mail-in registration form or access a mail-in form at www.sdsos.gov. Voters with disabilities may contact the county auditor for information and special assistance in voter registrations, absentee voting or polling place accessibility. John Brunskill, County Auditor Published October 4 & 11, 2012, at the total approximate cost of $25.34.

13-43-6.6. Although a collective bargaining agreement between a district and its teachers may set forth specific additional grounds for termination or set forth provisions as to the procedure or notice, no agreement may limit the district's right to terminate or refuse to renew the contract of a tenured or nontenured teacher for the grounds set forth in 13-43-6.1 to 13-43-6.3, inclusive. No agreement may limit the protection afforded to a teacher under 13-43-6.5. Section 54. For purposes of this Act, the term, school year, means the regular school term as referenced in 13-26-2. Section 55. That repealed. 13-3-73 be

Legal Notices Protect Your Right To Know

13-3-73. There is hereby created the teacher compensation assistance program within the Department of Education to provide funds to school districts for the purpose of assisting school districts with teacher compensation. School districts are eligible to receive funds from the teacher compensation assistance program based on their fall enrollment numbers. The department shall provide fourfifths of the funds for the teacher compensation assistance program to each participating school district. The Board of Education shall promulgate rules, pursuant to chapter 1-26, to create an oversight board appointed by the secretary of education for approval of applications as well as guidelines for district applications based on district instructional goals, market compensation or other specific district requirements as approved by the department. Participation in the program is discretionary. District applications shall be approved by the local board of education. The applications shall be reviewed by the teacher compensation assistance program oversight board and shall be recommended to the Board of Education for final approval. The Legislature shall review the teacher compensation assistance program in 2012 to determine its effectiveness and to determine whether to continue the program.

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13-43-6.1. A tenured or nontenured teacher may be terminated, by the school board, at any time for just cause, including breach of contract, poor performance, incompetency, gross immorality, unprofessional conduct, insubordination, neglect of duty, or the violation of any policy or regulation of the school district. A school district may nonrenew a teacher who is in or beyond the fourth consecutive term of employment as a teacher with the school district pursuant to 13-43-6.3 for just cause, including breach of contract, poor performance, incompetency, gross immorality, unprofessional conduct, insubordination, neglect of duty, or the violation of any policy or regulation of the school district. Section 50. That 13-43-6.2 amended to read as follows: be

13-3-74. The Teacher Compensation Assistance Program Oversight Board shall annually monitor the progress of participating school districts with their teacher compensation assistance plans, and submit its findings to the Board of Education. Section 57. That repealed. 13-3-74.1 be

13-43-6.2. If nonrenewal of a tenured teacher is contemplated under 13-436.1 13-43-6.3, the superintendent or chief executive officer shall give written notice of an intention to recommend nonrenewal to the teacher and the school board; a written statement of the reasons for the recommendation; access to the employment records of the teacher; the opportunity to the teacher for a hearing before the school board to present reasons in person or in writing why the nonrenewal should not occur; and the opportunity to be represented. The teacher shall request the hearing as provided in 13-43-6.9. The school board shall conduct the hearing not sooner than fourteen days, nor later than forty-five days, after receipt of the teacher's request for hearing. The parties may waive the time limitations provided for in this section. Section 51. That 13-43-6.3 amended to read as follows: be

13-3-74.1. There is hereby established the Teacher Compensation Assistance Program Advisory Council. The council shall be under the supervision of the Department of Education. The speaker of the House of Representative shall appoint three members of the House of Representatives to the council, including at least one member from each political party, and the president pro tempore of the Senate shall appoint three members of the Senate to the council, including at least one member from each political party. The Governor shall appoint the remaining members of the council, including at least one teacher, one school administrator, and one representative of a statewide education organization. Section 58. That repealed. 13-3-74.2 be

13-43-6.3. Until a teacher is in or beyond the fourth consecutive term of employment as a teacher with the school district, a A school board may or may not renew the teacher's contract of a nontenured teacher. The superintendent or chief executive officer shall give written notice of nonrenewal by April fifteenth but is not required to give further process or a reason for nonrenewal. After a teacher is in or beyond the fourth consecutive term of employment as a teacher with the school district, 1343-6.1 and 13-43-6.2 apply to any nonrenewal of the teacher's contract. A school board may refuse to renew the teacher's contract of a tenured teacher for just cause, including breach of contract, poor performance, a rating of unsatisfactory on two consecutive evaluations pursuant to section 38 of this Act, incompetency, gross immorality, unprofessional conduct, insubordination, neglect of duty, or the violation of any policy or regulation of the school district. On or before April fifteenth, the superintendent or chief exec-

13-3-74.2. The council shall examine how teacher quality and teacher salaries in the state can be enhanced, and how the funds appropriated in fiscal year 2010 and in subsequent fiscal years by the state for the teacher compensation assistance program established in 133-73 can best be utilized to assist in that effort. The council shall consider a variety of issues surrounding teachers including market compensation, a tiered licensure system, a system for evaluating teachers, mentoring and induction programs for teachers, and continuing contracts for teachers. Section 59. That repealed. 13-3-74.3 be

13-3-74.3. The council shall complete its work and the secretary of education shall provide its recommendations to the Governor and to the Executive Board of the Legislative Research Council no later than November 15, 2008. Section 60. That repealed. 13-3-75 be

13-3-75. The South Dakota Board of Education shall promulgate rules pursuant to chapter 1-26 establishing the application process; application timelines; the guidelines for district applications based on school district instructional goals or market compensation; and a system to monitor the progress of participating school districts with their compensation assistance plans and to ensure that each participating school dis-

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Senator Tim Johnson (D-SD), Senator John Thune (R-SD) and Representative Kristi Noem (RSD) today sent a letter to U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki to request a meeting in Hot Springs regarding the proposed changes to the Black Hills Health Care System (BHHCS). The delegation was joined by Senator Mike Enzi (R-WY), Senator John Barrasso (R-WY), Senator Mike Johanns (R-NE), Representative Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Representative Adrian Smith (R-NE). The Senators and Representatives expressed frustration and disappointment in how proposed changes to the BHHCS have progressed. The BHHCS gave its word that the process would be open, transparent, and inclusive. However, a September 10, 2012 meeting between BHHCS officials and the Save the VA Committee broke down when the BHHCS said it was not in a position to negotiate on its proposal. Since that time, many stakeholders have lost trust in the process and fear that the actions of the BHHCS over the past ten months were all for show. The Senators and Representatives wrote: We remain committed to ensuring that our veterans receive the highest quality of care and believe that their voices and concerns need to be a part of any proposed changes. Given the recent developments as to how this process is moving forward, we are requesting a meeting with you, the tri-state congressional delegation and members of the Save the VA Committee in Hot Springs, SD. We believe that it is important you hear directly from the members of the community, our veterans, and other stakeholders directly affected. The full text of the letter is below: October 2, 2012 The Honorable Eric Shinseki Secretary of Veterans Affairs Department of Veterans Affairs 810 Vermont Avenue, NW Washington, D.C. 20420

Murdo Coyote October 11, 2012

Page 10

Delegation requests meeting with Veterans Affairs Secretary Shinseki in Hot Springs
that this was not a final proposal and input from the public would be given full and fair consideration. The Committee never intended its counterproposal to be an all-ornothing alternative to the BHHCS proposal. They were led to believe, as were we, that the process moving forward would be collaborative. Recently, BHHCS sent its original proposal and all other proposals received to the VA Central Office (VACO) for review. We remain committed to ensuring that our veterans receive the highest quality of care and believe that their voices and concerns need to be a part of any proposed changes. Several Veteran Service Organizations, tribal governments and the State of South Dakota have issued resolutions expressing serious concerns with the BHHCS proposal as written and concerns have also been raised by some veterans and organizations in Nebraska and Wyoming. Concerns such as the extent to which major components of the BHHCS plan have been vetted with private health care providers and facilities, how the BHHCS proposal can effectively provide care to veterans in areas already declared medically underserved or with Critical Access Hospital designation, and concerns expressed by Native veterans relative to the Indian Health Service need to be considered. We are worried that these concerns may not have been addressed in the BHHCS proposal submitted to the VACO. These

by Donna Adrian Garlic lovers get ready; garlic needs to be in the ground at least one month before ground freezes, so now through mid-October is the ideal time to plant. Start by planting the cloves from the large bulbs. The larger the clove, the larger the size of the mature bulb at harvest. Do not divide the bulb until just before planting. Some people have had good luck planting the bulbs from the grocery store, but it is recommended to buy your bulbs from a supplier. Garlic needs fullsun site with loose soil rich in organic matter. Add compost to the bed, plant the cloves, pointy side up, three to five inches apart at a depth of two to three inches. Add a layer of mulch. Plant five inches apart in all directions is you plant them in a bed. In the vegetable garden, be sure to remove old plants, do a final weeding and mulch the bed with straw, grass clippings, or chopped leaves. These mulches can be turned into the soil, by the worms and microorganisms in the soil by

next spring to help fertilize next years crops. The perennials need one last weeding, give them a good layer of mulch. After the ground is frozen, mulch around the crowns of your plants to reduce the chance of frost heaving and winter kill. Mow the lawn one last time. This is one of the easiest solutions for leaves, it involves no raking. There is no reason to rake all the leaves off the lawn. Simply run the mower at a high setting it will break up the leaves. The leaves break down over winter, providing your soil with nutrients and shading the soil. Do this once a week until the leaves have quit falling and leave your rake in the garden shed. Mowing and leaving the grass and leaves lay is equal to one fertilizing applied to the lawn. You can spread compost over the lawn to get it off to a good start next spring; this is the easiest solution, as it involves no raking. I stick with my motto, less weeds, less water and less work regardless whether its vegetable garden, flower beds or lawns.

Dear Secretary Shinseki: We write to express frustration and disappointment in how proposed changes to the Black Hills Health Care System (BHHCS) have progressed. We were hopeful that the BHHCS would keep its word about making this process open, transparent, and inclusive, as you assured us would be the case in your letter dated May 18, 2012. We were assured that public comment and feedback would be seriously considered and, as appropriate, be incorporated into any final proposal. It has come to our attention that at a September 10, 2012 meeting between the BHHCS Veterans Administration (VA) and the Save the VA Committee (the Committee), the meeting broke down when the BHHCS said it was not in a position to negotiate on its proposal. Whether this was a misstatement or fact, trust has been lost, relationships damaged, and many fear that the actions of the BHHCS over the past ten months were all for show. When the BHHCS made the proposal public last December, stakeholders were led to believe

concerns are addressed in the Committees counterproposal. Given the recent developments as to how this process is moving forward, we are requesting a meeting with you, the tri-state congressional delegation and members of the Save the VA Committee in Hot Springs, SD. We believe that it is important you hear directly from the members of the community, our veterans, and other stakeholders directly affected. We ask that this meeting take place as soon as possible and any action on this proposal be delayed until a meeting can take place. Finally, we ask for transparency as to how proposals are evaluated and what criteria are used to make any final decision. We appreciate your attention to this issue and your timely response. Sincerely,

Tim Johnson, United States Senator John Thune, United States Senator Kristi Noem, Member of Congress Mike Enzi, United States Senator John Barrasso, United States Senator Cynthia Lummis, Member of Congress Mike Johanns, United States Senator Adrian Smith, Member of Congress

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A grassroots coalition representing family farmers and small businesses is asking voters to reject what is believed to be the largest tax increase in the state's history. On November 6, South Dakota voters will decide whether they are willing to pay $180 million in new revenue every year to school boards and Medicaid providers, such as hospitals and clinics. The money would come from a 25 percent increase in the state sales tax. The funding would be in addition to what the two groups already receive from state taxpayers. Opponents say voters should put their foot down and vote against the new tax. Initiated Measure 15 is an enormous tax increase that would give $90 million in new revenue to K-12 school boards, and $90 million in new revenue to Medicaid providers, every year, forever, says No on 15 co-chair Michael Held of the South Dakota Farm Bureau. Just over the next decade, that's a whopping $1.8 billion in new money for those two

Farm and business groups oppose $180 million state tax increase
groups. Not one cent of the new tax money would go to infrastructure, public safety, or higher education. Giving more money to schools and Medicaid providers might sound good, but the plan has some major problems, warned No on 15 co-chair Shawn Lyons of the South Dakota Retailers Association. If you read this vaguely-worded proposal, there is nothing that says specifically how the money is to be spent, Lyons noted. It doesn't have to be used to raise teacher salaries or reduce class sizes, and it doesn't have to be used to reduce medical costs. They could stick it all in reserves if they want to. The lack of oversight should be another red flag for voters, Lyons noted. They have left out any provision for legislative oversight, he said. That is lousy tax policy. We have a good citizen legislature which is vigilant about protecting taxpayers in the budgeting process. But if Initiated Measure 15 went through, these two groups would get a full 20 percent of the state sales tax dollars without having to account to the Legislature for how they're spending it. While K-12 education and Medicaid providers had their state funds trimmed last year, members of the No on 15 Committee point out that every other part of the state budget faced similar cuts in response to poor economic conditions. Since then, the Governor and Legislature have restored $18 million of the cuts, and the state finished the budget year with $48 million in unexpected revenue and savings. Everyone had to tighten their belts, Held stated. So why should these two groups step in line ahead of everyone else and get more state tax dollars back than was cut from them?

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Lyons also questioned the timing of the proposal. Last year, many of our state's farms, homeowners and businesses were hit with huge losses from flooding. This year, the pendulum swung the opposite direction, and people are struggling as a result of drought. Do we really expect those people to dig even deeper into their pockets and fork over 25 percent more in state sales tax on nearly everything they buy when they're not even sure how that money is going to be spent? The No on 15 group says they don't have the same financial resources as the people behind the proposed tax hike. We understand that the people who want this tax increase have planned an expensive, aggressive advertising campaign, Held said. Our grassroots coalition represents the little guys, and we don't have that kind of money to throw around. All we have is a firm belief that the average person in South Dakota doesn't want higher taxes. Along with the South Dakota Farm Bureau and South Dakota Retailers Association, other groups which are voicing opposition to the proposed tax increase are the South Dakota Farmers Union, National Federation of Independent Business, South Dakota Trucking Association, South Dakota Beer Distributors, South Dakota Innkeepers Association, South Dakota Agri-Business Association, South Dakota Petroleum and Propane Marketers Association, Music and Vending Association of South Dakota, South Dakota Manufactured Housing Association, Licensed Beverage Dealers of South Dakota, South Dakota Association of Cooperatives, the South Dakota Grain & Feed Association, and the South Dakota Coalition for Responsible Taxation.

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by U.S. Rep. Mike Rogers We can get our national news on cable television, catch the weather on local broadcast stations, listen to talk radio on the AM or FM dial and follow our favorite blogs on the Internet, but where do we turn for local information that directly impacts our daily lives? More often than not it is community newspapers. Technology has transformed how we gather information in the 21st Century. Newscycles run 24/7, tablets and laptops are becoming smaller and smart phones keep getting smarter. As a result most traditional large newspapers are struggling to stay alive they are more and more frequently printing only two to three times a week, personnel and content are shrinking like never before, and more information is shifted to online editions. Yet local community newspapers are thriving because they have persistently weathered the storm year in and year out to remain a fixture in our everyday lives. As our societies become more complex and diverse with growing numbers of ways to obtain information, the role of local newspapers in informing our communities becomes even more significant. We count on them to regularly check in with the courts and police stations. They print announcements on births, deaths, engagements, marriages, anniversaries, church news, job openings, school information and service club endeavors. They publish notices of local municipal meetings. They print tax

Local newspapers connect Rutz appointed head of state Emergency Medical Services us with our communities
increases, millage initiatives, notices of changes in laws and property rezoning all issues that most directly affect our pocketbooks by determining how our hard-earned tax dollars are spent at the local level and how are local officials are representing us. They help run the local economic engine and provide a marketplace for the community. They offer local small businesses with an effective and affordable means of connecting with local consumers. They print sales at the supermarket, coupons for discounts at local stores, real estate listings, and classifieds for everything from a used car to a neighbors garage sale. Its also personal. Communities feel a sense of ownership in their local newspaper, and the people that report the news are often our friends and neighbors down the street. News aggregating websites such as Drudge Report and the major news blogs are great at offering up major national and international news and analysis, but they simply do not provide the information on issues that impact us at the local level. It is especially true for the elderly and those with low incomes who often have less access to computers and transportation. They normally only publish once a week, but community newspapers remain the one constant source of local information. In good times and in bad, they stay focused on us as a community. Now more than ever, community newspapers are an important binding thread of our cities and towns.

Murdo Coyote

Murdo Coyote October 11, 2012

Page 11

Thune on pheasant season


by Senator John Thune The annual hunting population boom will soon be upon us as friends, family, and visitors make their way to the fields in search of our state bird, the Chinese ringnecked pheasant. In parts of South Dakota, more people will return for the pheasant opener than holidays and it can be hard to get a seat on an airplane filled with camouflage bird-seekers. As we dig out our orange hunting gear and clean our shotguns, we prepare for one of the great traditions of our state. As a member of the U.S. Senate Agriculture Committee, I have an opportunity to shape and support conservation programs that boost wildlife habitat and benefit our hunting traditions in South Dakota. During debate of the Senate Farm Bill, I worked to consolidate 23 conservation programs into 13, while reauthorizing the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), a program of great benefit to our

Buy chance on 80 acres to support S.D. soldiers


Five hundred ticket holders will be in a drawing to win approximately 80 acres of prime hunting ground in east-central South Dakota this month in a raffle to benefit soldiers of the 114th Fighter Wing Security Force Squadronof the South Dakota Air National Guard. The drawing is part of a fundraising opportunity to send the members of this guard unit and their families on a deep-sea fishing adventure in Alaska when they return from their most recent deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The raffle and trip are part of a donation from Preventive Health Strategies to help restore the bond between soldiers and families after their long absence. For returning veterans to successfully adjust to their home lives

Marilyn Rutz of Belle Fourche has been appointed Director of the State Office of Emergency Medical Services, replacing Danny Hayes, who retired. Public Safety Secretary Trevor Jones announced the appointment on Friday. Rutz has been serving in the position since late September. Marilyn has the education, training and experience to be a great fit in the EMS office, Jones said. She is committed to the public safety of South Dakota citizens and will be a strong advocate for programs that continue to improve the quality of the training and equipment of the men and woman who provide emergency medical services. Rutz has been an emergency medical technician since 1999 and a Paramedic since 2002. She worked for the Butte County

Ambulance Service, Lead-Deadwood Regional Hospital Ambulance, Lead-Deadwood Regional Medical Clinic and Mountain Plains Health Consortium before joining the State EMS office in June of 2010 as an Emergency Medical Specialist. She is married with two adult children. One of my primary goals is to support and strengthen ambulance services and EMTs in South Dakota, Rutz said. I look forward to the challenges ahead. I recognize that a large majority of responders are volunteers, and I welcome comments and suggestions on ways the Office of Emergency Medical Services can help those dedicated men and women do their jobs. Hayes retired in June. Emergency Medical Services is an agency within the Department of Public Safety.

states pheasant population. Pheasant hunting generates approximately $200 million in revenues for South Dakota. Whether it is the licenses, gas, and gear that they buy, or the nights spent in lodges and hotels throughout the state, it is clear that hunting in South Dakota is also big business. But as a kid growing up in Murdo, we didnt think of hunting as a business. For me and many other kids across the state, hunting is a way to learn responsibility and spend time outdoors. This year will be no different as sons and daughters across South Dakota walk the fields, shotguns in hand, looking to bag their limit. Hunting season in South Dakota is my favorite time of year and I can think of no place I would rather be than in a field with family and friends by my side. I wish all hunters a safe and successful hunting season.

Pasture, rangeland and forage (PRF) insurance is available for 2013 in South Dakota based on a Rainfall Index (RI). Haying and grazing needs can be covered against moisture shortages using PRF-RI, says Matthew Diersen, SDSU Extension Risk & Business Management Specialist. While producers would prefer to be paid if they did not have forage, PRF-RI relies on a close historical relationship between rainfall timing and forage production amounts, Diersen said. He explains that producers can guard against low precipitation during insured intervals for localized grids specific to haying or grazing needs. Rainfall is grid-level and not farm- or ranch-level when measured. November 15, 2012, is the deadline to purchase or change coverage for the 2013 calendar year. Diersen explains that the PRF-RI coverage available in South Dakota mirrors pasture rents (per acre) for grazing. The coverage is constant at $204.23 per acre for haying. In the event that precipitation is low during an insured interval, producers could use indemnity payments to replace income or to purchase replacement feed, he said. Unfortunately the coverage does not increase should prices move higher during the insured year. Encouraging indicators at the state level suggest that PRF-RI would work well to manage forage production risk. In years with belowaverage rainfall in South Dakota the hay yield was also often below-average. In particular, notable drought years in South Dakota (1976, 1988, 2002 and 2006) had sharply lower rainfall totals and hay yields. According to the Census of Agriculture there were 23 million acres in permanent pasture and rangeland

South Dakota pastures now insurable with rainfall index

across South Dakota in 2007. PRF has been available in South Dakota since the 2007 crop year using a vegetation index, but only 540,000 acres were insured with PRF in 2012. As detailed in the crop insurance provisions, catastrophic coverage is not available for PRF. Thus, producers may also purchase Noninsured Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) coverage for the pasture, rangeland, and non-alfalfa hayland, Diersen said. He says it is up to producers to decide whether the insurance is necessary and valuable. The high subsidy rate likely gives the coverage value, but there are no absolute guarantees that precipitation shortages will always line up with forage needs, he said. Premiums for PRF-RI vary by county, type, coverage level, practice/interval, and grid location. Producers have to pick a coverage level from 70 to 90 percent of the grid base. A default to consider would be the 70 percent level as it has the highest subsidy rate. Producers also have to pick a productivity level from 60 percent to 150 percent of the county base. This allows for intracounty variability in soil type, grade, and forage type. Diersen explains that there are many ways to allocate coverage. Not all acres need to be insured. Selected acres are allocated across 11 two-month intervals. Intervals cannot overlap a given month. At most 70 percent and no fewer than 10 percent of acres can be in a single interval, he said. Ideally, a producer will know key months that a lack of precipitation would result in less forage production. For more information, visit www.igrow.org. Interested insurable parties can also contact a crop insurance agent or go on-line to the RMA website www.rma.usda. gov.

Breast cancer awareness month


by Rep. Kristi Noem Like all South Dakota moms, I have loved watching my children grow and cannot wait to see the careers they go into, the spouses they choose and the children they will have. I want to be around for all of lifes little milestones, and breast cancer awareness is a big part of that. Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women, and research shows that one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some time during her life. The good news is there have been advances in research, technology and early detection over the years that have helped decrease the number of breast cancer related deaths. But there is much more work to be done. October is breast cancer awareness month and its a great opportunity to help spread the word. I was in Sioux Falls recently to

after a deployment, the whole family needs time to readjust, said Dr. Annette Bosworth of Preventive Health Strategies in Sioux Falls. Our returning vets need time, in a restorative environment, to reconnect with their families - to make the family unit whole again after it has been disrupted by the drama and difficulty of deployment. To support the soldiers of the 114th and purchase one or more raffle tickets, contact Preventive Health Strategies at 605-3681741. All proceeds from the land raffle will go to support the Alaskan fishing adventure. For more information, to see photos of the land or to purchase tickets online, go to the event website at www.imgivingawaythefarm.com.

participate in the South Dakota Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. In all, over 6,000 participants, spectators and supporters came out for the race. Its always good when funds stay close to home, and I was happy to learn that seventy-five percent of funds raised in South Dakota stay in South Dakota, while the other 25 percent go toward national research. I encourage all South Dakotans to recognize this month and put an extra effort into spreading the word about breast cancer. If possible, consider participating in or volunteering for a Komen event, or help spread the word through social media or simply by talking with family, friends and colleagues. If you want to know more about how you can get involved in South Dakota, visit: http://www.komensouthdakota.org/.

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www.midwestgold-silver.com for instructions or call 605-260-4653. CHRYSLER CERTIFIED TECHNICIAN needed for Chadron Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram in Chadron, Nebraska. $30.00/hour, relocation plan, benefits, training, 5-day work week, great work environment. Jeremy: 308-432-9004; jkennedy@hotmail.com. EMPLOYMENT

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Experience in road/bridge construction/maintenance preferred. For application contact: Douglas County Auditor (605) 724-2423.

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Help Wanted

DEPUTY SHERIFFS POSITION: Haakon County. Competitive wages/excellent benefits. Send state applications or resum: Haakon County Sheriff, Box 249, Philip, S.D. 57567. Information: 605-859-2741. FULL-TIME PARKS MAINTENANCE: City of Canton, S.D. CDL & commercial pesticide applicator license required within 6 months. Deadline: October 17. www.cityofcantonsd.com or 605987-2881. EOE.

LAKEFRONT BANK LOAN Liquidation $29,900 lake property, 100 clear water shore; Glacial Lakes region NE S.D. Thousand Lakes Realty of Minnesota. 866346-7006, www.1000LakesMN. com. ADVERTISE IN NEWSPAPERS statewide for only $150.00. Put the South Dakota Statewide Classifieds Network to work for you today! (25 words for $150. Each additional word $5.) Call this newspaper or 800-658-3697 for details. OTR & DRIVER OPPORTUNITY NOTICES

CAREGIVER/AIDE: Part time position available in the Murdo area assisting elderly and disabled individuals in the comfort of their own homes. Will assist with basic cleaning, laundry, meal prep, personal cares and other tasks which allow independence. Flexible schedules and great supplemental income. Please contact the office (605) 224-2273 or 1-800-899-2578. Be sure to check out our web site at homecareservicessd.com. M39-4tc

To place your ad here contact the Murdo Coyote today at 669-2271

Truck Drivers Needed


Altendorf Transport is
hopper bottoms, reefers hiring OTR drivers for

DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSION is taking applications for full-time Douglas County Highway Superintendent. Must have valid Class A Drivers License.

MANAGER NEEDED for progressive credit union. Excellent benefits and salary. Resumes only submitted to Box 69, Gregory, S.D. 57533. EEOC.

ROUGH COUNTRY SPRAYING: Specializing in controlling Canada thistle on rangeland. ATV application. Also prairie dogs. Call Bill at 605-669-2298. M21-24tp

Notice

$1500.00 SIGN-ON BONUS! EXP. OTR Drivers, TBI, 33/34, $375 mo., health ins., credit, 03 safety bonus, Call Joe for details, 800.456.1024, joe@tbitruck.com.

Must have Class A CDL Must have medical card Pass drug test

and RGN (oversized loads)

Call Larry Freier at


No need to relocate

POTENTIAL HUNTING LODGE or hospitality location. 4800 sq ft former bar/restaurant with full kitchen, restrooms, tables. Plenty of parking. Located next to the Vivian Coffee Cup. Triple net lease. Call 605-690-5408 M40-4tp for more information.

BLACK LEGEND SERIES BUMPER. Fits 2010-2012 Dodge Ram pickup. Was only on pickup for two weeks. No damage; like new condition. $1,700. Call Patrick Barnes at 605-530-0051 or Karlee Barnes at 605-295-0047. M41-tfc

For Sale

701-520-3203

Business & Professional Directory


Rent This Space $4.25 a week/ minimum 3 mos.

Address Change? If youre moving or have a change of address, please let us know as soon as possible to ensure timely delivery of your Murdo Coyote! Call: 605-669-2271 Fax: 605-669-2744

Ranchland Drug
259-3102
Nightly Deliveries to Murdo Senior Citizens Discount

HEIMAN CONSTRUCTION
and Seamless Gutters
Allen Heiman Owner

Located in White River, S.D.

P.O. Box 433 Presho, S.D. 57568-0433 Phone: (605) 895-9644 Cell: (605) 730-5634

Variety of Colors Free Estimates

Words cannot express enough our thanks to those who went out of their way to battle the flames that so easily could have consumed the homes and properties of so many of us. I am convinced that our own home, hay and properties are still standing because of the effort of the men who worked so hard to bring the fire under control. Our eyes are opened, yes, to the realization that they really are just things and when it comes down to it, not all that important in the whole scheme of things, but how thankful we are to still have the comforts that those things bring and the relief of not having the stress and worry of rebuilding and reacquiring those things we need. Thank you to each one involved, we are grateful. The Roghairs Brad and Shawna Darian, Annalee, Mesa Jubilee and Riata We want to thank Dr. Kip Kinsley and Sam Seymour for their help in getting our cattle worked last week. Additional thanks to Jean Kinsley for providing food for the meal. Herman and Jewell Bork

Thank You

New Life Home, Inc.


Residential Living Center
24Hour Care HomeLike Atmosphere
203 W. Hwy. 16, Presho, S.D. 605-895-2602

CALL US FOR ALL YOUR HOME REPAIRS

AERIAL & AG SERVICE


Aerial & Ground Application Chemical & Fertilizer Sales GPS Equipped

Valburg

Tires & Service ~ 605-669-2077 Exit 191 ~ Murdo SD

Venard Inc

The family of Joyce Dykema would like to thank everyone who expressed their sympathy through cards, letters, prayers and phone calls. We appreciated hearing your memories of our mother. The Dykema girls and their families

605-669-2121 Clinic J.S. McNeely 605-669-2553 Home RN, CFNP dba Jones County Clinic
609 Garfield Ave., Murdo, SD 57559

Murdo, Martin & White River

Your Full Service Lumber and Hardware Store


105 E. 2nd Street PO Box 108 Murdo, SD 57559 Phone: (605) 669-2201 Fax: (605) 669-2450 Dennis and Kevin Moore

Dan: 605-259-3134 Charlie: 605-452-3311


Family owned and operated Our family serving your family

LowIncome Housing 1 & 2 bedroom apartments Incomebased rent Includes light, heat, water and garbage pickup

Murdo Housing & Redevelopment


605-669-2681

H ildebrand S teel & C oncrete


Contact us for ALL types of concrete work!

Murdo Nutrition Program Menu


October 15 Fish Portions Scalloped Potatoes Peas Fruit Muffin Mandarin Oranges & Banana Slices October 16 Salisbury Steak in Gravy Boiled Potatoes & Gravy Green Beans Bread Pears October 17 New England Boiled Dinner w/ Ham & Vegetables Dinner Roll Fruit Cocktail Cake October 18 Roast Turkey Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Broccoli Cranberries Bread Chocolate Pudding October 19 Sloppy Joe on a Bun Oven Potatoes Coleslaw Peaches

Murdo
Jerry Hildebrand Cell: 605.488.0291

Kadoka
Rich Hildebrand Cell 605.431.2226

Office: 605-837-2621 Toll Free: 1-877-867-4185

Equal Housing Opportunity

Daryl & Scott Isburg, Funeral Directors

Concrete RediMix

Family Dentistry
James C. Szana, DDS
Murdo Health Center Wednesday & Thursday 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

669-2131

Rent This Space $4.25 a week/ minimum 3 mos.

ALL PRO TOWING


24-Hour Service Light to Heavy Duty Towing Repairs Domestic Cars & Trucks

Phone: (605) 669-2075 Murdo, S.D.

(605) 869-2150

Cell: 605-222-0317 Pierre, S.D. E-mail: darrenboylesales@pie.midco.net Website: www.darrenboylesales.com

New & Used Farm Equipment REA Seeds

Darren Boyle Sales