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We at Tripps Auto, along with thousands of other customers in Michigan, are tired of unnecessarily paying exorbitantly high electricity

rates as a result of being held captive with no option to choose another electricity supplier.
--Phil Tripp, Owner Tripps Auto Jackson Citizen Patriot, published October 8, 2012

These higher electric costs are crippling our businesses and deterring economic growth.
--Phil Tripp, Owner Tripps Auto Jackson Citizen Patriot, published October 8, 2012

Dietary fiber manufacturer J. Rettenmaier USA LP could save up to $350,000 per year on electricity for its Portage plant if it could switch to a Consumers Energy competitor
--Gerhard Goss, Director of Administration and Controlling for J. Rettenmaier MLive, published August 8, 2012

Retailers can make decisions on where to purchase everything else for their business, but we can't decide where to buy our electricity."
--James Hallan, President and CEO of the Michigan Retailers Association Gongwer Michigan, published August 22, 2012

If we are to continue to grow and add the high-paying jobs that our product market dictates, or even to survive, we need to have vendor choice that allows us to source the vendor that allows us the best competitive prices and service."
--Mark Butler, Owner of Campbell Grinder Company MIRS, published November 2, 2011

The states that have really opened their markets up to competition are Pennsylvania and Texas. In those states the original utilities are still doing quite well.
--Steve Elsea, Director of Energy Services, Leggett & Platt Inc. Mackinac Center For Public Policy, published August 31, 2011

Hey, were trying to run a business here, and price increases make it difficult to budget and plan. If we did that to our customers wed be gone in one to two years.
--Jonas McCluskey, President, Elm Plating Jackson Citizen Patriot, published August 6, 2011

"Energy is our third-highest cost component behind raw material and labor. Michigan's electricity rates are now the highest in the Midwest. Limiting electric competition not only makes my company less competitive it definitely hurts Michigan business in general."
--Steve Elsea, Director of Energy Services, Leggett & Platt Inc. Restructuring Today, published June 15, 2011

"The benefits we gain from a competitive market, such as the ability to better manage our energy needs, have direct and positive implications for the country's economy. First, it creates savings, which allows us to maintain low prices for our customers and invest in our business. Second, it allows our business and those of other US businesses to better manage our bottom lines."
--Steve Elsea, Director of Energy Services, Leggett & Platt Inc. Restructuring Today, published June 14, 2011

Today, the cards are heavily stacked against Michigan businesses when we must compete against one another but our electricity providers, be it Detroit Edison (DTE) or Consumers Power, do not, resulting in the twin evils of rising electric rates for us and lost opportunities for job creation in Michigan.
--Tommy Brann, Owner of Branns Sizzlin Steaks and Sports Grille The Oakland Press, published October 15, 2010