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A turtle with personality

Meet the area artisan behind this stuffed creation. See Page 4.

THE ABINGTON

behind this stuffed creation. See Page 4. THE ABINGTON FEATHER in her cap Miss Chief Kaitlyn

FEATHER in her cap

Miss Chief Kaitlyn Zaleski has entertained spectators at Lakeland High School football games with her fire and sword- throwing performances. See Page

14.

JOURNAL

An edition of The Times Leader

See Page 14. JOURNAL An edition of T he T imes L eader Clarks Wilkes-Barre, Summit,

Clarks Wilkes-Barre, Summit, Pa. Pa.

www.theabingtonjournal.com

OCTOBER 17 TO OCTOBER 23, 2012 50¢

Door-

to- door donation

BY BEN FREDA Abington Journal Correspondent

CLARKS SUMMIT - Au- tumn is harvest time. A time for farmers to reap the foods of their labor. A time of cornuco- pias and abundance. But there are many who struggle against hunger in this area, which is why this is also a time for food drives. Summit Baptist Bible Church in Clarks Summit will organize its 5th annual Athletes in Action food drive Oct. 21. Students from the church’s youth group, students from Summit Christian Academy school and athletes from Abington Heights High School will meet at the church at 1 p.m., and from there will travel door- to- door in neighbor- hoods to collect donations from Clarks Summit residents until 6 p.m. They will collect foods such as soups, canned vegetables, cereals, peanut butter and other non-perishable foods. Residents who do not have food on hand to donate, can give money for the purchase of food and water for the pro- gram. If residents will not be home during the drive, they can call the church in advance and leave food on their porches. “It’s a good way to get the

See Donation, Page 6

“It’s a good way to get the See Donation, Page 6 INSIDE   11 Calendar 2

INSIDE

 

11

Calendar

2

Classified

16

Crosswords

8

Obituaries

24

School

10

Sports

14

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The Abington Journal

UNBRIDLED EXCITEMENT

UNBRIDLED EXCITEMENT ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELLEN BUGNO Member of the Lakeland Jr./Sr. High School homecoming court, Jake Noldy,

ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELLEN BUGNO

Member of the Lakeland Jr./Sr. High School homecoming court, Jake Noldy, enjoys time on the dance floor.

Ryan and

Gina take

a break

from

dancing at

Abington

Heights

High

School

home-

coming.

from dancing at Abington Heights High School home- coming. ABINGTON JOURNAL/EMILY TAYLOR Can I have this

ABINGTON JOURNAL/EMILY TAYLOR

Can I have this dance?

B lustery fall afternoons and evenings jam-packed with touchdowns, bonfires, pep

rallies and teens transformed into royalty signify Homecoming season in the Abingtons. This past weekend, high school students at Abington Heights and Lakeland celebrated the annual rite of passage. See game coverage on Page 14 and 15 and photos of courts and dances on Page 24. Catch a glimpse of college homecoming events at Baptist Bible and Keystone in an upcoming print edition and online at www.theabingtonjournal.com.

Report

shocks

residents

BY ROBERT TO MKAVAGE

rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com

WAVERLY - Waverly Ele- mentary School Principal Steve Aquilina sent a letter home to parents stating that Oct. 9, a third-grade boy was allegedly confronted by an older white male after exiting Bus #35. According to the letter, the man offered the student video games in an attempt to lure him into his car. The incident oc- curred at the intersection of Willow Road and Laurel Hill at 3:45 p.m. Waverly police conf irmed that they received a call later that night, around 6 or 7 p.m., regarding the incident and the report is still under investiga- tion. The public is asked to report suspicious behavior to Waverly Police or Waverly Elementary School. According to Abington Heights Superintendent of Schools Dr. Michael Mahon, all principals and bus drivers in the districts were notified of the confrontation, along with play- ground moderators and gym teachers. “They will all be on alert, as they always are,” Mahon said. Although the report was troubling, Mahon said the dis- trict is not instituting any major changes at this time. “We’re not panicking, but our eyes are wide open after the incident,” he said. Alexis Lounsberg, a mom with two students enrolled at Waverly Elementary School, was taken aback after hearing about the incident. “I was shocked and a little scared,” she said. “Anytime

See Report, Page 6

a little scared,” she said. “Anytime See Report, Page 6 ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Dipti Pancholy decorates

ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI

Dipti Pancholy decorates for ‘Eye on India’ at the Abington Community Library Oct. 20.

Global message

BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Abington Journal Correspondent

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP.- The concept of the upcoming “Eye on India” program is to recognize, pro- mote and celebrate a glob- alization happening around the world, according to Dipti Pan- choly, M.D., moderator of the program to be held at the Abington Community Library Oct. 20 in the Ryon Room. Members of the library’s

Te en Leadership Committee, as well as non-member teen and adult volunteers, who share an appreciation for Indi- an culture, attended an Eye on India work session at the li- brary Oct. 13, and spent time customizing presentation boards to represent the cultures of various home-states in In- dia. Va nshika Bhardwaj, 13 , an

See Global, Page 9

A full fall day of FUN

Oct. 20 events include costume parade for children and pets, Mad Scientist Lab, pony rides, scarecrow making, giant pumpkin carving to name a few.

BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Abington Journal Correspondent

K ids in search of free

Saturday fun can visit

downtown Clarks

Summit in a Halloween cos- tume and trick-or-treat for free candy. They can play games of Ghost Busters and Spooky Eye Toss, try their hand at a UFO craft, make popcorn hands and candy monsters and watch giant pumpkin carvings. Then it will be time to participate in a Child and Pooch Costume Parade. There will not be a short- age of amusement at the Fall Fun Day Oct. 20, according to Laura Ancherani, exec- utive director of event host, the Abington Business and Professional Association. A full day of free activities is planned for the community.

“There’s really nothing like it in this area. You’ve got that uniqueness and on top of it, it’s free,” said Ancherani. “You can come to the event in the mor ning at 11 a.m., go to the (Heritage Baptist) church and eat for free, ride a pony, go on a hayride, ride the rides, make a scarecrow- …come to town in a Hallo- ween costume and get some free candy, go to a free party and see the giant pumpkins being carved. You could spend the whole day here and not spend any money.”

The fun will begin at 11 a.m. at Heritage Baptist Church, 415 Ve nard Road, with free food, rides, games, scarecrow making, pony rides and a magician and a juggler, and continue until 4 p.m. “A large pumpkin demon- stration will be held at the church around noon,” said Marc Crouthamel, Sculpted Ice Works of Lakev ille. And from 2 to 8 p.m., the fun will continue in Clarks Summit where there will be

See Fun, Page 9

in Clarks Summit where there will be See Fun, Page 9 ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Tara Crum,

ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI

Tara Crum, left, and Dorothy O’Connor create some excitement deco- rating the Clarks Summit Fire Hall for Fall Fun Day.

PAGE 2A www.t heabingtonjournal.co m

Th e Abington Journal Clarks Su mmit, PA

WEDNESDAY , OCTO BER 17 , 2012

YOUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR

HOLIDAY EVENTS

October 20: Fall Fun Day, at Heritage Baptist Church from 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Downtown Clarks Summit from 2 – 8 p.m. Includes free food, rides, games, scarecrow making, pony rides, magician, juggler, giant pumpkin carving, children and pets parade, trick or treating, mystery maze, fall market and more. Info:

587.9045 or www.theabing- tons.org.

October 21: The Griffin Pond Animal Shelter’s Annual Halloween Parade, at the shel- ter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd, South Abington Twp. Registration will begin at Noon with the Pa rade star ting at 1 p .m. Va ri- ous prizes will be awarded for Best in show, Funniest, Cutest, Most Original, Creative, and Classiest. Info: 585.0516. DAILY EVENTS

October 17: Abington Lions Fire Prevention Event, at the Clarks Summit Volunteer Fire Company No. 1, 321 Bedford St., Clarks Summit at 6:30 p.m. Abington Lions will provide light refreshments. Reserva-

tions are appreciated. Cost: free (free -will donations will be accepted) Info/RSVP:

586.3034.

Families Helping Families, a the Abington Community Li- brary at 7 p.m. Presenter: Jeff Zerechak. Chicken-n-Biscuit or Ham Dinner, at Clifford United Methodist Church, Main St, Clifford, from 4 – 6 p.m. Take out or dine in. Includes dinner, dessert and drink. Cost: $7.95.

October 19: Birds of Prey program for home-schooled students, at Endless Mountains Nature Center on Vosburg Road in Washington Twp from 9:30 a.m. to noon. Participants will learn which birds live here and how to identify them, meet the Nature Center’s live birds of prey, dissect an owl pellet, and search for wild birds of prey. Cost: $6 per student, and $3 per parent. Info: www.EMN- Conline.org or 836.3835. Keystone College Breast Cancer March, at 6: 30 p.m. The march, open to Keystone students and the public, will begin on campus and proceed on College Avenue to the Fa c- toryville Fire Co. All proceeds will be donated to the North- east Regional Cancer Institute. Registration begins at 5:30 p.m. at the Keystone College Green. Registration is $5 and partici- pants will receive a gift basket raffle ticket, a breast cancer bracelet and pink glowstick, while supplies last. A social with food and beverages for sale at the Factoryville Fire Department will follow the event.

October 20: The American Cancer Society Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk, at Kirby Park in Wilkes-Barre, registration beginning at 8 a.m.

Library to host Holiday Marketplace

The Abington Community Library’s 2012 Holiday Mar- ke tplace will take place Nov. 10 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This is the fourth year for the popular shopping event. A variety of handcrafted merchandise will be available. The event includes a large gift basket raffle of great prizes. Admission is free.

Oct. 20 Corn Roast to benefit C.G. church Clarks Green United Methodist Church will host

Oct. 20 Corn Roast to benefit C.G. church

Clarks Green United Methodist Church will host its First Annual Corn Roast and Pulled Pork Dinner Oct. 20 from 4 to 6 p.m. in the church hall at 119 Glenburn Rd., Clarks Green. Tickets cost $8 for adults and $4 for children 12 and under. Mike Pacyna is the dinner organizer and chairman. Sandy Corselius is in charge of the seasonal desserts. The corn will be prepared by Warren Watkins and Jim Corselius. Sides include cole slaw, beans and pickles. Shown, seated, from left: Tony Antinnes, Joyce Crounse, Pastor Brent Stouffer and Sandy Corselius. Standing: Don Kieffer, Fred Staffmaster, Mike Pacyna, chairman and Jim Corselius.

and event program at 9 a.m. Info: 905.2540 or sarackling- es@aol.com.The Dalton Com- munity Library Book and Bake

Sale, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. The library has a large selection of adult and juvenile fiction and nonfiction, magazines, paper- backs, recordings, baked goods and more for sale. Info:

563.2014.

Country Christmas Fair, at Clarks Summit United Metho- dist Church on Morgan High- way from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Fea- tures crafts, baked goods and more for sale from 40 vendors. Cost: $1 (children 12 and under free). Thomas R. Kovall Memorial Scholarship Fund Rummage Sale, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Abington Heights High School Cafeteria. Items avail- able for purchase are: new and gently used housewares, holiday decorations, knickknacks, cloth- ing and toys. Many items are priced at $5 or less. There will be a theme basket raffle and a bake sale. A bag sale will start at noon. Clarks Summit United Metho- dist Church’s Annual Country Christmas Fair, at the church, 1310 Morgan Highway, Clarks Summit from 10 a.m. -4 p.m. Ve ndors will offer an ar ray of handmade items including jew- elr y, candles, rugs, knitted items, leather goods, ceramics, woodworks, dolls, and much more. Refreshments, baked goods and the United Methodist Wo men’s “Pick your ow n coo- kie booth” will also be featured. Cost: $1 admission for adults and free for children 12 and under. Info: 587.4141. On India, at the Abington Community Library from 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. Attendees will ex- perience traditions from various home-states in India with mem- bers of the community repre- senting their ancestral state. All ages are welcome. Light re- freshments will be served. Seat- ing is limited and registration is required. Info/register: 587.3440 or visit www.lclshome.org/ Abington and click on Library Events.

Celerity Bartending to benef it Griffin Pond Animal Shelter, at Rumrunnerz Bar

and Grill, 600 E. Drinker St, Dunmore, from 2 – 5 p.m. Asbury/Providence Men’s Group Roast Beef Dinner and Bake Sale, at 720 Dela- ware St, Scranton, Take-outs at 4:30 p.m. and eat-ins from

5 - 7 p.m. Cost: adults $10,

Children 12 and under $5 and age 3 and under free. Tickets/ info: 343.1035.

October 21: Bereavement

Support Group session, in the Parish Center of Our Lady of the Snows Church in Clarks Summit at 2 p.m. All are welcome to this informal and informative session. Info:

586.1741.

Pasta for the Pooches, at Crystal Fire Company in Jermyn from 12 – 4 p.m. Cost: $8 donation. Benefits Griffin Pond Animal Shelter. Info: 876.3026. Fi fth Annual Fo od Drive , at

1 p.m. To leave a bag of food on your pourch and be placed on the pick-up list, call Sum- mit Baptist Bible Church at 586.3351. All of the food is donated to the Scranton Res- cue Mission each year. Benef it Pasta Dinner for Cassie Davies, at the New- ton-Ransom Fire Hall, 1890 Newton-Ransom Blvd, Clarks Summit, at 4 p.m. Cost: Adult $10 Children $7. Sponsored By Neighbors Helping Neighbors.

October 22: Dalton Fire Co. Ladies Aux. Bingo & Spaghetti Supper, in the Dal- ton Fire Hall. Bingo starts at 6:45 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. The spaghetti supper will run from 5 to 8 p.m. Takeouts available. Tickets at the door: Adults $8, children 10-6 $6, 5 & under Free. Info: 563.1268.

October 23: Newton Ran- som Fire Company Ladies Auxiliary Meeting, at 6:30 p.m.

Safe and spooky fun

There’s a rumor going around that Oct. 27, during the twilight hours of 6 and 8 p.m., the “Spirit of the Great Pumpkin” will be

lurking around the South Abington Park. According to the South Abington Lions Club, that rumor is true. Once again, the club is get- ting into the spirit of the season and planning an event to help everyone enjoy a Halloween that is fun, safe—and just a little bit scar y. Children 10 and younger are invited to join in the celebration and festivities at the South Abington Park Pavilion. The event includes Halloween refreshments around a warm fire, face painting, pumpkin painting, story telling and more.

Whether in costume or not, participants will receive “tricks and treats.”

Attic Shop now open

The Attic Shop, a clothing consignment shop for the whole family, located in the lower level of the Waverly Community House, is now

open for the season. It is run by the Waverly Woman’s Club, and all proceeds are donated to charity. Shop hours are: Wednesday and Friday mornings from 9:30 a.m. to noon; first and third Wednesday evenings from 5:30 to 8 p.m.; second Saturday mornings from 10 a.m. to noon. Holiday clos- ings include Nov. 21 and 23, 2012, Dec. 26 and 28, 2012 and March 29, 2013. For more information, call

570.586.5991.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Editor:

The company I work for interacts with people with disabilities. Many of these people live independently in their own homes through the services we provide to them. I recently attended a Junior Comets football game held at Comet Stadium. It came over the loud speaker that the stadi- um had about 6 handicapped parking spaces. All the spaces were taken up by cars that had neither a “handicapped” li- cense plate nor a placard in the windows. It was furthered announced that the cars would receive a ticket and some would be towed. Three able bodied women got up to move their cars. They managed to climb up and down the stadium stairs,

so I can only imagine that they could park their cars and walk to the stadium. I want to thank the announ- cer that day for bringing awareness to an all too com- mon problem. Handicapped parking places are close to buildings, stores etc. People park there for the easy access to the places they are going with total disregard to the people who the parking spaces are intended for. More people like this an- nouncer at a football game need to take a look around them. If you see someone parking in a space they should not be in then tell them. It only takes a few seconds to improve a life of someone who lives with a disability. Linda M. Scott

Wo men’s Club to sponsor Fa ll Fest Arts and Crafts Show

Tunkhannock Junior Wom- en’s Club will sponsor its 26th Annual Fall Fest Arts and Crafts Show Oct. 27 at the Tunkhannock Area High School, 135 Tiger Drive, Tunk- hannock from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission is $1 and children under 12 get in free. More than 150 crafters and artisans are expected at this year’s event. Patrons will find a variety of handmade and hand-

embellished gifts, as well as homemade lunch and dessert options available for purchase in the school’s cafeteria. Food items include: soups, pizza, hot dogs, cold sandwiches, meat- ball hoagies, pork sandwiches, pies and cookies. All proceeds benefit local charities and com- munity programs. For more information, e-mail tjwc57@yahoo.com or visit tjwc.tripod.com.

e-mail tjwc57@yahoo.com or visit tjwc.tripod.com. Little Sisters of the Poor to hold roast beef dinner The

Little Sisters of the Poor to hold roast beef dinner

The Little Sisters of the Poor will hold an annual homemade roast beef dinner Oct. 21 from 12 to 4 p.m. at Holy Family Residence, 2500 Adams Ave., Scranton, adjacent to Mary- wood University. The dinner will be catered courtesy of Stirna’s Restaurant, Scranton. Takeouts will be available all day. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children 10 and younger and can be purchased by calling 570.343.4065, on the web at littlesistersofthepoor- scranton.org or at the door. The menu includes roast beef, mashed potatoes and gravy, carrots, applesauce, rolls and butter, pie and assorted bever-

ages. The event will also in-

clude easy-listening entertain- ment, a bake sale, various raf- fles and more. Shown are committee mem- bers, seated: Faith Foley, Judy Cosgrove and Joyce Tressler. Standing, first row: Sr. Marie Therese, lsp; MaryCarol Kan- ton and Janet Skibinski. Sec- ond row: Jackie Galvin, direc- tor of development and com- munications and Pete Kanton. Committee members absent from photo: Charlie Butler; Theresa Durkin; Cathy Gavin; Ann Kwak; Alice Micone; Carole Paswinski; Sr. Gilmary Speirs, I.H.M.; Sandy Yantorn; Mother Maureen, lsp; Sr. Ge- rard Marie, lsp and Lisa Blak- er, director of activities.

THE ABINGTON

JOURNAL

211 S. Sta te St., CLARKS SUMMIT, PA 18411 • 570-587-1148 NEWS@THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM

EDITOR KRISTIE GRIER CERUTI 585-1604 / kgrier@theabingtonjournal.com

STAFF WRITERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER 585-1606 / lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com ROBERT TOMKAVAGE 585-1600 / rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com

RETAIL ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

JILL ANDES 970-7188 / jill.andes@timesleader.com

AUBREE ARMEZZANI 970-7291/ aarmezzani@timesleader.com

CLASSIFIED ADVISOR LINDA BYRNES 970-7189 / lbyrnes@timesleader.com

COVERAGE AREA: The Abington Journal, a weekly community newspaper that is part of Impressions Media in Wilkes-Barre, PA, covers the “Abingtons” area of Lackawanna and Wyoming counties. This includes but is not limited to Clarks Summit, Clarks Green, South Abington, Newton, Ransom, Glenburn, Dalton, La Plume, Factoryville, Waverly, Tunkhannock and the Abington Heights, Lackawanna Trail and Lakeland school districts. Our circulation hovers between 2,000 and 3,000 readers. We try to get to as many events as possible, but staff and space limitations make it impossible to cover everything. If you have news about your family, town or organization, please send it to us and we’ll do our best to publish it. Photographs (with captions) are welcome.

CORRECTIONS, clarifications: The Abington Journal will correct errors of fact or clarify an y misunderstandings crea ted by a stor y. Call 587-1148. Ha ve a story idea? Please call. We’d like to hear about it. Letters: The Abington Journal prints all letters, which have local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The Abington Journal, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. All letters must be signed and include a phone number where we can reach the author. Editor reserves the right to edit or reject any item submitted. Deadline is noon, Friday prior to publication. Want a photo that has appeared? We can provide color prints of photos taken by our staff. Prices: 8x10 - $25; 5x7 - $12. Call, mail in, or stop by to order.

CIRCULATION Orders for subscription received by Friday at noon will begin the following week. See box at right for subscription prices. Local subscriptions should arrive Wednesdays. Please inform us of dama ge or delay. Call 587-1148. The Abing- ton Journal (USPS 542-460), 211 S. State St., PO Box 277, Clarks Summit, PA 18411. Published weekly by Wilkes Barre Publishing Company, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA, 18411. $20 per year, in Lackawanna and Wyoming counties (PA); $24 elsewhere in PA and additional offices. Periodicals postage paid at Clarks Summit, PA, 18411, and at additional offices.

ISSN. NO. 1931-8871, VOL. 86, ISSUE NO. 42 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Abington Journal, 211 South State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411. ©COPYRIGHT 2012: Entire contents copyrighted. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced by any means without the express written consent of the publisher.

ADVERTISING CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Mondays at 10 a.m. DISPLAY ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Thursday at 5 p.m. CALL 587-1148 (Thursday at noon if proof required.) We have a variety of rates and programs to suit your advertising needs. The Abington Journal satisfies most co-op ad programs. Creative services at no charge. Combination rates with The Dallas Post, Dallas, available. We can pro- duce your newsletter, flyer or newspaper. Call for quotes on typesetting, pro- duction and printing.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM

PAGE 3A

ISN’T IT ROMANTIC?

ISN’T IT ROMANTIC? ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Norbert Mayr and Diane Hrubos will celebrate their 7th anni-

ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI

Norbert Mayr and Diane Hrubos will celebrate their 7th anni- versary in April, 2013 with a banana split for dessert.

‘Harmonious’ life

BY JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Abington Journal Correspondent

B anana splits, laughter

and a devotion to

their family are a few

items 67-year-old Norbert Mayr and his wife, Diane Hrubos, 56, South Abington Township, cherish. In 2005, they agreed “enough is enough” and married after 13 years in a long- distance relationship. The couple met at Diane’s family’s farm in New Jersey in 1966, but “It (their family ties) goes back to my moth- er and Norbert growing up together in Ger many,” said Hrubos. Mayr was born and raised in Germany in the same building as Diane’s mother and following his immigration to the United States in 1965, their families remained in close contact. Hrubos was 10 in 1966 when Mayr, who was work- ing at a jewelry store and living in North Carolina, came to visit. Hrubos re- called, “I had just gotten my ears pierced when he came to visit and he brought me a pair of white gold earrings with a diamond chip. I’m pretty sure that’s when I fell in love. I know that I had a crush on him for most of my life.” In the spring of 1967, Mayr married; Hrubos married in 1977. “We had separate existences, but were always in touch. We always knew what the other one was doing,” said Mayr. Hrubos described their journey as a “crooked road until 20 years ago…. Our lives intersected…I got married and had children and he got married and had children, but he was always on the outskirts of my life.” Years later, after Mayr divorced, he took a teaching position at Penn State Wor- thington Campus in Dun- more. “Fairly frequently my mother invited Norbert to holiday dinners because he was living alone,” said Hru- bos. Twenty years ago, Hrubos said, “…I called him (Mayr)

Twenty years ago, Hrubos said, “…I called him (Mayr) Norbert Mayr, the first time he saw

Norbert Mayr, the first time he saw Diane Hrubos in 1966. Diane is the girl at center with her older John and their sister Cathie. Hrubos was 10 and Mayr was 20. They married 6 years ago.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

and said, ‘Do you want to go out to dinner with me?’ He said, ‘Sure.’ So I drove up here (to Clarks Summit) and here we are.” Mayr recalled his reac- tion to her call. “I didn’t know what to do…This was unusual…but it felt more like a friend in need than anything else. She had just separated from her husband…I had a feeling she needed someone to talk to.” He added, “I had almost gotten used to the idea that I was going to live alone for the rest of my life, and the realization that this was not going to happen was won- derful. After a while, it be- came apparent that when she wasn’t here, something was missing. It was a gradu- al sort of thing that all of a sudden, after a while, it was really tough to envision life if she wasn’t a part of it.” They lived 100 miles apart and in separate states until seven years ago. Hrubos said, “My kids were in school and I didn’t want to take them out and I had a good job. Norbert couldn’t move because he had tenure at the Penn State Worthing- ton Campus.” They were married by a justice of the peace in April

To have your love story or special anniversary considered for a feature in an upcoming edition of The Abington Journal, send name, contact info, anniversary date and details to Editor Kristie Ceruti, kgrier@theabington journal.com, call 585.1604, visit the Abington Journal, 211 S. State Street, Clarks Summit, PA 18411.

2005.

“Our wedding reception was the two of us at Friend- ly’s (former Friendly’s in Clarks Summit) with ba- nana splits,” said Hrubos with a laugh. Hrubos described their marriage as, “Like sleeping in your own bed. It’s easy and comfortable…rarely do we have an argument.” Mayr said, “We’ve known each other so long and so well, it’s just a harmonious sort of thing.” Among interests they share is a great appreciation for grandchildren, whom they visit often; reading; handcrafts (Hrubos makes glass and Mayr enjoys woodworking) and, of course, banana splits. Every year on their anniversar y, they commemorate with a banana split at Friendly’s. Above their bed is a wall decal that states, “It’s never too late for happily ever after.”

states, “It’s never too late for happily ever after.” Diane Hrubos and her granddaughter Olivia Traxler,

Diane Hrubos and her granddaughter Olivia Traxler, in Chesa- peake, Va. at Disney on Ice with husband Norbert Mayr.

peake, Va. at Disney on Ice with husband Norbert Mayr. ‘Friends and Fa mily together with

‘Friends and Family together with Ted’

BY KASEY LYNN Abington Journal Correspondent

CLARKS SUMMIT- Te d Pietryka, 40, an Abington Heights High School gradu- ate, Class of 1990, was thrown into a tailspin of pain- ful memories one night in August when he was in- formed that he would be liv- ing a nightmare again. The night prior to a family vacation, Pietryka awakened to a nosebleed that would not stop, which forced him to spend the rest of the night in the emergency room of an area hospital. The following morning he and his wife of 12 years, Jen, received news that two mass- es were detected in his right lung. The couple have been together for 21 years, during which time they battled his first bout of cancer together. Twenty ye ars ago at the age of 20, Ted Pietr yka wa s diag- nosed with esophageal cancer and treated in Philadelphia. His wife said, “We always said we would go back if he got sick again.” . In August, he was trans- ported to a Philadelphia hos- pital. There, the nonsmoker was told he had lung cancer. That was the beginning. When pulmonologists per- formed a lung biopsy they found a spot in his throat and he was informed that he had cancer there as well. To have two different cancers growing inside him was unusual, he was told, because the cancer did not metastasize from his lung to his throat, rather, it developed in both areas sep- arately. The cancers in his lung and throat have spread to his lymph nodes, making it stage 3 cancer. The doctors’ primary goal right now is his lung, but the chemotherapy treatments should work on both the can-

but the chemotherapy treatments should work on both the can- Ted and Jen Pietryka, shown, feel

Ted and Jen Pietryka, shown, feel fortunate to be surrounded by friends and family while Ted is being treated for two forms of cancer. A fundraiser “Friends and Family Together for Ted” will take place Nov. 11.

cer in his lung and throat, according to Jen Pietryka. “Sometimes not knowing what to expect is better than having experienced it before,” said Jen Pietryka. “It’s different this time in regard to the fact we have a family now, it’s more diffi- cult. And it’s harder on Ted because he can’t work and be as involved with our boys.” The couple are raising three boys, ages 10, 8 and 4. Jen Pietryka said the boys are young and unable to under- stand the complexity of their father’s sickness but know what their parents feel they need to know. “The marathon has begun, but it feels like we are behind in the race,” said Jen Pietryka It has been two months since they received his diag- nosis. He has finished his second chemo treatment and has one more to complete. Then in mid-November, he will receive a PET scan to check on the treatments’ pro- gress. “Ted knows that after che- mo he won’t be able to get out of bed, kiss the boys goodnight, or sit on the side- lines of their soccer games. We know that just getting through the day is a daunting task, something most others take for granted,” she added. “It makes it harder because

we keep looking back 20 years ago to what worked back then, but we can’t this time because technology has changed so much, the treat- ment plans have changed also,” she said. The bright side to the life of this family: all their friends and family members have surrounded them and jumped in to help. “We are so fortunate to be surrounded by friends and family whom have showered us with love and compas- sion,” said Jen Pietryka. “ ‘One day a time’ is the slogan we are living by and we will continue to fight for our beloved boys and all of you.” Those friends have created a fundraiser for Ted Pietr yka and his family, “Friends and Family Together for Ted.” Mary Ellen Berry has helped organize a committee for the fundraiser, which meets every We dnesday at 7:30 p.m. at State Street Grill in Clarks Summit. Berry said she has known Te d Pietr yka since high school; they graduated to- gether and he and her hus- band have been best friends since kindergarten. The fun- draiser Nov. 11 at the State Street Grill will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. A Silent Auction and 50/50 raffle will be held and a DJ will provide entertainment. Tickets for the benefit, $50, will include food stations and an open bar. All proceeds will help offset medical expenses of Te d Pie- tryka. Monetary donations can be made directly to a fund:

“Friends and Family Together for Ted,” C/O PNC Bank, 207 South State Street Clarks Summit. For more information con- tact, Mary Ellen Berry at

570.212.1345.

information con- tact, Mary Ellen Berry at 570.212.1345. SUBMITTED PHOTO When Daisies meet pumpkins Members of

SUBMITTED PHOTO

When Daisies meet pumpkins

Members of the Waverly Daisy Troop 50969, recently decorated pumpkins. They are shown, from left: Bella Moher, Sophie Snyder, Emma Wagner, Eva Blaum, Sadie Gilbert, Gabriella Potis, Gianna Fisne and Abigail O’Sullivan.

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PAGE 4A www.t heabingtonjournal.co m

Th e Abington Journal Clarks Su mmit, PA

WEDNESDAY , OCTO BER 17 , 2012

C.G.

discusses

budget

BY EMILY CULLEY Abington Journal Correspondent

CLARKS GREEN- Clarks Green Borough Council dis- cussed the tentative budget for 2013 at its monthly meeting Oct. 10 at the borough building. Council member Alan Hughes described it as “a work in pro- gress.” Council members re- ceived an early draft of the budget to be reviewed and amended as necessar y. Council president Keith Williams said in regard to plan- ning the 2013 budget, “I want to reassure the public that coun- cil is exercising diligence.” Further discussion concerned the upcoming Veterans Ou- treach Oct. 26 in which Annis- sa Fetchen from the Lackawan- na County Veterans Affairs will be available at the borough building to discuss Veterans benef its from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Council also mentioned that it is seeking donation of toys or gift cards for the Dec. 15 Health and Safety Fair at Our Lady of Peace School. Councilman David Rinaldi reported on the annul leaf bag distribution and thanked those who helped including Abington Heights High School senior John Olevnik, John Earley, Ben Brown, former councilman Rick Williams and 15 students from Baptist Bible College and Seminary (BBC&S). “It was a wonderful experi- ence getting to know the young people from BBC & S,” Ri- naldi said. “The students were more than happy to help.” He mentioned that as Chair of the Refuse and Recycling Committee, he would like to revisit involving BBC&S stu- dents for next year’s leaf bag distribution. Council member Marnie O’Dea Palmer and President Williams introduced the idea of a quarterly newsletter for resi- dents to keep them apprised of new residents, ordnances and events. Palmer said it could be a venue for getting to know resi- dents’ thoughts and opinions concerning the borough. She volunteered to research the cost.

the borough. She volunteered to research the cost. ABINGTON JOURNAL/EMILY CULLEY A Veterans Outreach will be

ABINGTON JOURNAL/EMILY CULLEY

A Veterans Outreach will be host- ed at Clarks Green Borough Build- ing Oct. 26 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Shown are Clarks Green council- man Victor Alberigi and Council President Keith Williams planning it.

Scranton joins 3rd coast-to-coast rally

On Oct. 20, concerned citi- zens of Scranton will take to the streets to voice public opposi- tion to the President Barack Obama administration’s Health and Human Services Mandate. The Mandate forces all employ- ers—including religious schools and hospitals—to provide free contraceptives, surgical steril- izations and abortion-inducing drugs through their health plans, regardless of religious or moral convictions. The Scranton Stand Up for Religious Freedom Rally will begin at noon at Courthouse Square, across from the Wiliam J. Nealon Federal Building, 235 N. Washington Ave., Scranton, joining more than 130 cities to date and towns from Maine to Hawaii participating in this national event. A complete list of rally sites and other details are available at StandUpRally.com.

ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER ’Artist With a Needle’ Marie Kowalski offers her plastic craft creations

ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER

’Artist With a Needle’ Marie Kowalski offers her plastic craft creations for sale at the Newton Ransom Fire Compa- ny Ladies Auxiliary Fall Craft Show Oct. 13.

CREATIVITY in Newton

Auxiliary Fall Craft Show Oct. 13. CREATIVITY in Newton Edward Kloniecke, of Moosic, creates wood plaques

Edward Kloniecke, of Moosic, creates wood plaques such as this one by first drawing the design on a computer, then sending it to a laser, which acts as a printer, to etch and cut the design into the wood. The artist said he has worked with the craft for about 3 years and also uses other materials such as glass, cloth and marble, al- though wood is his biggest seller. He said he creates per- sonalized gifts. For details, visit scrantonengraving.com.

F rom dog

treats and

couch-

shaped tissue box covers to hand-painted glassware, the Newton Ransom Fire Company Ladies Auxiliary Fall Craft Show had it all. Shoppers browsed the various tables set up in the fire hall Oct. 13, inspecting the varie- ty of artistic cre-

ations and making purchases. For a listing of more upcoming craft shows, see the Arts and Entertainment Calendar on Page 11.

shows, see the Arts and Entertainment Calendar on Page 11. Rose Cognetti has been sewing these

Rose Cognetti has been sewing these stuffed turtles and similar stuffed lizards, frogs, monsters, bears, ghosts, crazy dolls and more as gifts for about 40 years, she said, and she’s been selling them at local craft fairs for about three years.

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‘Safe’ discussions at library

BY GERARD E. NOLAN Abington Journal Correspondent

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP.- When a family mem- ber seems to be exhibiting signs of drug or alcohol abuse, it can be difficult to know how to help that per- son. Educating those with loved ones who have sub- stance abuse problems is among the aims of the Abington Families Helping Families program, which runs at the Abington Com- munity Library’s Ryan Room each Wednesday be- ginning at 7 p.m. One of the goals of the program is to “convey accu- rate information for people exposed to drug and alco- hol abuse and addiction,” said Gary Davis, facilitator

for the Abington Families Helping Families program. Davis, a court liaison with Clearbrook Treatment Centers, said the idea be- hind holding the program at the library is that that set- ting is “safe and comfort- able.” “We have folks come in who are in recovery,” Davis said. “We’re offering sup- port. They speak about their experience.” Those in recovery can also provide insight to those struggling with addic- tion or who have family members struggling, he added. Davis explained that spreading awareness is im- portant because informed people can better handle a crisis.

“Police chiefs, clinicians, etc.—folks don’t meet these people until there’s a cri- sis,” he said. “In a crisis,

details are missed,” he add- ed, which is why Families Helping Families hopes to inoculate attendees with information that will help them in their battle against addiction. The speaker Oct. 17 will be Jeff Zerechak, who is director of drug and alcohol programming in Lackawan- na and Susquehanna coun- ties. “I expect an informative presentation,” Davis said. Anyone interested in learning about substance abuse is encouraged to at- tend. For more information, call the library at

570.587.3440

tend. For more information, call the library at 570.587.3440 PHOTO COURTESY DAVID RINALDI Vo lunteers aid

PHOTO COURTESY DAVID RINALDI

Volunteers aid in leaf bag distribution

According to David J. Rinaldi, Clarks Green Borough Council member and Chair Refuse and Recycling Committee, on Oct. 6, Clarks Green Borough conducted its annual leaf bag distribution. Annually, council members were tasked with the physical delivery of the bags to borough residents. In an effort to increase efficiency and create a community event, Council solicited volunteers from the community to assist. They contacted Jonathan Strayer, Director of Student Activities at Baptist Bible College and Seminary offered assistance from the student body there. In less than a week’s time, 15 students volunteered: Abigail Sko- glund, Tamra Lenfesty, Ashley Adams, Faith Helbig, Claudia Erway, Vicky Eaton, Kristen Miller, Rachel Ingalls, Daniel Pfuelg, Stephen Yakaboski, Ethan Balsavo, Josh Mowers, Kevin Fisher, Kristen Schill and Peter Rel- ph.Additionally, resulting from a borough sign board request , John Olevnik, a senior at Abington Heights High School, offered and rendered his assistance. Three other individuals donated their time as well John Earley,Ben Brown and former Borough Councilman Rick Williams. Shown are volunteers at the Clarks Green Borough leaf bag distribution, including students from Baptist Bible College and Seminary.

at the Clarks Green Borough leaf bag distribution, including students from Baptist Bible College and Seminary.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM

PAGE 5A

Parenthood, Abington Style with Adriane Heine
Parenthood,
Abington Style
with Adriane Heine

Simple life saves money

leave a wake of strewn clothes and unfinished homework in

their wake and race to the TV. All so that the entire house- hold could be held captive by a shrill, raspy-voiced dance teacher who berates her young students while their bejeweled mothers look on, whispering bleeped obscenities. “This is what’s breaking our household budget,?” I mused.

I don’t know what took me

I was never a cable TV per- son. With so many good shows on the basic networks, I couldn’t even contemplate keeping up with the offerings on hundreds of channels, time-wise or financially. Until five years ago, that is, when the free offer came in the mail. “Sign up now and receive a free laptop!” The phone com- pany had paired with the sat- ellite television company to offer a bundle package; phone, internet and television, all on the same bill. The three major networks and PBS had always been enough for us. I was the only mom around whose kids didn’t know who Sponge Bob was. They had been raised thus far on “Clifford the Big Red Dog,” “Sesame Street” and no commercials. I felt no need for more channels, but the free laptop came at the perfect time. We were opening a business and really needed it. The price to get more chan- nels was within reason and the kids were thrilled. It seemed like the right time to upgrade. In the five years since, our family’s appetite for more and more channels has grown. One Sunday, the Eagles were playing on a sports chan- nel we didn’t receive. So we added it. Then Oprah started her own network. It wasn’t part of our package, so I added it. Then we watched Animal Planet on a road trip and real- ized we didn’t have it, so we added it. Last fall, after strong storms, repair technicians were to our house more than once to fix the satellite recep- tion. “I can give you HBO free

$100 million in aid available

The Lackawanna County Commissioners received noti- fication that the U. S. Small Business Administration ap- proved $100,850,800 in Disaster Assistance Loans for residents and business owners in Penn- sylvania affected by Tropical Storm Lee and Hurricane Irene. According to SBA officials, 2,618 home and business disas- ter loans have been approved. The commissioners urge residents who experienced diffi- culties to contact either www.sba.gov or the SBA’s Cus- tomer Service Center at 800.659.2955 (800.877.8339 for the deaf and hard-of-hearing).

for three months,” the tech pitched. I agreed, then ne- glected to cancel it when the rate increase kicked in. Next thing I knew, this for- mer proud “Caillou” and “Charlie Rose”-watching, budget-conscious mom, was shelling out well over $200 a month for TV. Pretty silly considering we have little time to watch it. Between home- work, after-school activities, jobs and chores, we are lucky if we watch an hour a night. It hasn’t gone unnoticed that our nearly one-year-old pre- fers “Bar ney,” just as her sis- ters had, to any slick Disney- fied version of the Mickey Mouse Clubhouse. I remem- ber the guilt I felt when her big sisters first left PBS for Disney and Nickelodeon. The worst part had been their reac- tion to the colorful commer- cials with the catchy jingles. Our first few Christmases as satellite TV-watchers had brought must-have toys that were systematically played with once and left to collect dust. In addition, the ever-filling DVR had become a source of stress, another thing on the never-ending To-Do List. “Do you know you have 22 episodes of ‘The View’ re- corded?” my husband asked. “When are you going to watch them? Do you realize we only have 34 more hours of record- ing space left on the DVR?” On any given weeknight, as I race to get the kids showered after practice, check their homework and prep their backpacks for the coming day, he could be heard calling out, “Hur ry, guys! We have three Glee episodes to watch. Come and sit down, quick!” Then there was the dreaded Tuesday night ritual: “Dance Moms.” Our middle-schooler had heard about it at school and both she and her younger sister were hooked. They would race in from practice,

so long, but the $253 bill that came this month finally set

me into action. First, I got the husband on board. “I could give up my hunting shows,” he said. “There’s al- ways ‘Pennsylvania Outdoor Life.’” Then he went on, “If you could save us some mon- ey, it would be so worth it.” Next, the kids. I knew this would be a tougher sell. I wasn’t seeking their approval as much as hoping to make them understand the changes. “We can’t lose Nickelodeon, Disney or MTV!” one ex- claimed. “MTV?” I asked, “I didn’t know you watched MTV.”

“ ‘Ridiculousness’! I love

that show.” “Honey, it is a funny home video show,” I said, “but, is it worth $50 a month? You watch it once in a while on a Saturday morning.” She shook her head indicating that no, it was not. We talked about how little time we have to watch TV, how many shows we all like on regular TV and how much money we will save. They agreed it was a good idea. The phone call was even more productive than I had hoped. My husband was thrilled with the savings and now the costly extracurricular activities the girls had been asking for became feasible. As we settled down on the couch on Sunday night to watch “America’s Funniest Home Videos” instead of “Honey Boo-Boo,” I was re- minded of years gone by, of simpler times. I smiled and sighed peacefully, knowing our lives just became a little bit simpler and a lot less cost- ly.

Adriane Heine and her husband, Doug, own Dublin’s Pub in West Scranton and are raising their three daughters in Waverly. Contact her at news@theabingtonjournal.com or with column questions or suggesti- ons.”

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Children’s Holiday Coloring Sweepstakes

ASSOCIATION Children’s Holiday Coloring Sweepstakes The grand prize child winner of the coloring sweepstakes is

The grand prize child winner of the coloring sweepstakes is invited to ‘flip the switch’ to light the town at the Tr ee Lighting Ceremony Saturday, Nov.17 at 6 p.m. Grand Prize: $500 Savings Bond from Fidelity, Discount and Deposit Bank Second Prize: To be announced Third Prize: To be announced Rules: All entries must be receive d by Fr iday, Nov. 9 at noon. Entrants must be age 12 and under. One entry per child. Entries may be mailed to the ABPA P.O. Box 98, Clarks Summit PA 18411 or dropped off at The Abington Journal, 211 South State Street, Clarks Summit. Winners will be selected by a random drawing and notified by phone. Contact the ABPA with questions at 570.587.9045.

Contestant Name

Contact phone number (not for publication):

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PAGE 6A www.t heabingt onjournal.co m

Th e Abington Journal Clarks Su mmit , PA

WEDNESDAY , OCTO BER 17 , 2012

SCARECROWS: Don’t forget to VOTE

, OC TO BER 17 , 2012 SCARECROWS: Don’t forget to VOTE CareGivers America Scarecrow: Dr.

CareGivers America Scarecrow: Dr. CGI

Don’t forget to VOTE CareGivers America Scarecrow: Dr. CGI Jaya Yoga Everything Natural Cloe & Company

Jaya Yoga

to VOTE CareGivers America Scarecrow: Dr. CGI Jaya Yoga Everything Natural Cloe & Company Lawler’s Affordable

Everything Natural

America Scarecrow: Dr. CGI Jaya Yoga Everything Natural Cloe & Company Lawler’s Affordable Elegance Steve

Cloe & Company

Dr. CGI Jaya Yoga Everything Natural Cloe & Company Lawler’s Affordable Elegance Steve Pronko Jewelry Refill

Lawler’s Affordable Elegance

Natural Cloe & Company Lawler’s Affordable Elegance Steve Pronko Jewelry Refill Station refills. Now fixe s

Steve Pronko Jewelry

Refill Station refills. Now fixes computers.

BY KASEY LYNN Abington Journal Correspondent

CLARKS SUMMIT- A local business has added a new service to their store. The Refill Station, 213 South State Street, now offers computer repairs. The local family business has been open for three and a half years. The store is run by Jason Zeidman and Jennifer Henning. “We added the computer repairs to the business because it is something I’ve always liked to do,” said Zeidman. The Refill Station offers computer sales, computer

repairs, small business net- working and ink and toner sales. The business advertises the slogan, “Ref ill and Save.” Zeidman said that they are always busy. The Refill Station also of- fers free pickup and delivery to all local businesses. They also make house calls. And it is now possible for customers to order online at www.there- fillstationonline.com. Custom- ers can contact The Refill Station with questions or busi- ness at 586.3455. “We like to support other local businesses as much as we can,” said Zeidman.

other local businesses as much as we can,” said Zeidman. Vote for your fa vorite bu

Vote for your favorite business scarecrow and be entered to win. The ABPA business scarecrow pho- tos and addresses appeared Oct. 17 and again this week in The Abington Journal and online. View them online at www.theabingtonjournal.com and at all participating business locations. Vote for your favorites by Wed., Oct. 31 in one of three ways (email, in person, regular mail) and you’ll be entered to win great prizes. WHAT YOU CAN WIN: $100 gift cer tif icate

good at all of the participating scarecrow businesses. HOW TO VOTE:

1. Email to news@theabingtonjournal.com

With a subject line “Scarecrow Contest” email the

following: your favorite scarecrow and its location, your name, town and phone number. We won’t pub- lish, it’s just to verify your vote.

2. Drop off/send via regular mail same info as

above to The Abington Journal 211 S. State Street, Clarks Summit PA 18411 Attn: Scarecrow Contest. If the office is closed, leave your vote in our bright blue drop off box in front of The Abington Journal.

Business Scarecrow Locations

* Everything Natural- 426 S. State St.

* Soul to Sole- 535 S. State St.

ABINGTON JOURNAL/KASEY LYNN

Owners of The Refill Station, Jennifer Henning and Jason Zeidman, now offer computer repair.

* Caregivers America- 718 S. State St.

* Steve Pronko Jewelry, 120

S.State St.

www.TheAbingtons.com
www.TheAbingtons.com

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* Kidazzle- 320 S. State St.

* Cloe & Company- 410 S. State

St.

* Lawler’s Affordable Elegance- 210 Depot St.

* Duffys Coffee House- 312 S. State St.

* AAJRB Community

Classroom- 304 S. State St.

* Jaya Yoga- 320 S. State St.

* My Gym- location TBD

DONATION

Continued from Page 1

community active with the church,” said youth group member Dylan Passetti. This year, a competition will take place to see which team can collect the most food. Teams will be split into groups of four or five. Each team will get a map of the neighborhood. At 6 p.m., they will return to Summit Baptist Bible Church to weigh the collected food.

The team that brings in the most food will win a pizza party. The overall goal for the church is to collect more than 2,000 pounds of food, their total collected last year. “People around here are generous,” said youth group member Jonathan Hanna. All of the collected foods will be donated to food pantries in Lackawanna County, including the Scranton Rescue Mission. I’m always proud of the stu-

dents and athletes because of their willingness to give up a Sunday afternoon,” said Sum- mit Baptist Bible Church Pastor Frank Passetti, who leads the food drive. “It’s not just a youth group effort, but also a commu- nity effort.” If anyone has any questions about the food drive, contact Passetti at 570.575.3995 or e-mail fpassetti@comcast.net.

Scranton Prep students offer tutoring for the Scholarship Entrance Exam

As a service to the community and the school, Scranton Prep National Honor Society stu- dents are preparing to tutor eighth graders for the upcoming Scholarship Entrance Exam. The tutoring will take place on Tuesdays. Tutoring began Oct.16 and runs for the six weeks prior to the entrance exam Dec. 1.

Eighth graders are tutored in the math and verbal concepts that are covered by the exam. Be- coming familiar with the struc- ture of the test and the nature of the questions is an important part of the test preparation. For more information contact the Office of Admissions at 941.7737, ext. 112.

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REPORT

Continued from Page 1

someone tries to lure a small child into their car, the results can be beyond devastating.” Despite the incident, Lounsberg feels the communi- ty is full of good-hearted resi- dents. “I have two students in the school and we have the most caring, loving parents I’ve ever seen,” she said. “I feel the community is a little bit of a throwback in that parents look out for children other than their own.” Lounsberg hopes the letter will heighten awareness among everyone in the com- munity to avoid a more seri- ous problem. “It’s only after a tragedy happens that everyone looks back and says what could have be done,” she said. “What we can do now is watch out for our kids and pay attention.”

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THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA

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THE ABINGTO N JOURNAL CLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WEDNESDAY , OCTO BER 17 , 2012

CROSSWORDS

PA WEDNESD AY , OC TO BER 17 , 2012 CROSSWORDS ANSWERS ON PAGE 24 Committee
PA WEDNESD AY , OC TO BER 17 , 2012 CROSSWORDS ANSWERS ON PAGE 24 Committee
PA WEDNESD AY , OC TO BER 17 , 2012 CROSSWORDS ANSWERS ON PAGE 24 Committee

ANSWERS ON PAGE 24

AY , OC TO BER 17 , 2012 CROSSWORDS ANSWERS ON PAGE 24 Committee plans annual

Committee plans annual Artisans’ Marketplace

Members of the Artisans’ Marketplace committee met recently to plan for the annual event which is set to take place at the Waverly Commu- nity House Nov. 17 and 18 . Shown above, front row, from left: Maria Donahue, Co-Chair; Sybil Keris, Hospi- tality; Susie Sugerman, Lun-

cheon; and Kate Cole, Grand- mas Kitchen. Back row, from left: Danielle Carpenter, Trea- surer; Michele Hughes, Chair; Kathleen Nelson, Holiday Hearth Booth; and Susan Gershey, Signage and Suppli- es. Absent from photo is Sue Houck, Tickets and Hostesses.

Casey announces Scott Twp. funding

U.S. Senator Bob Casey (D- PA) announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Development program has approved a Community Facility Direct Loan of $1,094 to Scott Township in Lackawanna County.

Rural Development funds will be used to repave existing roads which were affected by Town- ship Sewer Authority’s recently installed central sewers. In addi- tion to the affected roads, Scott Township will also be repaving other roads in poor condition.

Nature center programs to take flight

Birds will be the focus of a series of programs set for October at the End- less Mountains Nature Center (EMNC) on Vosburg Road in Wash- ington Township. There will be pro- grams for all ages and visitors can interact with the new hands-on exhib- its in the lodge.

The series begins with a Birds-of-

Prey Identif ication Wo rkshop Oct. 17 , from 7 to 8:30 p.m., followed the next day by a field trip to Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Kempton, Berks County. There is no fee for EMNC stewards and for others the fee is $5.

On Oct. 18, participants can visit

one of the “hottest hawk migration spots” on the east coast to see “The Greatest Show Above the Earth.” De-

tails will be mailed to registrants. The entrance fee to Hawk Mountain is $6 for adults, $5 for seniors, and $3 for children 6-12 years. EMNC stewards are free through a reciprocal program with Hawk Mountain Sanctuar y.

On Oct. 19, the center will host a

program on birds of prey for home- schooled students, from 9:30 a.m. to noon. The fee for the program is $6 per student, and $3 per parent.

My name is

Billy

My name is Bi lly Name: Billy Age: 5 years Sex: Neutered male Breed: Tiger cat

Name: Billy Age: 5 years Sex: Neutered male Breed: Tiger cat About me: I enjoy the company of other cats, but have no experience with dogs or children. Remember to contact the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter at 586.3700 if your pet is lost or goes astray.

The Griffin Pond Animal Shelter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd., Clarks Summit, is open for the adop- tion of pets from noon to 4:30 p.m., daily. Wish list items are always appre- ciated, including cat litter and paper tow- els.

Adopt a cage at the Griffin Pond Animal Shel- ter for one month and your $20 donation will go toward care and feeding of the animal in that cage for the month you choose. A card will be placed on the cage identifying the sponsor for that month. Send the following Adopt-a-Cage informa- tion, including name, address, city, state and zip, phone number, sponsor month, choice of dog, cat or small animal cage and how you would like your sponsor card to appear, along with $20 for each cage to The Griffin Pond Animal Shel- ter, 967 Griffin Pond Rd., Clarks Summit, PA 1841 1.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM

PAGE 9A

FUN

at least 20 pumpkins carved on display. “We will be carving 8 to10 of them live from 2 to 6 p.m. up in front of businesses on State Street in Clark Summit. There will be two carvers and we will be doing designs from simple and fun to intricate and detailed…De- signs will be fun and spooky,” said Croutha- mel. In the future home of the Abington Area Community Classroom (AACC) located on the first floor of the Clarks Summit Borough Hall, is where eventgoers will find informa- tion, including a floor plan and flyers with information regarding AACC classes and how to donate. Expect to find Cake Pops that look like pumpkins donated by Ann Rich; a pop- corn machine courtesy of the Lions Club of the Abingtons, with an opportunity for chil- dren to make Popcorn Hands; a Mad Scientist Lab and a Candy Monster craft by the Abing- ton Heights Civic League; water for sale do- nated by Glen Summit; Ve nus Flytraps; “Little Shop of Hor rors” “Audrey” costume courtesy of the Clarks Summit Shade Tree Commis- sion; Ghost Busters Game, Spooky Eye Toss and a UFO craft hosted by Girl Scout Cadet Troop 50-273; hot chocolate and food avail- able from Duffy’s Coffee House; story time with Chris Arcangelo; information from The Deutsch Institute; Meri Rockaway selling dog- gie treats and a Mexican holiday Day of the Dead craft table sponsored by the Clarks Sum- mit Borough. Co-chairs for the borough hall Fall Fun Day activities are Dorothy O’Connor and Tara Crum. Volunteers are needed to help with the pa- rades. To lend a hand, contact Dorothy O’Con- nor at Sole to Soul, 570.585.0439. The 2012 Fall Fun Day is sponsored by The Abington Journal, My Gym, Everything Nat- ural, and Summit Frameworks. For a complete list of activities, refer to the schedule of events. More information is avail- able by calling Heritage Baptist Church at 570.587.2543 or the ABPA at 570.587.9045.

Baptist Church at 570.587.2543 or the ABPA at 570.587.9045. ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER These are not ordinary

ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER

These are not ordinary balloons. Not on the inside, that is. A surprise awaits trick-or-treaters who are brave enough to pop one at Kidazzle, 320 S. State St. during Fall Fun Day Oct. 20.

Fall Fun Day in the Abingtons Events

Sponsors are Everything Natural My Gym, Summit Frameworks and The Abington Journal. Co-chairs are Dorothy O’Connor and Tara Crum. Heritage Baptist Church, 415 Venard Road from 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Free food, rides, games, scarecrow making, pony rides,

a magician and juggler.

11 a.m. - New Appalachia, a gospel bluegrass band noon - Live Pumpkin Carving noon– 2 p.m. - Pony rides 1-3 p.m. - Scarecrow Making

1 p.m. -Juggler Rob Smith

2:30 p.m. - Phil Crosson Magic

Downtown Clarks Summit - from 2 to 8 p.m. Children and pooch costume parade, trick-or-treat at area businesses, live giant pumpkin carvings. 2- 5 p.m.- Free photo booth at The Abington Journal. Get a keepsake photo taken with a giant pumpkin. Enter My Edition “Draw Your Worst Nightmare” contest.

2- 5 p.m. Kidazzle, 320 S. State St., Trick-or-treaters pop a balloon on the Halloween wall of fun win a prize. 3:30 - 3:45 p.m. Costume Parade Lineup at Citizens Savings Bank Parking lot, 500 S. State St.

4 p.m. – Child and Pooch Costume Parade, heads down

Davis Street and ends at Borough Building. 5-6:30 p.m. Party at Clarks Summit Borough Building,

304 S. State St., first floor, future home of the Abington Area Community Classroom, includes games, crafts.

- Cake Pop pumpkins

- Popcorn machine and make Popcorn Hands

- Mad Scientist Lab and a Candy Monster craft

- Venus Flytraps

- “Little Shop of Horrors” “Audrey” costume

- Ghost Busters Game

- Spooky Eye Toss

- UFO craft

- Hot chocolate and food

- Doggie treats for sale

- Mexican holiday Day of the Dead craft table

6 p.m. story teller Chris Arcangelo at Clarks Summit Borough Building

Giant Live Pumpkin Carvings

Noon at Heritage Baptist Church; 2 to 6 p.m. in front of businesses on State Street in Clark Summit. Noon- Heritage Baptist Church- 415 Venard Rd

2 p.m.-The Abington Journal- 211 S. State St.

2:30 p.m.- Sole to Soul- 535 S. State St.

3 p.m.-Sprint Physical Therapy- 539 S. State St.

3:30 p.m.- Everything Natural- 426 S. State St.

4 p.m.- Summit Frameworks- * Not at business location (along S. State St.) 4:30 p.m.- Lawrence Young - 418 S. State St.

5 p.m.- MyGym- * Not at business location

5:30 p.m.- Sprint Print- * Not at business location

Pre-Carved Pumpkin Locations Nickie’s Fabulous Hoagies- 611 S. State St. Pro-Active Chiropractic- 1146 Northern Blvd. Sanderson State Street Salon- 509 S. State St. Mamma Mia- 507 S. State St. Kidazzle- 320 S. State St. Duffy’s Coffee House- 312 S. State St. AAJRB Community Classroom- 304 S. State St. Lawler’s Affordable Elegance- 210 Depot St. Angel’s Galeria- 208 Depot St. Steve Pronko Jewelry, 120 State St.

Find out how to vote for Business Scarecrow on Page 6 of this week’s Abington Journal.

GLOBAL

Continued from Page 1

eighth-grade student at Abing- ton Heights Middle School, is not a member of the Te en Leadership Committee, but offered help and support for the program. Bhardwaj moved to the United States May 25, and would like the community to learn more about the people and cultures of India. She said, “I’m here in the United States and it (the pro- gram) is of my motherland. I hope they (people) will learn India is very good, there’s lots of traffic and it has many mon- uments.” Dr. Pancholy, whose goal for the program is to further rec- ognize and promote an appre- ciation for the beauty in di- versity that exists in our com- munity, said, “We, in North- eastern Pennsylvania have a view of the world that is very Eurocentric. We have a diverse region, however our vision is Eurocentric. We have so many cultures amongst us…We are an accepting culture and a gentle people here, but what happens, I think, is that there is a tendency towards finding comfort in homogeneity.” She added, “I think there is an ap- preciation in finding beauty in diversity. Eye on India is a unique example of that and that’s why I wanted to start out with this project in two phas- es.”

I wanted to start out with this project in two phas- es.” ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI Vanshika

ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI

Vanshika and Aditya Bhardwaj.

The program Oct. 20 will highlight the unity and diversi- ty in India through folk dance demonstrations, verbal pre- sentations, a question and answer period and a time for attendees to sample Indian food by region. Participation in folk dances is encouraged. Food will be made by people from the various regions of India and among the food, Pancholy said, will be available are Dhokla made from chick pea flour and Rajma and rice. Pancholy said, “…India is

pea flour and Rajma and rice. Pancholy said, “…India is Rani and Kareena Dalavai, 1. truly

Rani and Kareena Dalavai, 1.

truly like Europe in that it is a series of several little countries with its own little languages, clothing, customs, trades – things that make it special…I want to be able to show there is diversity in India, but then there is this unified nation. You can be beautiful but retain your uniqueness.” The second phase of the program, Nov. 17, will focus on the Diwali Festival, com- plete with sparklers for the kids and desserts. “The Diwali Festival is the equivalent of our Indian Christmas, Fourth of July and New Year’s all rolled up into one. We exchange presents and pray for peace, wealth and forgiveness. We put away all of our differences, rejoice and visit friends and family.” Pancholy thanked Leela Baikadi, project artistic con- sultant, who dressed a manne- quin in themed clothing and will present a collage and dec- orate the library room themat- ically; Sandy Longo, young adult librarian, who she said “played an indispensable orga- nizational role in the project” and the Teen Leadership Com- mittee and co-chair, Maitri Pancholy. Volunteers included : Udai Aulakh, Rachel Ezrin, Pari Pancholy, Ellie Sullum, Brianna Heffley, Rani Dalavai, Kareena Dalavai. Register at 570.587.3440 or on line at lclshome.org/abing- ton.

at 570.587.3440 or on line at lclshome.org/abing- ton. Our Lady of Peace first grade students dance
at 570.587.3440 or on line at lclshome.org/abing- ton. Our Lady of Peace first grade students dance

Our Lady of Peace first grade students dance to some music during the Race For Education fundraiser held in the school gym Oct. 12. Front, from left: Nora Kolucki, of Jermyn and Rachel Fay, of Nicholson; back row:

Rosey Kelly, of Clarks Summit and Lilly Haggerty, of Clarks Summit.

ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER

OLP students grooving to education

Students at Our Lady of Peace, Clarks Green, traded in their saddle shoes for sneakers and hit the gym floor walking, running and dancing Oct. 12. The “Race for Education” event, attended by more than 350 students from kindergarten through eighth grade, raised funds for the school’s needs.

Participating in Our Lady of Peace ‘Race For Education’ fundraiser, from front: Jack Burke, second grade, Clarks Summit; Alyssa Kelly, first grade, Scranton; Peyton Houli- han, first grade, Clarks Sum- mit; Keith Pryitchyk, second grade, Clarks Summit; Chris- topher Molnar, second grade, Clarks Summit; Jerry Dona- hue, second grade, Clarks Summit; Quinn Kelly, second grade, Clarks Summit.

Clarks Summit; Quinn Kelly, second grade, Clarks Summit. ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/EMILY TAYLOR Catherine Michelle
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/EMILY TAYLOR Catherine Michelle King Laboranti was represented at An Empty Place at

ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/EMILY TAYLOR

Catherine Michelle King Laboranti was represented at An Empty Place at the Table Domestic Violence Exhibit at Keystone College.

Keystone hosts ‘Empty Place’

In obser vance of National Domestic Violence Aware- ness Month, Keystone College and the Women’s Re- source Center of Scranton presented, “An Empty Place at the Table” Oct. 9 in the Fireplace Lounge, Hibbard Cam- pus Center. The exhibit serves as a visual reminder of the deadliness of domestic violence. It honors the lives of those from Lackawanna and Susquehanna counties who were murdered in acts of domestic violence and seeks to increases the understanding of the impact of domestic and sexual violence on families and communities.

of domestic and sexual violence on families and communities. ABOVE: From left: Kristi Greid- er, Mary

ABOVE: From left: Kristi Greid- er, Mary Endrusick and Amy Clark of The Women’s Re- source Center put together, ‘An Empty Place at the Table,’ an exhibit on domestic vio- lence, at Keystone College

FNCB signs up to support Ryan’s Run

Allied Services Integrated Health System welcomes a new major sponsor to the 2012 Ryan’s Run Campaign. First National Community Bank (FNCB) has joined a team of community-minded organizations to raise funds for children and adults with dis-

abilities. FNCB along with WNEP- TV’s Ryan Leckey and 18 other “Team Leckey” members are helping raise awareness and funds to support the work of Allied Services in improving the lives of children and adults with disabilities and life-chang-

ing injuries. The campaign will culminate Nov. 4, with team members running the 26.2 mile New York City Marathon. The Ryan’s Run campaign has raised more than $340,000 in two years. To get involved, visit www.allied-services.org/ ryansrun.

PAGE 10 A w ww.t heabingtonjournal.co m

Th e Abington Journal Clarks Su mmit, PA

WEDNESDAY , OCTO BER 17 , 2012

Golf plans on hold

BY BRITTNEY PIERCE Abington Journal Correspondent

WAVERLY TWP. - Waverly Township will recieve tips on their Frisbee golf course from a Frisbee golf design profession- al. At the Oct. 8 meeting, Town- ship Supervisor Dr. Douglas Klamp mentioned they would “very much like some recom- mendations.” Ordering goals is going to be held off until it’s certain that the Frisbee golf course will be used. If the goals are to be anchored in concrete, it will need to be done soon before the weather turns colder, said public works director Thomas James. There was no new business.

A.H. graduate completes training

Army Pvt. Gustavo W. Defreitas has graduated from basic infantry training at Fort Benning, Co- lumbus, Ga.

During nine weeks of training, the soldier received training in drill and ceremonies, weapons, map read- ing, tactics, military courtesy, military justice, physical fitness, first aid and Army history, core values and traditions. Defreitas is the son of Ro- sangela Charlesworth and step- son of Charles Charlesworth, both of Clarks Summit. He is a 2008 graduate of Abington High School, Clarks Summit.

Defreitas

graduate of Abington High School, Clarks Summit. Defreitas Factoryville man gr aduates Air Force Airman Aaron

Factoryville man graduates

Air Force Airman Aaron C. Billings graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in mil- itary discipline and studies, Air Force core values, phys- ical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits to- ward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Billings is the son of Frank Billings, Factoryville. He is a 2010 graduate of Tunkhannock High School.

Rewarding trips

BY ROBERT TO MKAVAGE

rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com

“The conditions are quite different than home,” Freidlin said. “It usually pours every day and is very muddy. It’s also very humid. It can be somewhat oppressive at times, but we like it because it builds character.” The groups also take every precaution to ensure that everyone remains safe. “I always take another female chaperone,

either a parent or teacher at the school,” Frei- dlin said. “We have great tour guides and make sure every aspect of the trip is covered so the kids stay safe." According to Freidlin, groups are already forming for next sum-

mer’s adventures to Pana- ma and Costa Rica. “It becoming difficult to pick the groups because so many kids have interest and several want to return over and over again,” he said. “It’s feels like home to them.” Diane Ostrowski, a fourth grade teacher at Waverly Elementar y School, who went along on the first trip to Panama thought it was an eye- opening for both the stu- dents and chaperones.

“The Embera people are such simplistic, caring, and giving people,” she said. “They live without electricity in grass huts in the middle of the rainforest. Our students recognized how little the Embe- ra people needed in order to live such happy and fulfilling lives. The adventurous experi- ence was truly breathtaking and life changing for the students, and myself as an adult.” Students who participated in the Panama trip were James Barrett, Holly Beppler, Han- na Braid, Katie Carlin, Madeleine Cohen, Brendan Conahan, Victoria Jeschke, Taya Kobrynich, Brian Mattern, Raeva Mulloth, Rishi Mulloth, Brandon Ostrowski, Rachel Owens, Sarah Richardson, Susan Scappatura, Catherine Simakaski, Emily Smith and Ra- chel Yannuzzi.

A bington Heights Middle School sev-

enth grade science teacher Michael

Freidlin has taken students on adven-

tures through the rainforests of Central

America for the last 14 years as part of trop- ical ecology trips. Freidlin has organized funding for be- tween 30 to 40 trips, giving more than 500 students an opportunity to expand their hori- zons. This year, Freidlin led two trips, one to Panama from July 2-10, and

one to Panama and Costa Rica from Aug. 4-20. During the time in Costa Rica, the group went on several hiking and kayaking adventures. According to Freidlin, one “very special hike” took place in Sirena, along the coast of the Osa Peninsula. “It’s known as the Ama- zon of Central America,” he said. “Prominent scientists from all over the world trav- el there for research studies. The hike is 20 miles long one way. It’s very difficult,

but also very inspiring and rewa rding. We saw some ve ry interesting endangered species including alligators and all types of monkeys. In one of the museums we visited, there were different species of frogs, birds and snakes, among other ani- mals. We got to see ever ything the jungle has to offer. “The kids absolutely loved it.” Freidlin believes the trips are both a fun and education experience for the kids. “The culture is so different,” he said. We live in huts right in the jungle. The kids get to speak and learn a new language in order to communicate with the indigenous people, and they actually fall in love with the lan- guage. It gives them a different perspective. They find they don’t need iPhones or video games to have fun.” Freidlin enjoys the bond his groups have developed with the people in Panama and Costa Rica. “We’ve established such a good relation- ship that we want to return year after year,” he said. “Some kids feel closer to the indige- nous people than they do to people back home. “It also means a lot to the indigenous peo- ple because they feel like they have an im- pact on the kids. In Panama, they built us our own huts.” Even though the climate is extreme, the group always has an enjoyable experience.

“The kids get to speak and learn a new language in order to communicate with the indigenous peo- ple, and they actually fall in love with the lan- guage…. They find they don’t need iPhones or vid- eo games to have fun.”

Abington Heights Middle School seventh grade science teacher Michael Freidlin On ecology trips through the rainforests of Central America

On ecology trips through the rainforests of Central America SUBMITTED PHOTO Abington Heights seventh grade science

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Abington Heights seventh grade science teacher Michael Freidlin with Miguel Flaco.

grade science teacher Michael Freidlin with Miguel Flaco. Queen for a day Queen Victoria’s Court at

Queen for a day

Queen Victoria’s Court at Vic- torian Days in Belvidere, N.J.

Shown, from left: Bridget Conlogue, Jennifer Ochman, Margaret Messana and Mary Ann Rodeghiero.

C.S. resident enrolls at Coastal Carolina

Cassandra Coles, a resi- dent of Clarks Summit, has enrolled in Coastal Carolina University. For four consecutive years, Coastal Carolina University has been recog- nized as one of “America’s 100 Best College Buys” in

the Institutional Research & Evaluation Inc. annual sur- vey of more than 1,200 col- leges and universities. CCU has a total enrollment of 9,000 students and offers more than 70 undergraduate programs of study and 7 graduate programs.

INJURED AT WORK, SUING OUTSIDE OF WORK While workers’ compensation can provide employees who are
INJURED AT WORK, SUING OUTSIDE OF WORK
While workers’ compensation can provide employees who are injured on the job
with money and benefits, it does not compensate them with monetary awards
related to pain and suffering, nor does it provide punitive damages that punish
employers who are responsible for poor safety controls or dangerous conditions.
With this in mind, injured employees may want to explore the possibility of
bringing their cases outside the workers’ compensation system. Another work
injury scenario that may prompt personal injury suits includes being injured by
a defective product, in which case a product liability suit may be brought against
the manufacturer. Similarly, a worker injured by a toxic substance might bring a
toxic tort lawsuit against its manufacturer.
If you’ve been hurt at work and want to pursue a case outside of the workers’
compensation system, please call Amil M. Minora. I have years of experience
dealing with all aspects of personal injury law. That means I have the expertise
you need to get the money that you deserve. Please call (570) 961-1616 to
schedule a free initial appointment to discuss the merits of your case. My
address is 700 Vine St., Scranton. I’m here to help.
www.minorakrowiak.com
HINT: If a third party were to be responsible for your workplace injury, it
might be possible to bring a personal injury lawsuit against that person.
Amil M. Minora, Attorney at Law

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Gift B a sk ets For A ny Occasion

• H appy Birthday

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310 S . BLAKELY S T.

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A team of champions

BY ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER

lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com

CLARKS SUMMIT- Com- petitive horse riding is more of a team sport than one may think, according to Madison Strony, of Clarks Summit, recent winner of the Eques- trian National Championship for Children’s Working Hunter Horse Division in the Marshall and Sterling horse league. The 17-year-old Abington Heights High School Senior said she considers her horse, Aye Spy, an 11-year-old male gelding, and his trainer, Leah Cruciani, Chapter XI Farm, Jermyn, as her teammates. She said when her family moved to the area from Erie about five years ago, she was in between trainers, and since then, Cruci- ani took the horse under her wing and helped him become what he is today. “Leah [Cruciani] really helped me get where I was,” Strony said. “Without her, I don’t think I would have been able to even get here or qual- ify.” She added she thinks Aye Spy wouldn’t be as great as he is without her either. Strony also gave a lot of credit to her mother, Elisa Strony, who suppor ted her in

the sport throughout the years.

“I can’t say every mom will

wake up from getting a phone call from a hotel at 3:45 in the morning,” she said, “to be at the show at 4:30 and on by 5.” And there have been many shows. Most recently, Strony finished the Marshall and Sterling League 2012 regular riding sea-

son in third place nationally, on her way to her second top ten qualifying visit to the national finals, the first trip being in

2010.

A press release stated she

“counts this as the most presti- gious win of her career,” even topping her accomplishment of grand champion at the Syracuse PHA horse show earlier this year. Her next big trip is back to the United States Equestrian Feder- ation Zone 2 finals Oct 21 in Harrisburg, for which she is ranked third out of the top 15. She said she considers this her “last hurrah,” as this is her last year in the children’s division, and she hopes to have fun com- peting and “end it on a good note.” After high school, Strony said she aspires to attend college to major in biology.

peting and “end it on a good note.” After high school, Strony said she aspires to

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM

PAGE 11A

ArtsEtc

Visual Arts/ Performing Arts

“Terra Firma and the Spirit of Flight,” Recent Sculpture by Denis A. Ya- nashot, on display through Oct. 19 at Keystone College Linder Gallery in the Miller Librar y.

Lamar Advertising’s Up and Coming Comedy Series, Oct. 20 at Scranton Cultural Center at the Ma- sonic Te mple, Shopland Hall, Fourth Floor, at 8 p.m. with Cocktail Hour, Live Music and Improv at 7 p.m. Headliner: Eric Kirkland. Opener: Chris Dubail. New is Improv by Here We Are in Spain. Emcee: Rock 107’s Dave DiRienzo. Mu- sical Opener: Jane Demi- john. Cost: $16. Tickets:

344.1111, Ticketmaster.com or 1.800.745.3000.

The End: Authorship, Nostalgia and the Beatles, Oct. 21 at the Dietrich The- ater in downtown Tunkhan- nock at 3 p.m. Presented by:

Kenneth Wo mack. Cost:

Free. Through an audio and video-oriented discussion, Beatles scholar, Kenneth Wo mack, will bring the sto- ry of the Beatles to life. In- fo/reservations: 996.1500.

Tales from Alaska Story Hour, Oct. 23 at the Tunk- hannock Public Library from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. For

all ages Storyteller: Fiona Powell. Cost: Free. Regis- ter/info: 836.1677 or

996.1500.

Literary Arts

Writers Group, for ages 18 and up, at the Dietrich Theater in downtown Tunk- hannock, Thursdays from 7 to 8:30 p.m., ongoing. All

genres and levels of writing welcome. Cost: Free. Info:

996.1500.

STACKS Writing Group, the second and four th Tuesday of ever y month at 6:30 p.m. at The Banshee, 320 Pe nn Ave., Scranton.

Arts, Crafts and More

“Solutions,” New Medi- tation Classes, at the Wa- verly Community House, 1115 North Abington Rd Waverly, Thursdays through Nov. 1 f rom 7-8:30 p.m. with Buddhist monk, Gen Samten Kelsang.

Quilting for Kids - "Birds in the Air", Wednesdays through Dec. 12 at the Dietrich Theater in downtown Tunkhannock from 3:30 to 5 p.m. For ages 6 a nd up. Instr uctors: Te rr y Keller, Peggy Lane, and In- grid Rogler. Admission: $6 per class. Children will learn early American quilt- ing techniques as they cre- ate this quilt that was pop- ular during the time of the Civil War. This colorful yet simple quilt that is all about freedom from slavery stitches up quickly. All ma- terials will be supplied. Register: 996.1500.

Country Christmas Fair, Oct. 20 at Clarks Summit United Methodist Church, Morgan Highway from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Cost:

$1 (children 12 and under free).

Ellen Rutkowski, a vocal teacher at Marywood Uni- versity and Larry Vojtko, baritone and program director at WVIA FM at a recent Mostly Opera performance.

at WVIA FM at a recent Mostly Opera performance. MORE THAN MOVIES Dietrich Theater Erica Rogler
at WVIA FM at a recent Mostly Opera performance. MORE THAN MOVIES Dietrich Theater Erica Rogler

MORE THAN MOVIES

Dietrich Theater Erica Rogler

It could be argued that the Beatles have been the most

influential rock ’n roll group in the world. Whether young or more mature, I am sure most

of us have a favorite Beatles

song. What’s yours? For me, it

is “Yellow Submarine”. The

song reminds me of my broth-

er who went through a long

phase of playing their music on the piano and his keyboard when we were growing up. On Sunday, Oct. 21 at 3 p.m., the Dietrich Theater will be hosting a free Beatles pre- sentation called “The End:

Authorship, Nostalgia and the Beatles.” We hope yo u can join us for this audio and vid- eo-oriented program with Beatles scholar Ke nneth Wo- mack. During this talk, he will bring the story of the Beatles vividly to life as he traces the group’s history from their salad days in Liverpool to the mean streets of Hamburg, through Abbey Road, to the

twilight of their career. He will discuss the origins of the group’s compositions as well

Good Ol’ Gershwin

BY GERARD E. NOLAN Abington Journal Correspondent

G eorge Gershwin, one of the most renowned com- posers of the 20th centur y, will soon get the Mostly

Opera treatment. “He wrote wonderful stuff,” said Helene Tinsley, director of Mostly Opera. “We’re going to touch on the highlights.” Mostly Opera, a Scranton-based organization committed to provid- ing quality opera and other music to the region, will present Mostly Gershwin at 6 p.m., Oct. 28, at the Radisson at Lackawanna Station, Scranton. As the name suggests, the show will primarily feature music from Gershwin, but perform- ers will trot out tunes from some of his contemporaries, too. Tinsley, who will help host the show, will perform a song penned by Scranton native Ned Washington, who was nominated for 11 Oscars and won two for his film music. Gershwin, perhaps best known for his classical piece “Rhapsody in Blue,” wrote his music in the 1920s and ’30s, crafting some of the most well-known songs in American histor y. Ira, his brother, wrote

much of the lyrics for his songs, and the two worked as a team. “He combined classical style with folk music, and at that time it was jazz,” Tinsley said. “The peo- ple just stood up and said, ‘Wow, this is something different.’ It changed music.” Among the songs included in the show are selections from Gersh- win’s folk opera “Porgy and Bess” as well as pieces from some of Gershwin’s other shows. Most of the music will be familiar to even casual Gershwin fans. “The songs we have in the show are standalone hits,” she said. Mostly Opera will transform the Radisson into a theater with profes- sional sound and lighting and top- notch singers from the region. An orchestra will provide the music, including excerpts from “Rhapsody in Blue” and “An American in Paris.” A crowd favorite, Tinsley said, is the part of the show when the audi- ence is encouraged to sing along. “We pass out sheets of music to the audience,” she said. Mostly Opera was founded in 2000, but it has roots that stretch back to the 1960s, when Norbert K.

Betti started the Scranton-based opera company Opera IV. “One of the things that Mostly Opera does is try to be an advocate for opera in the community and be a showcase where regional talent can get the experience of actually singing before an audience,” Most- ly Opera board member and Glen- burn resident Marilyn Costa said, adding that all of singers come from within an hour of Scranton. One way of promoting opera is the organization’s sponsorship of a

See Gershwin, Page 13

as be Mostly Opera soprano Cathe- rine Carter attends Mary- wood Uni- versity.
as
be
Mostly Opera
soprano Cathe-
rine Carter
attends Mary-
wood Uni-
versity.

their songwriting and re-

cording practices. Bring your

entire family to this event and share with each other favorite memories or songs of the Beatles. This program has been sponsored by the Pennsylvania Human- ities Council through their Commonwealth Speakers program. Tick- ets can be reserved by call- ing 570.996.1500 or they can

picked up at the Dietrich’s

ticket. Another event that I am looking forward to is Tales From Alaska, a story hour at the Tunkhannock Public Li- brar y Tuesday, Oct. 23 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. All ages are invited to expe- rience stories from Alaska told by master storyteller and WVIA radio personality Fiona Powell. During this hour, chil- dren and adults will learn about this state’s people and culture through the ancient tradition of storytelling. Ad-

mission is free. To preregister, please call the Tunkhannock Public Library at

570.836.1677.

This story hour is being held

in conjunction with the Die-

trich Children’s Theatre’s up- coming production of “Balto:

A True Story of the Bravest

Dog in America.” On Friday, Oct. 26 at 10 a.m. and Sat- urday, Oct. 27 at 11 a.m., we will go back in time to the blinding blizzard of 1925 that almost shut down the Alaskan town of Nome. An outbreak of disease threatens the children, and the medicine needed is 800 miles away. No one could

“One of the things that Mostly Opera does is try to be an advocate for opera in the community and be a showcase where regional talent can get the experi- ence of actually singing before an audience.”

Marilyn Costa, Glenburn resident Mostly Opera board member

Marilyn Costa, Glenburn resident Mostly Opera board member Marywood opens ‘Talisman’ exhibit Oct. 20 Marywood

Marywood opens ‘Talisman’ exhibit Oct. 20

Marywood University will present a painting exhibition, “Talisman” by Renée Emanuel, opening Oct. 20 in the Suraci Gallery on campus. An opening reception for the artist will be held from 6-8 p.m. A regional artist and a native of Northeast Pa., Emanuel graduated from Marywood University with an MFA in Painting. She creates colorful paintings in acrylic, watercolor, and casein that celebrate her strong connection to the land and the still life objects, shown, that evoke an interior landscape. Whether it’s the tapestry of the natural world that calls her, or the beautiful patterns and relationships in her still life, the artist believes that painting can be a meditative state, opening up both to observed reality and her inner landscape. From the Greek verb “Teleo” the original meaning of talisman is “to consecrate.” This active description appeals to the artist, who believes that the act of painting, opening up both to observed reality and to her inner landscape, can be a meditative state. Emanuel was recognized as an award winner in the publication, The Best of Amer- ica, Watercolor Artists and Artisans.

See Dietrich, Page 13

Who directed "Argo"? Last week’s answer: Tim Burton Last week’s winner: Kathy Shumbres of Clarks
Who directed "Argo"?
Last week’s answer:
Tim Burton
Last week’s winner:
Kathy Shumbres
of Clarks Summit
Contestants can only win once in a 60-day period.

PAGE 12 A w ww.t heabingtonjournal.co m

Th e Abington Journal Clarks Su mmit, PA

WEDNESDAY , OCTO BER 17 , 2012

SHOPPING FOR SUPPER

SHOPPING FOR SUPPER POSTCARD COURTESY JACK HIDDLESTONE Have basket will travel. After cleaning his house Friday,

POSTCARD COURTESY JACK HIDDLESTONE

Have basket will travel. After cleaning his house Friday, this Busy Bear might be enter taining dinner guests Saturday, as illustrated by ar tist “Wall” copy- right 1906 by the Ullman Manufacturing Company.

Writer finds his niche

BY GERARD E. NOLAN Abington Journal Correspondent

Daniel Grotta has worn a variety of hats throughout the years—photojournalist, war correspondent, print journalist, literary biographer, critic, book editor, tech writer, entrepreneur and now fiction writer. The author, who was the first to chronicle J.R.R. Tolkien’s life in a biography, recently released a collection of seven short sto- ries titled “Seven from Haven.” Billed as a collection with an “O’Henry-like sensibility, charm and humor,” the stories are set in the fictional Pocono town of Haven, “where strange and wondrous things happen,” according to a description on Amazon.com. The Newfoundland-based writer described his stories as “fantastical—possibly ghost stories,” but whether anything supernatural is at work is a bit ambiguous, he explained. “The stories of Haven are written about a town that takes care of its own,” he said, re- ferring to the tight-knit ethos of communities in the Poconos. “It’s something that I wanted to do for many years, but I got

something that I wanted to do for many years, but I got “Seven From Haven,” Daniel

“Seven From Haven,” Daniel Grotta’s short story collection was released Oct. 4 and is available on Amazon.com.

bushwhacked by reality,” Grotta said of writing fiction. The reality of trying to write while earning a living took on many forms throughout his career. “This is Daniel version 5.0 or something like that,” he said. Grotta worked as a photo- journalist, a freelance writer publishing in magazines and newspapers and a book editor, among other jobs. Grotta then became interested in the emerg- ing field of personal computers and began writing about them. In writing about technology, Grotta soon found a niche where he could write and make a re- spectable living. He founded a

company that electronically transmitted articles directly to publishers before the dawn of the Internet. “I saw that computers were going to be the wave of the fu- ture,” he said. After a while, his company, though revolutionar y, began to founder. “We were too early,” he said. “We lost our shir ts financially.” Following his company’s collapse, Grotta was left with a skill set that was rare in those days—an expertise in tech- nology with a writer’s talent. “All computer articles were being written by engineers and techies,” he said. “There was a need and a market for someone who could translate the informa- tion into laymen’s terms.” This new venture took off, and soon Grotta had more work than he could ever hope to complete. “We wrote for a number of magazines, including ‘PC’ and ‘Macworld,’” he said. “We wrote literally hundreds of re- views and columns.” He has continued to write about technology and has em- braced the e-Publishing revolu- tion.

A sea change is afoot within

the publishing industr y, accord- ing to Grotta. In much the same way that digital photography brought about the obsolescence

of film, e-publishing will render “dead tree books” a thing of the past, he explained.

A printing revolution “as

profound as Gutenberg’s will leave its permanent imprint for better or for worse,” he said. .Grotta, along with his wife,

Sally, owns a publishing imprint called Pixel Hall Press, which published “Seven from Haven.” In many ways, Grotta’s running

a publishing imprint is an out-

growth of his years of experi- ence in the publishing and tech- nology fields. The operation of his publish- ing imprint “seems like an actual extension of technologies we’re writing about,” he said. “With the rise of the Internet and e- Publishing, we’re mor phing into

a new career.” “Seven from Haven” as well as Grotta’s other fiction, as well as Sally Wiener Grotta’s writing, is available on Amazon.com. For more information on Da- niel’s and Sally’s writing, visit pixelhallpress.com

Medical clinic opens in Jermyn

Linda Tho- mas-He- mak, presi- dent and CEO and primary care physi- cian of this
Linda Tho-
mas-He-
mak, presi-
dent and
CEO and
primary
care physi-
cian of this
office, made
opening
remarks
about the
new facility.
ABINGTON JOURNAL PHOTOS/BEN FREDA

The Wright Center opened a new bu ilding of the Mid Va lley Practice in Jermyn Oct. 5 with an Opening Night Reception held inside and outside the facility. Official sponsors were: Attorney Larry and Kathy Moran; Archi- tects Hemmler & Camayd; First Liberty Bank and Trust; Grimm Construction; Ken and Linda Po- well; Accentuate Caterers of Dis- tinctive Events; Mary and Phil Marrara; Clauss Bovard Insurance Agency and VNA Hospice.

Marrara; Clauss Bovard Insurance Agency and VNA Hospice. From left: To ny Manger, practice manager, Zaza
Marrara; Clauss Bovard Insurance Agency and VNA Hospice. From left: To ny Manger, practice manager, Zaza

From left: Tony Manger, practice manager, Zaza Varsimashvili, program manager, Stephanie Pior- kowski and Christina Lynady, medical assistants.

From left: Lindsay Gress, director of care coor- dination, Kari Machelli, RN care manager, Alycia Coar, physician’s assistant, and Rebecca Alunni, physician’s assistant.

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Bonf ire Festival Oct. 20

The Scranton Iron Furnaces, 159 Cedar Avenue, will present Bonfire at the Iron Furnaces Oct. 20 from 8 to 11 p.m. The second annual event features visual arts group The Pop-Up Studio, The Tom Petty Appreciation Band, a Jack O’Lantern Carving Competi- tion, fire artist Chris Mina and food and drink. To highlight the ar t of stor y- telling, Scranton StorySlam will tell traditional stories around a fire bowl lent by nationally recognized local artist, Elena Colombo and poet Jack McGui- gan will return to the main stage for Celtic Readings.

The event has expanded to include Hispanic tradition in- cluding Day of the Dead activ- ities by Scranton Reads Com- mittee to celebrate this year’s book, “Bless Me Ultima.” There will be an ofrenda or altar where the community is encouraged to bring photographs of loved ones who have passed on, a make a skull craft and special Day of the Dead face painting. Tickets are $20 at the door and can be purchased in ad- vance for $15 by calling 570. 963.4804 or visiting www.an- thracitemuseum.org. Children under 12 are free but donations will be accepted.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM

PAGE 13A

LIBRARY NEWS

SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 13A LIBRARY NEWS BY MARY ANN MCGRATH “Spending” will be the theme

BY MARY ANN MCGRATH

“Spending” will be the theme of the first of three upcoming pre- school-oriented Story Hours about money to be held at the Abington Community Library this fall. Registration is now underway in the Chil-

dren’s Room for the first program scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 25 from

1:30 to

brar y. Librar y staff mem- bers Nancy Burke and Mary Ann McGrath will read aloud stories from the children’s collection about making choices and interact with the children

up

and spend their “money” wisely. Each child will make a simple craft relat- ed to the theme and take home a free gift, plus an activity kit with a DVD promoting PNC Bank’s financial literacy initia- tive for young children, “Growing Up Great: For You, For Me, For Later.” PNC has generously pro- vided support for the purchase of books, prizes, and craft materials for the Story Hour series as well as donating the liter- acy kits to all area public libraries. Stop in the Children’s Room to pick up a complimentary kit and find out more about the upcoming programs. New Cookbook in the Adult Collection “The Meat Free Mon- day Cookbook,” edited by Annie Rigg with photog- raphy by Tara Fisher. The Meat Free Monday Cam- paign was launched in 2009 by Paul, Stella and Mary McCartney as a simple and straightfor- ward idea to show every- one the value of eating less meat. This new cookbook is aimed at everyone who cares about the environment and is

as

2

p.m.

at

the li-

they

set

a

“store”

happy to eat vegetarian one day a week, but needs inspiration and guidance to expand their repertoire of meatless meals. With menus for each of the 52 weeks of the year --- two main recipes, plus four other ideas for each meal of the day --- all illustrated with artful photographs, the book is organized by season, with recipes for meatless soups, inventive salads, baked dishes, stews and snacks. New How-To Books for Adults “Beaded Jewelry: Cre- ate Your Own Style,” by Maya Brenner. Follow step-by-step projects to make elegant and top- quality necklaces, brace- lets, and earrings for a fraction of what it would cost in a store. There are tips, techniques, equip- ment needed and inspira- tional ideas for every fashion from delicate to bold and chunky. “Grow Your Handmade Business: How to Envi- sion, Develop, and Sus- tain a Successful Creative Business,” by Kari Chap- in. With the help of this book, creative crafters can achieve their long- term business goals by learning how to license and market their hand- made goods. It is de- signed to share real-life practical knowledge on how to achieve success with a creative business. “Living on the Coast,” by Barclay Butera. Styles of these beach homes range from cottage and classic to modern and elegant, a style for every taste. Interior designer and decorator Butera shares his tips for giving any home a beachy clean ambience.

The Abington Community Library is located at 1200 W. Grove St., Clarks Summit. Visit our website, www.lclshome.org/abington to register online for events or call the library at (570) 587-3440. Don’t have a library card? Regis- ter for one at http:// www.lclshome.org/libraryinfo/ library_card_reg.asp.

http:// www.lclshome.org/libraryinfo/ library_card_reg.asp. Business Alliance donates to Grif fin Pond Animal Shelter

Business Alliance donates to Griffin Pond Animal Shelter

Recently, NEPABAG, or Northeast PA Business Alliance Group, mem- bers and officers presented a $500 check to Janet Garvey, Board Mem- ber and Volunteer Coordinator of the Griffin Pond Animal Shelter in South Abington Township for food and care of the animals at the shel- ter. Shown, from left are: Bob Scott, Coachfirm, President; Chuck Parry, Edward Jones; Scot Florey Sr., Florey & Holloway Cleaners and Janet Garvey, Volunteer Coordinator.

GERSHWIN

Continued from Pa ge 11

free opera lecture before every high-definition trans- mission of a Metropolitan Opera show at Cinemark in Moosic. “We hire expert lecturers who come and present a lecture free in the theater before the opera begins,” Costa said. “We’ve been doing that for six seasons.” The opera company re- ceives support from the Lackawanna County Office of Arts and Culture to help fund the talks. The pro- ceeds from the company’s fall show will go toward its spring show, which consists of more operatic works than

the fall show with its light- er fare of operettas, arias and Broadway music, for example, Costa said. Tinsley said she has lis- tened to Gershwin’s music since she was a child, but as she grew older, she real- ized how truly great he was. The composer, who died at the age of 38, left behind an impressive oeuvre that demonstrated his innovative spirit and workmanlike output. “He always wanted to grow,” Tinsley said of the composer. “He was an in- cessant worker. He was a genius.” The cost of the event is $60 and includes dinner. For more information, con- tact, 570.346.3693.

dinner. For more information, con- tact, 570.346.3693. County honors Ko men chapter for ‘Good Wo rks’

County honors Komen chapter for ‘Good Wo rks’

“Good Works in Lackawanna County” is a new initiative cre- ated by the Lackawanna County Commissioners to recognize and honor organizations who make a difference through their “un- selfish actions, innovative programs and total commitment to the area’s residents.” The local chapter of the Susan G. Komen Foundation was the first recipient of the award for its role in breast cancer awareness and women’s health. Shown, from left: Lackawanna County Commissioners Corey D. O’Brien and Jim Wansacz; Dolly Woody, Executive Director of the area’s Komen Foundation and Commissioner Patrick M. O’Malley.

Komen Foundation and Commissioner Patrick M. O’Malley. ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI ‘Opening Night’ at

ABINGTON JOURNAL/JOAN MEAD-MATSUI

‘Opening Night’ at Dietrich

The Dietrich Theater’s Opening Night Gala held Sept. 21, of- fered local theater goers two movies, “The Intouchables” and “Moonrise Kingdom,” as well as the culinary delight of hors d’oeuvres, desserts, an opening night wine, and beer from Ep- icurean Delight, Seasons Restaurant, Twigs Restaurant & Café, and The Fireplace Restaurant. Pictured here, Amy Colley serving up cheer to guests attending Opening Night Gala

DIETRICH

Continued from Pa ge 11

get through the storm by plane, train, boat or car. It is up to a fearless dog named Balto to travel through the blizzard and save the town, if he can get there in time. Join us to find out what happens. Admission is free thanks to a grant from the Pennsylvania Humanities Coun- cil. Tickets are available by calling 570.996.1500 or at the door while supplies last. For those of you who are more interested in classes, we invite you to explore the first steps in creating stained glass pieces in Introduction to Stained Glass. Taught by in- structor Esther Harmatz on Monday, Oct. 22 from 6 to 9

p.m., students will learn to work with a design, cut glass, polish, foil wrap and solder. At the end of the session, students will leave with a finished piece. Admission is $60 including supplies and equipment. Harmatz will also be teaching Jewelry Making: Expressions in Fused Glass on Mondays, Oct. 29 from 6 to 9 p.m. and No- vember 12 from 7 to 9 p.m. In this class, you will create your own beautiful glass designs that will be turned in to a pendant, a pin and a pair of earrings. Ad- mission is $60 and all materials will be provided. Call the Die- trich at 570.996.1500 for more information or to register for either of these classes. As you can see the Dietrich is so much more than the movies.

As you can see the Dietrich is so much more than the movies. Beatlemania to sw

Beatlemania to sweep the Dietrich

during the month of the 50th anniversary of the release of The Beat- les first single of “Love Me Do,” the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock will host a free presentation chronicling The Beatles, a musical phe- nomenon that changed popular music forever. Pennsylvania Humanities Council scholar Ken Womack will present a history of The Beatles in his multi-media presentation Oct. 21 at 3 p.m., of “The End: Authorship, Nostalgia and The Beatles.” Sara Santa of Tunkhannock can remember seeing a Beatles movie at the Dietrich Theater in the 1960s, and during the movie children were dancing in the aisles. Esther Harmatz, projectionist and supervisor at the Dietrich Theater, remembers just missing a chance to meet them in person, because her father wanted to get back home to Scranton. For information or to reserve free tickets call 570.996.1500 or pick them up at the ticket booth. Tickets will be available at the door.

or to reserve free tickets call 570.996.1500 or pick them up at the ticket booth. Tickets

SPORTS

Clarks Summit, Pa.

OCTOBER 17 TO OCTOBER 23, 2012 50¢

A.H. senior double trouble for league opponents

2012 50 ¢ A.H. senior double trouble for league opponents ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI Abington Heights senior

ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI

Abington Heights senior Ryan Patrick has excelled at his new position on the soccer field.

BY CHRISTINA CORDNER Abington Journal Correspondent

Ryan Patrick, a 17-year- old senior at Abington Heights High School is one of five seniors on the soccer team. Patrick played the last two years as a central de- fender. However, Abington Heights head coach Steve Klingman recently moved him to the forward posi- tion to take some pressure off of fellow senior Kevin Elwell. “We felt he could help us a bit more offensively, so we moved him to for- ward,” Klingman said. “He scored all three goals in the 3-0 win over Wallen- paupack in the first game he played up front. Patrick scored another goal on October 9 ve rsus Va lley

View. “He’s a very talented player,” Klingman said. “He has very good size for a high school soccer player- probably 6’2”, 190 lbs. and deceiving speed for his size. He can be intimidating both offen- sively and defensively to opponents.” Patrick serves as a co- captain along with fellow senior starters Matt Hoyt, Kevin Elwell and Caleb Overholser. In 2011, Patrick made 1st team Lackawanna League. “Ryan was the top vote getting defender on the 2011 All Lackawanna League Division 1 team last fall,” Klingman said. “He is the only four-time letterman on the varsity team this year.

Patrick has the potential to play college soccer, but now might be leaning to- ward kicking football in college. He is undecided on where he will attend college, but has narrowed down his potential topics of study. “I am still exploring my college options, but am interested in pursuing a major related to the math and sciences,” he said. “I hope to have the opportu- nity to kick at the college level. He then commented on his diabetes, and the sup- port he has received. “I was diagnosed with Ty pe 1 d iabetes wh en I was 10 years old and wear an insulin pump,” he said. “I feel fortunate that it has not interfered with my

said. “I feel fortunate that it has not interfered with my ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI Abington Heights

ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI

Abington Heights quarterback Dante Pasqualichio scrambles for yardage in the Comets 20-7 win over Scranton Prep.

Comets top Cavaliers

BY ROBERT TO MKAVAGE

rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com

CLARKS SUMMIT- Despite completing just four passes, Abington Heights high school quar- terback Dante Pasqualichio made the two most impor- tant throws of the game, connecting for a pair of touchdown passes in the Comets’ 20-7 win over Scranton Prep in a key Lackawanna Football Con- ference Division I game at Comets Stadium Oct. 13. “I thought we did some things well in spots offen- sively that gave us an op- portunity to put some points on the board,”

COLLEGE ROUNDUP WITH BILL ARSENAULT

Mike Beamish is taking up where he left off for the Uni- versity of Pennsylvania sprint football team. The 5-foot-8 sophomore running back from Clarks Summit (Abington Heights) has carried the ball 75 times for 396 yards in three games for the 2-1 Quakers. That’s a 5.3 yards per carry and 132.0 yards per game average. Beamish opened the season with 139 yards in a 42-34 overtime loss to Cornell and had 134 yards in a 24-20 tri- umph over Franklin Pierce and 123 yards last weekend in a 16-13 victory over Mans- field. He has also caught

Abington Heights head coach Joe Repshis said. “Defensively, when we had our backs against the wall a few times the players re- sponded and we were able to come out of here with a hard fought victory against a very good football team.” On just the second play of the game, Scranton Prep quarterback Griff DiBileo botched the hand off to tailback Marshall Kupinski and Comets’ defensive end Zack Sutter pounced on the loose ball at the Cavaliers’ 24-yard line. Abington Heights cashed in on the turnover when kicker Ryan Patrick made a

35-yard field goal less than two minutes into the game. After a Scranton Prep three-and-out, the Comets took nearly seven minutes off the clock but failed to score when a high snap prevented Patrick from attempting a field goal. The Cavaliers capitalized on the momentum by put- ting together an 11-play 90-yard drive that was capped by a 5-yard touch- down run from Kupinski. Mark Fetter added the extra point to give Scranton Prep a 7-3 lead with 8:59 re- maining in the second quarter. Kupinski finished the

re- maining in the second quarter. Kupinski finished the PHOTO COURTESY PENN ATHLETICS Abington Heights’ graduate

PHOTO COURTESY PENN ATHLETICS

Abington Heights’ graduate Mike Beamish (13) is a key member of the Penn sprint football team.

three passes for 34 yards and a score and is averaging 40.1 yards on 15 punts. Last season, Beamish rushed for 662 yards on 112

carries (5.9 per carry), caught 13 passes for 136 yards and had six total touchdowns. He also averaged 33.8 punting and was named to the Colle-

game with 107 yards rush- ing on 22 carries. Comets linebacker Joe Dietz recovered a Pat Mari- no fumble at the Cavaliers’ 36-yard line midway through the second quarter, but the Abington Heights drive stalled when Pasqual- ichio was sacked on third down by Kupinski. Abington Heights re- took the lead when Pas- qualichio connected with Nate Hollander on an 8- yard touchdown to cap a 6-play 53-yard drive with 47.9 seconds left in the first half. Pasqualichio scram-

See Comets, Page 15

giate Sprint Football League first team as a runner and second team as a punter. He was the only freshman to make the first team. “Mike has developed into one of our team leaders,” coach Bill Wagner said. “His teammates respect what he says and how he goes about the daily life of a sprint foot- ball student-athlete.” The coach is impressed with the fact that Beamish has rushed for over 100 yards in each of the first three games and leads the league in punting. “Mike is a pleasure to coach and is constantly work- ing to improve,” Wagner said. ROBINSON LEADS THE WAY – Bridgette Robinson (Abington Heights) is in her senior season with the SUNY-

ability to participate in athletics although it does require an element of dis- cipline and planning. I am very appreciative of the support I have received from Coach Klingman in allowing me to play two fall sports and have really enjoyed having the oppor- tunity to be a part of both teams.” He also talked about soccer and his other hob- bies “For the past two years, I have spent my spare time with a travel soccer team out of Ne wb ur gh, N. Y. ,” he said. “Outside of soc- cer and football, I enjoy wakeboarding, snowboard- ing and playing piano.” Patrick is also the kicker

See Senior, Page 15

piano.” Patrick is also the kicker See Senior, Page 15 ABINGTON JOURNAL FILE PHOTO Patrick made

ABINGTON JOURNAL FILE PHOTO

Patrick made a 42-yard field goal against Valley View.

Friday FIRE

BY ROBERT TO MKAVAGE

rtomkavage@theabingtonjournal.com

During Friday night home football games at Lakeland Jr./Sr. High School, fans are treated to more than just the battle on the gridiron. Miss Chief, Kaitlyn Za- leski, dazzles those in at- tendance with the throwing of fire and knives. “I have been throwing for seven years,” she said. “I get really nervous beforehand, but once I hit the field the adrenaline kicks in and I don’t even think about it.” The Scott Township resi- dent was honored to follow in the line of great Miss Chiefs over the years. “This year, there were three girls who tried out,” she said. “I was really emo- tional and so proud when I was selected. When I was given the headdress and tomahawk by last year’s Miss Chief, McKensie Cur-

now, all the other girls were cheering and clapping. It meant a lot.” Zaleski cherishes the time spent with the other mem- bers of the Chiefs’ drill team. “I’ve been able to do what I love most,” she said. “I have a great group of girls who are really supportive and listen well. Overall, it’s been a really good year." Zaleski, who is also the captain of the boys basket- ball cheerleading squad, was thrilled to be named to the homecoming court. “I was psyched,” she said. “I had no idea that I was going to be voted in. They called my name during the announcements at lunch. I was shocked and really hap- py about it.” Zaleski is the daughter of Jeffrey and Karen Zaleski. She plans to study art ther- apy in college and is consid- ering Marywood University.

apy in college and is consid- ering Marywood University. SUBMITTED PHOTO Lakeland Jr./Sr. High School Drill

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Lakeland Jr./Sr. High School Drill Team Captains, from left: Alex- andra Valenta, Kaitlyn Zaleski and Cassandra Jean.

Oneonta field hockey team and the two-year captain is doing a great job leading the Red Dragons, who are 7-3 overall and 3-1 in SUNYAC play. Robinson, a defender, has started all 10 games, the team giving up 17 goals in 10 games with two shutouts. Oneonta dropped a tough three overtime 1-0 decision to Brockport for its first league setback last Friday. “Bridgette is the epitome of a team leader,” coach Kelly Kingsbury said. “She has taken her game to a new level and has put a lot of pieces together. It’s great to see her playing as well as she is be- cause she has worked hard over the past three years to get where she is today.” The coach feels that this is

a special season for Robinson

and the Red Dragons. “We are having a great sea- son so far and I know it will continue with the leadership that Bridgette provides for the team,” Kingsbury said. FRUEHAN PITCHING IN – Sophomore James Frue- han (Abington Heights) is starting on defense and re- turning kicks for the Virginia Military Institute football

team. The 5-foot-9, 180-pounder

is second on the team in tack- les with 36. He has two pass breakups and is credited with

a half of a sack. He’s also

returned 10 punts (10.3 per return) and three kickoffs (19.7 per return). “James moved from safety

See Roundup, Page 15

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2012

THE ABINGTON JOURNALCLARKS SUMMIT, PA

WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM

PAGE 15A

♦ CLARKS SUMMIT, PA WWW.THEABINGTONJOURNAL.COM PAGE 15A The Holy Cross High School girls golf team won

The Holy Cross High School girls golf team won the District 2 Class AA championship on Oct. 9 at Scranton Municipal Golf Course. Shown, from left after the match: Coach Tom Paddock with golfers Emily Okrepkie, Rachel Mackrell, Selena Cerra, Gianna Chase, Maura McDonough and Maggie McDonough

Holy Cross, Prep win titles

STAFF REPORTS

Holy Cross and Scranton Prep high schools won District 2 girls golf team championships Tues- day at Scranton Municipal Golf Course and qualified to play in the PIAA East Regional Oct. 16 at Golden Oaks Golf Club in Fleetwood. Holy Cross defeated Valley View, 330-459, in Class AA. Scranton Prep, playing un- contested, won the District 2 Class AAA championship by shooting 372. The Lady Crusaders and

Classics needed to shoot 400 or better while winning the district to advance into state play. Selena Cerra’s 2-under-par, 70 led the way for Holy Cross. Emily Okrepkie added 80 while Rachel Mackrell shot 89 and Giana Chase 90. Ashley Turpak shot 91 but was the only Valley View player to break 100. Danielle Dalessandro led Scranton Prep, shooting an 81. Lauren Wells added 87 while Christine FitzPatrick shot 101 and Marina Polanchek shot 103.

ROUNDUP

Continued from Page 14

to cornerback in the spring and it’s been a good move,” defensive coordinator Jeff Farrington said. “He is a fierce competitor on the field and brings a can-do attitude in all situations. He’s a very aggressive defender either playing the run or the pass.” The Keydets are 3-2 on the season after a 17-7 victory over Presbyterian last Sat- urday. Fr uehan had a team- high 11 tackles in the game. GRUNZAS DOING THE JOB – The Mansfield field hockey team is just 4-7 over- all and 0-4 in PSAC West play after a tough 3-2 over- time loss to No. 3-ranked Indiana, PA last we ek end bu t the Mountaineers have been getting standout play from

sisters Kristyn and Kayla Grunza. Both are former Lackawanna Trail standouts. Kristyn has four goals and seven assists for 17 points. But scoring is just half the story for the talented senior. “Kristyn’s skills are un- matched in Division II,” coach Diane Monkiewicz said. “She commands the center of the field and is a blast to watch.” Kayla, a sophomore, has picked up an assist and also has two defensive saves. “Kayla is coming into her own,” Monkiewicz said. “She is much more aggres- sive and makes things hap- pen on attack. She’s a solid defender and looks more and more like Courtney (the older sister and a former Mansfield All-American).” Courtney Grunza has been working with the team and is

on the sidelines for games. Sophomore Lacey Croas- dale, also a former Lacka- wanna Trail performer, is on the squad. She has three goals and two assists. “Lacey is a spark plug,” Monkiewicz said. “She is a very dangerous offensive player and she gives speed and dimension to our attack. She’s not afraid to shoot ’em up. We’ve only touched the surface in regards to her abilities as a field hockey player.” GOOD START FOR MECCA – Sophomore Da- vid Mecca (Abington Heights) has been playing solid golf for the Hofstra men’s team this fall. Mecca has played 12 rounds in five tournaments and has been in the 70s in 11 of those rounds. In the other, he posted a two-under-par 69

in the final18 of George Mason’s Patriot Intercolle- giate in Lorton, VA. He opened with 77 and had 71 in the second round to finish tied for 11th in a field of 81 golfers. “David’s improvement over

last year is consistency in his short game,” coach Joe El- liott said. “David hits the ball a country mile so length

is not an issue.”

The player and coach con- tinue to work hard on his short game. “I would like David to work on his 100 yard in game,” Elliott said. “And also work on his patience. Not every pin needs to be attacked.” The Pride will compete in the Big 5 Championship Saturday and Sunday in Huntingdon Va lley outside of Philadelphia.

SENIOR

Continued from Page 14

for the Abington Heights Comets football team. It is his first year playing football, but he has so far made every one of his attempted extra points.

“He just started work- ing on this last spring and I don’t think he has missed an extra point all year," Klingman said. Patrick kicked two field goals, including one from 42 yards, in the team’s win over Va lley Vi ew Oct. 6. “He consistently puts

kickoffs inside the 5-yard line and had a couple in the end zone at Va lley View, which I am sure is a major benefit to the football program,” Kling- man added. Patrick commented on his experiences on the football field. “Kicking field goals

has been a learning expe- rience,” he said. “Since

this is my first year kick- ing, I learned in order to be successful, you don’t only have to be a good kicker, you need to have

a good snapper, like TJ

Mur ray, a good holder like J.C. Show, and a good line to protect you.”

Dunmore prevails over Lakeland

BY CHRISTINA CORDNER Abington Journal Correspondent

On a cold Oct. 12 night, the Dunmore Bucks traveled to Scott Township to take on the Lakeland Chiefs. Lakeland Jr./Sr. High School football team kept the score close for most of the game, but ultimately fell to Dunmore 22-17. Dunmore scored the first points of the game with a 4-yard touchdown run by Daiqwon Buckley with 8:44 left in the first quarter to make the score 7-0. Dunmore was favored go- ing into the game and despite Lakeland possessing the ball for a longer period of time in the first quarter, the Bucks looked as if they would dom- inate the game. The Bucks did not stop there. With 8:42 left in the half, quarterback Brandon Kujaw- ski threw a 24-yard touch- down pass. The teamsucceed- ed in making a two-point conversion to make the score

15-0.

With 1:36 remaining in the half, Lakeland scored its first touchdown of the night on a

10-yard run by quarterback Kyle Kiehart. This brought the score to 15-7. However, the half was not

over for the Chiefs offense as they recovered a fumble with 54 seconds remaining in the second quarter. Lakeland tight end Cody

remaining in the second quarter. Lakeland tight end Cody ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELLEN BUGNO Lakeland quarterback Kyle

ABINGTON JOURNAL/ELLEN BUGNO

Lakeland quarterback Kyle Kiehart looks downfield for an open re- ceiver. The senior accounted for both a rushing and passing touch- down in the Chiefs 22-17 loss to Dunmore Oct. 12.

Delfino scored a touchdown with just 26 seconds remain- ing in the half. Josh Natale made the two-point conver- sion and the score was tied, 15-15 going into halftime. When Dunmore got the ball back, Buckley scored another touchdown on a 58- yard run with 6:40 left in the third quarter. This brought the score to 22-15. Lakeland blocked a punt for a safety with 1:32 remain- ing in the third quarter. This brought the score to 22-17. With 1:42 left in the game, Lakeland was on Dunmore’s 17-yard line on a third-and- one play. However, they re- ceived a 5 yard penalty for illegal procedure and could not score. “When you’re playing a good team like Dunmore, you can’t give them a touch- down,” Lakeland head coach Jeff Wasilchak said. “You can’t have a one -yard punt from your own 26…. And the second quarter we decided we didn’t want to tackle ei- ther. “You have to play the full 48 minutes. We’r e lear ning that the hard way.”

Old Forge drops Lackawanna Trail

BY CORY BURRELL Abington Journal Correspondent

FACTORYVILLE– A fi rst half filled with big plays helped Old Forge jump ahead early in the Blue Dev- ils 35-14 win over Lacka- wanna Trail Friday at Lions Pride Stadium. A sluggish start for both teams quickly turned in Old Forge’s favor after Anthony Piccolini intercepted a pass and gave the Blue Devils the ball at the Lions’ 33-yard line. Two plays later, running back Brian Tomasetti scored on a 29-yard run. Tomasetti got better after his first score. He scored on the second play of the Blue Devils’ next drive on a 47- yard run. On the first play of Old Forge’s third possession, Tomasetti ran through seem- ingly the entire Lions’ de- fense for a punishing 83- yard touchdown to put the Blue Devils ahead 19-0 early in the second quarter. Old Forge head coach Mike Schuback had nothing but praise for Tomasetti, who finished with 199 yards and three touchdowns. “Brian’s an exceptionally

great running back,” Schu- back said. “I’ve coached so many great running backs, but I’ll tell you, size, speed, power, he has it all. He’s very humble, he gives a lot of credit to his teammates, but the biggest thing about Brian is how he can run a simple power play and turn it into a 70 or 80-yard run.” The Blue Devils kept the Lions out of sync offensively throughout the first half. Old Forge’s defense managed to get crucial plays, including two fourth-down stops, to prevent the Lions’ from gaining momentum. Trail managed only five first downs in the first half. Another big touchdown came before halftime, this time from Blue Devils’ quar- terback Brenden Wahl’s 52- yard pass to Piccolini. Old Forge added a 33-yard field goal from Matthew Mancuso as time expired to take a 29-0 lead into halftime. “We’ve got some very talented, skilled kids,” Schu- back said. “I’m really proud of them. They put a lot of extra time in this week to read and recognize what they

[Lackawanna Trail] do on defense. We just had to get to our zones and control the line of scrimmage, and I thought we did that well.” The Lions started to show some life in the second half. Lackawanna Trail opened the third quarter with a 15-play drive that led to the Lions’ first touchdown of the night, a goal line rush by Jeremy Greenley. The Blue Devils answered right back when Shane Schu- back caught a quick pass from Wahl and proceeded to break several tackles en route to a 47-yard score that gave Old Forge a 35-7 lead. Wahl ended the night with 188 yards and two touch- downs against one intercep- tion. The Lions managed to control the game much better in the second half, running 29 plays while holding Old Forge to only 15. Lackawan- na Trail head coach Steve Jervis said the second-half improvement was a credit to his team’s heart. “I was very proud of our kids’ effort in the second half,” Jervis said. “They

didn’t roll over. I think we outplayed them in the second half, so that says something about the character of our team.” Lackawanna Trail would score again on a 2-yard run from Greenley, who ended the night with two touch- downs and 52 yards, but it was not

enough. The Lions out- scored the Blue Devils 14-7 in the second half. “All you can ask for is

an opportu- nity,” Jervis said. “We had that opportunity and we didn’t capitalize. They got us

out of rhythm on offense and defensively we really didn’t have an answer in the second half…When you’re down four touchdowns at half, it kind of limits what you can do.” Lackawanna Trail’s record now stands at 5-2. Old Forge improves to 7-0. Lackawanna Trail’s next game will be on the road at 7 p.m. Friday against Susquehanna.

Jervis

be on the road at 7 p.m. Friday against Susquehanna. Jervis ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI Members of
be on the road at 7 p.m. Friday against Susquehanna. Jervis ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI Members of

ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI

Members of the Abington Heights boys soccer team who organized the Red Card for Cancer initiative for their senior project are, from left:

Sante Romaldini, Ricky Guditus and Justin Levy.

A.H. boys soccer team gives cancer a RED CARD

The Abington Heights High School boys soccer team raised awareness for cancer through their Red Card for Cancer initia- tive. Te am members Sante Romaldini, Ricky Guditus and Justin Levy organized the event as their senior project.

COMETS

Continued from Page 14

bled 45 yards on a third down play to keep the drive alive. Jamie Henzes returned the second half kickoff to the Scranton Prep 34-yard line. Patrick hit his second field goal of the game, a 22-yarder, eight plays later to increase the Comets’ lead to 13-7 with 7:55 remaining in the third quarter. Scranton Prep drove the ball down to the Comets 22-yard line late in the third quarter, but Hollander made his sec- ond big play of the game in- tercepting DiBileo at the goal line. “The defensive line got good pressure up front,” Hol- lander said. “The quarter- back’s eyes were just on one receiver so I went for the ball and got it.” The Cavaliers advanced the ball to the Abington Heights 22-yard line again on their next drive, but came away empty when DiBileo fumbled

the snap on fourth down. After the big stop, the Comets put together an 8-play 75-yard drive that was capped by a 43-yard pass from Pas- qualchio to Show. Patrick’s extra point gave Abington Heights a 20-7 advantage with 2:43 left in game. “They blitzed up the middle and (fullback) Jerry Langan picked it up real nice,” Pas- qualichio said. “J.C. found a seam in the defense and made a great catch, and run after.” Abington Heights’ running back Ryan Judge, who gained 72 yards on 16 carries, picked up two first downs during the possession. Scranton Prep head coach Nick Donato recognized that some costly mistakes swung the momentum in the game. “I want to give Abington (Heights) a lot of credit,” he said. “They executed and we turned the ball over too many times. The effort was there, but we didn’t play how we would have liked to.”

there, but we didn’t play how we would have liked to.” ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI Abington Heights

ABINGTON JOURNAL/STEPHANIE WALKOWSKI

Abington Heights wide receiver fights to break the tackle of Cavaliers defensive back Jake Stafursky.

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 17, 2012

Abington Journal

PAGE 16

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AUTOMOBILE ADVERTISING.
Payment plans.
YOUR CAR
INCLASSIFIED!
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
Do
you need more space?
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
A
yard or garage sale
360
Instruction &
CA$H ON THE $POT,
ALL LEASE PAYMENTS AND LEASE MONIES DUE AT
SIGNING INCLUDE TA X A ND TA GS! THE BUY FOR
PRICES REQUIRE TA X A ND TA GS TO BE PA ID. OTHER
FORD REBATES MAYBE AVAILABLE IF YOU QUALIFY.
0% FINANCING AVAILABLE IN LIEU OF SOME
REBATES ON SELECT MODELS
DON’T BE FOOLED GET A REAL PAYMENT!
Training
Free Anytime
in classified
is the best way
Pickup
to
570-301-3602
Tractor Trailer Train-
ing Classes Forming
Now. If qualified
train daily or week-
end. Financial Aid,
Pell Grants, Post 911
GI Bill, Job Place-
ment Assistance.
National Tractor
Trailer School Liver-
pool and Buffalo NY
(Branch)
clean out your closets!
You’r e in bussiness
with classified!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
The All New 2013 FORD FUSION
CAT, black short
hair, 4 year old,
small white sec-
tion on chest.
Pittston, near
Nafus/ Allardyce
park area. $100
REWARD !!!
LEGAL NOTICE
FICTITIOUS NAME
Notice is hereby
given that Saman-
tha T. Irving has
filed with the Secre-
tary of the Com-
monwealth of Penn-
sylvania on Sep-
tember 17, 2012, an
Application for
Registration of the
Fictitious Name little
foot design. The
principal
place of business is
located at RR4, Box
4224, Hack Road,
Dalton, PA 18414
www.ntts.edu
570-655-6569.
Completely Redesigned
Stop in and see it
for yourself!
NEW
ESTATE NOTICE
Estate of Michael W.
Stepanovich, late of
the city of Scranton
county of Lack-
awanna and state of
Pennsylvania: (Died
September 12,
2012). Letters of
Administration, in
the above estate
having been grant-
ed, all persons hav-
ing claims or
demands against
the estate of the
decedent should
make them known
and present them,
and all persons
indebted to the
decedent shall
make payment
thereof without
delay to MICHAEL
STEPANOVICH,
Administrator, or to
KELLEHER &
KELLEHER, 800 Oak
Street, Scranton,
Pennsylvania 18508.
KELLEHER &
KELLEHER
Attorneys for Estate
1-800-243-9300
DODGE‘02
VIPERGTS
120
Found
LIKE
Atty. Jacob Nogi
415 Wyoming Ave.
Scranton, PA
In Stock and Ready for Delivery!
18503
Used Tires
&
2013 FORD C-MAX HYBRID
MEETING NOTICE
The Clarks Green
Planning Commis-
sion will meet on
November 7, 2012
at 8 p.m. at the
Clarks Green
Borough building.
Janice F. Brown
Secretary
406
ATVs/Dune
Buggies
Batteries
for $20
HAWK 2011 UTILI TY ATV
& Up
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
Come see, drive &
experience the
All New C-Max
In Stock Available for delivery!
VITO’S
FORD‘02MUSTANG
ESTATE NOTICE
&
GT CONVERTIBLE
47
MPG
GINO’S
ESTATE NOTICE
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
135
Legals/
Public Notices
2013 FORD EDGE SE AW D
LEGALNOTICES
18” Aluminum Wheels, Rear Spoiler
SYNC System, Sirius Satellite Radio
Stk# 013151
MSRP
Gibbons Discount
Retail Customer Cash
Ford Credit Retail
Retail Bonus Customer Cash
$31,745
- $743
The Abington
Journal is a
newspaper of
general circula-
tion and meets
the require-
ments by
Newspaper
Advertising Act
45 Pa.C.S.A.
Section 301.
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters
Testamentary have
been granted in the
Estate of Anne H.
Gavigan, late of
Scranton, who died
9/16/2012. All
persons indebted
to said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same,
without delay, to
the Executrix,
Marianne Lyons,
116 Barberry Lane,
Clarks Summit, PA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MICHAEL W.
STEPANOVICH,
LATE OF THE BOR-
OUGH OF DURYEA,
COUNTY OF
LUZERNE AND
STATE OF PENN-
SYLVANIA: (DIED
SEPTEMBER 12,
2012)
LETTERS OF
ADMINISTRATION,
in the above estate
having been grant-
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
- $1,500
18411.
- $1,000
ESTATE NOTICE
- $500
$
28,002
ESTATE OF LOUIS
J. GIORDANO,
JR., DECEASED,
late of Clarks Sum-
mit, Lackawanna
County, Pennsylva-
nia. Letters Testa-
mentary in the
above having been
ed, all persons hav-
ing claims or
demands against
the estate of the
decedent should
make them known
and present them,
and all persons to
MICHAEL
STEPANOVICH,
Administrator, or to
KELLEHER &
KELLEHER, 800
Oak Street, Scran-
ton, Pennsylvania
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,995 takes it
away.
570-817-2952
Wilkes-Barre
TOMAHAWK`11
SUBARU ‘04
FORESTER XT
(Turbo) Symmetrical
AWD, auto, 52,000
miles, 4 cylinder
black metallic/ black
grey interior, remote
starter, heated
seats, alloy wheels,
towing package,
AM/FM /6-CD, AC,
original owner,
excellent condition,
$14,000, 570-851-
5549. Albrightsville,
PA.
TOYOTA `03
HIGHLANDER
DEADLINE:
18508
White.
Buy it for
Original Owner.
Garage kept.
PRICE PLUS TA X A ND TA GS. EXPIRE 10/1/12
Mondays at 4 pm
for current week
KELLEHER &
KELLEHER
Attorneys for Estate
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
Excellent condition.
$9,750. Neg.
2013 FORD EXPLORER XLT
Deadline varies
570-677-3892
150 Special Notices
570-817-2952
during holiday
Wilkes-Barre
weeks
Fog Lamps
Leather Wrapped
Steering Wheel w/
Audio Controls
Rear View Camera
SYNC System
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
Stk# 013131
RATE:
ADOPT
409
Autos under
$5000
$1.00 line/$12.
MSRP
Gibbons Discount
Retail Customer Cash
$36,015
per inch
FORD’95F150
- $1,145
Adopting your
newborn is our
dream. Joy filled
home, endless
love, security.
Randi & Chuck
- $1,500
1-888-223-7941
Retail Bonus Customer Cash
- $500
For information or
questions
regarding legal
notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
$
570-970-7371
32,870
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.8 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
or email to:
570-675-5046.
Buy it for
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
granted, all persons
having claims or
demands against
the Estate of the
decedent shall
make them known
and present them,
and all persons
indebted to said
decedent shall
make payment
thereof, without
delay, to Jill G.
Blom, 4605 S.
Greene Pl., Ken-
newick, WA, 99337
or Amanda Martino,
7807 Rt. 183,
Bernville, PA 19506
or Attorney Stephen
J. Evers, 213 R.
North State Street,
Clarks Summit, PA
Leave message,
will return call.
PRICE PLUS TA X A ND TA GS. EXPIRE 10/1/12
$4495.
570-831-7312
2013 FORD FOCUS SE
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18411
BOWLERS WANTED
Monday Men’s
League at Stanton
Lanes, 6:30 pm
start. Come out &
join the fun!
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
570-760-8951
18711
566 Sales/Business
566 Sales/Business
Cruise Control
AM/FM/CD
SYNC w/ My Ford To uch
Stk# 013097
Stephen J. Evers
Attorney for the
Estate
Development
Development
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
FOSTER PARENT(S)
AUTOMOTIVEAUTOMOTIVE
MSRP
Gibbons Discount
Retail Customer Cash
$18,995
Palletized Bluestone/
NEEDED
IMMEDIATELY
SALESSALES
- $590
Flagstone Auction
- $1,500
CONSULCONSULTATANTNT
$
Buy it for
16,905
(550) Pallets of Cut Stone/
Landscape Stone (550)
For: Johnson Quarries, Inc.
Valley Chevrolet is seeking
individuals who are self starters,
team oriented and driven.
(No Experience Necessary)
PRICE PLUS TA X A ND TA GS. EXPIRE 10/1/12
2013 FORD ESCAPE SE 4WD
for teens or sibling
groups.
Compensation,
training, and 24
hour on-call sup-
port provided.
Please call
FRIENDSHIP
HOUSE (570) 342-
8305 x 2058.
Compensation up
to $1200.00 per
month per child.
• Salary & Commission • Benefits
• 401K Plan • 5 Day Work Week
• Huge New & Used Inventory
1.6 L Eco Boost Engine
17” Aluminum Wheels
Blind Spot Mirrors
SYNC System
Stk #013138
LOOKING for Wade
& Helen Griffith.
Please contact Kim
Patton at krpat-
BE PART OF THE
BEST SALES TEAM
IN THE VALLEY!
ton48@hotmail.com
Apply in person to:
WWANTEDANTED
Blake Gagliardi, Sales Manager
Rick Merrick, Sales Manager
VAVALLEYLLEY CHEVROLETCHEVROLET
MSRP
$29,130
MALEMALESINGERSSINGERS
- $576
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre
Gibbons Discount
Retail Customer Cash
570-285-4810
- $1,000
542
Logistics/
542
Logistics/
542
Logistics/
$
Transportation
Transportation
Transportation
27,734
Buy it for
Growth Creates Opportunity
Start
A NewCareer!
PRICE PLUS TA X A ND TA GS. EXPIRE 10/1/12
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly,
after completion of 90 day probation period.
Darryl Jayne
Doug Higgins
Manager Stephanie Abraham
Casey Grow
Liz Hopkins
John Orue
General Sales Manager
Pre-Owned Sales
Finance Director
Director of Social
Media
Internet Sales
Sales Consultant
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge
LEARN
AND EARN!
Don Hull
Keith Kime
Joe Dickhut
Andy Noone
Kurtis Medeiros
Sales Consultant
Sales Consultant
Sales Consultant
Sales Consultant
Sales Consultant
Le Raysville, PA 18829
(Lawton / Wyalusing Area)
Saturday, October 20, 2012, 9:30 AM
Auction To Be Held At Johnson Quarries,
15962 Route 467, Stevensville, PA. From
Lawton: Take Route 706 To 467, Go 2 Miles
to Auction Site. From Wyalusing: Take
Route 706 To Route 467.
(550) Pallets Of Quality Bluestone, Pat-
tern Pavers, Landscape Stone, Etc., (550)
Including: Thermal Full Colored Pattern,
Including 1’ x 1’ x 1”, 1’ x 18” x 1” Plus
Other Asst. Dimensions & Thicknesses; Full
Color Colonial; Full Color Irregular; Full
Color Irregular Tumbled; Lilac Irregular /
Standup; Lilac Colonial; Lilac Pattern, 1” &
½”; Tumbled Pavers, 1’ x 1’ & 1’ x 18”;
Creek Stone; Snapped Colonial; Other Asst.
Types & Varieties; Palletized Stone To Be
Sold By The Pallet Or By Square Ft. And
Take The Pallet Full. Alike Pallets & Types
Will Be Offered By The Pallet And Buyer
Can Take Multiple Pallets. Selling Arrange-
ments Will Depend On Types, Varieties And
Way Stone Is Palletized. Types, Sizes, Sell-
ing Terms & Other Pertinent Info Will Be
In Detailed Catalog On Our Website @
www.manasseauctions.com;
Loading Of Stone: Stone Will Be Loaded
For Buyer Free Of Charge For 2 Weeks Fol-
lowing Auction, From Monday – Friday
8:00AM – 3:00PM, By Appointment.
Terms & Conditions: 13% Buyers Premium
Will Be Charged. Payment In Full Day Of
Auction In Cash, Good Check or Major
Credit Card, 3% Discount For Payments
Made By Cash Or Check. Nothing Removed
Until Settled For.
Auction Preview: Friday, October 19, 2012
From 12PM To 4PM & Day Of Auction
From 8AM Until Auction Start Time.
Auctioneers Note: The Johnson Family
Have Decided To Reduce Their Stone Inven-
tory, To Make Room; These Are All Top
Quality Items, Not Seconds; All Selling
Absolute To The Highest Bidder, Plan To
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
JOB FAIR!
• High School Diploma/GED
EVERY
• Computer Skills
950 Main Street, Dickson City, PA. 18519
570-489-4747 • 1-800-853-4641 • Exit 190A Interstate 81 -1mile
THURSDAY
• Valid Driver’s License
• Criminal Background Check
12-4
HOURS:
AT THE
Mon.-Thur. 8:30 - 8:00 • Fri. 8:30 - 5:00 • Sat. 8:30 - 4:00
Attend. Mel & Matt Manasse
PA Auctioneers License # AU571L &
TUNKHANNOCK
ATATTN:TN: ALLALL LINCOLN/MERCURLINCOLN/MERCURYY OOWNERSWNERS
LIBRARY
AU3517L
Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benefits Available *
THE BIGGEST NAME IN FORD, GIBBONS FORD IS AUTHORIZED TO SERVICE YOUR VEHICLES
CALL 489-4747 OR 1-800-853-4641 TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT
FULL SERVICE…
TIRES………ALIGNMENTS
- MASTER CERTIFIED FORD TECHNICIANS
Sales Managers & Auctioneers
Whitney Point, NY
607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE
www.manasseauctions.com
OPEN MON. - FRI. 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM • SAT 7:30 AM - 12:00 PM
NIGHT DROP OFF BOX
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.

PAGE 17

Abington Journal

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 17, 2012

708

Antiques &

Collectibles

ANTIQUEOAK

HIGHBOY

17, 2012 708 Antiques & Collectibles ANTIQUEOAK HIGHBOY refinished with new vintage hardware Excellent condition

refinished with new vintage hardware Excellent condition New Price $245.

570-466-6499

Do you need more space?

A yard or garage sale in classified is the best way

to clean out your closets!

You’r e

in bussiness

with classified!

746 Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets
746
Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets

CLARKS SUMMIT

Garage Sales/ Estate Sales/ Flea Markets CLARKS SUMMIT 105 Sally Drive Sat., Oct. 20th, 8-4 3

105 Sally Drive Sat., Oct. 20th, 8-4 3 American Girl Dolls, clothes, jog- ger, wagon, jumpy house & more.

776 Sporting Goods

BICYCLE

MURRAY“DAZZLER”

20” girl’s. Powder blue with pink trim accents & wheels, white tires. Front & rear brakes plus coaster foot brake. Good condition $40. 570-814-9574

Looking for the right deal on an automobile? Turn to classified. It’s a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions!

a showroom in print! Classified’s got the directions! 796 Wa nted to Buy Merchandise Co llect

796 Wanted to Buy Merchandise

got the directions! 796 Wa nted to Buy Merchandise Co llect cash, not dust! Clean out

Collect cash, not dust! Clean out your

basement, garage

or attic and call the Classified depart- ment today at 570-

BUYINGSPORTCARDS

Pay Cash for baseball, football, basketball, hockey & non-sports. Sets, singles & wax. Also buying comics.

570-212-0398

800 PETS & ANIMALS
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
815
Dogs
comics. 570-212-0398 800 PETS & ANIMALS 815 Dogs PAWS TO CONSIDER ENHANCE YOUR PET CLASSIFIED AD

PAWS

TO CONSIDER

ENHANCE

YOUR PET

CLASSIFIED

AD ONLINE

Call 829-7130

Place your pet ad

and provide us your email address

This will create a seller account online and login information will be emailed to you from gadzoo.com “The World of Pets Unleashed”

You can then use your account to enhance your online ad. Post up to 6 captioned photos of your pet Expand your text to include more information, include your contact information such as e-mail, address phone number and or website.

Motorcycle for sale? Let them see it here in the Classifieds!

570-829-7130

829-7130! 744 Furniture &
829-7130!
744 Furniture &

Accessories

570-829-7130 829-7130! 744 Furniture & Accessories DEN FURNITURE Wo od/cloth. Reg- ular size sofa, chair and

DEN FURNITURE Wood/cloth. Reg- ular size sofa, chair and ottoman. Coffee table, 2 end tables. Excellent condition. $325 for all.

570-675-5046

754 Machinery &

Equipment