Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 524

*

*

*

*

*

#

,*

GIFT OF

THE FORTY TURKISH YEARS EMPIRE.

IN

FORTY YEARS

IN THE

TURKISH EMPIRE;

OR,

;fjflttt0itgi

Of

REV. WILLIAM GOODELL, D.D.,

LATE MISSIONARY OF THE A. B. C. F. M. AT CONSTANTINOPLE.

BY HIS SON-IN-LAW,

E. D. G. PRIME, D.D.

NEW YORK:

ROBERT CARTER AND BROTHERS,

530 BROADWAY.

1876.

Copyright,

BY ROBERT CARTER & BROTHERS.

V

.,

1875-

r

-;:

iy-i

v,-

Cambridge :

Press of John Wilson 6* Son.

INTRODUCTION.

IN the year 1860, in a public address in the city of

London, the Earl of Shaftesbury paid the following

tribute to the character of the American Missionaries

in Turkey :

" I do not believe that in the whole history of missions ; I pure evangelical truth of the body of men who constitute the

find any thing to equal the wisdom, the soundness, and the

of any negotiations carried on between man and man, we can

do not believe, that in the history of diplomacy, or in the history

American mission. I have said it twenty times before, and I

will say it again

my meaning

for the expression appropriately conveys

that they are a marvellous combination of

common sense and piety.

Everyman who comes in contact

with these missionaries speaks in praise of them. Persons in

authority, and persons in subjection, all speak in their favor;

travellers speak well of them ; and I know of no man who

has ever been able to bring against that body a single valid be found, that these American missionaries have done more

works, and exemplified by their fruits ; and I believe it will

toward upholding the truth and spreading the Gospel of

Christ in the East, than any other body of men in this or in

any other age."

This volume is designed to preserve the memory

and perpetuate the influence of the pioneer of this

noble band of missionaries at the Turkish capital,

objection.

There they stand, tested by years, tried by their

M183839

VI testimony of all his associates.

INTRODUCTION.

the one most honored and beloved, according to the

A man of almost

singular simplicity of character, he had a rare com establishing the kingdom of his divine Master among

men, and pursuing it with a singleness of aim and a

seriousness of heart that proved it to be his absorb

ing object in life, by his cheerful disposition and his

affectionate bearing toward all with whom he came in

consecrated to the great work of advancing and

bination of qualities which in him were in nowise

to his convictions With of the truth utmost and of firmness duty, which in adhering were

inconsistent.

of the most decided character, he had the gentleness

of a child in his mode of expressing them.

While

contact, he made his presence a continual benedic

tion. He exemplified the apostolic injunction, " Let

your speech be always with grace, seasoned with

salt," but at the same time the spice ofwit, of genuine

fragrance humor, added on all a charm that came to his from conversation his pen. and left a

He kept no diary of his varying emotions.

He

was apparently so devoid of self-consciousness and so

engrossed with his life-work that he seldom turned

his thoughts in upon himself. The journal which

he kept, with more or less fulness, during the greater

part of his life, was simply a record of events.

This,

together with his correspondence, public and private,

which was inimitable in style, has furnished an em

barrassing amount of material for a single volume,

the perplexity arising from the difficulty in deciding

INTRODUCTION.

Vll

what to omit. His letters alone, which were unique,

lively, and truly spiritual in their tone,

letters

of friendship, of affection, of consolation, would fill

many volumes.

His residence and labors at Constantinople covered

the entire period marked by that movement known

as the Protestant Reformation in Turkey. Being the

first missionary on the ground ; having been instru

mental in establishing numerous schools for the vari

ous classes of the population ; having translated the

whole word of God out of the original tongues into

ing the language preached of the a large gospel part daily of at the the people capital, ; and and hav up

and down the Bosphorus at the various suburbs, he

was one of the chosen instruments of that reforma

On this account no

tion during all its progress. one of the most interesting chapters in the annals of The history of such a life, as that which is imper

the labors of Dr. Goodell.

fectly sketched in these pages, is alone a sufficient

confined to the work as immediately connected with

inconsiderable portion of the volume is devoted to a

record of this remarkable movement, which forms

Christian missions.

This record is here necessarily

answer to the question, " What have Christian mis

sions accomplished ? "

CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1

His Mother.

Letter on the Death of his Father.

1-21

Solomon Goodell.

Great-Uncles.

Sabbaths in Olden Time.

Before the Days of Temperance.

New England Pastors.

CHAPTER II

Phillips Academy.

Teaching School.

Preceptor Adams.

St. Johnsbury, Vt.

22-46

Schoolmates.

Yoke of Oxen.

Dartmouth College.

Class

mates. Fisk, Spaulding, &c.

&c., at Salem.

CHAPTER III

he found a Wife.

Revival in College.

Fruits.

Ordination of Newell, Judson,

47-61

Harriet Newell.

Andover Theological Seminary. Serious Accident.

CHAPTER IV

Evangelistic Labors.

Attending Medical Lectures.

Missionary Association.

Ordination of

How

Devotes himself to Missionary Service.

Daniel Temple.

How he found a Wife for a Friend.

Elizabeth Adams.

62-70

Licensed to Preach.

Catskill.

Ohio and In

Mr. and Mrs. Thurston.

Mr. Bingham.

Roman Catholic Helper.

Judge Cooke.

Agency for A. B. C. F. M.

Western New York.

diana.

Visit to the Indian Missions.

CHAPTER V

71-84

His Malta. Mr. Ordination Abbott. at New Haven.

Voyage to Beyrout.

Maronite Priest.

Marriage.

Crete.

Departure for Palestine.

Greek Privateer.

Acquiring Languages.

85-102

Greek Revolution.

Missionary Labors at Beyrout. Cyprus. Head-quarters at Beyrout.

CHAPTER VI

Armenian Helpers.

Death of Pliny Fisk.

Beyrout Bombarded.

Anarchy.

Mr. Goodell s House Pillaged.

In

demnity.

munion.

Calamities Overruled.

Success of Work.

Interesting Com

103-111

Lazaretto.

Asaad Shidiak.

Work Broken Mountain Up. Retreat.

CHAPTER VII

Driven from Syria.

Voyage to Malta.

Domestic Enjoyment.

Greek Pirates Executed.

Episcopal Missiona

ries, Messrs. Robertson and Hill.

Scriptures.

Carabet and Wortabet.

Translating

X

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VIII

Kemoved to Constantinople. Population of Constantinople.

112-125

Approach to the City.

Remarkable Hail-Storm. Mission Work.

The Armenians.

Pera.

Birth Destructive of a Son, Establishing

126-148

Americans at Constantinople. Descriptive Letter.

Conflagration.

Constantino Washington.

CHAPTER IX

Lancasterian Schools.

menian Patriarch.

Church.

Nicomedea.

Schools.

Loses Everything.

Commodore Porter.

Buyuk Dere.

Greeks.

Letter to Snow Mrs. Bethune. Storm.

Ar

Fish

Ancient Epiphania Nice. of the Greeks.

The Eucharist. Plague and Cholera.

CHAPTER X

Journey to Broosa with Commodore Porter.

Turkish

Greek School for Girls.

Amusing Visitor.

The Muezzin.

A Marriage.

Arrival of Messrs. Dwight

149-169

and Schauffler.

Disasters to Turkish Letter to Army. S. E. Morse.

Mohammed Ali. St.

Turkish Char

Simonians.

Turkish Etiquette

acter.

Priests.

timaljian.

A Circumcision.

Turkish Dinner.

Ordination of Armenian

Pesh-

Visited

170-201

Armenian Bigotry.

New

Panayotes Constantinides

Encouraging Prospects.

HohannesandSenakerim.

Visit to Sultan s Palace.

by a Jesuit.

CHAPTER XI

Wisdom in Conducting Missions.

His Policy.

Patriarch.

Death of Drs. Dodge, at Jerusalem, Morrison, in China,

Carey at Serampore.

Heaven.

Lyinan and Munson Letter at Sumatra. to Dr. Plumer.

Citizenship in

Quali

Visit of Armenian Bishops.

fications of a Missionary s Wife.

dences.

Journey.

Vicissitudes of Work.

CHAPTER XII

Trials at Broosa.

Visit to Broosa.

Striking Coinci

Incidents of

202-228

The Plague. Its Origin. Mohammedan Fatalism. Great Mortality.

Rigid Quarantine of Houses.

Letter to Judge Cooke.

Dwightby the Plague.

Another Letter to Judge Cooke.

Death of Mrs.

Other Trials.

Retrenching.

Worship of Saints.

Journey to Trebizond.

Inci

dents.

"Dairyman s Daughter"

and Revival at Nicomedia. Turkish Reforms.

Dr. De Kay.

System of Government.

Visit

229-247

of Two Priests.

Letters to Mr. Grimshawe.

CHAPTER XIII

Breaking Out of Persecution.

Armenian Bank

Providential In

ers.

Converts seized, thrown into prison, banished.

Death of Sultan Mahmoud.

terposition.

Abdul Mcdjid Inaugurated.

Hatti Shcrif of Gul Plane.

Another Great Fire.

The Jews.

Mr. Goodell s Catholic Spirit.

Views of Duty.

Letter to Prof. Haddock.

CONTENTS.

XI

CHAPTER XIV

Domestic Afflictions.

Death of his Son, Constantine Washington.

248-265

Letter

to his Aged Father.

the Mission.

Children s Letters. Letter to Rev. S. H. Lucy Calhoun Goodale on its Thurston. Completion. In

Brightening Prospects of

266-290

To his Brother, on his Fiftieth Value of the Scrip

Year.

Lectures on the Bible.

Jonas King.

Death of

CHAPTER XV

Translation Completed.

To John Adams, LL. D.

tures.

cidents from his Journal. Mr. G. s Father.

Letters to Mrs. Thurston and Mrs. Cumings.

Death of Commodore Porter.

CHAPTER XVI

291-314

Execution for Apostasy. Great Changes.

Constantinople. Letter to Mr. Stewart.

ruption.

Interference of Foreign Powers.

Scottish Dis

A New-England Thanksgiving at

Letter to Dr. Anderson.

Mr. Tem

ple s Recall.

Departure of Two Daughters. GreatJoy.

Anathemas.

Infernal Machine.

Social Persecution. Christ s KingdomPresent. Girls Boarding School.

Great Distress.

Dark

315-327

Reasons

Vertanes excommunicated.

Days.

CHAPTER XVII

FirstProtestantChurchOrganized.

PastorChosen.

given by the Church.

By the Mission.

Death of Two Aged Members.

Their History.

Revival in Boarding School.

Declines Visiting the

Holy Laud.

Visit to Smyrna.

First Protestant Marriage. Protestant Charter of 1847.

CHAPTER XVIII

328-353

Letter to Judge

Death of British Great Chaplain. Union Prayer Meeting.

Cooke.

Winslow.

Prince of Beggars.

Letter to Drs. Curtailing Spaulding Expen and

Self-Sustentation.

ses.

Changes in Mission.

Another Fire.

Revival in School.

Visit

to Nicomedia and Ada Bazar.

Interview.

CHAPTER XIX

Revisiting America.

Another Conflagration.

Remarkable

354-368

Death

Protestant Charter of 1850. Return to Constantinople.

Reminiscences.

Visiting his Kindred.

Letters of Mr. Schauffler and Bishop Gobat.

of Dr. Mr. John Temple. Adams and Dr. Anderson.

Thirty Years.

Templeton.

Two Colleges.

CHAPTER XX

Changes of

Letters to

Degree of Doctor of Divinity from

369-382

Resuming his Work.

at Home.

Reproved.

Letter to Children in America. Letter to a Baptist Aggressive Church. Movements

Helpers.

Call for Men.

Cherokee Daughters.

Seven Marys.

Patriarch

Xll

CHAPTER XXI

TheCrimeanWar. Fears for theMission. The Hatti Humayoun.

CONTENTS.

Anniversary of the Church.

Lord Stratford s Departure.

383-407

Tenth

Letter to

Phillips Academy.

Death.

America.

niscences.

Correspondence with Dr. Hamlin.

Count de Zuylen.

His Brother s

Revivals in

Three Pairs of Spectacles.

Marriage of a Daughter.

Death of Panayotes.

Jubilee of A. B. C. F. M.

Remi

Threescore and Ten. Correspondence. Dr. Goodell s Reminiscences.

Murder of Mr. Coffing.

Incident with Turks.

Great Changes.

Scenes and Incidents.

CHAPTER XXII

Visit to Aleppo.

At Beyrout.

England

Lady.

408-424

Aintab.

Invited to

Letter to his Children. Dr. Pfander and Mr. O Flaherty. Meeting of Residents.

Decides to return to America.

Sundering of Many Ties.

Letter from a

Our Civil War.

425-451

His

Thanksgiving.

CHAPTER XXIII

Work among Turks.

Reply.

Great Excitement.

Letter to Lord Stratford.

Sir Henry Bulwer s Course.

In

Gift of Bell and Organ by Madison Square Church, New York.

vitation to a Silver Wedding.

CHAPTER XXIV

Increasing Infirmities.

Board.

Farewell Letter to Evangelical Churches.

442-451

Letter to the

Address

to Dr. Goodell.

Presentations.

Letter to Children of Missionaries.

Letter of Mr. Morris, U. S. Minister.

Farewell Calls in the City.

De

Arrival at Boston. Meeting of A. B. C. F. M. at Chicago.

CHAPTER XXV

parture from Constantinople.

Hartford. at his Son s in Phila

452-408

Incidents.

Dr. Goodell s Address.

Home

Journeyings.

delphia.

Letter of Dr. S. I. Prime. His Death.

As a Church Member.

Fall on Death the Ice of and Mrs. Broken Arm.

Constant Labors.

ReturntoPhiladelphia.

Writing Rem

Goodell.

469-479

Letter to Dr. Schauffler.

Summer Tour in 3866.

Meeting of Board atPittsfield.

iniscences. Hamlin; Rev. Dr. Schauffler.

CHAPTER XXVI

Brief Illness.

Tributes to his Memory from former Associates, Rev. Isaac Bird; Rev. Dr.

APPENDIX

Imperial Documents on Civil and Religious Liberty.

480

Hatti Sherif of Gul

Hane".

Pledge of Sultan abolishing Death Penalty for Apostasy.

Protestant Charter of 1847.

1853 protecting Protestants.

Paris.

Protestant Charter of 1850.

Firman of

Hatti Humayoun of 1856. Treaty of

FORTY YEAHS

IN THE TURKISH EMPIRE.

CHAPTER I.

WHEN

Dr. Goodell returned to his native land in

and die

1865, to spend the evening of his days

among that he his would kindred, commit his to children paper for united their in perusal an urgent and request preser

vation such recollections With characteristic of his life modesty as he might he shrank have strength for a

to record.

long time from complying with their request, until by a sort

of stratagemhewas induced to writedownsomereminiscences give you some reminiscences of my early days, and of the

1 Olden Time, I cannot do better, perhaps, than to begin at

In complying with your request to

Though I cannot testify to it from my

the very beginning.

own personal recollection, yet it has been asserted too often

to be now called in question, that at Templeton, Mass., the

morning of the 14th of February, 1792, was very tempestu

ous, and that the snow-storm was so furiously driving and

drifting as almost to prevent our family physician, who lived

full three miles away, arriving hi season to be present at

of his earlier years.

He had only begun the record when,

after an illness of a few hours, he fell asleep, " and he was

not, for

God

took him."

The few sketches he had pre

pared are comprised in the earlier pages of this volume, and

commence as follows :

"Mr DEAR SON,

2

FORTY YEARS IN THE TURKISH EMPIRE.

my first appearance on this or any other stage. The small

room in which I first saw the light of this world was, in my

day, always called The Stranger s Room, but whether it had

always been called such, or whether it was so named from

its having received the little stranger on that cold, stormy

morning, I cannot say.

This room was, it may be, nine

feet by seven, and contained one window, a bed, a small

table, a Bible, a hymn-book, and two or three chairs.

Ad

joining this room,and to be passed through in order to reach

it, was one other room, and only one, and this was our

kitchen, our parlor, our dining-saloon, and, in fact, every

thing else which can be predicated of a New England home.

The house stood on the hill-side, and was one story high.

Under our parents bed was the trundle-bed, which was

regularly rolled out at night, and rolled back every morn

ing.

Here three of us were nicely tucked in every night,

and here we began

to repeat, with all seriousness, * Our

Father, and Now I lay me/ And here we had as pleasant say that she possessed like precious faith with my father, she had were few, but she contrived to increase and multiply

those few as only a woman of great economy and thrift

taste in dress and of neatness in every thing. The comforts

dreams and as refreshing sleep as though we were in the

king s palace.

" The vivid impressions I have of my father you already

knowfrom the tract called * The Missionary s Father.

And

justice to the memory of my gentle mother requires me to

and that she was in every way worthy of him.

She pos

sessed, in an eminent degree, a meek and quiet spirit, and

was a woman of great delicacy of

feeling, an example of

could do. ger s Room to hear her last words.

For many years an invalid, her last sickness

was long and painful, but not a word of complaint do I

On the morning

recollect of ever having heard her speak.

of Dec. 2, 1809, we all assembled in that little Stran

And she passed away

with hallelujahs on her lips.

Well do I remember with

HIS MOTHER.

3

what clearness of voice she said, f Hallelujah ! hallelujah !

halle

.

Her feet seemed yet standing firm in the midst

of the river. But her voice suddenly ceased ; for strength

and breath were both gone, and the remainder of the halle

the other side of Jordan. her, and these survived her many years. Indeed, most of

lujah was left to be finished on

"We all

felt sure that she had gone

from

a world

of sorrow

to one of joy, from poverty to the riches of heaven.

" Eight children, four sons and four daughters, survived

them remain to this present.

At the time of her death, But, with confidence, she

none of her children were professors of religion; and she

had to leave them all in an evil world, and very ill prepared

to make their way through it.

committed them all to Him in whom she herself believed.

Could she have looked forward and seen their pathway

through life ; could she have seen all her eight children,

one after another, coming forward and joining themselves have would been have too died much from well, for excess I her verily of feeble joy believe and frame, thankfulness. the and sight that would she

to the Lord s people, and three of her four sons preaching

the glorious Gospel, and one of them becoming a missionary

in a foreign land :

O

my kind mother! I often think, what would I not give

to see thy gentle face once more, and, on my knees, to

ask ten thousand pardons for every unkind word I ever

answered thee, and for every grief or pain I unnecessarily though herself ill supplied with means, was always ready

to and reach honored forth her her ; hand and why to the should needy. they Her not neighbors do so ? for loved on

her tongue was the law of kindness, and she was ever more

afraid of doing than receiving an injury. * The heart of her

husband safely trusted in her, and, as they think of all her

gentle ways, her children rise up and call her blessed.

" How well do I remember, even to this day, some of the

caused thee !

"I always remember, with gratitude, that my mother,

4

FORTY YEARS IN THE TURKISH EMPIRE.

beautiful hymns she used to sing to me sixty-five or seventy

How often in the days of her pilgrimage, in Beneath a burning sky,

" * So pilgrims on a scorching sand,

years ago.

times of trial and pain, when spinning flax on her little

wheel, did her sweet voice sound out with great clearness hi

the following words :

Long for a cooling stream at hand ;

And they must drink or die/

Yes, drink, and and at at the that fountain-head same fountain-head of Divine consolation she will drink she did for heaven.

dle, the treadle, and all, will surely be remembered in

ever. And that little spinning-wheel, the distaff, the spin

" There was one incident connected with my mother s last

painful sickness which should not be forgotten.

Her appe

tite was generally poor, but one morning she fancied she

could eat and longed for a trout. rivers and brooks was

spring, when the ice in the

It was early in the

just

breaking sluggish waters. up, and the meadows were all flooded with the

I was in those days as great a fisherman

as the Apostle Peter may be supposed ever to have been, and the way through the woods :

riding at full speed, and singing, at the top of my voice, all

entreaty, I took my hook and line and went on horseback,

knew that trout were ordinarily found only in the purest

I

and swiftest running water.

But at my mother s earnest

" Spare us, O Lord, aloud we pray,

Nor let our sun go down at noon ;

Thy years are one eternal day,

And must thy children die so soon 1

found the meadows as I had expected, so flooded, I could it into the nearest waters before me; and, wonderful to

come anywhere near it. But I baited my hook, and threw

not, in any conceivable way, reach the main stream, nor

I

HIS FATHER.

5

relate, a much larger trout than it was common to take in

that stream, even in the best season of the year, immediately

seized it, and I drew it to the land, feeling that Hewho once mother loved, that her soul might bless me before her death.

once carried it home, and made savory meat such as my

And I doubt not she prayed then, as I feel assured she had

directed the fish to Peter s