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Rules of Procedure

Budapest International Model United Nations 2012

Contents I. II. III. Foreword BIMUN The Executive Board 1) The rights of the Secretary-General 2) The rights of the President of the General Assembly 3) The rights of Chairs The Rights and duties of the Representatives Attire and Decorum Language Speeches Notepapers Working Papers and Draft Resolutions 1) Working Papers 2) Draft Resolutions Resolutions 1) Heading of the Resolution 2) Preambulatory Clauses 3) Operative Clauses The Approval Panel Flow of the Debate 1) General Debate 2) Lobbying 3) Debate on the Draft Resolutions 4) Open and Closed Debates 5) Main Submitter 6) Co-Submitters Yields Amendments 1) Unfriendly Amendments 2) Friendly Amendments 3) Amendments to amendments Voting 1) The outcome of the Voting 2) Substantive Voting 3) Procedural Voting 4) Roll Call Voting Quorum Roll Call

IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX.

X.

XI. XII.

XIII. XIV.

XV.

XVI. XVII.

XVIII.

Points i. Point of Personal Privilege ii. Right of Reply iii. Point of Order iv. Point of Parliamentary Inquiry v. Appeal to the Chairs Decision vi. Point of Information

XIX.

Motions i. Motion to Resume/Table the Debate ii. Motion to Exclude the Public iii. Motion to move to the Previous Question iv. Motion for Suspension or Adjournment of the Meeting v. Motion to Invite a Guest Speaker vi. Motion to Extend the Debate Time vii. Motion to vote by Roll Call viii. Motion for Q & A Session ix. Motion for an Open Debate x. Motion to Propose an Amendment XX. Rules of the General Assembly XXI. Rules of the Security Council

I.

Foreword

The Rules of Procedure based on the United Nations Charter has been made up to determine the procedure of Budapest International Model United Nations (BIMUN) 2012, with the purpose of taking practical reasons into consideration. The Rules of Procedure includes the expected conduct, behaviour and procedures. The BIMUN Secretariat has the right to change the Rules of Procedure at any time during the conference, and before, with the permission of the Secretary-General. The changes will automatically be adapted to the procedure of the debates. II. BIMUN The laws stated in The Rules of Procedure will apply to the Main Committees of the General Assembly (Main Committee 1 [DISEC] and Main Committee 6 [Legal Committee]), the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the Crisis Committee, the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Human Rights Council (HRC), the Historical Security Council and the Security Council during BIMUN 2012. III. The Executive Board The Executive Board of BIMUN 2012 consists of the Secretary-General, Deputy SecretaryGenerals, Chairs, Presidents, Vice-Presidents and Deputy Chairs. 1) The rights of the Secretary-General Rights and duties of the Secretary-General (1) The Secretary-General has the right to overrule any decisions of other members of the Executive Board once he feels the necessity of doing so. (2) The Secretary-General shall be absolutely independent, thus shall not receive instructions from any person. (3) Whenever the Secretary-General is present he has to be the first to be addressed when delivering a speech to the house by the delegates. (4) The Secretary-General may designate one of the Deputy Secretary-Generals to act on his behalf. (5) The Secretary-General may take oral or written statements to any forum at BIMUN concerning any issue. The Deputy Secretary-Generals have the same right, but only with the permission of the Secretary-General. (6) The Secretary-General shall open and close the session of BIMUN 2012.

2) The rights of the President of the General Assembly The rights and duties of the President (1) The President shall open and close each meeting of the General Assembly. (2) During the sessions the President (keeping himself to the Rules of Procedure) shall have complete control of the proceedings, and shall be responsible for them to the SecretaryGeneral. (3) During the sessions the President has the right to (and shall) a) Determine the opening and closing of each Debate b) Announce the Suspension of the Meeting c) Announce the Adjournment of the Meeting d) Moderate the Meetings e) Rule on Points and Motions f) Announce decisions and news g) Accord the right to speak h) Limit the speaking time i) Ensure observance of the rules j) and reserve any further rights of the Chairs (4) The President must be, in all case, able to give reason for the decisions they made before. (5) The President must be able, at any time, to set Representatives doubts at rest referring to the Rules of Procedure. The President may call upon the Secretary General for advice. (6) The President of the General Assembly must be present at all meetings of the General Assembly. (7) The President has the right to invite the Representatives of the first plenary meeting to observe one minute of silence dedicated to prayer or meditation. 3) The rights of Chairs If for any reason the Chair is unable to attend the sessions they shall designate one of the Deputy Chairs to take their place. The Deputy Chair, who takes over the Chairs place, shall have the same powers and duties as the Chair. The rights and duties of the Chairs (1) The Chair shall open and close each meeting of the designated committee. (2) During the sessions the Chairs (keeping themselves to the Rules of Procedure) shall have complete control of the proceedings, and shall be responsible for them to the SecretaryGeneral. (3) During the sessions the Chair has the right to (and shall) a) Determine the opening and closing of each Debate b) Propose the Suspension of the Meeting

c) d) e) f) g) h) i)

Propose the Adjournment of the Meeting Moderate the Meetings Rule on Points and Motions Announce decisions and news Accord the right to speaking Limit the speaking time Ensure observance of the rules

(4) The Chairs must be, in all case, able to give reason for the decisions they made before. (5) The Chair must be able, at any time, to set a Representatives doubts at rest referring to the Rules of Procedure. The Chair may call upon the Secretary-General for advice. (6) The Chair may requests a nation to deliver a Policy Statement on a certain issue, though preparation time has to be given to the delegate. (7) The Chair has the right to invite a guest speaker to the committee/council if the Item on Agenda requires the presence of another nation which is not present in the committee/council. (8) The Executive Board of the Security Council, Economic and Social Council and the Human Rights Council shall deserve the same rights and duties as the Chairs.

IV.

The Rights and duties of the Representatives (1) Representatives must not be absent from sessions of their committees unless they have received a permission in advance to do so from the Executive Board of their committee/council. (2) The Representatives shall not be late from the sessions. If it is the case they shall write a notepaper to the Chair in which they give reasonable explanation for being late and announce the state of presence. The admonishment of the delegate for being late is a subject to the discretion of the Chair.

(3) All Representatives are allowed to drink during the sessions but are prohibited to consume any kind of comestibles. Beverages and water shall be kept in recapped bottles or cans under the desks during the whole session. In a reasonable case (health problems such as low blood sugar etc.) the Representatives can ask the Chair via Point of Personal Privilege to release them from these constrains.

V.

Attire and Decorum (1) During BIMUN one should dress in strictly formal clothes and act professionally. (2) Male participants are to wear suit and tie with proper, elegant dark shoes or equally formal clothing.

(3) Female participants are expected to wear a trouser-suit or skirt with coat and elegant, dark shoes. (4) The skirts should not be placed higher than one palm above the knees. The shirts or blouses must have an appropriate neckline to keep a professional ambience during the conference. (5) Non-formal clothing such as jeans, jumpers, T-shirts, sneakers, slippers etc. are strictly forbidden during the whole conference. (6) Traditional costumes of the country represented are allowed during sessions besides formal clothing. (7) If one denies dressing in formal clothes or shows improper attitude, the Chair has the right to disciple the delegate and the attire has to be corrected as soon as possible. (8) All Representatives are to act professionally, as diplomats, and must keep a formal atmosphere at all times during the conference. (9) In case a delegate shows indecent behaviour, the Secretary-General may admonish or expel them to the Executive Boards nomination or provide the right to any member of the Secretariat or the Executive Board to do so.

VI.

Language During the entire conference, including all formal sessions and informal meetings, the only official language is English; no other languages are allowed to address the public. Delegates who violate this rule shall be called to order by the Chair.

VII.

Speeches (1) Delegates may hold a speech only after being recognized and called to the floor by the Chair. (2) When holding a speech, all functions staying in the room/hall should be addressed in respect to their titles (as: Secretary-General, Chairs, delegates, NGOs, guests etc.) (3) All speeches must be held only in English, no words or phrases in the language of the country represented should be included in them. (4) Speeches should always be related to the matter under discussion. (5) Delegates may only refer to themselves in either in third person singular or in first person plural. (6) The Chair may interrupt the speaker when their speech is not strictly in connection with the subject of the matter or the content is offending, incongruous or the speech is held in an inappropriate way. (7) The delegate has to yield the floor back to the Chair when being requested to do so, only after that may they leave the floor. Only in this case may delegates use the first person singular.

VIII.

Notepapers Delegates may inform each other about current issues, their points of view, discuss actions or ask opinions in a semi-official way during the sessions via passing Official Notepapers. Notepapers shall be provided and passed by the Administrative Staff. Notepapers should be written in English. A Notepaper may not be delivered if it contains inappropriate language or the content is not related to the Items on Agenda. The Chair may suspend the passing of Notepapers at any time if the smoothness of the debate requires it.

IX.

Working Papers and Draft Resolutions 1) Working Papers Working Papers shall be submitted via the Approval Panel, formed as a Resolution in all aspects during the Lobbying. Working Papers may be submitted for final approval only if all requirements are considered fulfilled by the Main Submitter. Once passed the final approval, a Working Paper becomes a Draft Resolution. 2) Draft Resolutions Draft Resolutions are the approved Working Papers with the sufficient number of Submitters. Submission requirements of Draft Resolutions: (1) Are sealed and signed by the Secretary-General; (2) The number of Submitters in aggregate reaches at least 20 percent of the number of the nations present in the committee/council; (3) In Economic and Social Council, Human Rights Council and the Crisis Committee the least number of Co-Submitters is 5. The Chairs shall inform delegates about the required number of Submitters when starting a new Agenda Item.

X.

Resolutions 1) Heading of the Resolution The heading is the first part of the Resolution which shall contain: (1) the name and title of the committee/council,

(2) the Item on Agenda it concerns, (3) the Main Submitter, (4) the Co-Submitters. 2) Preambulatory Clauses This section of a Resolution recalls former Resolutions or treaties on the same matter, which once again require attention. It highlights the importance of the issue and delineates the political, economical, cultural, social or environmental situation of a country or region the Resolution deals with. The beginning of each Preambulatory Clause is indicated in italics with one preambulatory phrase and separated from the next by a comma (,) and a single spacing. Each Preambulatory Clause must be numbered.

3) Operative Clauses The Operative Clauses are the main segment of a Resolution as they comprise the recommended solutions. They represent the specific actions that all submitters intend to carry out for resolving the matter. The Clauses have to be numbered with Arabic numerals, sub-Clauses with small letters of the alphabet and further detailed lists with Roman numbers. The beginning of each Operative Clause is indicated in italics with one action phrase. Operative Clauses are separated from one another by a semicolon (;). Full stop (.) is used only at the end of the Resolution itself. The font to be used is Times New Roman, dimension 12.

XI.

The Approval Panel (1) Once a Working Paper is considered finished by the Submitters, it shall be handed in to the Executive Board of the committee/council in both printed and in digital formats. The Executive Board fills in the Approval Form and the document will be sent to the Grammar Approval. (2) The Grammar Approval may invite the Main Submitter for consultation. (3) Having signed by the Grammar Approval the document will be finalized by the Formal Approval. (4) A Working Paper is considered approved once affirmed by the seal and the signature of the Secretary-General. (5) Following the approval process the document shall be sent back to the committee/council in adequate issues, and from this very moment it is considered a Draft Resolution.

XII.

Flow of the Debate The finishing act of the committees first informal meeting shall be a Voting Procedure to set the Agenda. The discussing order of the Issues will be set by the Executive Board of the committee/council according to the number of votes on each of the Items on Agenda. 1) General Debate Discussion on a certain Issue shall be started by the General Debate where delegates have the opportunity to express their countries opinions on the topic, state their concerns and suggest optional ways as solutions of the matter. Once the time on the General Debate elapsed the house shall move on to the Lobbying. 2) Lobbying Lobbying is the stage of the discussion when delegates are to collaborate and prepare Working Papers to be submitted via the Approval Panel. During the Lobbying delegates are free to: a) leave the committee hall b) have informal discussions c) use the Lobbying-Rooms (mezzanine-floor) d) use the computer rooms (ground floor) e) use the installed computers in the committee hall The time for the Lobbying is set by the Chair to their discretion. When the time for the Lobbying elapses the session shall start on time with a Roll Call. 3) Debate on the Draft Resolutions (1) Following the Lobbying the committee is back to session to discuss the approved Working Papers (Draft Resolutions) with sufficient number of Submitters. (2) The order of debating on the submitted Draft Resolutions will be set by the Executive Board of the committee/council according to the number of Submitters. In case the number in aggregation of Submitters shows equality at two or more Resolutions, the order shall be put to a Procedural Voting. (3) Once the debating order of the Draft Resolutions is declared, the Chair reads out the Operative Clauses of every Draft Resolution in the mentioned order. (4) The Chair, having introduces the Draft Resolutions, sets the debate time, which shall be equal for Time in Favour and Time Against.

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(5) The first speaker of Time in Favour shall be the Main Submitter who may introduce the submission to the house and delivers the opening speech of the debate. The Main Submitters speech may also include reading out Operative Clauses from the Draft Resolution under discussion. (6) During the Time in Favour delegates who wish to support the Resolution may express their opinions. (7) Following the Time in Favour the house shall move on to the Time Against in which nations in opposition may express their opinions concerning the Draft Resolution. (8) Once the debate time elapsed the house shall move to the Voting Procedure on the Draft Resolution as a Whole. (9) If the Draft Resolution gains at least simple majority of the votes and passes, the debate on the issue is closed and the house will continue with the next Item on Agenda. (10)In case the submission fails, the next Draft Resolution of the debating order will be discussed. (11)The discussion of the issue is also considered closed when all Draft Resolutions have failed. 4) Open and Closed Debates The debate is considered open if no restrictions are imposed on the nature of the speeches. The debate is considered closed if the content of the speeches are restricted as in favour or against. 5) Main Submitter The Main Submitter of the Resolution is the Representative who is responsible for the submission. Once the Draft Resolution is brought to the floor, the Main Submitter has the right to introduce it to the house and deliver the opening speech of the debate. Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Observers may not be the Main Submitters of any Draft Resolution. A delegate must not be the Main Submitter of more than one Draft Resolution per issue. 6) Co-Submitters The Co-Submitters of a Draft Resolution are the Representatives firmly in support of the submission wishing to represent the content via the committee/council. NGOs and Observers may be listed as Co-Submitters of a Draft Resolution, but they shall not be taken into account when determining the debating order of the submissions. A delegate must not be the Co-Submitter of more than one Draft Resolution per issue.

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XIII.

Yields During the General Debate or while a Draft Resolution is being debated in either Open or Closed debate delegates, after having their speeches finished and the entertained Points of Information answered, have the right to yield the floor to another Representative. This yield may be overruled by the Chair. At any other cases when the Representative on the floor does not wish to yield the floor to another delegate or no other options are in order, they may yield the floor back to the Chair. The Chair may call upon the delegate at any time to yield the floor back.

XIV.

Amendments (1) Delegates have the right to amend the Operative Clauses of the Draft Resolution being debated at any time until the Chair opens the Voting Procedure on the Draft Resolution as a Whole. (2) Amendments shall be passed in writing via Official Amendment Sheets to the Executive Board of the committee and proposed by raising a Motion to Propose an Amendment. (3) Amendments are categorized as Friendly and Unfriendly Amendments. (4) Amendments to Amendments are in order. (See point 3).) (5) Once an Amendment is being debated the debate time on the Draft Resolution is paused. (6) The Representative proposed the Amendment may at any time withdraw the proposal until the Voting Procedure.

1) Unfriendly Amendments (1) Unfriendly Amendments are proposed changes in the Draft Resolution that lack the support of some or all of the submitters. Once an amendment declared unfriendly, the Chair sets the debate time and requests the Representative proposing the amendment to introduce the reason of the proposal. (2) Following the elapse of the debate time the committee moves on to the Voting Procedure. (3) Amendments gained simple majority of the votes as affirmative pass, thus adapted to the Draft Resolution, and the house is back to the debate on the Draft Resolution as a Whole.

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2) Friendly Amendments (1) An amendment is considered friendly if a) all the Submitters of the initial Draft Resolution are in support of the proposal, b) the Operative Clause it wishes to change has not been amended before. Newly added/deleted Clauses are considered as amended. (2) In case an amendment is declared friendly, it is automatically adopted without substantive Voting Procedure or debate. 3) Amendments to amendments (1) An amendment to an amendment can only be friendly. (2) An amendment to an amendment is considered friendly once the submitter of the original amendment agrees upon overwriting their amendment. (3) Once the originally submitted has successfully been overwritten, the debate is back to the discussion on the modified amendment. (4) In case of disagreement by the submitter of the original amendment the amendment to the amendment is deleted. XV. Voting All Voting Procedures shall be ruled by the Chair. To the inchoation of the Chair all members of the house have to vote by raising their placards at the adequate moment, except at Role Call Voting, as in that case the Representatives have to vote one by one. Voting Procedures are categorised according to their natures as Substantive and Procedural Voting. 1) The outcome of the voting Simple majority: Simple majority is the half plus one votes as affirmative by the nations present in the committee/council. Two-thirds majority: To pass by two-thirds majority means there has to be at least twice as many votes in favour as against. 2) Substantive Voting (1) When voting on an Amendment or on a Draft Resolution, Substantive Voting is plied. (2) Should the debate on a currently discussed topic conclude, the committee moves directly into Voting Procedure. (3) When determining the majority abstentions are considered as the delegate not present during the current Voting Procedure.

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(4) In case of Substantive Voting only Member States are allowed to vote. NGOs, Observers and guests may not express their opinions on the subject of the voting during the Voting Procedure. (5) Each question on Substantive Voting requires simple majority to pass.

3) Procedural Voting (1) Except for Draft Resolutions and Amendments Procedural Voting is used on any other question put to vote. (2) At a Procedural Voting all members of the house have to vote including NGOs and Observers, exclusively in favour or against. Abstentions are out of order at Procedural Voting. (3) Procedural Voting shall be indicated on the Agenda or on the debating order of the Draft Resolutions submitted via the committee in case the number of submitters shows equality. In these cases only in favour votes are in order and delegates may not vote in favour of more than one item of the voting. (4) Guests must not vote under any circumstances. 4) Roll Call Voting Roll Call Voting can be proposed by the Chair or by any of the delegates via raising a Motion to vote by Roll Call. During a Roll Call Voting all members present in the committee/council will be called by the Chair individually in alphabetical order, following the English alphabet. Hearing their names members shall answer according to the nature of the voting. XVI. Quorum For opening a debate at least the half of the members of the committee/council plus one member have to be present. If it is not the case, the Chair shall decide whether the debate should be opened. Substantive voting shall not be held without a quorum of the committee/council. XVII. Roll Call Roll Call takes place at the beginning of every session or the Chair may order it when there is a change in the number of attendants. The Chair shall call all the members of the committee/council including NGOs and Observers in alphabetical order following the English alphabet. All members who are present have to state their attendance by raising their placards and saying present.

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The final act of every Roll Call shall be the announcement of (1) the number of delegates present, (2) the number of votes required for simple and two-thirds majority.

XVIII.

Points (1) A Point may not interrupt the speaker except for the Point of Personal Privilege due to audibility and Point of Order due to improper parliamentary procedure. (2) The Chair may rule those Points out of order that are improper. (3) Points are not debatable and seconds are not needed to be recognized. (4) Points shall be indicated by raising the placard high and saying the concrete Point except for a Point of Information. (5) Points shall be stated clearly after the Chair recognized it. i. Point of Personal Privilege A Point of Personal Privilege may be raised by the delegates at any time during the discussions or the General Assembly. It may only refer to the wellbeing, discomfort or safety of the delegate. A Point of Personal Privilege is immediately addressed by the Chair who may also refuse to recognize the Point if it is incongruous or dilatory. A Point of Personal Privilege may only interrupt the speaker when it is due to audibility. ii. Right of Reply A delegate can raise a Right of Reply in the case of immense personal or national offense. Whether the Point is approved is subject to the discretion of the Chair. The delegate who has raised the Point may state which remark they considered to be insulting. The Representative addressed within the Point may also explicate their aspect diplomatically. Hearing from both sides the Chair will decide whether public apology is in order as a consequence. This Point shall be raised only after the speaker on floor has finished their speech. iii. Point of Order The Point of Order must be related to the Rules of Procedure. Delegates may raise a Point of Order, if they do not consort with a current decision of the Chair concerning the Rules of Procedure. A Point of Order may also be raised in case of improper parliamentary procedure. Only in this case, the Point may interrupt the speaker. The Chair has the right to overrule the statement of the delegate.

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iv.

Point of Parliamentary Inquiry Point of Parliamentary Inquiry may be raised to the Chair, if the query is related to the Rules of Procedure in general. After the Point was raised the delegate shall be given the explanation required. The Chair may refuse to answer if the content concerns any other question but the Rules of Procedure.

v.

Appeal to the Chairs decision Appeal to the Chairs decision can be raised in case the delegate finds that the Chair has recently made and incorrect ruling. Appeal to the Chair's decision shall be entertained at any case. Once the delegate has explained their reasons for raising the Point, the Chair invites the Secretary-General to make an immediate decision on the matter, inspecting the state of affair. The judgement of the Secretary General shall be considered peremptory.

vi.

Point of information A Point of Information can be raised by the Representatives after a speech has been delivered on the floor. Before the Points are raised the Chair questions the speaker on the floor whether they are open for Points of Information. Points of Information must be phrased as questions related to the speech that has recently been delivered. The Chair may overrule any Points of Information if the phrasing is rhetorical or the content is offending or incongruous. The speaker has the right to refuse answering if they find the Point offending or not relevant to the subject under discussion. When a delegate feels that their question was not answered properly they may request to follow up. Approving of the request is subject to the discretion of the Chair.

XIX.

Motions (1) Proposing a Motion shall be indicated by raising the placard together with the Blue Card. Once recognized by the Chair the concrete Motion has to be clarified by the Representative who raised it. (2) Motions shall not interrupt the speaker. (3) Entertaining Motions is subject to the discretion of the Chair as the Chair also has the right to overrule any Motions before the Voting Procedure on a particular Motion.

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(4) Motions need to be seconded at least twice to be entertained. In case a delegate is in opposition of the Motion, they may express their disagreement by saying objection when the Motion was proposed. Both are indicated by saying second or objection loudly. (5) If the Motion is seconded by at least two delegates, and there are no objections, the Motion is automatically approved. (6) In case the Motion had been seconded at least twice and there also had been objections the Motion shall be put to a Procedural Voting.

i.

Motion to Resume/Table the Debate The house may consider tabling the Item on Agenda under discussion to the recommendation of the Chair or the delegates. In case of objection, the delegate who called for this Motion has to speak in favour and the first oppositional against it. After the reasoning the Motion will be put to vote, and will pass if gains two-thirds majority of the votes as affirmative. Once having been tabled, the issue may be reintroduced to the house at a later point of the session by raising a Motion to Resume the Debate. The Motion to Resume the Debate follows the same procedure as the Tabling. Since the currently discussed Draft Resolutions have priority, a topic can only be reintroduced when the debate on the currently discussed Agenda Item is declared finished, namely, a Resolution has passed or all Draft Resolutions were discussed on the certain issue and failed.

ii.

Motion to Exclude the Public A Motion to Exclude the Public may be raised if the Chair or any of the Representatives feel disturbed by the audience or guests or feels that the further acts of the committee/council requires more confidentiality. In case of objection, this Motion will immediately be put to vote and simple majority is required for it to pass. Observers and NGOs also fall under the power of this Motion. If the mentioned parties feel disturbed by the Motion having been approved, an initiative could be handed to the Chair, requesting to release them from this concern.

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iii.

Motion to move to the Previous Question Motion to move to the Previous Question can be called when the Chair or a Representative wishes to move into Voting Procedure. Motion to move to the Previous Question could be substituted with appropriate kinds of the Motion that fit the current situation. a) In case of a Closed debate when the discussion is in Time in Favour, this Motion will move the debate directly into Time Against (Motion to move into Time Against), b) When the discussion is in Time Against the Motion will move the debate into the Voting Procedure (Motion to move directly into Voting Procedure on the Draft Resolution as a Whole), c) When there is a General Debate on the topic, delegates may raise this Motion to open the Lobbying before the time on the General Debate elapses (Motion to move into Lobbying time), d) In case of an Open Debate, the discussion will also move into the Voting Procedure once the Motion is approved by the house (Motion to move directly into Voting Procedure on the Draft Resolution as a Whole). Should an objection be raised, the Motion will be debated to the extent of a speech in favour by the Representative who raised the Motion and one speech against by the first oppositional. The speeches shall be followed by a Voting Procedure on the Motion. The Motion passes when it is supported by two-thirds majority of the votes. The Chair may overrule this Motion in case the debate has been unsatisfactory or when the time and the Agenda Item allows more debate to be done on the topic.

iv.

Motion for Suspension or Adjournment of the Meeting A delegate may move for the Suspension of the Meeting in order to postpone the committee functions for lunch break or for any similar purpose. Motion to Adjourn the Meeting can be raised when the Representatives wish to end the meeting until the session of the next day. Delegates may reason the purpose for raising both Motions and the Chair may overrule them at any time. This Motion will immediately be put to vote and simple majority is required for it to pass.

v.

Motion to invite a Guest Speaker This Motion can be used when the delegates feel the importance of inviting a guest from another committee/council to join the discussion, especially if the Agenda Item is dealing with an issue of a country which is not represented in the committee/council.

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This Motion shall be explained by the Representative who raised it within a short speech. In case of any objections, the first oppositional may also have the floor to argue for the objection. After the reasoning the Motion will immediately be put to vote thus simple majority is needed for it to pass. vi. Motion to Extend the Debate Time Representatives may raise a Motion to Extend the Debate Time when the currently discussed Item on Agenda requires more debate to be done. In case of objection both the caller and the first oppositional have the floor to explain their point of view briefly. After the reasoning, the Motion shall immediately be put to vote. For this Motion to pass simple majority is required. vii. Motion to vote by Roll Call A delegate may raise a Motion to vote by Roll Call at the start of the Voting Procedure, or if they feel that the Voting Procedure was inappropriate or ambiguous. This Motion shall automatically be approved by the Chair if considered to be in order, thus the Voting Procedure shall be continued according to the content of XV./4) Roll Call Voting. This Motion may not interrupt the Voting Procedure. viii. Motion for Q & A session This Motion may be raised only during General Debate or when the house is in an Open or Closed debate on a Draft Resolution. It may not be used when debating on a Motion, Amendment or any procedural issue. Entertaining this Motion, the Chair shall ask the caller which nation they wish to put questions to, and ask the Representative of the country named within if they support this Motion. After an affirmative answer this Motion will immediately be put to vote with simple majority required. Once the proposal is approved by the house, a speakers list will be made of the nations wishing to put questions to the chosen country. The Chair shall moderate the questioning, and also has the right to limit the speaking time and the number of the questions. Receiving the floor from the Chair delegates shall rise and ask one question from the subject of the Q & A session. Once the speakers' list has expired and there are still questions on the floor the Chair may decide to continue the Q & A session by entertaining the questions individually.

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Delegates shall be called to order by the Chair once the question is rhetorical or incongruous. Plea to follow up is subject to the discretion of the Chair. ix. Motion for an Open Debate This Motion may only be raised when there is a Closed Debate on the Resolution. It will immediately be put to vote and simple majority is required for passage. Should this Motion pass, the remaining time of the Closed Debate will count in aggregate as the further debate time on the Draft Resolution or Amendment. In case the Chair feels it necessary they have the right to set the time for the debate to their discretion. During the Open Debate all nations may speak either in favour or against freely, according to their points of views. x. Motion to Propose an Amendment Motion to Propose and Amendment shall be used when a delegate wishes to put forward a change on the Operative Clauses of the Draft Resolution currently being debated. This Motion is in order only if the proposed changes have been sent to the Chair via Official Amendment Sheet.

XX.

Rules of the General Assembly (1) The General Assembly is the plenary meeting of all committees and councils of BIMUN, where Resolutions by the First Committee (DISEC), Sixth Committee (Legal Committee), United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP), Human Rights Council (HRC), and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) shall be debated and voted on by all Member States of BIMUN 2012. The debate time on the Resolutions shall be set by the President and may not be modified by the house via Motion to Extend the Debate Time. (2) Each committee/council may submit no more than one Resolution to the General Assembly. The finishing act of the last official meeting of each committee/council shall be a Procedural Voting on the accepted Resolutions to decide which one to pass to the General Assembly. The Resolution gained the most votes in favour will be the one debated in the General Assembly. (3) Resolutions by the Security Council, Historical Security Council, Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and the Crisis Committee shall be introduced to the house to the extent of the Operative Clauses and speeches in support, starting with the Main Submitter.

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(4) To the request of the President the introductions are moderated by the Executive Board of the particular body of BIMUN 2012. (5) Yields shall be in order and moderated according to XIII. Yields (6) During the General Assembly all Motions and Points are in order except for a) Motion to Exclude the Public b) Motion for a Q & A Session c) Motion to Propose an Amendment d) Motion to Resume/Table the Debate e) Motion to Invite a Guest Speaker f) Motion to Extend the Debate Time g) Motion for Suspension or Adjournment of the Meeting (7) The General Assembly shall be ruled by the President of the General Assembly according to III./2) The rights of the President of the General Assembly. XXI. Rules of the Security Council Each and every part of the Rules of Procedure shall be applied in the Security Council except for the changes XXI. Rules of the Security Council implicates. 1) General Debate The first session shall be started where delegates are given the opportunity to express their countries views and opinions on certain issues and state their concerns and their ways of solving the conflict. Once the time on the General Debate elapsed the house shall move on to the Lobbying. 2) Lobbying Lobbying is the stage of the discussion when delegates are given the chance to collaborate and prepare their Working Papers which later on must be submitted to the Approval Panel. During Lobbying delegates are free to: a) leave the committee hall, but must stay within the area which is signed by the Presidency b) have informal discussions c) use the computer room signed by the Presidency The time for the Lobbying is set by the Presidency. When the time for Lobbying elapses, the session shall start with a Roll Call.

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3) Debate on the Draft Resolution (1) After Lobbying the Security Council will start its formal session to discuss the approved Draft Resolutions which are ready to be debated. (2) The order of debating on the submitted Draft Resolutions will be decided upon by the Presidency. (3) Once the order of the Draft Resolutions has been declared, the President reads out the Operative Clauses of every Draft Resolution in the mentioned order. (4) After all the submitted Draft Resolutions on the specific issue have been introduced by the President, the Main Submitter of the Resolution will be asked to speak about the Resolution as a whole. Followed by the Main Submitters speech, specific special envoys of the Security Council will be asked to speak about the Resolution. (5) After speeches on the Resolution are finished, the Presidency will set the debate time. (6) Debates in the Security Council shall be executed Clause by Clause when debating on a Draft Resolution and all debates are Open Debates. (7) Every time moving to a new Clause, the Main Submitter of the Resolution will be asked to give a speech about the specific Clause or to appoint any of the Co-Submitter to act on the Main-Submitters behalf. (8) When delegates feel there has been enough debate on the particular Clause, they may move the debate into the Voting Procedure by raising a Motion to move to the Previous Question. (9) The Security Council consists of 15 members, of which 5 are permanent (P5 states), including: a) China b) France c) Russian Federation d) The United Kingdom e) The United States (10)There are 10 non-permanent members consisting of a) Azerbaijan b) Columbia c) Germany d) Guatemala e) India f) Morocco g) Pakistan h) Portugal i) South Africa j) Togo (11)Apart from the 15 members special envoys are accepted in the Security Council who shall participate in all the sessions of the Security Council except for Substantive Voting.

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(12)During the Voting Procedure, Veto Power applies for the 5 permanent countries. The Veto Power entitles them to strike out a specific Clause of the Resolution, or the Resolution as a whole without question or without voting taking place. In order to pass Amendments, Clauses or Resolutions in the Security Council, two-third majority is required in favour, including all P5 members either voting in favour or abstaining. If a P5 nation uses its Veto Power, the Clause or the Resolution is immediately struck out. Before using the Veto Power, delegates must notify the Presidency with an acceptable reason stating why they would need to veto a specific idea or Clause. If the problem cannot be solved during the formal debate, any P5 members have the right to call for a P5 meeting, which is also known as the P5 Caucus. (13)A P5 Caucus is an informal meeting in the Security Council that breaks the debate. All P5 members leave the councils room into a separated area, accompanied by the President of the Security Council. There they are allowed to discuss a certain aspect of the Resolution without needing to speak in the third person. The P5 Caucus generally happens when one of the P5 Members considers on voting against (vetoing) a Clause that other P5 delegates are in favour of. In the caucus, the P5 delegates discuss whether the Clause is worth being enclosed to the Resolution or it should be struck out. To ask for a P5 Caucus, delegates need to send a Notepaper to the Presidency. (14) If the Clause fails and all P5 members either voted in favour or abstained, a Motion to Divide the House can be called. If the Motion is entertained by the Presidency the council will move into a Roll Call Voting, where all delegates are only allowed to vote with in favour and against, and Veto Power applies here as well. (15) When the Clause by Clause debate is finished, the house shall vote on the Operative Clauses as a whole. (16) After the Voting on the Operative Clauses as a Whole has been passed, delegates need to vote on the Preambulatory Clauses as a Whole.

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