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November 30, 2012 Vol. LXXXII No. 10 $1.00


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times change, but needs go on
Getting ready
for Chanukah 8, 14, 27
Stern Gang alums
set to party on 25
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2 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
This year Chai Lifeline will touch the lives of more than 4,300
children and families around the corner and across the globe.
Become a partner. See how much more we can do together.
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Celebrating Hope
Please join us
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and help to
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children and
families around
the world.
MaiMonides Legacy award
Arthur A. KLein, MD
Regional Executive Director - Western Region
Senior Vice President for Childrens Services
North Shore - LIJ Health System
i-shine Founders award
DeenA intrAtor
Annette KAufMAn
StACey Zrihen
caMp siMcha appreciaTion award
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dinner chairs
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FYI
letters to the edItor PAGe 21
I suggest first and foremost that no one, absolutely no
one, walk on the streets of our community.
Sandra Steuer Cohen, Teaneck
CANdlelIGhtING tIMe: FrIdAY, NoV. 30, 4:11 P.M.
shABBAt eNds: sAtUrdAY, deC. 1, 5:14 P.M.
Noshes ................................................................................................... 5
oPINIoN .............................................................................................. 18
CoVer storY.....................................................................22
GAllerY ..........................................................................................52
torAh CoMMeNtArY ..................................55
Arts & CUltUre ....................................................... 56
lIFeCYCle ...................................................................................60
ClAssIFIed .............................................................................. 62
reAl estAte ...................................................................... 64
Contents
Iron Dome 18%
Electricity 36%
Family and Friends 46%
What are you
most thankful
for this week?
Do you celebrate every night
of Chanukah with gifts?
To vote, log onto jstandard.com
ChANUkAh
Late for the latkes 16
letters
FroM IsrAel
A Likud
lament
42
Arts & CUltUre
Potoks Asher Lev
on the stage 55
edUCAtIoN
Hi-tech Hebrew teaching 12
loCAl
Mission: Solidarity 6
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Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 3
Librarians bequest
stocks Englewoods stacks
For four decades, Jean Grushkin was a fixture at the Englewood
Public Library. She started working in 1968; she retired in 2008, when
she was 86 years old. She died two years later.
She was not the only Grushkin to love books. Her husband, Philip
Grushkin, was a book designer, who illustrated Robert Frosts work.
Besides working in the reference section and occasionally
staffing the circulation desk she claimed Jewish books as her fief-
dom. She placed the orders for Judaica, and she ran the librarys an-
nual Jewish Book Month program.
The Brooklyn native also served as shop steward for the librarys
union; her fellow workers praised her as a pit bull in negotiations.
So perhaps its no surprise that in her will, she left $15,000 to the
library for the purchase of Holocaust and Judaica books, earning
her memory a permanent place on the librarys shelves. This week,
the library held a reception to mark the gift and display the books it
bought with the bequest.
Larry Yudelson
Jean Grushkin
JS-4
4 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
R.S.V.P. to Kathy Frost, 201-836-7474
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Business Administrations Small Business Advocate of the Year award, and was appointed by President Reagan as chairman of the
Council on Womens Business Enterprise and by President Clinton as a member of the National Womens Business Council. She served
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Develop a "Moving Mom" team
Organize each step of the process
Find helpful resources in your
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Work with attorneys, stagers, real
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JS-6*
6 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
Never question your effectiveness. Just go
Local leaders make emergency trip to israel before cease-fire
AbigAil Klein leichmAn
O
ne simple principle made Rabbi Joel Mosbacher
leave Mahwah to travel to areas of Israel under
fire from Gaza: You go see your family when
they need you, not only in the good times, he said.
Mosbacher, the spiritual leader of the Reform
congregation Beth Haverim-Shir Shalom, elaborated.
I wanted to see the situation for myself so I could
understand it on the ground and at large as much as
possible, to find out more about ways in which American
Jewry can connect with Israelis now, he said.
Mosbacher was the sole New Jerseyan in a delegation
of 12 lay and professional leaders from the Jewish
Federations of North America who made a two-day
emergency solidarity mission to Israels south during
Operation Pillar of Defense and made a $5 million
commitment to the Israel Terror Relief Fund.
A delegation from the Rabbinical Council of America,
led by its president, Rabbi Shmuel Goldin of Englewood,
followed close behind JFNA. And a separate Englewood
group, inspired by congregational rabbis Goldin (of
Congregation Ahavath Torah) and Zev Reichman (of the
East Hill Synagogue), gave up Thanksgiving at home
to be with Israelis on the front lines. Ahavath Torahs
assistant rabbi, Mordechai Gershon, also was part of the
group.
I was very torn initially, Ahavath Torah member
Scott Herschmann said. I knew that practically speaking
I wasnt going to contribute much, but as I watched
rockets being fired on cities in the south from the comfort
of my couch, I had to get up and do something to help
whether by buying products from stores in the affected
cities, or bringing supplies and words of appreciation to
soldiers. I left my wife and four kids at home to be in the
middle of a war because I felt that joining my brothers
and sisters in Israel shows am Yisrael chai the nation
of Israel lives.
When your home is in danger, you come home
RAbbi Shmuel goldin
D
ay One: Tuesday, Nov. 20
The first indication that things are different
emerges as you listen to the radio on the ride
from the airport to Yerushalayim. Over and over again, the
regular program is interrupted as a calm voice announces:
Tzeva Adom: Red alert Kiryat Malachi; Red alert Beer
Sheva; Red alert Ashkelon; Red alert Ashdod; Red
alert Yerushalayim.
And you realize what these announcements mean; city
after city under attack; families, children scrambling for
cover; terror raining down haphazardly from the sky; no
guarantees of safety anywhere.
I am here in Israel, as president of the Rabbinical
Council of America, together with a delegation of rabbis
from across the United States and Canada. At the same
time, I am participating in a solidarity mission from my
own Englewood community. The goals of our missions
are clear. We are here to lend solidarity to the citizens of
Israel at this critical time. We are here to experience, if only
for a few days, what the lives of our brothers and sisters
in southern Israel have been like for much too long. We
are here to learn how we can help Israel when we return.
Above all, we are here because we do not feel that we can
be anywhere else this week.
We dropped everything to come, on a moments notice,
because when your home is in danger, you dont run the
other way. You come home, even if, for now, its just for a
visit.
Our first day here was filled with experiences that we
never will forget. We visited Kiryat Malachi, the scene
of the recent fatal rocket attack. We climbed up to the
devastated apartment, recited psalms, and then visited
family members of one of the victims as they sat shiva. We
traveled to Moshav Shibbolim, a small town in the Negev
that none of us had ever heard of, and visited in small
groups with families who live under the constant fear of
rocket attacks.
During these visits, a red alert was sounded and we all
were forced to find cover together with the families. We
spent time with children attending programs in a bomb
shelter, because it is unsafe for them to go to school. We
spoke with Israeli citizens, from government officials to
people on the street, sharing our wishes and hearing their
stories.
Over and over again, they thanked us for coming. Over
and over again, I objected. The thanks, I explained, go in
the opposite direction. We are here to thank you for your
courage and dedication; for fighting our battles, every day
of your lives.
Perhaps Im dreaming, but you get the sense that
globally things may have reached a tipping point. There
is a sense of growing consensus, not only in Israel but
throughout the world, that the status quo cannot continue.
President Obamas words say it all: The precipitating
event here thats causing the current crisis was an
RCA rabbis surveying a destroyed Kiryat Malachi
apartment. Sharon altShul, realJStreetS.com
Visitor Brian Haimm with soldiers on a base at the
Gaza border. courteSy Brian haimm
see Just Go page 53
see CoME HoME page 53 IDF soldiers at the front. courteSy raBBi Shmuel Goldin
RCA rabbis take cover during a red alert.
JS-7*
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 7
Date: December 9, 2012 Time: 7PM
All Tickets: $25 and $100
Savion Glover and HBO Def Comedy Poet
Carlos Andres Gomez
Bill Berloni and Sandy -
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Liz Gillies - from Nickelodeons Victorious
Ali Stroker - The Glee Project
Kelli Rabke Agresta- Broadway credits:
Joseph... Les Miserables
Alexander Diaz - bergenPACs Director of Education
Scarlett Diaz- Young Fiona National Tour Shrek
HeatherBraverman, Chris Marksbury -
Singer/Songwriters

Students from bergenPACs Performing Arts School,


Englewood Idol Brian Park
The Elisabeth Morrow School Superchamber Violins
under the direction of Amelia Gold
Many other Broadway performers - and beyond!
All proceeds go to helpHurricane
Sandy NJ Relief Fund
PET RESQ of Tenafy, and Little Ferry
& Moonachie School Districts
Box Offce: 201-227-1030
A Relief Concert
Bergen Performing Arts Center
30 North Van Brunt St. Englewood www.bergenpac.org
CHANUKAH SALE
to benefit
SINAI Schools
Featuring brand new styles of sterling silver
jewelry that never tarnishes for children,
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A portion of proceeds from your
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Bunny Hains Jewelry
The shaliachs tale
Being with israel without being in israel
AvinoAm SegAl-elAd
T
he first thing I did upon hearing about
the military operation in Israel was to
call Amit, my commander from my
reserve duty unit.
Me: Ma hamatzav? (Whats up?) Are we
being called in? Are we entering Gaza? Give
me details. Should I come? When should I
come?
Amit: Calm down. All I have been doing
in the last day is speaking to my soldiers who want to
know whats happening and if we are being called in.
Me: Great, but you didnt answer my question. Are
we called in? Should I come? When and where?
Amit: You do know that our unit is trained to fight
in the north. Did you forget the Israeli map during
your stay in the U.S.? Gaza is in the south. No, we
havent been called in, and no, stay where you are. Your
support is what we need. Go talk about Israel and tell
stories about what we are doing here.
Me: I knew there was a reason I called you. Thats
what I needed to hear. Oh, and one more thing, if we
do get called in, promise that youll call me
Amit: ------ (Amit just hung up on me.)
I am the community shaliach and the director of the
Center for Israel Engagement at the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey, in partnership with the Jewish
Agency for Israel.
I arrived here from Israel almost a year and half
ago, and now my wife, our three children, and I
live in Paramus. In Israel, I was a lawyer; I worked
for the Israeli government and argued cases on its
behalf before the Supreme Court there. But I always
wondered what it would be like to see Israel from an
entirely different vantage point. That was one of the
things that led me to this great adventure of shlichut.
In the past 13 years I also have become part of a
second family, my Miluim (reserve duty) family.
We meet at least once a year for a few weeks at a
time, we wear the same green uniform and share the
same jokes, we go through tough training together, and
unfortunately from time to time we fight in the same
battles together.
One day you are a respected lawyer, wearing a tie,
coming home late from a hard day at work, reading a
book to your children, singing them the Shema and
kissing them good night, and the next day you are a
soldier crawling on the ground aiming at targets hiding
in bushes. When you ask yourself why, thats when
you think about your family and the children who are
sound asleep at home. Then it suddenly becomes very
clear and simple.
Other shlichim have told me there are moments
when you really feel you need to be in Israel. I had not
as yet experienced those moments. Thanks
to Skype and being close to JFK and Newark
airports, I see my parents and my siblings
often. (It is with a bit of shame that I admit
that I speak to and meet with some of my
friends more frequently in the United States
than in Israel).
Now here I am, serving as a community
shaliach, far away from Israel and my family
and friends. I listen to Israeli news; check the Internet
every minute, and call my friends and family every day
to see if everything is okay.
Living in Israel is part of my identity. My parents
moved to Israel from the United States in 1973, a
few years before I was born. As a family, every year
we celebrated the anniversary of their aliyah. I grew
up with the feeling that living in Israel was a dream-
come-true for my parents and grandparents and,
perhaps, without even noticing it, also my own
dream-come-true.
So I ask myself a tough question. How can I be away
from Israel at a time like this?
This recent challenging time has been eye-opening
for me. I suddenly understand what it is to care about
Israel and worry about Israel from afar, and have been
deeply touched by so many people adults, teens,
children, and seniors who care so much and reach
out to lend their support to Israel. I have learned what
it is to be with Israel without being in Israel. That is
such an important lesson for someone, like me, who
until now has lived his whole life there.
Once the rockets started flying, the Jewish
Federation of Northern New Jersey took action, and I
was privileged to take part in the effort of reaching out
to the community. I have been going around speaking
to students in schools and in synagogues throughout
the community. I have come out of each and every
session with a strong feeling that I now understand the
meaning of one mishpachah one family.
When I mention Israel in these times it is important
for me to emphasize that we Israelis are strong and
positive. We believe in the cause. Therefore, we should
not express feelings of sorrow or pity for Israel. We
should, however, continue caring, reaching out,
showing solidarity, and supporting Israel in as many
ways as possible.
These last two weeks have been a great lesson for
me. I am privileged and honored to be part of the
northern New Jersey community. At the end of my stay,
I will return home strengthened.
Avinoam Segal-Elad is the shaliach and director of the Cen-
ter for Israel Engagement at the Jewish Federation of North-
ern New Jersey.
IDF
soldiers
at the
front.
courteSy
raBBi
Shmuel
Goldin
RCA rabbis take cover during a red alert.
JS-53
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 53 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 7
Speaking to the Jewish Standard en
route to Tel Aviv from Ashkelon, Mosbacher
recounted that his group had met with a
trauma specialist in Sderot, the border city
that has absorbed thousands of rockets
from Gaza over the past dozen years.
I did some chaplaincy work with first
responders after Sandy, last months
destructive superstorm, so to watch Israeli
first responders struggling with their own
emotions and needs and obligations has
been impactful for me, Mosbacher said.
The JFNA group spent time with a
family whose home was struck by a missile,
with elderly citizens of a southern Israeli
moshav, or cooperative village, and in one
of 60 Ashkelon bomb shelters.
I spoke with a 9-year-old girl who was
painting a tribute to the Israeli army on the
wall of the shelter, Mosbacher said. That
resonated with me, because my son is 9. I
asked her how she is doing and she said,
Down here we cant hear anything. To see
Israeli strength and vulnerability has been
very emotional.
The RCA group, 20 strong, had a packed
schedule from Tuesday afternoon through
Thursday night, mainly arranged on the
fly. The things weve done have been
unbelievable, Goldin said.
We said Tehillim [Psalms] in an
apartment in Kiryat Malachi where three
people were killed, and we made a shiva
call to one of the families of the victims,
he said. Weve had military lectures
explaining the situation to us as it was
developing. We went to an Iron Dome
installation near Beersheva, and we visited
four injured soldiers at Beershevas Soroka
Medical Center. People kept thanking us
for coming, and I kept turning it around
to say, We thank you for being here and
defending the country, and thus defending
world Jewry.
On the day before Thanksgiving, the
RCA and Englewood groups traveled
together and experienced the panic of a
red alert signaling 90 seconds in which to
find cover from incoming missiles.
East Hill Synagogue member Brian
Haimm watched the Iron Dome missile
interception system at work. While we
were there, an alarm went off and in
seconds you heard a popping in the sky,
he said, noting that the Hebrew for Iron
Dome is Kippat Barzel. The word kippah
is more often used to mean skullcap.
Wearing a kippah is to acknowledge that
God above is protecting all of us, said
Haimm, who also helped deliver 2,500
pre-Chanukah jelly doughnuts to soldiers
massed on the border with Gaza.
David Wisotsky, a pediatrician and
member of Ahavath Torah, was especially
moved by his visit to the Jewish National
Funds 21,000-square-foot sheltered play
space in Sderot.
The children in Sderot havent been
able to play outside for the 10 or 12 years
that Sderot has been under rocket fire,
he said. Soldiers were playing games with
them instead of nannies, but that was
normal for them.
Wisotskys son Adam, 34, a social
worker from Passaic, recalled that on a
NORPAC lobbying mission to Washington
several years ago, he used the political
action committees talking points to
encourage lawmakers support for a
certain mode of security for Israel. I did not
know much about it, but later I heard it had
passed. That was, of course, the economic
assistance package to build the Iron Dome.
About two days ago, I was standing
there looking at rockets pouring over
Sderot, and Iron Dome shooting them
down, saving countless lives, Wisotsky
continued. Because of that little bit of
involvement that I didnt even understand
at the time, thousands of lives have been
saved. In the same way, we may not fully
understand the benefits of our presence
here, but people really do care that we
came, and you never know how it impacts
each person.
Goldin added that many of the group
had debated whether their presence
would matter. Every time weve come
as a community during times like this,
uniformly everyone we met thanked us for
coming and thought it was just wonderful
that we came, said Goldin, who led a
congregational mission in 1999 to bring
toys, shoes, and medicine to children in a
Macedonian refugee camp during the war
in Kosovo. When they see people dropped
everything to come, that is a message you
cant give any other way.
You should never question your
effectiveness. Just go.
ever-escalating number of missiles; they
were landing not just in Israeli territory,
but in areas that are populated. And there
is no country on earth that would tolerate
missiles raining down on its citizens
from outside its borders. So we are fully
supportive of Israels right to defend itself
from missiles landing on peoples homes
and workplaces and potentially killing
civilians. And we will continue to support
Israels right to defend itself.
Perhaps the world community finally
will give Israel the space to do what it needs
to do, which is whatever any other country
in the world under the same circumstances
would do.
As I write these words, Tuesday evening
in Israel, uncertainty hangs in the air. The
dilemma haunts each Israeli. Will there
be a cease-fire or a ground incursion
into Gaza? Should Israel risk the lives of
its young soldiers in an enterprise that
is certain to carry loss? Can Israel, on
the other hand, stop now, without real,
tangible, lasting gains?
We will see what tomorrow brings. But
for now I know one thing. There is nowhere
else that I would rather be; nowhere else
that I should be.
Day 2: Wednesday, Nov. 21
On Wednesday a cease-fire between
Israel and Hamas is called, and another
dimension of our trip opens before us.
Suddenly we are surrounded by intense
debate: the deep disappointment of
soldiers, who are ready to complete the
job they came to do; the frustration of
southern Israelis, who desperately want
greater security; the complex political
concerns of Israels leaders; the sighs
of relief as parents greet their children
returning from the front.
Day 5: Saturday Night, Nov. 24
We have continued our visits with
citizens of southern Israel from all walks of
life. From hospitalized victims of terror, to
soldiers on the front, to children in a huge
protected indoor playground in Sderot,
the resilience of our people is astounding.
On two occasions during our trips south,
we are forced, in response to red alerts, to
evacuate our minibuses, lie down on the
ground, and protect our heads with our
hands. This is a small taste of what Israelis
must live with constantly.
We leave tonight with a deep sense of
unfinished business. But, perhaps, that is
exactly the point. Sadly, few in Israel speak
today of solutions to the conflict with our
enemies. Successful military endeavors
can, at best, buy periods of quiet. During
those times, Israel must predict and
prepare for the next confrontation.
Most importantly, we leave with the
feeling that we have done something vital
over these past few days. We have given our
Israeli brothers and sisters the one gift that
only we can give. We have shown them our
willingness to cross oceans at a moments
notice simply to say thank you.
We know that it is far from enough. But
for us, if not for them, this gesture has been
life-changing.
Shmuel Goldin is rabbi of Congregation Ahavat
Torah in Englewood and president of the Rab-
binical Council of America.
Just go frOM page 6
Come home frOM page 6
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JS-8*
8 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
Rabbis riff on Chanukah
Larry yudeLson
T
u Bi-Shvat doesnt have this problem.
Nobody ever preached that the meaning
of the Jewish New Year of the Trees was being
overshadowed by practices imported from Arbor Day.
And no one scolds congregants for making their
Shemeni Atzeret observances seems more like Columbus
Day.
But Chanukah oy, Chanukah. A holiday often under
the shadow of its more popular calendrical neighbor,
Christmas.
Rabbi Debra Orenstein says its ironic that this is
the holiday when we sometimes aspire to appropriate
the customs of the general culture, because the essence
of the Chanukah story, and the essence of the original
battles of the Maccabees, was about the right to be
different.
Orenstein, of Congregation Bnai Israel in Emerson,
says that it is misrepresenting what Chanukah is and
what it could be in the eyes of Jews when we call it the
Jewish Christmas or allow that impression to stand.
The commercialization of the season thats not
something I want to borrow from the general culture.
Thats not attractive for Christians about Christmas; why
would Jews want to bring that into Judaism?
Which is not to say that she agrees with those who
play down Chanukah as an unimportant minor holiday.
Its a historical holiday. The word minor conveys the
wrong impression. Its significant. It has an important
message and a place in the life of the Jewish calendar.
Orenstein said the core messages of Chanukah have
to do with the right to be different, with the willingness
to fight and sacrifice and step out in faith, even when the
odds are against you.
She sees an important message of the balance
between faith and action in the holiday.
The story of the oil lasting for eight days conveys
divine protection, and that miracles can surprise and
benefit you. But in this holiday, that miracle is only
portrayed as happening after people have taken actions
and risks. We need both of those elements. We need
confidence that if we step out in faith well be supported
by miracles that havent yet revealed themselves.
Rabbi Stephen Wylen of Temple Beth Tikvah in Wayne
said hes surprised at all these rabbis who preach to
all their congregants and the Jewish people to stop
celebrating Chanukah so much, like thats the biggest
problem we have over-celebrating our holidays.
Times change, and Chanukah is a minor holiday only
in the technical sense that its not commanded in the
Torah. Its obviously a major holiday in the mindset of
American Jews, and I think for very good reasons.
Sukkot is not as big as it was two thousand years
ago because hardly any of us are farmers anymore.
The messages of Chanukah are increasingly relevant to
American Jews, Wylen continued.
Its completely anachronistic to attribute to Judah
Maccabee the idea of fighting for religious freedom.
Matthias, Judahs father, said, Everyone who wishes to
remain loyal to the traditions of our ancestors, follow
me.
What the Maccabees understood as maintaining
ancestral traditions, we understand as religious freedom
freedom to maintain our identity in the face of the
Ghosts of Chanukah presents
Larry yudeLson
Chanukah is a holiday about the Jewish past and pre-
serving the Jewish future.
But is it or rather, should it be a holiday of
presents?
For rabbis, inclined to stress the spiritual over the
material, thats a matter of some debate.
People say stop all this gift giving, Rabbi Stephen
Wylen of Temple Beth Tikvah in Wayne said. It seems to
me, we live in a pretty rich country. And if people want to
use some of their excess income on giving gifts to their
loved ones, what the heck? Go right ahead! When my kids
were little, I always bought them presents for Chanukah.
It was a nice thing to do. Let them enjoy it.
Now, however, a couple of my kids live in Israel,
where the whole present thing is not so big, he says.
Years ago, Wylen served as a rabbi in Huntington,
West Virginia. We were pretty poor then. I didnt have
a big salary, and we were raising four children. My wife
and I decided that year we would just buy for each other
practical gifts we needed for the house anyway. My big
present for her that year was a DustBuster, that little
hand-held vacuum cleaner.
On the first night of Chanukah, the television station
came over to my house for a live broadcast. So after we lit
the candles, I gave the gift to my wife, but she didnt open
it on camera. Afterwards, the whole town called to ask:
What did he give you?
Rabbi Debra Orenstein of Congregation Bnai Israel
in Emerson said that gift giving can be a very spiritual
opportunity, when you think about what the other
person prizes and loves.
I have some customs from my own growing up that
I carried on and passed on to my kids. We do give eight
presents. When I was growing up, the first few nights
were things you were going to get anyway like socks
and barrettes wrapped in a beautiful present. It was
the joy of sharing, wrapping, and opening.
Rabbi Ruth Zlotnick of Temple Beth Or in Washington
Township said that in her family, we dont make a big
deal about giving lots of gifts but we do make sure
that one night is a night of giving books. Its still books,
not ebooks. And one night we empty our tzedakah boxes
that we fill before Shabbat dinner each week. We count
the change, and usually by that time theres a special
tzedakah project in the synagogue that goes to Israel.
This year, her Temple Beth Or is raising funds to equip
Israeli fire fighters.
People just have to develop some kind of restraint,
Rabbi Lawrence Zierler of the Jewish Center of Teaneck
said. Its just a question of proportion, the same way no
one has to show up for Black Friday if they dont want to.
You can give gifts to your children in other ways, spread
throughout the year.
When his kids were young, they received smaller
gifts on Chanukah.
I have to admit the truth, Zierler said. When
I was growing up in Ontario, we decked our halls
with streamers of dreidels. We were living in a non-
Jewish neighborhood. We need to somehow deal with
something that was compensatory. On Christmas
morning, I used to wake up with non-Jewish neighbors
and even opened up presents with them.
Look what happened. I became a rabbi.
Rabbi Lawrence Zierler
Rabbi Debra Orenstein
Rabbi Stephen Wylen
Rabbi Ruth Zlotnick
JS-9*
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 9
Synagogues let the light shine
Larry yudeLson
A
t the Jewish Community
Center of Paramus, the high-
light of the Chanukah sea-
son is, well, the high light: the elec-
tric menorah on the synagogues roof
that can be seen a long distance off,
according to the synagogues spiritual
leader, Rabbi Arthur Weiner.
We do this to fulfill the mitzvah
of making the miracle of Chanukah
known in the larger community, he
said.
The 10-foot-tall chanukiyah is
lit every night, but on Dec. 11,
the congregation will gather in the
synagogue parking lot for a special
communal lighting ceremony.
By contrast, the holiday lighting
tradition at Temple Beth Or in
Washington Township takes place
indoors, and lets the congregation
live up to the meaning of its name:
house of light. On the Friday night
of Chanukah, families bring in their
chanukiyot and light them on the
bimah.
Theres really something very
beautiful about that, says the
congregations Rabbi Ruth Zlotnick.
We see every familys chanukiyah lit
up. Were living the mitzvah of letting
our light be seen, and coming together
as a community.
Its focused on the aspect of making
sure that Judaism is passed on from
generation to generation. Theres a
thrill seeing all those candles, and
bringing a little piece of peoples home
into the shul gets to the spirit of the
mitzvah.
And it recalls for Zlotnick the real
miracle of Chanukah: Were still lighting
our chanukiyot over the generations.
Congregation Bnai Israel in
Emerson has tackled the holiday focus
on gift giving head-on, dedicating
four evenings during the holiday
for opportunities for congregants to
give to the community after lighting
candles.
They visit nursing homes and
veterans; they sit together and make
blankets for the homeless. We have
more and more families participating,
the shuls Rabbi Debra Orenstein said.
But at the Jewish Center of Teaneck,
Rabbi Lawrence Zierler believes the
holidays place is in the home.
Ive tried to downplay the need
for Chanukah to be in shul beyond
lighting the menorah in shul each
morning and night, he said. Im
focusing more on the music and the
idea of it being a table-based holiday.
A look ahead at Chanukah 2013
(and 2070 and 2165)
a reflection on Gods timing
Larry yudeLson
N
ext year, America will shut down on the first day of Chanukah.
It will be a legal holiday.
No, this is not an effort by federal lawmakers to give Jewish holidays
equal time on the federal holiday calendar.
Rather, the first day of Chanukah falls on Thanksgiving: Nov. 28
If this sounds unusual, well, it is.
This unusual coincidence will reportedly next occur in 2070 and 2165 and then
not for 60,000 years.
Its going to take us a little while to wrap our minds around it, said Rabbi Debra
Orenstein of Congregation Bnai Israel in Emerson. Its so weird to contemplate. Im
convinced there are strong, powerful spiritual opportunities in this timing.
How so?
Every year we have this conversation are the High Holy Days early? Are they
late? Theres an invitation in this crazy timing next year to cast aside all our own
sense of why isnt this on my clock? and start to really get in harmony with Gods
timing.
The Mishnah teaches, Align your will with Gods will. Similarly, align your
timing with Gods timing. Sometimes were very impatient; we feel things are coming
too slow. Were always wanting God to adjust to our timing, including on the big
issues, like When am I going to meet my bashert? When will that job come? When
will the mashiach be here? Its just an invitation to laugh at ourselves and get back in
rhythm with Gods time, Orenstein said.
incredibly attractive culture in the midst
of which we live. Our experience is quite
parallel to that of the Maccabees. There
are many lessons of Chanukah we can
strongly identify with. I would go with that
flow as opposed to trying to fight it, Wylen
said. Its well and good to try to revive
Sukkot and Shavuot, but those people
who claim that were only celebrating
Chanukah because were imitating
American Christmas dont understand the
historical process involved.
Christmas in the Christian world
was technically a minor holiday. Many
early American Protestants were strongly
opposed to Christmas observance
altogether. The Puritans outlawed it.
Christmas did not get big until Charles
Dickens and the poem A Visit from St.
Nicholas in the early 19th century.
Not long afterwards, Jewish
nationalists revived Judah Maccabee as
a role model, Wylen said, reinventing
Chanukah with its real history which in
prior centuries Jews either ignored or
didnt really know at all. Traditional Jews
knew so little about the actual story of
Chanukah. The traditional Al Hanisim
prayer begins In the days of Matityahu,
the high priest. If he was the high priest,
there wouldnt be Chanukah at all.
Even today a lot of Jews know the
story so poorly they think the eight days of
Chanukah are because the oil for one day
burned eight days. Kids ask: Why does it
take eight days to prepare oil? It doesnt.
You just squeeze olives.
The original story is they decided
in advance that it would be an eight
day observance, like Sukkot, Wylen
continued.
The whole miracle story was built
around suppressing the history and the
relevance of Judah Maccabee. In the
modern observance, Judah Maccabee and
his fights for cultural independence in
the Greek empire take on great relevance.
Its about who we are, and our struggle
to remain Jewish against the forces of
assimilation.
Were not going to resist assimilation.
If Judaism is going to survive in America,
its because were going to find a way to
assimilate and remain Jewish. Thats what
the Maccabees worked out; we need to
work out something as successful for
ourselves.
Christmas and Chanukah both grew
big along the same time in the modern
era, to some extent because of the growth
of secularism. Chanukah and Christmas
are both are relatively secular holidays.
If youre a Christian, the really religious
holiday is Easter; if youre a Jew, its the
High Holy Days and the three festivals,
he said.
Wylen pointed out that critics of
Chanukah are overlooking something
the Jewish holiday and Christmas have
in common: the date. Chanukah is
the 25th of Kislev; Christmas is the
25th of December. Those are the
first winter months of their respective
calendars. They take place on the same
date. Obviously theyre not completely
distinct, he said.
JS-10*
10 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
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Proud moment for informal education
Post-sandy nCsY carnival geared to cheer hoboken youth
Lois GoLdrich
W
hile the twice-yearly conventions of the
National Conference of Synagogue Youths
New Jersey Region traditionally include ele-
ments of social action, this year students will have a dif-
ferent kind of volunteer experience.
In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, we decided
that instead of the usual Thursday night recreational
activity at the [convention] hotel, well give students the
opportunity to make a real difference, said Rabbi Yaakov
Glasser, New Jersey director of the NCSY, the Orthodox
Unions youth group.
According to Glasser, the 300 or so students attending
the Dec. 6-9 convention will not go straight to the hotel,
based at the Hudson Valley Resort in upstate New York,
but will travel instead to the Hoboken community center
run by the citys housing authority.
Theres a large contingent of kids connected to that
community center, many from the projects, Glasser
said. Our kids will be running a carnival for their kids.
To give the Hoboken youngsters a respite from the
dislocation of the hurricane, the NCSY students are pre-
paring a host of carnival-related activities for them. The
youth organization also will offer a full kosher dinner to
the 400 middle-schoolers expected to attend.
I met with the head of the housing authority to
discuss the menu, Glasser said, joking that while it
would have been less expensive to serve cheeseburgers,
hed explained to the Hoboken official why this was not
possible.
NCSY students are already planning activities such as
ring-toss, juggling, face-painting, knocking down cans,
and balloon animal-making, said Glasser.
Its whatever the kids create, what they make of
it, he said, noting that the NCSY delegation will arrive
Thursday afternoon to set things up. The housing au-
thority will construct a tent and well design the booths
around tables.
After the carnival, NCSYers will be bused back to
the convention hotel for a debriefing a multimedia
presentation about what we did, he said. On Friday
morning, they will have an additional opportunity to
do volunteer work in upstate New York and then will re-
group for Shabbat.
Glasser said that although the youth group is spon-
sored by the Orthodox Union, it attracts high school
students from a wide spectrum of backgrounds, from
completely unaffiliated to Orthodox. Were trying to
instill within Jewish teens of all affiliations a passion for
Judaism and a motivation to further discover and culti-
vate their Jewish identity.
Its different things for different kids, he said, ex-
plaining that some may choose to focus on Israel, some
on tikkun olam, and still others on Shabbat. The com-
monality is in inspiring the next generation to want to
perpetuate Jewish identity.
Glassman said the New Jersey NCSYers are extremely
excited, extremely motivated by the carnival project,
which is being coordinated by regional associate director
Rabbi Ethan Katz.
Its one thing to learn about the values of Judaism
caring for the world and being a light unto the na-
tions, he said. Its another thing to put them into action.
[Students] usually have the opportunity to be educated
and inspired. We rarely provide an opportunity for the
kids to manifest those values by making a difference.
The carnival project also fits in well with the conven-
tion theme, he said.
The theme will be chesed, kindness, and responsibil-
ity, Glassman said. Unlike volunteer experiences created
specifically for the students, this is real. Theyre walking
into a community where kids have been impacted in a
major way.
While NCSYers already have done volunteer work
centering on the hurricane for example, working with
the Minnesota-based Nechama disaster relief group
Glassman said he was looking for a way to involve a large
number of teens.
He noted that the Hoboken project flows beautifully
into the theme of Chanukah and the notion of putting a
menorah outside and in the window. We want to illumi-
nate the outside world with our value system.
Glasser said the carnival project shows the versatility
of informal education that it can adapt to changes
in the environment and to whats going on around us,
that we can reshape the educational experience so that it
resonates with the [teens].
Its what we should be doing, he said. Its a proud
moment for informal education.
Last year NCSYers had a carnival for sick children in Israel. Courtesy NCsy
JS-11
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 11
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ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
A
rea day schools are taking advantage of interac-
tive technologies to bring spoken Hebrew into
the classroom in fresh, appealing ways.
First-graders at the Moriah School of Englewood are
using a new computer-based Hebrew teaching program
to supplement their language acquisition at a critical
young age.
According to Faigy Ravitz, technology integration spe-
cialist for the Center for Initiatives in Jewish Education,
the Tal Am CAL computer program was modeled on in-
structional software such as SuccessMaker, which allows
each child to move at an individualized pace within an
engaging interface.
We at CIJE were inspired to facilitate the creation of a
similar Hebrew language program that could revolution-
ize Jewish day schools Hebrew programs, said Ravitz,
who trained the four Moriah first-grade teachers to use
the product devised in conjunction with Hebrew instruc-
tion materials producer Tal Am. It was piloted in several
schools last year.
CAL is a play on words it stands for computer as-
sisted learning, and it is also the Hebrew word for easy.
Using texts, songs, stories, music, and visual aids, it is
meant to help teachers make Hebrew instruction easier.
The children use it twice a week in 25-minute seg-
ments, and eventually they will be able to log on from
home whenever they like.
This is a colorful, fun, interactive, and individualized
program that each child uses with a password and head-
phones, said Leah Levi, a Jewish studies teacher in her
28th year at Moriah. Each works at his or her own level
and pace, and there are a lot of interactive games and
songs in Hebrew. The kids are really enjoying it.
The completed sessions are stored so that the teacher
can track every users progress. The children even can
record themselves speaking, and the teacher can listen to
monitor how they are doing.
Levi said the program complements her already
12 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 30, 2012
Deena Kahane showing Chanukah in Jerusalem to
students at Yavneh Academy.
Learning Hebrew interactively
Local day schools use technology to bring language alive
Hebrew-intensive classroom by catering to each stu-
dents learning style without being competitive. The
kids are very eager to do it because they are competing
against themselves and not the rest of the class.
Moriah and other schools are also using live long-
distance learning. Aliza Picard, a longtime Moriah
teacher from Israel who returned to her homeland three
years ago, has continued teaching fifth-graders in the
Englewood school via videoconferencing four days a
week.
A similar setup was piloted 12 years ago at the Torah
Academy of Bergen County, a boys high school, by for-
mer assistant principal Rabbi Zvi Grumet. After making
aliyah, Grumet continued teaching Bible to some classes
for two years through videoconferencing. Based on that
model, about 10 years ago he created the Lookstein LIVE
program based at Bar-Ilan University.
Former Teaneck resident Susan Yammer is the edu-
cational coordinator for Lookstein LIVE, which is used
by 10 American schools including Yavneh Academy and
Yeshivat Noam in Paramus, as well as the Rosenbaum
Yeshiva of North Jersey in River Edge. The four Israel-
based teachers in the program teach Hebrew, Bible,
Talmud, Mishnah and Israeli current events.
It seems to fill a number of needs, said Yammer, a
former Yavneh classroom teacher. Schools turn to us be-
cause of the Israel connection the exciting notion that
Ki mitzion tetze Torah [For out of Zion comes Torah]
and for the pragmatic reason of finding a qualified, cre-
ative teacher during specific hours.
She added that Yavneh decided to continue with the
program for a second year after assessing its effectiveness
in the participating childrens level of Hebrew speaking.
The three area schools using Lookstein LIVE all have
the same teacher, Deena Kahane, who made aliyah from
Teaneck in 2008. She had taught at Moriah and RYNJ.
Though Lookstein LIVE faculty can serve as primary
Hebrew classroom teachers, Kahane works with hand-
picked children for extracurricular enrichment in lan-
guage and Bible. The sessions meet three times a week
for 40 minutes each.
A few times a year, Kahane livestreams a Hebrew les-
son for the entire fourth and fifth grades at Yavneh. Often
these sessions are centered around the holidays in Israel.
During Chanukah, she strolls through Jerusalems Old
City with her webcam, showing the children the meno-
rahs displayed outside doorways and talking about the
holiday in Hebrew, of course.
She has also taken the New Jersey schoolchildren
to army swearing-in ceremonies at the Western Wall,
explaining the oath the new recruits shout in unison, and
why the ancient wall is an appropriately symbolic place
for the ceremony. Shell interview a few soldiers for the
segment as well.
Kahane does not feel the physical distance prevents
her from connecting with her students.
At Yavneh Im teaching two grades, so I have some
of last years kids. A few were in Israel over the summer
and came to visit me. In a sense, whenever I teach them
theyre in my home. I try to convey an excitement about
life in Israel. For example, if its raining I will devote a
few minutes to explaining the significance of that. When
Gilad Shalit was freed, I taught them a song written in his
honor.
Yammer says that as technology advances, so does
the nature of Lookstein LIVE. My job is to build this
program, she said. More and more schools are contact-
ing us because we have so many wonderfully qualified
teachers here in Israel.
Moriah first-graders ready to learn Hebrew
with CAL, a computer program designed to let
them acquire language skills at their own pace.
JS-13*
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 13
Flatow scholarship applications
The Alisa Flatow Memorial Scholarship Fund is accepting
online applications for the 2013-2014 school year at
www.alisafund.org. The application deadline is Feb. 15.
Scholarships are for full-time study in a yeshiva,
seminary, or other approved program; students do not
have to be currently accepted into such a program to
apply to this fund, which awards six $4,000 scholarships.
Scholarship, volunteer activities, and financial need are
some of the factors considered.
The Alisa Flatow Memorial Scholarship Fund is
dedicated to the memory of Alisa Flatow of West Orange,
who was a 20-year-old studying in Israel when she was
murdered by terrorists near Kfar Darom on April 9, 1995.
The gift of education
Temple Emeths religious school is offering
a Chanukah gift free enrollment for new
students in kindergarten through third-
grade until June. Synagogue membership
is not required. On Saturday, Dec. 15, the
synagogue offers Chanukah Family Fun,
with crafts, stories, music, and dance, for 2
-to-5-year-olds and their families, 9:30 to
10:45 a.m. Call (201) 833-8466.
Seniors perform
for seniors
The theater group of Bright Side
Manor, an assisted living facility in
Teaneck, performed its most recent
production, Fiddler on the Roof,
for residents of CareOne in Teaneck
on Nov. 19.
Ohel youth training program
is launched in Bergenfield
The Ohel New Jersey regional office and Congregation
Beth Abraham of Bergenfield began a certificate-training
program for 20 Shabbat youth group leaders on Nov. 18.
The concept was designed and produced via a collab-
orative effort between Simcha Feuerman, Ohels director
of operations; Rabbi Dr. Jonathan Krug, dean of student
life and welfare at the Frisch School; and the presenter,
Evan Kroll. Ohel will train the group to serve as youth
leaders and role models for children. Topics included
bullying awareness and prevention, self-esteem develop-
ment, preparing lessons and activities, and child safety.
Beth Abrahams youth leaders will get certificates of
completion from Ohel at the end of the course.
For more information, call Simcha Feuerman at (201)
692-3972 or email Beth Abrahams youth director, Aryeh
Morris, at aryeh.morris@gmail.com.
Psychologist Evan Kroll leads an OHEL training
session for youth leaders. Courtesy ohel
Bri efly local
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Attend Yeshiva Universitys Sy Syms School of Business Sunday-Only
Executive M.B.A. Program Open House Dec. 16. For more information,
visit www.yu.edu/syms/emba. To register for the Open House, call Margie
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500 West 185th Street | NY, NY 10033
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December 16, 2012
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543 Cedar Lane Teaneck 201-801-0444
we welcome announcements of community events.
Photographs, when e-mailed, must be high resolution,
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JS-14*
14 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 30, 2012
Chanukah Chappenings
P
ublic lightings, special needs programming, gift-donating (not just giving), and lots of latkes make up the
Chanukah events taking place throughout our area beginning after Shabbat ends on Saturday, Dec. 8. As
of press time and deadlines, here are the highlights, as assembled by Beth Janoff Chananie. Check next weeks
Calendar of Events for additional listings.
December 2
Temple Avodat Shalom in River
Edge hosts a Chanukah-themed
Mothers Circle minicourse on
Jewish parenting for mothers of
other religious backgrounds who are
raising Jewish children. The topics they
will tackle include how to create a Jewish
home, a Jewish childs life-cycle events,
and an overview of the Jewish holidays.
The group meets at the shul, 9 a.m.
Made possible by a joint grant to the
Jewish Outreach Institute and the shul
from the Adler Family Innovation Fund.
385 Howland Ave. Stephanie, (201)
489-2463, ext. 202, or administrator@
avodatshalom.net.
Congregation Bnai Jacob in Jersey City
offers Lox n Learning, 9:30 a.m., featur-
ing tsimbl player and recording artist
Pete Rushefsky, most recently heard on
Itzhak Perlmans newly released CD of
Jewish music. Bagels and lox and wine
and cheese. Family Chanukah workshop.
Babysitting available. 176 West Side Ave.
(201) 435-5725 or bnaijacobjc.org.
The Gerrard Berman Day School
Solomon Schechter of North Jersey in
Oakland hosts Mosaic Menorah Magic,
for 2- to 8-year-olds, 10-11:30 a.m. Magic
show, music, and doughnuts. Sponsored
by local Dunkin Donuts, JFSNJ, and
Artistic Tile. 45 Spruce St. Amy Shafron,
(201) 337-1111, ext. 302, or ashafron@
gmail.com.
Ben Porat Yosef offers Reading Rocks,
with an author presentation, scavenger
hunt, puppet show, and face painting at
the Barnes & Noble at Riverside Square
Mall, Hackensack, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. (201)
845-5007, ext. 16, or www.benporatyosef.
org.
Congregation Gesher Shalom, the Jewish
Community Center of Fort Lee, holds its
annual holiday boutique, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
1449 Anderson Ave. (201) 947-1735.
Temple Emanu-El of Closter hosts its
Chanukah Bash & Volunteer Expo, featur-
ing a concert by Shir La La and arts and
crafts, 9:15 a.m. 180 Piermont Road. (201)
750-9997 or ween@templeemanu-el.com.
The Wayne YMCA holds a Chanukah
festival, 12:30 p.m., with face paint-
ing, arts and crafts, chocolate making,
latkes, doughnuts, and Scholastic Book
Fair. Stretch the Silly Man will perform
at 1, and there will be a Chanukah story
in the Goldman Library at 2. Bring
unwrapped new toys for a toy drive.
Sponsored by the Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jersey. The Metro
YMCAs of the Oranges is a partner of
the YM-YWHA of North Jersey. 1 Pike
Drive. (973) 595-0100, ext. 250.
Hershel and the Chanukah Goblins: A
Family Chanukah Program includes
storytelling, songs, arts and crafts, and
a concert by Play Me a Story at the
Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living
Memorial to the Holocaust, Manhattan, 2
p.m. The group includes the Israeli-born
duo, teacher/actress Maya Blank and in-
strumentalist Uri Sharlin. Made possible
through a gift from the Margaret Neubart
Foundation Trust. (646) 437-4202 or
www.mjhnyc.org.
The Mens Club of Temple Beth Sholom
in Fair Lawn offers Latke and Vodka, in-
cludes hors doeuvres, homemade latkes,
vodka, and beverages, at 5:30 p.m. Bring a
unwrapped new toy to donate. 40-25 Fair
Lawn Ave. (201) 797-9321.
December 5
A menorah will be lit at Paramus
Borough Hall, 7 p.m. 1 Jockish Square.
(201) 265-2100 or www.paramusborough.
org.
Rabbi Reuven Kimelman, Judaic scholar-
in-residence at the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades in Tenafly, discusses Our
Chanukah Versus the Chanukah of
History, the Talmud, and the Siddur at
the JCC, 8:15 p.m. (201) 408-1429 or www.
jccotp.org.
December 6
Shalom Baby offers a Chanukah
party at the Fair Lawn Jewish Center/
Congregation Bnai Israel, 9:30-10:45 a.m.
The group presents a way for moms and
dads whose children range from new-
borns or newly adopted through age 3 to
connect with each other and the Jewish
community through a monthly series of
play dates with play, music, storytimes,
snacks, and crafts projects. Administered
by the Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jerseys Synagogue Leadership
Initiative and co-funded by the Henry
and Marilyn Taub Foundation. 10-10
Norma Ave. Ellen Finkelstein, (201) 820-
3917 or ellenf@jfnnj.org.
December 7
COURTESY TBR
Temple Beth Rishon in Wyckoff ush-
ers in Chanukah with a congregational
dinner and services, 6 p.m. The Strauss/
Warschauer Duo performs with Cantors
Ilan Mamber and Jenna Daniels along
with the Kol Rishon adult choir and the
Zemer Rishon teen choir. (201) 891-4466
or www.bethrishon.org.
Temple Emanu-El of Closter holds a
congregational Chanukah/new member
dinner, 6 p.m. 180 Piermont Road. (201)
750-9997.
December 8
Chabad of NW Bergen County holds
a menorah lighting and celebration at
Wyckoff Town Hall, 6:30 p.m. Mayor Chris
DePhillips and local officials will be there;
it will include hot Chanukah refresh-
ments, glow giveaways, and grand raffle.
(201) 848-0449 or www.chabadplace.org.
The North Jersey Jewish Singles group
(45-60) at the Clifton Jewish Center
hosts the Chanukah Boomers Dance
with a DJ, 7-10:30 p.m.; doors open at
6:30. Refreshments. Bring a grab-bag gift
valued from $5-$10. Martine or Karen,
(973) 772-3131 or www.meetup.com (use
group name).
December 9
The Dora and Sidney Miller Early
Childhood Center at the JCC of Paramus
holds Holiday Playtime, an interactive
program with holiday crafts, music,
dance, refreshments, and playtime, for
2- to 4-year-olds with their parents or
grandparents, 10 a.m. Free. Judy Fox,
(201) 967-1334 or eccdirector@jccpara-
mus.org.
JS-15
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 30, 2012 15
The United Synagogue of Hobokens
Kaplan Cooperative Preschool pres-
ents Joanie Leeds and the Nightlights, a
kindie-rock band, 11 a.m. 115 Park Ave.
(201) 653-8666 or ushpreschool@gmail.
com.
Bris Avrohom of Fair Lawn presents
Chanukah Wonderland; children can
help make a large menorah cake; eat
lunch, latkes, doughnuts, and cotton can-
dy, play in a bounce house and at other
carnival games, make candles, and more,
11 a.m.-2 p.m. 30-02 Fair Lawn Ave. www.
jewishfairlawn.org.
Temple Israel and JCC in Ridgewood
hosts a Chanukah party for preschool-
ers and their younger siblings, 11:30 a.m.
Storytelling, crafts, games, and food. 475
Grove St. (201) 444-9320 or office@syna-
gogue.org.
Temple Avodat Shalom in River Edge
hosts Hot Hot Hanukkah, with activities
for ages 2- to 5- year-olds, noon, and con-
cert for all ages by Matty Roxx at 1 p.m.
385 Howland Ave. (201) 489-2463, ext. 201
or administrator@avodatshalom.net.
Temple Sinai of Bergen County in Tenafly
hosts a Chanukah celebration with food,
music, sports & games, arts and crafts, a
magician and more; noon-2 p.m. 1 Engle
St.(201) 568-3075.
The Jewish Museum in Manhattan
presents its annual Chanukah Family
Day with a performance by Yosi and the
Superdads, an art workshop, and gal-
lery tours, noon-4 p.m. For children 3
and up, accompanied by an adult. (212)
423-3200 or TheJewishMuseum.org/
specialfamilydays.
Shirah, the Community Chorus on the
Palisades, led by its founding director and
conductor Matthew Lazar, performs a
Chanukah concert at the Kaplen JCC on
the Palisades in Tenafly, 2 p.m. 411 East
Clinton Ave. (201) 408-1465 or jccotp.org/
shirah.
Lubavitch on the Palisades in Tenafly
holds its annual Family Chanukah
Festival, featuring M-Generation Boys
Concert, 4 p.m., menorah contest details
at www.chabadlubavitch.org/menorah-
contest, dreidels, doughnuts, and latkes.
11 Harold St. (201) 871-1152 or www.
chabadlubavitch.org.
The Chabad Center of Passaic County
hosts its grand Chanukah festival with
an ice carving and refreshments at
the Chabad Center in Wayne, 3 p.m.
Menorah lighting at 4:30. 194 Ratzer
Road. (973) 694-6274 or www.jewish-
wayne.com
Barnert Temple in Franklin Lakes holds
a Chanukah celebration with outdoor
menorah lighting, potluck supper, and
latke taste-off, 4:45 p.m. Music by NYC
Klezmer. Bring an unwrapped toy to be
donated to CUMAC (Center of United
Methodist Aid to the Community). 747
Route 208 South.(201) 848-1027.
Lubavitch on the Palisades of Tenafly of-
fers a chanukiyah lighting at the gazebo
at the Demarest Duck Pond, 5 p.m. (201)
871-1152 or www.chabadlubavitch.org.
December 10
The Teaneck-Hackensack chapter
of Hadassah meets for Chanukah at
Congregation Beth Sholom, Teaneck,
for entertainment by storyteller Sara
Sloan and refreshments at 12:30 p.m. 354
Maitland Ave. (201) 503-1897.
Chabad of NW Bergen County holds
a menorah lighting and celebration at
Mahwah Town Hall, 6 p.m. Mayor Bill
Laforet and local officials will be there.
Hot Chanukah refreshments, glow-give-
aways, and grand raffle. (201) 848-0449 or
www.chabadplace.org.
Lubavitch on the Palisades of Tenafly of-
fers a lighting at Huyler Park, 7 p.m. (201)
871-1152 or www.chabadlubavitch.org.
Bris Avrohom of Fair Lawn lights the me-
norah with the Fair Lawns Mayor Jeanne
Baratta in front of Fair Lawn City Hall, 7:30
p.m. doughnuts and chocolate gelt. 8-01
Fair Lawn Ave. www.jewishfairlawn.org.
December 11
The Englewood & Cliffs chapter of ORT
America hosts Chanukah lunch with
Spark and Spirit, A Musical Holiday
Celebration, featuring soprano Doris
Weiss and her award-winning composer
husband, Elliot, at Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort Lee, noon. Chanukah
gift boutique at 11:30 a.m. Kosher
Chinese food. 1449 Anderson Ave. Shirley,
(201) 585-1748.
The Jewish Community Center of
Paramus offers dinner, 5:30 p.m., out-
door menorah lighting, songs, and des-
sert. E. 304 Midland Ave. Reservations.
(201) 262-7691 or office@jccparamus.org
Lubavitch on the Palisades of Tenafly of-
fers a chanukiyah lighting at the corner of
Piermont and Ruckman roads in Closter,
7 p.m. (201) 871-1152 or www.chabad-
lubavitch.org.
The Manhattan Sephardic Congregation
offers a Chanukah party with food,
drinks, music, and interactive games
including ping pong, for singles, 30-50, 7
p.m. 375 East 75th St., Manhattan. (212)
988-6085 or www.sepharad.org.
December 12
Shalom Baby offers a Chanukah party at
the Gerrard Berman Solomon Schechter
Day School of North Jersey in Oakland,
9:30-10:45 a.m. The group offers a way
for moms and dads whose children
range from newborns or newly adopted
through age 3 to connect with each other
and the Jewish community through a
monthly series of play dates with play,
music, storytimes, snacks, and crafts
projects. Administered by the Jewish
Federation of Northern New Jerseys
Synagogue Leadership Initiative and
co-funded by the Henry and Marilyn
Taub Foundation. 45 Spruce St. Ellen
Finkelstein, (201) 820-3917 or ellenf@
jfnnj.org.
Lubavitch on the Palisades of Tenafly of-
fers a chanukiyah lighting at the corner in
front of the Cresskill Library, 7 p.m. (201)
871-1152 or www.chabadlubavitch.org.
December 13
Shalom Baby offers a Chanukah party at
Congregation Bnai Israel in Emerson,
9:30-10:45 a.m. The group offers a way
for moms and dads whose children
range from newborns or newly adopted
through age 3 to connect with each other
and the Jewish community through a
monthly series of play dates with play,
music, storytimes, snacks, and crafts
projects. Administered by the Jewish
Federation of Northern New Jerseys
Synagogue Leadership Initiative and
co-funded by the Henry and Marilyn
Taub Foundation. 53 Palisade Ave. Ellen
Finkelstein, (201) 820-3917 or ellenf@
jfnnj.org.
The sisterhood of Congregation Gesher
Shalom/JCC of Fort Lee meets to cel-
ebrate Chanukah, 12:30 p.m. 1449
Anderson Ave. (201) 947-1735.
Bris Avrohom of Fair Lawn offers an adult
Chanukah caf, 8 p.m. Sushi buffet and
wines from Israel. www.jewishfairlawn.
org.
The Museum of Jewish Heritage-A Living
Memorial to the Holocaust, Manhattan,
offers Light Up the Night, the museums
Young Friends annual Chanukah party
for Jewish professionals in their 20s and
30s, with a DJ, dancing, buffet dinner, a
high-end raffle, and gift bag for guests.
Cocktail attire. 8 p.m.-midnight. (646)
437-4319 or choffman@mjhnyc.org.
December 14
Temple Sinai of Bergen Countys Early
Childhood Center in Tenafly hosts
Chanukah Tot Shabbat. Services, 5:30
p.m., followed by dinner and menorah
lighting. 1 Engle St., Tenafly; (201) 568-
6867 or SAidekman@templesinaibc.org.
Temple Avodat Shalom in River Edge
holds a family Chanukah celebration.
Tot Shabbat, 6 p.m.; Shabbat/Chanukah
dinner, 6:30; services , BBQ dinner for all
reservations and fee required. At 7:30,
family services with sign language inter-
preter, 7:30. 385 Howland Ave. (201) 489-
2463, ext. 203 or www.avodatshalom.net.
Temple Beth El of Northern Valley in
Closter celebrates Chanukah with
its annual 101 Menorahs Shabbat,
6 p.m. Bring a menorah and seven
candles. Latkes and donuts; concert by
Temple Beth Els new Junior Band. 221
Schraalenburgh Road. (201) 768-5112 or
www.tbenv.org.
Temple Emanuel of the Pascack Valley in
Woodcliff Lake holds a Chanukah service
for young families, 7 p.m. (201) 391-0801.
Cong. Bnai Jacob in Jersey City hosts
Chanukah Shabbat dinner and a musical
celebration, 6:30 p.m. 176 West Side Ave.
(201) 435-5725 or info@bnaijacobjc.org.
Temple Emeth in Teaneck offers a
Shabbat Chanukah family celebration,
beginning with dinner, 6:15 p.m.; services
at 8. Bring menorahs and candles and
a nonperishable food item to donate to
the Center for Food Action. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 833-1322 or www.emeth.org.
Congregation Mount Sinai in Jersey
City offers Shabbat Chanukah Daven
and Dine, 7:30 p.m. 128 Sherman Ave.
RavShlomo.MtSinai@gmail.com.
December 15
Jewish Federation of Northern New
Jerseys eNgageNJ, a young leaders group,
holds its Black and White Chanukah
party at Avenue Event Space in Teaneck,
9 p.m. 1382 Queen Anne Road. Kimberly
Schwartzman, (201) 820-3936 or kimber-
lys@jfnnj.org.
December 16
The Jewish Cultural School & Society of-
fers a Chanukah family event with crafts,
dreidel games, author reading, singing,
ceremony, and pot-luck lunch, at the
Baird Center in South Orange, 10 a.m. 5
Mead St. (973) 233-0714 or jcss-nj.org.
JS-16*
16 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
Why my great-great-grandfather
was late for the familys Chanukah latkes
Curt Leviant
I
t was deep into the bitter Russian winter of 1843.
My great-great-grandfather, Chaim Leviant, then a
youngster of 15, was driving his grandfather Moshes
horse-drawn sleigh along the snow-covered roads not far
from Kariukovke. This shtetl in the Ukraine was noted for
its sugar factory, owned by the well-known Jewish mil-
lionaire and philanthropist, Brodsky. In another hour or so
the first light of Chanukah would be kindled at the house
of Chaims grandparents, where the entire family was
gathered to sing songs, play dreidl, and eat Grandmother
Dobbes crispy potato latkes.
The snow finally had stopped. The late afternoon sky
was clear. The roads, the roofs, the trees were white. The
fields were endless sheets of white. All was silent, except for
the music of the little bells in the horses harness; the snow
was so deep that even the horses hooves made no sound.
Young Chaim drove carefully. He knew that during
the winter, drivers had to follow three crucial rules: dress
warmly, never leave the path, and never ever fall asleep.
Yes, he had heard of faithful horses who brought sleeping
drivers home. But he also knew the tales of tragic accidents
a slumbering driver could fall from his perch, land in the
snow, and not be seen again until the spring thaw.
At the behest of his grandfather, Chaim had just de-
livered a goose, dried beans, flour, oil, and potatoes to a
poor Jewish family in a neighboring shtetl. Grandfather
Moshe was a wealthy man who supplied the sugar factory
with beets. He owned his house, but he leased the land on
which he grew the beets, for Jews were forbidden to own
land in Russia.
Despite the bearskin greatcoat and blanket on his
feet, Chaim was cold. To counter the chill in his bones, he
thought of the Chanukah lights and of his grandmothers
latkes. He began to sing, Ill soon be home to celebrate to
the tune of Maoz Tsur.
Chaim held the reins as the sleigh glided along.
Suddenly, he glimpsed something on the edge of a snow-
drift. Could that be a fur hat? Whoa! Chaim shouted,
tugging at the reins. The horse stopped. Yes, a fur hat. The
youngster jumped off the wagon. He picked up the hat
but his heart nearly stopped at the fright of what he saw
beneath it. It was a gloved hand. My God! Chaim cried.
He quickly began to dig in the snow with his hands until he
saw what he saw: a boy of about 12 or 13, wearing the fine
clothes of the gentry. Chaim put his ear to the boys chest
and nose; he was stunned but breathing. As he lifted the
lad into the sleigh, Chaim surmised what had happened.
A snoozing coachman, very likely drunk, had dropped the
reins and the unrestrained horses had set off in a gallop.
Then a rut in the road, and the lad must have tumbled out
into a snow bank while the sleigh sped on.
Chaim patted the boys face. He rubbed his hands and
chest. He took off his own bearskin coat and wrapped the
boy in it, then placed some blankets around his feet. Over
his own shoulders Chaim draped another blanket like a
tallis.
Can you hear me? Can you hear me? Chaim asked.
But the boys eyes remained closed. When the sleigh began
to move, however, Chaim heard a faint moan.
Father, father, the boy whimpered.
Youre safe, Chaim said. Who is your father? What is
your name? Tell me.
The boy answered slowly. Arkady Ivanovich
Goluptsin. I fell off our coach.
Ivan Goluptsin? Our provincial governor?
My father
Following the boys instructions, my great-great-
grandfather Chaim made his way to the Goluptsin winter
mansion. He knew he was late for Chanukah lights; he had
passed the turn-off for Kariukovke long ago.
A servant opened the door, took one look, and shouted,
Hes here. Master, hes here. Arkadys mother and the gov-
ernor rushed into the warm, brightly lit entranceway. They
saw a tall boy supporting their son, who was wrapped in a
huge bearskin coat they did not recognize.
Arkady was laid on a sofa, and his mother began rub-
bing his face and hands, while two servants removed the
bearskin and the boys leather boots. Another attendant
came with two glasses of hot tea on a silver tray, for the boy
and for Chaim.
He saved me, Mama. He found me. He saved me,
Papa.
Weve sent messengers to all the police stations, said
the governor. And that idiot of a coachman still hasnt
come back. Who are you, my boy?
I am Chaim Leviant from Kariukovke.
Oh, yes, where Brodsky has his sugar plant. I know
Brodsky well. Do you know who I am?
Your son told me.
How old are you? 16?
Actually, Im 15.
You are tall for your age, Chaim, and so grown up too.
The governor put his hand on his heart. Thank you, thank
you for saving my sons life. Come with me, please.
Governor Goluptsin put his arm around Chaims shoul-
ders and led him into a spacious dining room. A large, glit-
tering chandelier lit with many candles hung over a long
mahogany table. Why are you hesitating, my boy? Come
with me.
Sir, if you dont mind I I am late. Our entire family
is waiting at my grandfathers house, ready to celebrate our
holiday, Chanukah. I should have been there an hour ago,
and they must be worried.
I can understand that worry, Chaim, Goluptsin said.
We ourselves and he broke off, holding back tears. He
motioned to Chaim. It will only be a moment.
My great-great-grandfather Chaim followed the gover-
nor of the entire Kiev district into his office. An oil portrait
of the czar hung behind Goluptsins gleaming desk. Please
sit down.
The governor opened a drawer and placed a purse on
the desk.
I know it is your holiday and it is your custom to give
coins to the children. He smiled.
This I learned from Brodsky. Chaim, how many grand-
children does your grandfather have?
Chaim began counting to himself. Yakov, Israel-Noah,
Mendl, Tanya, Rachel, Rivka, Dvora and Boris. And Zyama
and Kalman, Lazar and Isak, Shmayke and Hillel and
until he reached 18, including himself.
The governor counted out 18 of the large, heavy, five-
ruble gold coins and spread them on the desk. The coins
glittered in the light. Chaim knew that an average workers
wages were a ruble a month.
Sir, Chaim said, please dont think me ungrateful,
but I dont want to be rewarded for the mitzvah of saving a
life. The Talmud teaches us that when someone saves one
life it is as if he has saved an entire world. This alone is my
reward.
Governor Goluptsin looked at Chaim. Hmm, I see.
Well, then, is there anything I can do for you?
Yes, said my great-great-grandfather Chaim, and the
prompt response must have surprised the governor. As
you know, sir, Jews are not allowed to own land in Russia,
except under rare and very special circumstances. You said
you know Brodsky. Our family does business with him.
They have always wanted to buy land to cultivate more
sugar beets and plant more crops. With this land we could
provide jobs for many people in the area.
So how can I help?
Could you get my family permission to buy a tract of
land outside Kariukovke?
For a moment the governor was silent. Chaim thought
that surely he would say it was out of his hands. Then
Goluptsins face brightened.
Chaim, you have my word. Come back in three days. I
shall contact the Imperial Bank in Kiev and the documents
will be prepared. And thank you again for your good deed.
Now the governor smiled. And dont forget your bearskin
greatcoat.
When he arrived at his grandfathers house, Chaim saw
no Chanukah lights in the window. But a dozen faces were
pressed to the glass and a few people stood outside. Now,
for the second time in an hour, Chaim heard the cry, Hes
here. Hes here!
Inside, the warm house was filled with the aroma of
potato latkes. His mother and father kissed and embraced
him, and he felt himself hugged from all sides. At that mo-
ment Chaim knew what a dreidl felt like, being spun and
turned in every direction. And then he quickly told his
story.
Now we can light the first light, said the beaming
Grandfather Moshe. We waited and we worried, but we
didnt want to light the first candle without you.
Then Grandmother Dobbe came in with a large platter
of latkes, saying, Right after the blessings we eat.
The menorah was lit, and the shamash candle and the
first flame glowed in the house. After the songs were sung,
Grandfather Moshe gave Chanukah gelt to all the children.
As they sat on the floor playing dreidl for walnuts, Moshe
called my great-great-grandfather Chaim into his study.
You refused the governor, but you wont refuse me,
eh? Moshe smiled. Then he pulled a coin from his pocket.
This five-ruble gold piece is for you. When the time
comes, give it to your firstborn son and tell him to pass it to
his son, along with this story.
And this is the coin, whose worth is far more than its
weight in gold, that we keep next to our menorah during
the eight days of Chanukah.
Like a legend, it sheds its own special light.
Curt Leviants most recent book is the short story collection Zix
Zexy Ztories.
Curt Leviant tells a warming Chanukah tale of a cold
Ukraine winter.
JS-17
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 17
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Editorial
JS-18*
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 07666
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Fax 201-833-4959
Publisher
James L. Janoff
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Jewish
Standard
jstandard.com
Founder
Morris J. Janoff (19111987)
Editor Emeritus
Meyer Pesin (19011989)
City Editor
Mort Cornin (19151984)
Editorial Consultant
Max Milians (1908-2005)
Secretary
Ceil Wolf (1914-2008)
Editor Emerita
Rebecca Kaplan Boroson
I dare you,
Sheldon; you,
too, George
Shammai EngElmayEr
H
ard dollar numbers are still hard to come by,
but it seems certain that
donations by Jewish
mega-millionaires to the recent
presidential campaign exceed-
ed $115 million from just 11
donors, five on the Republican
side and six on the Democratic
one.
In a post-election edito-
rial, this newspaper said it was
appalled at how much Jewish
money was expended. Other Jewish publications made
similar statements. The various editorials condemning
these expenditures do not challenge the right of anyone
to donate to political campaigns; they merely challenge
the level of giving.
To my mind, the use of
words such as appalled is
wrong not because the
expenditures were not appall-
ing, but because disgusting
is closer to the truth; outra-
geous works well, too.
Sinful, however, is the best word. Spending that kind
of money when communal needs go wanting is a sin.
So, to Sheldon Adelson, George Soros, Ronald
Perelman, the Lauders (most of whom gave to Obama,
by the way), the Bronfmans, et al, this column is for you.
I am not prepared to argue with you over the amount
of your donations. It is your money and you get to de-
cide how to waste it. I do, however, wish to issue you a
challenge.
First, a little background that, sadly, I fear most of you
are simply not interested in reading. Nonetheless, bear
with me.
It is about tzedakah. Notice, please, that I did not
say charity. In Judaism, we have no concept of char-
ity. Charity comes from the Latin word caritas, which
comes from the root word carus, meaning dear, costly,
or loved, and the root word cor, which means heart. In
other words, charity is something that comes from the
heart; it is motivated by compassion; it is wholly volun-
tary in nature.
Not so tzedakah; it derives from the root word tzedek.
Tzedek has multiple meanings, including righteous-
ness, justice, truth, purity, and sincerity. Several times
in Deuteronomy, tzedek is used as the word for honest
specifically, an honest weight and measure. To that
definition, the Talmud adds yet another to be liberal
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of the Conservative synagogue
Temple Israel Community Center in Cliffside Park and an
instructor in the UJA-Federation-sponsored Florence Melton
Adult Mini-School of the Hebrew University.
18 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
A check in time
H
urricane Sandy also known as the superstorm
caused a great deal of damage, and a great deal
of hurt.
Few, however, were as damaged and hurt as were
Jewish Family Service of Bergen and North Hudson and
Jewish Family Service of North Jersey. No, they did not suf-
fer the way so many among us did, and we are not equating
real suffering to what these two agencies endured. Yet we
are expressing a truth that demands telling: Sandy severely
impaired their ability to bring relief the next time.
The why of this should be obvious: They were sensa-
tional during Sandy, just as we have come to expect them
both to be.
These two agencies, which serve communties from
the flood-ravaged North Hudson area to the perpetually
flood-prone Wayne and everything in between, made use
of every available resource to bring food to the suddenly
homebound, shelter to the suddenly homeless, and hope
to the suddenly hopeless. And they did it in addition to
their daily efforts on behalf of the elderly, the jobless, the
Shoah survivors, and the needy of every faith, nationality,
age, and race who come through their doors.
This Sunday evening, Jewish Family Service of Bergen
and North Hudson is celebrating its 60th anniversary with
a major fundraising dinner, planned before Sandy but
now more urgent than ever. (See the article beginning on
page 21.) This spring, Jewish Family Service of North Jersey
hopes to have a major fundraiser of its own to replenish
coffers depleted by Sandy.
This is the season when people plan their end-of-year
giving, in order to lower their annual tax bill. Here is our
suggestion:
If you are not going to the dinner on Sunday, sit down
today and write a check to Jewish Family Service of Bergen
and North Hudson. If you are going to the dinner, increase
your planned donation by 20 percent or more.
At the same time, let none of us wait for the spring to
write a check to Jewish Family Service of North Jersey. The
tax break is now, so now is the time to write a check. There
will be plenty of time in the spring to write another one.
The need is great. There is no need to wait.
KEEPING
THE FAITH
One religious
perspectIve on
issues of the day
Bad timing
T
he United Nations General Assembly now has
before it an officially submitted draft of a decla-
ration of Palestinian statehood. Not only should
it be voted down, it should not even be allowed to be
brought up.
We are not opposed to Palestinian statehood. A
two-state solution continues to be the only truly viable
solution to the seemingly insolv able Palestinian-Israeli
conflict, which has gone on much too long. This long
has been the stated goal of the members of the United
Nations. In speech after speech and vote after vote, they
have affirmed that peace can best be achieved when a
Palestinian state resides next door to the Jewish one.
To grant the Palestinians statehood status now, how-
ever, is to reward bad behavior in the extreme. Several
times over the years, the Palestinians and Israel came
thisclose to settling the issue, only to have the Palestinian
side reject the proferred deals. The late and unlamented
(by us) Yasir Arafat even rejected an offer that would have
created a Palestinian state with a portion of Jerusalem
as its capital. His successor has resisted every attempt
at serious negotiations since taking over the reins of the
Palestinian Authority.
To be sure, the Israelis have not been all that willing to
make concessions for peace, but that has more to do with
the fact that it has already made so many concessions for
peace without serious response from the other side than
it has to do with unwillingness to deal at all.
Granting the Palestinians the status of statehood is to
say no to the peace process. That is not the way to bring
about peace. It is the way to guarantee more war.
Chanukah, oy Chanukah
T
is the season of our discontent. Chanukah is
upon us, and again we are making the most of
its status as the Jewish Christmas.
But it is not the Jewish Christmas. Christmas is a major
observance of another religion. Chanukah is a minor ob-
servance of ours. Unfortunately for the Christian faiths,
the meaning of Christmas has been grossly diminished
by the commercialism that has attached. Christmas is less
about the birth of a Christian messiah and more about
the hot new toys, such as LeapPad 2 Explorer and Wii U
for children, and mini iPads, video glasses, and Darth
Vader alarm clocks for adults.
Chanukah never was about gifts. Chanukah gelt does
not mean Chanukah gift. It is but a few pennies given to
children to play dreidel, so that they can learn what the
four letters mean. Nun, gimel, hey, and shin stand for nes
gadol hayah sham a great miracle happened there. In
other words, it is meant to spark questions from the chil-
dren about what was the miracle and why we should care.
While we rush to celebrate this minor holiday, we do so
by corrupting its message, thereby losing an opportunity to
teach our children the value we Jews place on the concept
of freedom. To our children, Chanukah is about getting
presents for eight nights, munching on jelly doughnuts (and
how many people know why doughnuts ?) and little else.
Chanukah begins a week from Saturday night. Enjoy
the festival; we surely intend to. Keep it in perspective,
however.
EdI TorI Al
with. Specifically, it means to be liberal with what is
your own and give it to the poor person by adding
overweight and overmeasure. (See Babylonian Talmud
tractate Chulin 134a; also Bava Batra 88b and elsewhere
for similar discussions.)
In other words, if a poor person comes into your
grocery store and asks for a pound of flour, and you
know that person needs more than that to feed his or
her family, it is tzedek to charge that person for a pound
of flour, but to give him or her a little extra, without em-
barrassing that person by saying you are doing so.
From tzedek, we also derive such meanings as kind-
ness, virtue, and piety. A tzadik, for example, is not a
saint in the Christian sense, just a normal person whose
very being is defined by one or more qualities associ-
ated with a definition of tzedek.
Which brings us to tzedakah, the feminine form of
tzedek. It means righteousness, purity, equity, and to
be liberal with. Tzedakah has nothing to do with the
heart. It is obligatory on those who have, because it is
the God-given right of those who have not. To use a
word considered dirty by many, it is an entitlement.
The only question is why. Here, then, is what Moses
had to say. If you say to yourselves, My own power and
the might of my own hand have won this wealth for me,
remember that it is the Lord your God who gives you the
power to get wealth.... (See Deuteronomy 8:17-18.)
Thus, as Britains chief rabbi, Lord Jonathan Sacks,
explains so cogently, Ultimately, all things are owned
by God, creator of the world. What we possess, we
do not own we merely hold it in trust for God....
[B]ecause we are not owners of our property but merely
guardians on Gods behalf, we are bound by the condi-
tions of trusteeship, one of which is that we share part
of what we have with others in need. What would be
regarded as charity in other legal systems is, in Judaism,
a strict requirement of the law....
Some of you fat cat donors, to hark back to an ex-
pression from a previous political era, may argue that
your donations to this years campaigns fit that bill. God
gave you the wealth and put you in a position to protect
the interests of the Jewish people or the Jewish state,
or both, and that is what you did with the $115 million
or so. To this, we turn to the second Moses, Moses
Maimonides, the Rambam:
A poor relative takes precedence to all others, a poor
member of ones household takes precedence over the
poor of ones city, the poor of ones city take precedence
over the poor of another city.... (See Mishneh Torah,
Gifts to the Poor 7:13.)
Put in simplest terms, we must prioritize our giving.
First consider what is most needed closer to home, and
by whom. There are more important matters to address
and none may be more important than Jewish educa-
tion. (Note to all my other readers: that means you need
to write out your end-of-year checks to your local syna-
gogues, the Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey,
the local Jewish Family Service agency, and so forth.)
So here is the challenge, Mr. Adelson, and Mr. Soros,
and all the rest of you others whose donations went
into that $115 million political pothole. Take one-third
of what you donated to the 2012 campaign and put it
into a superfund for Jewish education not for special
projects, or fancy buildings with your names on it, but
for tuition for any child whose parents cannot afford
it; for salary augmentation for teachers who otherwise
do not earn a decent living; for curriculum develop-
ment on a par with the best private schools; and for
enhanced quality learning at after-school programs for
those students whose parents prefer to send them to
public schools for their general education.
Spend that $38 million in this way and you will have
a far more positive impact on the future of the Jewish
people than any political donation can bring.
You especially, Mr. Adelson. This year, it seems, you
had money to burn. Use some of it to light up the Jewish
future. I dare you.
Op-ed
JS-19
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 19
Rocket science and disillusion
yEhuda hESS
I
f Israel was encouraging our aliyah, it would have let
its army achieve genuine peace with dignity.
More than a million Israeli citizens in the Negev
would enjoy the same protection and security the rest of
Israel has. A new oleh might not have to fear traveling to
Israeli cities, such as Beer Sheva, Ashkelon, and Ashdod.
How might a new oleh sing our national anthem, lihi-
yot am chafshi bartzeinu to be a free nation in our
land knowing that a ghetto mentality still exists in the
state of Israel?
I hope that there is a place for me in Israel. Not be-
ing a leftist, a liberal, or a secular Jew, I never advocated
a two-state solution or embraced the Oslo accords. I
remain disheartened by this hudna, or truce. Perhaps
I should adhere to the hackneyed refrain suggesting
Americans not offer advice to Israel. Ironically, this was
not communicated to Secretary of State Clinton last
week.
From my limited point of view, the construction of
fences, walls, portable bomb shelters, Iron Domes, and
bubbles against rocket attacks only imprisons Israel
within its borders. Israels aggressive Arab neighbors in
Gaza and Lebanon never needed to build such fences,
walls, and shelters to protect their citizens. I thought
Davids capital, Jerusalem, dictated Israeli policy, not
Americas DC.
Israels dependence on world opinion for self-vali-
dation is weakening its resolve. After years of suffering
indiscriminate rocket fire from Gaza, the mere fear of
no peace accord with Egypt was sufficient motivation
for no ground assault and Israel declaring a cease-fire?
Above all, Americas rock solid commitment to Israel
made Egypt the enforcer the same Egypt that would
not protect the Israeli consulate in Cairo. Political
turmoil and unrest has rendered Egypt incapable of
protecting its own military installations in the Sinai, let
alone enforcing a hudna in Gaza.
Israel maintains a strong military capacity. Operation
Pillar of Defense shot down more than 85 percent of in-
coming rockets over Israeli urban centers. Nevertheless,
how can this operation be called a success when the
enemy was neither eliminated nor deterred? Israel al-
lowed its political and financial capitals to be targeted;
an even worse effect was in decreasing the nations
morale. Thousands of Israeli soldiers sat helplessly near
the Gaza fence for days, witnessing hundreds of missiles
flying over them toward their homes and families.
IDF soldiers were demoralized after being trained for
a mission they werent permitted to execute. In fact, the
operation emasculated IDF soldiers to the extent that
they are now requesting bomb shelters for their IDF
bases.
Missile interceptors systems such as the Arrow, the
Iron Dome or even Davids Sling will not compensate
for Israels underlying weakness. Peace is achieved only
with strength. Israels accepting a ceasefire while un-
der attack disheartened its traumatized citizens in the
south, who demanded a ground assault. They expected
no less after living huddled in bomb shelters for days.
Similarly, the acceptance of a hudna, indicating a
temporary calming (hu-du is a noun that means quiet)
guarantees greater danger and destruction in months to
come. Now, Hamas may maintain its abhorrent charter
and genocidal goals without disarming.
A ground assault would have earned a respectable
cease-fire a waqaf itlaq annar rather than a
hudna. Not surprisingly, none of the Gaza terrorist fac-
tions responsible for launching hundreds of missiles
signed the hudna. Immediately after it went into effect,
20 rockets flew into southern Israel. Historically, hudnas
are short-lived.
More cease-fire violations seem certain to follow.
I remain apprehensive about United States guar-
antees that no missiles will be fired against Israel from
Gaza. American diplomacy appears to have protected
Hamas in the same way that it protected Hamas during
the Cast Lead operation in 2009. We just saw the expedi-
tious smuggling of Hamas leader Khaled Mashaal out of
Gaza into Cairo for negotiations and then to Qatar.
To perpetuate the Arab-Israeli conflict, America also
protected Hizbulla in Lebanon in 2006. The United
States also resurrected Yassir Arafat repeatedly, whether
by moving him from Beirut to Tunisia then back again
for the Madrid peace talks in 1991 or for the Oslo ac-
cords in 1993 or for the so-called final status talks in
Ramalla in 2001.
After Israels military victory in 1967, the U.S. govern-
ment sought to prevent Israel from defeating its Arab
enemies on the battlefield. American diplomacy during
the Yom Kippur War would have to save the Egyptian
army from collapse. For Washington, the existence of
Arab terrorist factions funded by Arab dictatorship na-
tions ensures a status quo of the Arab-Israeli conflict.
The present situation makes Israels existence more
perilous and unstable than before.
American diplomacy will soon resume as Israel pays
a far greater price within its heartland during its military
sequel.
Yehuda Hess has written articles on contemporary issues fac-
ing the Jewish community. He lives in New Milford and wel-
comes comments on his work at Magenami@aol.com.
Missile interceptors systems such
as the Arrow, the Iron Dome or even
Davids Sling will not compensate for
Israels underlying weakness. Peace is
achieved only with strength. Israels
accepting a ceasefire while under attack
disheartened its traumatized citizens
in the south, who demanded a ground
assault.
Yehuda Hess
JS-20*
20 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
Jewish-Hispanic relations: Long overdue!
rabbi Shmuly yanklowitz
I
recall overhearing very derog-
atory and racist remarks about
Latino Americans when I was
a child. In those conversations,
everyone from below the border
was referred to as a Mexican or
cheap labor.
Over the last few years, Ive
had the opportunity to do work in
some Central and South American
countries Argentina, Guatemala, and El Salvador
and I had the chance to spend time in Panama, Mexico,
and Belize as well. I learned a lot about these cultures
and gained a much deeper appreciation for the Latino
Americans in my home American community. I also
learned the deeper narrative about why and how so
many have immigrated to the United States.
Jews and Latino Americans live parallel lives, but ac-
cording to a recent survey conducted by the American
Jewish Committee they do not mingle. Latinos see Jews
as part of the white establishment, not as immigrants,
said Dina Siegel Vann, director of the AJCs Latino and
Latin American Institute. We need to convey to them
that we share a history of immigration.
Jews and Hispanics should work together. The com-
munities share many values, including the desire to
maintain their distinctive cultural identities. A recent
American Jewish Committee survey showed that while
many Hispanics did not know Jews, many had favorable
views about them:
78percentbelieveJewshaveacommitmenttofam-
ily life.
66percentbelievethatJewshaveastrongreligious
faith.
61 percent believe that American Jews make a
strong cultural contribution.
53percentbelievethatJewssupportcivilrights.
Still, there is a lot of room for growth in our relation-
ship with the Latino community. Another survey con-
ducted in 2001 showed that:
36 percent of Latinos believe there is anti-Semi-
tism in the Latino community.
44 percent of Latinos and 39.6 percent of Jews be-
lieved that the relationship today between Hispanics
and Jews in the United States is not excellent or good
but just fair.
36 percent of Latinos and 20.3 percent of Jews be-
lieve there is an anti-Latino sentiment in the Jewish
community.
20 percent of Latinos believe that the Catholic
church did enough during the Holocaust; only 6.2 per-
cent of Jews believe that.
20percentofLatinosbelievethattheUnitedStates
is too supportive of Israel; only 6.2 percent of Jews be-
lieve that.
On a positive side though, 72 percent of Latinos
and 76 percent of Jews believe that it is very important
for Hispanics and Jews to work together in order to
strengthen laws to prevent discrimination.
There is so much potential for collaboration, mutual
learning, and friendship.
Oddly, Hispanics and Jews may have more than cul-
tural values in common. For example, many Hispanics
do not know of the history and cultural legacy of
Spanish Jews. In addition, a number of Hispanics would
be surprised to know that they carry Jewish DNA, and
may be descended from conversos Jews forcibly
converted to Christianity. A 2003 genetic test of men
living in New Mexico, southern Texas, and northern
Mexico revealed that 10 to 15 percent had some Jewish
DNA. Many Hispanics named Alvarez, Rivera, Lopez,
and Mendez have found that they may have Sephardic
Jewish ancestors. In Chicago, the Alliance for Jews and
Latinos celebrates these common roots annually.
Of course, there are obstacles. In 2011, a Hispanic
councilwoman in Santa Ana, Calif., accused a local
Jewish businessman of ethnic cleansing and com-
pared him to Hitler. Fortunately, many Hispanics
called for her to resign, and she did issue an apology.
At the same time, some Jews have forgotten their im-
migrant legacy. Polls in 2011 revealed that a majority of
American Jews approved of the Arizona law designed
to combat illegal immigration, which was perceived by
many as a racist attack on all Hispanics.
Some fringe Jewish factions have taken a hard stance
on a group they offensively refer to as illegal aliens.
Of course, they forget that significant numbers of Jews
have entered America illegally over the last two hundred
years. The narrative that all Jews came to the United
States legally has been shown to be completely false.
Many Jews facing persecution fudged their passports
and many Israelis and Jewish immigrants today are here
illegally.
We are overdue in cultivating a strong Jewish-
Hispanic relationship. Over the last 50 years, weve done
a good job at Jewish-black and Jewish-Christian rela-
tions. In response to tensions in the Middle East, many
have begun to improve Jewish-Muslim relations. We
must tend to Jewish-Hispanic relations too.
Hispanics made up 10 percent of the electorate
nationally in 2012 and played a significant role in key
swing states including Florida, Colorado, and Nevada.
Seventy-one percent of Hispanics voted for President
Obama (versus about 27 percent for Mitt Romney); this
is similar to the votes of American Jews and Muslims.
This rapidly growing group will undoubtedly play an
increasingly important role in future elections.
Jews have been very successful change-makers in the
world because weve often been outsiders throughout
history. But today were accepted in America. So the
new question becomes how we can continue to play
the role of outsiders now that were insiders. How can
we continue to exist on the periphery, to be a voice for
those on the margins, and to be the social agitators for
a more just and holy world when were fully included on
the inside?
We generally have related best to minorities on the
periphery of society. For this reason, among many
others, we should be closer with our Latino American
brothers and sisters.
As a community, we should explore more opportuni-
ties to invite Latino Americans into our community. We
should leave our bubbles and meet others in their com-
munities. Jewish Latinos can play a crucial role in build-
ing bridges between Jews and Latinos and we all can do
our parts as Jewish ambassadors.
We should stand with all minorities seeking to be
treated with basic human decency. This is our covenant.
This is the dream: that all people may live freely in the
world. May we as the Jewish people continue to act as
global and local leaders building bridges and standing
in solidarity with all minority partners for a more just,
equitable, and free world.
Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz is the founder and president of Uri
LTzedek, an Orthodox social justice organzation. He is the se-
nior rabbi at Kehilath Israel in Overland Park, Kan.
Opinions expressed in the op-ed and letters columns are not necessarily those of
The Jewish Standard. Include a day-time telephone number with your letters. The
Jewish Standard reserves the right to edit letters. Write to Letters, The Jewish
Standard, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ 07666, or e-mail jstandardletters@gmail.
com. Hand-written letters are not acceptable.
JS-21
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 21
Its two ridiculous
Where else in the country are there two
boards of rabbis (Little praise for cem-
etery agreement from Board of Rabbis,
Nov 16)? If only we could present a united
front! Why is it here in North Jersey that
the divisions are so deep that our teachers
cannot agree to sit with one another at the
same table? We are all headed for the same
place, and God does not discriminate ac-
cording to the length of ones tzitzit.
Eric Weis
Wayne
Gaza and violence
Responsibility for Gaza rests with Gazans
It is heart rending to witness the loss of
innocent life among the civilians of Gaza.
However, a review of not so distant his-
tory reveals that tragedy is inevitable for
civilians whose culture produces radical/
destructive extremists obsessively con-
sumed with inflicting their way on neigh-
bors and the world beyond.
I cite the terrible suffering of the many
thousands of innocent Germans and
Japanese who gave strength (willingly or
unwillingly) to vicious and tyrannical re-
gimes during WW 2.
The ultimate responsibility for the
horror of the Israeli/Palestinian war rests
with the culture that gives birth and suste-
nance to these murderers.
Jerrold Terdiman MD
Woodcliff Lake
Walking to shul
We live here in Teaneck, Englewood, Fair
Lawn, etc., in our own little war zone.
Darkness descends early these days and
those heading for shul wearing their black
coats, black shoes, and black hats are
causing a dangerous situation walking
in the middle of our roads. I am a Jewish
neighbor who drives on Shabbat. There
is the constant threat of hitting one of the
street walkers on these dark nights as well
as the dimmer days of winter. Children
are walking at the sides of their parents,
who should not be in the streets under
any conditions; not to walk to shul, not to
play during the day on Shabbat, and not
to kibbitz with friends and other shul go-
ers in the middle of intersections.
If I were to drive on the sidewalk, all
hell would break lose. I do not. I drive with
extreme caution, at absurdly slow speeds
in this neighborhood. Apart from the lack
of visibilty, there is the extreme danger of
a child who is in front or to the back of my
car who does not even reach the height of
my rearview mirrors.
I have written variations of this letter
time and again. I suggest first and fore-
most that no one, absolutely no one walk
on the streets of our community.
I also recommend the use of a reflec-
tor vest for all adults and all children. It
may not make a fashion statement but
certainly it will deter some potential ac-
cident that is sure to occur sooner or later.
Parks are for children to play in; streets
are not. If you meet some friends on the
way home from shul, invite them to your
lawn or into your home. The streets are for
cars, so face it, wearing a light reflector or
reflective tape, I do not believe, will des-
crecrate Shabbat.
Sandra Steuer Cohen
Teaneck
Train halfway staff
Last July, legislative hearings were held to
gain insight into why halfway house pro-
grams are failing. The hearings uncovered
a grossly neglected, ungoverned service in
need of comprehensive reform and regu-
lation. A recurring theme of the hearings:
Employees were ineffective and lacked
proper training.
Any person with the responsibility to
transition former inmates back into so-
ciety must have the requisite training.
Its common sense. I will be proposing
legislation requiring employees to have
comprehensive training in maintaining a
safe and secure environment, preventing
violence, and curbing inmate escapes. I
also sponsored a bill requiring the state
auditor to review halfway house con-
tracts, which was conditionally vetoed by
the governor.
Whether the employee provides treat-
ment, education, job training, or medical
services, these individuals are the gateway
back into society for the programs in-
mates. Mandatory training would prepare
them for the job and take an important
step toward fixing a troubled system.
Assemblyman Gordon Johnson
(D-Bergen) 37th Legislative District
Its strictly about Jews
Each week I am eager to read the Jewish
Standard, particularly when a week of war
and sacrifice occurs in our Jewish home-
land of Israel. There were many good
articles with great first-hand accounts
and experiences. As I was reading it oc-
curred to me that too often when we, the
Jewish people, refer to our homeland as
Israel and not Jewish Israel we are help-
ing the enemy in their insidious PR battle
against the Jewish people. After all, none
of this would be happening if the land was
a democracy of Protestants, Catholics,
Sikhs, etc. The Holocaust is still fresh in
too many minds for the enemy to say they
want the Jewish people in the sea it is
more palatable to the world when it is the
country of Israel that they so describe. For
example: Marla Cohen talks about the
hand that Israel has been dealt (Nov.
23). Well this is not a new hand or a new
game, so to speak, but rather a continua-
tion of that which the Jewish people have
been forced to suffer for over 4 millennia.
Ben Sales wrote about Kiryat Malachi,
their fear, rage and resilience (Ethiopians
make aliyah, Nov. 23). It is a Jewish trait
to march forward and adapt to a new
Jewish reality. Lois Goldrich spoke to
Jeffrey Salkin (Salkin faults media cover-
age, Nov. 23), who rightly comments:
many choose to portray the Israelis as the
aggressors, even when they are respond-
ing to aggression. Things that would be
permitted and celebrated (when done
by) other nations are forbidden to Israel.
We the Jewish people need to substitute
Jewish for Israel(is) and then it becomes
easier to understand the worlds criticism.
None of what has ever gone on in Israel
is about the country Israel, it has always
been and will always be about the Jewish
people, whether we live in Israel, America,
Russia, Europe, or anywhere else on the
planet.
Varda Hager
Teaneck,
lETTErs
JS-22
Cover story
22 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
Joanne Palmer
There is a myth that somehow Jews are immune from
the sorrows that plague other families alcoholism and
drug abuse, sexual abuse, poverty, and the soul-sapping
loneliness of the elderly, to list some items on a long list of
sadnesses.
That myth is not true. We are normal people, open to
the same troubles and the same despair as everyone else.
But we also have a strong sense of community, and a
deep and age-old commitment to it and to each other.
Our values that we must help others, treat them with
respect, no matter who they are, and give them tools they
can use to help themselves express themselves in an
agency that is an often overlooked community gem, the
Jewish Family Service of Bergen and North Hudson.
JFS is about to celebrate its 60th anniversary; as it
marks that milestone with a gala dinner this Sunday, we
acknowledge it with a look at its accomplishments.
O
nce known as the Jewish Welfare Board and
operated under the aegis of what was then
known as UJA Federation, JFS began to take on
its present form in 1977, operating out of a small office
in Hackensack. (It is still a beneficiary of the renamed
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey; its office is
now in Teaneck.)
Our mission is to serve Jewish families in need, Ed
Ruzinsky, a former JFS president and treasurer and a 35-
year board member, said. In the early 80s, we resettled
more than 100 Russian families. Some of our trustees
helped schlep mattresses and furniture so that when
people got off the plane, theyd have someplace to sleep.
We found apartments for them, and we paid the deposits,
even before they were cleared through customs.
Over time, the agency grew, based on the demands of
the community, he said.
JFS offers a wide array of services. The mainstay
of the agency always has been clinical services for
individuals, families, kids with problems, Ruzinsky said.
Several years ago, we started a school-based
afterschool program, and its now in three school districts
North Bergen, Cliffside Park, and Fairview. We provide
activities for kids, including academic studies. Were
looking to expand it.
We also have a kosher meals on wheels program for
the homebound elderly. We provided about 25,000 meals
last year to about 125 people. We identify volunteers to
drive and deliver the meals.
We responded to the hurricane, Ruzinsky
continued, referring to Sandy. Among the many large
and small actions JFS took, he said, were that we
identified resources and posted them on our website; we
collaborated with FEMA; because we never lost power
we were able to open our doors to the public, so people
could walk in off the street and charge their phones; we
made coffee and brought it to people waiting on line for
gas; we delivered nonperishable food to our clients.
Those clients the homebound elderly, whose plight
was worsened by power and information outages
received special attention from JFS. We called all 176
of our elder clients to ensure their well-being, Ruzinsky
said. We called the police for wellness checks on 22
elder clients when we couldnt reach them ourselves.
We delivered over 50 hot meals to elder clients without
power, and we distributed supermarket gift cards, using
emergency funding from the federation.
There is another group JFS helps.
Today we have a very large community of Holocaust
JFS marks
first 60 years
The times they are a changin, but the needs never do
Staff intern Pincus Brechner unloads hurricane relief supplies as Dorothy OBierne, the director of JFSs
job search network, looks on. Courtesy JFs
year to year.
We have a diversified funding stream, she said.
Although JFS used to be funded entirely by federation,
this year only 18 percent of its budget was. The
federation is still a fabulous partner, but the truth is
that everybody is struggling now, she added. About 26
percent of JFSs funding comes from grants from federal,
state, and local governments and private foundations,
and another 31 percent is from fees for service and
reimbursements. Donations make up another 21
percent.
Not only is JFS still struggling with the fallout from
the economic meltdown, but its leaders also fear that the
fiscal cliff debate facing Congress now might hurt them
as well. The government is giving out less now, Feder
said. And when Congress talks about cutting social
services theyre talking about us.
Therefore, like other nonprofits, JFS is counting more
and more on its donors to sustain the programming we
offer that helps the most vulnerable in our commuity,
Feder said.
Next, she described a hypothetical case, someone
who is out of work and looking for help. Whats unique
about JFS is that you can walk in here thinking you want
one thing, help with one aspect of a job search, but
then you realize that you need so much other help too.
Because youre out of work, your marriage is struggling,
and youre having a hard time making ends meet.
We have counseling services, and we have a food
pantry, she said. We wrap around services that
means that we wrap services around a family, so that we
can help them, and teach them the skills they need to
sustain themselves in the future.
And what does JFS offer specifically in the way of
helping someone to find a job?
We have an amalgamation of different job boards,
Feder said. Beyond that, we have a job coaching service,
and we also work on resume writing skills, and on how to
use social media when youre looking for a job. We also
can try to connect people, maybe for some volunteerism
while theyre looking. We also help with interviewing
skills. You have to be able to present yourself well. When
you are discouraged, that gets harder and harder. Its
JS-23
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 23
survivors, Ruzinsky said. We receive funds from the
Holocaust Claims Conference the Conference of
Jewish Material Claims Against Germany but the
conference is becoming more restrictive in what we can
provide and get reimbursed for because it has limited
funds. And the survivors are getting on in years.
Funding is a constant problem for JFS, Ruzinsky
said. It gets funding not only from the federation
and the Claims Conference, but also from the federal
government and from donors. But if the agency owned
Fort Knox, it still wouldnt have enough money, he said.
Today people in the community who in years past
were benefactors some of them are now clients of
the agency, because they lost their jobs, burned through
their reserves, and in some cases lost their homes.
The last four years, since the economic meltdown of
2008, have been particularly hard, he said.
Lisa Feder, JFSs executive director, said that JFSs fiscal
year runs from January to December. The organizations
2011 revenue was $2,293,000, and its 2012 budget is $2.1
million. There is a great deal of normal fluctation from
Connecting across the ages
a JFs program pairs teens with seniors and their iPads
Alon Berkowitz of Alpine, 13, was the first teenager to
work on the TeleCare Connection, a program of Jewish
Family Service of Bergen and North Hudson.
I was looking for a community service project for
my bar mitzvah, and my parents told me about JFS,
about how they always have great ideas that can help
our community, he said. That was in January Lisa
Feder, the JFS executive director, had just secured a
grant for the program, but had gotten no further with
it. We caught her at a good time, Alon said. He and
his parents started by asking their friends to donate old
computers or iPads if they were about to upgrade their
systems; that made the original funding go further.
Then Alon and his mother, Nancy Berkowitz, met the
woman who was to be at the other end of the TeleCare
Connection, Lisbeth Strauss of Fort Lee, a German
Holocaust survivor.
Mrs. Strauss is an incredible woman, Nancy
Berkowitz said. This was a woman who had never
touched a computer before, or ever used email. She
originally was a schoolteacher, and she taught kids
about Alons age. When we first were there, she was
astonished. She looked at him and said, I used to teach
children your age, and now here you are, teaching me.
His first lesson with Mrs. Strauss was teaching her
how to turn the iPad on and off, and how to charge it,
she continued. That was the whole lesson. The touch
screen at first was incomprehensible to her. But she
has come such a long way, and now she writes very
sophisticated emails. She just didnt understand at first
that you could just touch your finger to the screen to
type.
When you never have dealt with new technology,
no matter how smart and well-educated you are, when
you come face to face with it, the whole thing seems
on some level to be magic, and as foreign as if its come
from another planet.
Alon also had to learn how to talk how not to
use a lot of terms that we use all the time, his mother
said. Just click doesnt make sense. Double click
doesnt make sense. Things on the Internet the whole
Internet itself dont make sense.
At first, Mrs. Strauss couldnt comprehend how
touching something on the iPad would affect things all
around her. The concept of email at first was a little bit
daunting. She didnt understand how it was going in
and coming out. But she was always eager to learn.
Alon Berkowitz taught his peers how to make
TeleCare Connection work. We met with teenagers
who were interested in teaching older people how to
use these devices. I went over some of the basics with
them how you need to act with elders, how to have
patience.
The Berkowitzes have developed a very real
friendship with Mrs. Straus. We see her at least once a
week, Alon said. We tend to drop in on weekends, to
check on her. During the storm, we made sure that she
was good.
The program assumes that most of the teaching will
be done over Skype, both because its less threatening
for the teenagers that way, and because, on a pragmatic
level, you dont have to rely on Mommy or Daddy to
drive you, Feder said. But you really come to love your
TeleCare buddy, Alon said.
Feder hopes that the program can grow. Were all
hoping that it ends up being a model, that as JFS can
show its success we can build it up from 20 seniors to
200.
Mrs. Straus has all these friends who are incredibly
jealous, Nancy Berkowitz added. They keep asking
if they can drop by when Alon teaches. There is an
incredibly want and need on the part of these elders to
live in the 21st century.
Joanne Palmer
Alon Berkowitz, 13, of Alpine, and his mother, Nancy.
From top, Mimi Paperman, Suad Gacham, and Amy
Adler stock shelves. Courtesy JFs
We called all 176
of our elder clients
to ensure their
well-being.
Ed Ruzinsky
JS-24
24 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
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harder to be upbeat and positive, and if youre not upbeat
and positive, you can interview but in the end that job
will not be yours.
We help approximately 3,000 people a year, Feder
said. (Most but not all of them are Jewish.)We dont
necessarily see everyone here, but we field calls; some
people we help here and some we refer to other places.
We work very closely with federation and with our Jewish
sister agencies; we also work with other community
partners, from United Way to the Center for Food Action.
Every one of those 3,000 people has a story. Some
of them are tragic. And then there are the stories of the
kids who have come in here who have been victims of
abuse, and through therapeutic services have been able
to heal.
Feder told the story of a veteran. This family is very
dear to me, she said. He is a veteran, Jewish, a relatively
young guy with two kids who was seriously damaged
by an IED in Afghanistan. It took him a while to come
back to the States. His wife is supportive, but when you
are limited in your physical capacities it is easy to be
depressed. He has serious permanent disabilities.
We were able to wrap around clinical issues for the
whole family. Its also the wifes issues, and the familys;
the whole family had to shift once to redefine themselves
when he went away and then again when he came back.
They dont have enough money, so were helping with
the food pantry. Hes not ready for a job search. And then
they were affected by the storm, had to leave their home,
and became transients. They ended up relocating out of
the area; theyve lost the support system they developed
over the familys lifetime here. Its a tragic situation.
Another story of wrap-around services is heading
toward a much happier ending.
A 52-year-old Jewish divorced mother of 12-year-
old twins is working, but shes really underemployed,
earning minimum wage, Feder said. She had been
working in a school system but was downsized and had
problems paying her bills; she had rented an apartment
based on her old salary and could barely afford it on her
new, lower wages.
JFS stepped in with its wrap-around services. We
helped pay her PSE&G bills, we got her into the food
pantry, and then we helped her move into a smaller
apartment, Feder said. She used JFSs clinical services
and its job coaching. She hadnt been able to go out on
job interviews because she was too depressed, but after
the coaching she had two serious job opportunities. Shes
waiting to hear, but she is very optimistic about being
offered at least one of them.
She went from being unable to look for work to being
a serious contender.
Feder remembered a particular case that was
emblematic of many more. There was a young girl
and her mom. They had been in an abusive situation.
Now this girl is married and has a baby, and the turning
point was the ability to connect in a healing relationship
with a JFS clinician, who could take a hurt preteen
to a confident adult without the feeling that she did
something wrong, that she was damaged goods. Thats
the work that you do in clinical services.
One new pilot program about which Feder is
particularly excited is TeleCare Connection, which pairs
homebound elderly people, particularly Holocaust
survivors, and teenagers. Survivors are getting older and
more isolated, Feder said. They have lived through a
lot of loss already. In general, she added, elderly people
tend to want to stay in their homes. We want them to
be able to do that, but it gets harder the more isolated
they are, because often they become more and more
depressed.
So weve put computers or iPads in the homes of
20 to 30 elders, some of them survivors, she said. The
teenagers, who are accompanied by their parents when
they visit their buddies homes, teach their elderly
partners how to use the technology.
This is just a glimpse of what Jewish Family Service
has achieved in its first 60 years. It is unlikely that its
founders could have imagined the places their creation
go; similarly, todays leaders can only begin to imagine
what the next 60 years will bring provided, that is,
that there will be enough funding for new visions to be
realized.
Sheryl Sarnak
The Honorable Harvey and Pearl Sorkow Jackie and Michael Kates
Joan Alter Doug Bern Beth Nadel
Dianne Nashel
JFSs 2012 honorees
We wrap around
services that means
that we wrap services
around a family, so that
we can help them.
Lisa Feder
JS-25*
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 25
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Rebels age, as shown by
Chanukah party in Tel Aviv
Zev Golan
T
hey are in their 80s and 90s now, but when the
British ruled eretz Israel they were teenagers, or
maybe in their 20s.
Their faces were on wanted posters; those who
were caught went to prison or were exiled to Africa.
They are the remnants of the most feared Jewish militia
that fought the British Lehi, commonly known as
the Stern Gang. Every Chanukah they met in Tel Aviv,
lit candles, shared some doughnuts, and watched their
numbers dwindle.
They chose to meet on Chanukah because it com-
memorates the victory of the few against the many.
They, too, began as a group of a few dozen extremists in
1940; even in 1948, when they all joined the Israeli army,
they numbered under one thousand.
Since 1932 Abraham Stern, their future leader, had
been writing songs about anonymous soldiers who
would live underground while fighting to liberate the
homeland. By 1941 his followers were killing officials of
the British regime who had promised to make the holy
land a Jewish home but more or less reneged, and they
were bombing the British offices that were preventing
Jewish immigration. By then Stern was on the run and
many of his men were in jail. His imprisoned troops
crafted an olivewood Chanukah lamp and smuggled it
to him with a note: To our days Hasmonean, from his
soldiers in captivity.
Chanukah was a special time for the fighters. We are
a handful of freedom fighters, possessed with a crazy
desire for sovereignty, and according to our detractors
of little strength, Stern wrote. But this is not so. The
little strength is much greater than it appears. Like the
Hasmoneans oil, the fire of zealousness and heroism
burns in the temple of our hearts, a divine flame. The
day is coming soon when we will use this flame to light
the candles of our Chanukah, the Chanukah of the
Hebrew kingdom, in a free Zion.
Stern was captured by British police in a rooftop
apartment in south Tel Aviv and shot to death. The
veterans have held their Chanukah gatherings in this
hideout, now an Israeli museum. They were joined ev-
ery year by Sterns son, Yair, now 70. He was always the
youngest veteran in the room. Though he was 6 years
old when the British left and Israel was established, he
paid the price for being his fathers son.
During the War of Independence, an Israeli army
unit drove past his house on its way to battle. The
commander jumped out of a jeep and ran to Yair, who
was playing in the yard. We have an army and a state
thanks to your father, he said, then drove off. If I
hadnt heard that, I dont know how I would have turned
out, Yair said recently. He became a sports reporter and
ultimately the director of Israel Television. Now retired,
he promotes the memory of his father and the 127 Lehi
members killed by the British or in the 1948 war with
the Arabs.
Over the years the number of fighters attending the
party dropped and the number of grandchildren rose.
One regular was Hanna Armoni, now 87. In the 1940s she
brought food to the undergrounds prison escapees and
blew up bridges. Her husband, Haim, helped blow up
some British oil refineries and was one of 19 Lehi fighters
sentenced to death for it. Hanna took out an ad in a local
paper to inform Haim that hed become a father, but he
[photos stern gang 1,2]
[captions]
[1]
This olivewood chanukiyah was sent from
prison to Abraham Stern.
[2]
The remnants of the Stern Gang celebrate
Chanukah: Lehi veteran Tuvia Henzion lights
candles with Hanna Armoni. The photo
behind them is of Abraham Stern.
This olivewood chanukiyah was sent from prison to
Abraham Stern.
see RebeLS page 26
CHANUKAH
JS-26*
26 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
eNgage
YOUNG L E ADE RSHI P
NJ
J ewi s h Feder at i on of Nor t h er n New J er s ey
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Black & White Hanukkah Party
Saturday, December 15
9:00pm - 12:30am
Avenue Event
1382 Queen Anne Rd., Teaneck
Tickets - $40
Chinese Auction -
tobeneftHurricaneSandyrelief
Event Co-Chairs
Stefanie Haft, Josh Prell,
Jason Sperber & Melissa Brown
RSVP by December 10
Black and White Cocktail Attire
To purchase your ticket please visit
jfnnj.org/bwhanukkah
Please contact Kim Schwartzman
for more information
kimberlys@jfnnj.org or 201 820-3936
TwoHourOpenBarBufetDinner DJ JakeGreenWine&BeerSelection*RafesServiceProject
Co-sponsored by RBC Wealth Management
*Must be at least 21 to attend.
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was killed escaping from Acco prison before he met his
daughter. The daughter attended last years party with
her own children.
Lehi was violent, Hanna says, but in all the years
of our war with the British, Lehi never targeted a woman
or child. Our targets were British police, soldiers, and
government officials. Tuvia Henzion, 92, was a syna-
gogue choirboy who had studied auto mechanics. He
fought with British Colonel Orde Wingates raiders
before joining Sterns militia. When Stern was killed,
Henzion reorganized some of the remaining fighters
into secret cells of three or four members; Lehi kept this
structure for the rest of its war. One of the young people
he drafted into Lehi was Armoni. In recent years, the
two organized the Chanukah parties.
Stern himself had liked parties. He had been con-
sidered the life of any he was at, and usually he led the
guests in songs and dances.
When he died Stern was hated by the British and by
almost all Palestinian Jews, who did not understand his
insistence on throwing the British out of the homeland,
especially during a world war. Today, Stern has been
honored by the Knesset and has streets and even a town
named for him. His followers, once the few against the
many, today are the consensus in Israel.
But every year, fewer of the original few meet on
Chanukah, because fewer survive. This year they decid-
ed not to spend the time and money on invitations and
refreshments. Instead, they appealed for contributions
and have hired someone to put their literature online
and revamp an old website. They havent given up hope,
and plan on having a party next year.
Perhaps Judah Maccabees troops also gathered on
Chanukah to celebrate their victory until none of them
were left, and history was left with their stories.
Israeli historian Zev Golans latest book is Stern: The Man
and His Gang.
The remnants of the Stern Gang celebrate Chanukah:
Lehi veteran Tuvia Henzion lights candles with Hanna
Armoni. The photo behind them is of Abraham Stern.
Rebels frOM page 25
Lehi was violent, but in all the years
of our war with the British, Lehi never
targeted a woman or child. Our targets
were British police, soldiers, and
government officials.
Hanna Armoni
BOSTON From Kung Pao kosher com-
edy to a swinging Mardi Gras version of
the Dreidel song, two new Chanukah
season releases explore the intriguing,
delightful, and sometimes perplexing
ways in which American Jews have re-
sponded to Christmas.
In a book and an audio CD compila-
tion, the holiday season known as the
December dilemma is seen and heard
in a new light. An added bonus: the cov-
ers of both are enticing and entertaining.
In the book A Kosher Christmas
(Rutgers University Press, $22.95) sub-
titled Tis the Season to be Jewish,
Joshua Eli Plaut offers a richly detailed,
page-turning read that draws on his-
torical documents and ethnographic
research sprinkled with often humorous
images and photos.
In his introduction, Plaut, a rabbi and
scholar, admits to a lifelong fascination
with Christmas. The son of a rabbi, he
recalls that when he was growing up on
Long Island in the 1960s his mother took
him to sit on Santas lap every December.
She was never worried about any
influence on me as a child because my
family was secure in its Jewish identity,
he writes.
Plaut paints a historical portrait of
the shifts in American Jewish attitudes
toward Christmas the only American
holiday founded on religion, he notes.
Jews have employed a multitude of
strategies to face the particular challeng-
es of Christmas and to overcome feelings
of exclusion and isolation, he writes,
adding that Jews actually have played a
crucial role in popularizing Christmas by
composing many of the countrys most
beloved holiday songs.
Plaut treats readers to a chapter on
the popular Jewish custom of eating
Chinese food on Christmas, a tradition
that surprisingly dates back more than a
century to Eastern European immigrants
on the Lower East Side of New York. One
photo shows a sign in a Chinese restau-
rant window that thanks the Jewish peo-
ple for their patronage during Christmas.
In the 1990s, comedian Lisa Geduldig
hosted the first Kung Pao Kosher
Comedy evening of Jewish stand-up
comedy in a San Francisco Chinese res-
taurant on Christmas. Two decades later
the event is still going strong and it is
replicated in cities across America.
On a more serious note, Plaut reveals
a long history of Jewish volunteerism on
Christmas, serving the needy and work-
ing shifts for non-Jewish co-workers,
allowing them to spend the day with
family and friends.
Plaut also covers the challenges faced
by intermarried families at Chanukah
and Christmas. He addresses as well the
subject of public displays of religious
symbols, with Jews on both sides of the
issue.
Jonathan Sarna, the American Jewish
historian who wrote the foreword, cau-
tions that the book should not be read
merely as a story of assimilation. In a
phone conversation, the prominent
Brandeis University professor argues
that if that were the case, the book would
be about how Jews observe Christmas.
Rather, Plaut chronicles how Jews
demonstrate their Jewish identity
through alternative ways of acting on
Christmas that show them to be Jewish
and American. Most significant, Sarna as-
serts, A Kosher Christmas is important
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 27
JS-27
see Chanukah page 28
Shining a new light on the
Jewish response to Christmas
Penny Schwartz
446 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 201-692-0192 Fax 201-692-3656
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28 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
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HACKENSACK SUPPLY CO
Thu, Nov 18, 2010
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CLI, SN, TN, TJ, GR, RWD
BARBARA
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Paperware for All Occasions
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Restaurant Supplies
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Chafing
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(BEHIND BABIES R US & ASHLEY FURNITURE) WWW.HACKENSACKSUPPLY.COM
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BARBARA
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Chafing
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$4.69
545 Rt. 17 S. Paramus 201-652-2500
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New Years Hats
& Noisemakers
On Sale
because it portrays how two religions
are transformed by the knowledge of the
other.
The CD, Twas the Night Before
Hanukkah ($15.99) is a lively and in-
spiring music collection gathered by the
Idelsohn Society, a nonprofit volunteer
organization that aims to celebrate a
Jewish musical heritage that may be lost
to history.
The two-CD set includes 17 tracks for
Chanukah and Christmas some fa-
miliar and others that are lesser known.
Performers on the Chanukah disc in-
clude Woody Guthrie, Cantor Yossele
Rosenblatt, Flory Jagoda, Mickey Katz,
the Klezmatics, and Debbie Friedman.
Among the voices that croon and swing
on the Christmas disc are the Ramones,
Theo Bikel, Dinah Shore, Sammy Davis
Jr., and Benny Goodman.
A 31-page booklet of liner notes is a
fascinating read of short essays, notes on
the songs, and colorful reproductions of
old Chanukah recordings.
The project started as an effort to
present a historical survey of Chanukah
music, according to David Katznelson,
a veteran record producer who is one
of the four principals of the Idelsohn
Society. Other members of the core
group include Roger Bennett, Courtney
Holt, and Josh Kun.
As their search deepened, they
found noteworthy Chanukah recordings,
Katznelson recalls, some by well-known
performers, others by little-known
singers and educators. But the group
was most struck by the abundance of
Christmas music by Jewish composers
and performers.
The biggest Jewish names in music
have at least one Christmas recording
in their catalog, they write in the liner
notes.
The group shifted the lens of their
project to tell the full story of how
American Jews used music to negotiate
their place in American national cul-
ture, according to the liner notes.
This was an amazing way to look
at Jewish identity in the 20th century,
through a combination of the history
of Chanukah recordings side by side
with Jews performing Christmas songs,
Katznelson affirms.
Some of the earliest Chanukah re-
cordings appear in the 1920s and 1930s.
By then, what had been a minor Jewish
holiday through the later years of the
19th century had been transformed into
a major celebration that was promoted
by Jewish religious leaders and em-
braced by American Jewry.
The emergence of Chanukah re-
cordings parallels that transformation,
Katznelson suggests. In the postwar
1950s, in addition to traditional songs,
livelier recordings targeted children.
On the Chanukah recording,
Katznelson points to Yevonim (The
Greeks) by Rosenblatt as the showstop-
per. Rosenblatt, a Ukraine native who
immigrated to New York in 1912 at the
age of 30, became known in the United
States as the greatest cantor of his time.
A Yiddish song about the Chanukah
oil that burned for eight days, Yevonim
opens with a chorus of women followed
by Rosenblatts huge, haunting rich tenor
full of color and warmth.
Many will be surprised by Guthries
upbeat version of Hanukkah Dance,
part of his 1940s collection of Jewish
songs made for Moses Asch, founder of
Folkways Records.
He can take anything and make it
American, Katznelson says of the late
folk legend, whose centennial birthday
this year is being marked by performanc-
es of his music across the country.
Sure to be a party favorite is the ver-
sion of Dreidel performed live by
Jeremiah Lockwood, Ethan Miller, and
Luther Dickinson. The song was re-
corded live at a pop-up Chanukah record
store concert hosted last year in San
Francisco by the Idelsohn Society.
At the end of the song, the trio takes
off into the New Orleans classic Iko Iko,
sung to the tune of Dreidel. The tune
no doubt will get listeners off the couch,
singing and dancing.
On the Christmas CD, Katznelson
is most drawn to Bikels little-known
1967 recording of Sweetest Dreams Be
Thine. Bikel, the beloved Jewish folk
singer and actor, performs the Christmas
song moving between Hebrew and
English.
Its the quintessential track of the
whole compilation, Katznelson says.
Its just Chanukah and Christmas, side
by side, a perfect mishmash.
Katznelson says the society hopes the
music conveys a deeper sense of Jewish
history while raising questions that pro-
voke conversation about the meaning of
the holiday music.
Some may hear familiar songs in a
new perspective, he says.
This is music that is usually in the
background, Katznelson says. Were
bringing it to the foreground.
JTA Wire Service
Chanukah frOM page 27
This was an amazing way
to look at Jewish identity in
the 20th century, through a
combination of the history of
Chanukah recordings side by
side with Jews performing
Christmas songs.
David Katznelson
JS-29
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 29
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JEWISH STANDARD 11/30/12
SWEET HOLIDAY SAVINGS
Frozen foods for the festival
Golden
Vegetable Pancakes
10.6 oz.,
select varieties
Goodmans
Box Soups
4 oz.,
select varieties
Golden
Blintzes
13 oz.,
select varieties
Essential Everyday
Apple Sauce
23-24 oz.,
select varieties
Manischewitz
Potato Pancakes
6 oz.,
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Tabatchnick
Soup
14.5-15 oz.,
select varieties
3
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19
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Square Candy
Filled Dreidel
2 oz.
99

Streits
Potato Pancake Mix
4.5-6 oz.,
select varieties
2
for
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Prices effective November 30 thru December 16, 2012
HAPPY
CHANUKAH
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New childrens books: High seas
adventures, food, and fun
Penny Schwartz
BOSTON An imaginative historical tale of adventure
set on the high seas will captivate young readers this
Chanukah season.
Emanuel and the Hanukkah Rescue is one of a few
new childrens books for the eight day Festival of Lights,
which begins this year on the evening of Dec. 8.
Meanwhile, two fun-filled books aim to get food-
loving kids of all ages into the kitchen with tantalizing
menus while offering other fun holiday activities.
Emanuel and the Hanukkah Rescue
Heidi Smith Hyde, illustrated by Jamet Akib
Kar-Ben ($17.95 hardcover; $7.95 paperback; $13.95
ebook); ages 5-9.
From the opening pag-
es of Emanuel and the
Hanukkah Rescue, young
readers will know theyre
in for something out of
the ordinary. Set in the
18th century whaling port
of New Bedford, Mass.,
the fictionalized historical
tale by Heidi Smith Hyde
tells the story of a spir-
ited 9-year-old Jewish boy
named Emanuel Aguilar
whose father is a merchant
who sells sailing supplies
and other provisions to the
citys whalers.
Papa, when will I be old enough to go to sea?
Emanuel asks his father, who cautions his son against the
dangers of whaling.
Emanuel yearns to place the family menorah in the
window during Chanukah but his father is fearful, recall-
ing the tragedy of the Inquisition in his home country of
Portugal, where Jews were not free to practice their faith.
This isnt Portugal, Papa. This is America! Emanuel
protests, reminding his father that Chanukah celebrates
religious freedom.
On the last day of Chanukah, Emanuel stows away
aboard a whaling ship, leaving a note for his papa ex-
plaining his hope to be free. But a sudden and vicious
storm transforms the fun adventure, as Emanuel learns
firsthand the dangers of the sea. By storys end, the re-
united father and son find hope and courage in the light
of Chanukah and its power to inspire freedom.
Artist Jamel Akibs richly colored pastel paintings
cast a luminous glow across the landscape. His highly
detailed, realistic illustrations put readers into the story,
from the interiors of the merchant shop and the family
home to the dramatic scenes at sea. One double page
spread depicts the busy working waterfront where angu-
lar, strong whalers unload crates and barrels from ships.
Hyde was inspired to create the story after reading an
article about Jewish involvement in New Bedfords whal-
ing industry. Jews were an integral part of the industry in
New England coastal areas, she learned, serving as mer-
chants, candle exporters and even ship owners. Some
Jews in the region practiced their faith in secret.
Hyde says she was struck by the parallels with
Chanukah, with its themes of the miracle of the oil and
religious freedom. In Emanuel, she wanted to explore
what it means to hide ones identity.
Mostly, I want kids to realize that its important to be
themselves, not to be afraid of who they are, she said.
Hanukkah Sweets and Treats
By Ronne Randall
windmill Books
This colorful book offers step-by-step instructions for
six holiday recipes including luscious latkes, easy apple-
sauce, fudgy gelt, and a cupcake menorah. The large print
format with lots of photographs and graphics opens with
a two-page spread, Before You Begin Cooking, with lists
of what you will need as well as safety precautions and
even a section on how to use measuring spoons.
Boxed sidebars offer little-known facts on the history
of apples, a note on the nutrition of potatoes (must be
before theyre fried in oil) and this astonishing statistic:
The largest bakery in Israel produces up to 250,000 suf-
ganiyot Israeli-style filled doughnuts on each of the
eight days of Chanukah. A simple glossary defines words
including dough, Maccabees, vitamin, and Yiddish.
Maccabee Meals:
Food and Fun for Hanukkah
Judye Groner and Madeline Wikler, illustrated by
Ursula Roma
Kar-Ben ($8.95 paperback; $6.95 ebook); ages 7-12.
Authors Judye Groner and
Madeline Wikler know a
thing or two about kids and
fun for the Jewish holidays.
The pair have co-written
more than two dozen
books, including their first,
My Very Own Haggadah,
which has sold more than 2
million copies.
Maccabee Meals fea-
tures large, easy-to-read
print, lots of lively illus-
trations and a selection
of enticing, unique recipes such as waffle latkes with
yogurt, or a tea sandwich in the design of a menorah.
Interspersed with the recipes and drawings are short sto-
ries and other Chanukah facts. One box tells readers that
Chanukah and Christmas coincide once every 38 years.
Who knew? All recipes are marked with a dreidel
symbol indicating whether they are dairy, meat or parve
and with a dreidel score ranging from no-cooking ease
to the harder use of hot stove with an adult. Instructions
for crafts, playing dreidel, and candle blessings complete
the book. Parents will most appreciate the page on party
etiquette and this one-liner: Remember, good cooks al-
ways leave the kitchen neat and clean.
JTA Wire Service
In Emanuel and the
Hanukkah Rescue,
author Heidi Smith Hyde
explores what it means
to hide ones identity
through the tale of a
spirited 9-year-old boy
in a Massachusetts port
town. Courtesy Kar-Ben
PuBlishing
www.jstandard.com
CHANUKAH
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 31
JS-31*
Celebrate a Joyous
Hanukkah with
Jewish Homes FREE,
HOT, KOSHER Meals!
Members of
We will deliver free hot kosher meals
to the door of seniors in Bergen County
on Wednesday, December 12th.
To Register:
Whether you or someone you know is 65
or older, call 201-784-1414 Ext. 5532 by
December 3rd to register.
Volunteers Needed!
YOU can help the Jewish Home perform
this mitzvah by volunteering to help
deliver meals! Call 201-750- 4237
to volunteer.
RCBC
Glatt
Kosher
Caterers
8th Annual
Latke Eating Contest
SundAy, dEC. 16 10:00 A.M.
At Cedar Lane Plaza
CAtegories: Ages 18 & up 13 to 17 12 and under
Cash & Prizes!
CHANUKAH
Baked latkes for
Chanukah, with roasted
capon as a main dish
Helen nasH
W
hen I married 55 years ago,
I knew nothing about cook-
ing. I grew up during war
years in Europe, when food was not
available.
So my exposure to food, and particu-
larly to traditional food, was nonexistent.
After I married, I decided to take cooking
classes, first studying with chef Michael
Field, author of the 1965 book Michael
Fields Cooking School. He realized that
I had limitations because I never ate any
of his meat dishes; I kept kosher. But he
wanted to help and gave me substitutes
and kept saying, You can do this.
From there I moved onto Chinese
cooking and classes with Millie Chan,
author of Kosher Chinese Cookbook.
I also read many books and took notes.
And as ingredients became available
in kosher versions, I experimented.
Equipped with all of this information, I
tested and retested recipes to make them
kosher and my own.
Now I am the author of three cook-
books, the most recent of which was just
published this fall, Helen Nashs New
Kosher Cuisine.
For holidays, I must confess that I like
traditional recipes, so it is a little unusual
that I would attempt to change anything
in a potato latke recipe. But since I also
believe in nutritious, healthy eating hab-
its, I had to find a way to improve on the
tradition of frying latkes.
My challenge: to preserve the flavor of
the fried potato pancake and at the same
time to make it healthier, less messy
frying is always messy and more
versatile. In other words, a latke doesnt
have to be just for Chanukah. It can also
be a lovely side dish for fish, chicken,
or meat. It can even be a wonderful ap-
petizer served with gravlax or as a small
Roast capon with olives makes a great Chanukah dish. Ann StrAtton
see Latkes page 32
My challenge: to preserve
the flavor of the fried potato
pancake and at the same
time to make it healthier,
less messy frying is
always messy and more
versatile.
Helen Nash
JS-32
32 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
hors doeuvre topped with smoked salmon.
After many trials, I discovered that latkes can be
baked with very little oil while still preserving their
crispy texture and flavor. In addition, my recipe can be
made in batches and frozen in plastic containers with
wax paper between the layers. The fact that they can be
made ahead of time is particularly helpful for Chanukah
party hosts, who have so many other responsibilities.
My recipe requires the same technique of grating
the potatoes and the same seasoning, but a fraction of
the oil that normally is used when youre frying potato
latkes. The important element is that the cookie sheets
should be of nonstick heavy gauge and the oven tem-
perature quite high.
Ive also included a recipe for roast capons with ol-
ives, which makes a great Chanukah dish if youre serv-
ing a full meal. Capons have a subtly sweet taste that is
quite different from chicken and turkey. The olives add
an interesting flavor and give the sauce a delicious taste
and texture. My family and friends especially the ol-
ive lovers always ask for second helpings.
POtatO Latkes
Makes 6 dozen bite-size latkes
Ingredients:
4 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 medium onion, quartered
4 medium Idaho baking potatoes
1/4 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1 large egg plus 1 large egg white, lightly whisked
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Preparation:
Place an oven shelf in the lowest position and preheat
the oven to 450 degrees. Brush three heavy nonstick
cookie sheets with 1 tablespoon oil each. (the thick-
ness of the sheets allows the bottoms of the latkes to
become golden.)
Pulse the onion in a food processor until finely
chopped. transfer to a large bowl. remove the metal
blade from the processor and put on the medium
shredding attachment. Peel the potatoes and cut
them lengthwise into quarters. insert them into the
food processors feed tube and grate. Combine the
potatoes with the onion. add the flour, egg, egg
white, and the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and mix well.
season to taste with the salt and pepper.
Place 1 level tablespoon of the potato mixture slightly
apart on the greased cookie sheets. Bake the latkes
one sheet at a time on the lowest shelf for 11 minutes,
or until the bottoms are golden brown. turn the latkes
over and bake for another 6 minutes, or until they are
lightly golden.
notes: Latkes can be baked earlier in the day and
reheated. arrange on a wire rack set over a cookie
sheet in a preheated 350-degree oven until hot, about
6 minutes. the wire rack prevents them from getting
soggy.
to freeze: Place latkes side by side in an airtight plas-
tic container lined with wax paper, separating the
layers with wax paper. to reheat, take them straight
from the freezer and arrange on a wire rack set over a
cookie sheet. Place in a preheated 400-degree oven
until hot, 8 to 10 minutes.
ROast CaPON WItH OLIVes
Makes 10 to 12 servings
Ingredients:
1 capon, about 9 pounds
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
2 onions
1 cup tightly packed flat-leaf parsley, coarsely
chopped
3/4 cup pitted Kalamata olives, quartered
3 tablespoons unsalted margarine, melted
1 cup dry white wine
Preparation:
Preheat the oven to 350. discard any excess fat from
the capon. rinse it inside and out and pat dry with
paper towels. season the inside and out with lemon
juice, salt and pepper.
thinly slice one of the onions and set aside. Quarter
the other onion and place it in the cavity along with
the parsley and 1 tablespoon of the olives. Brush the
capon with the margarine and place it on its side in a
roasting pan. scatter the sliced onions and the remain-
ing olives around the pan.
roast the capon for 35 minutes, basting with one-
third of the wine. turn the capon on its other side
and roast for another 35 minutes, again basting with
a third of the wine. turn the capon breast side up for
15 minutes, basting with the remaining wine. turn the
breast side down for another 15 minutes. the capon is
ready when the
drumstick juices run clear. (the total cooking time is
about 1 hour and 40 minutes, or about 11 minutes per
pound.)
remove the capon from the oven and cover it tightly
with heavy foil. Let it stand for 20 minutes to let the
juices flow back into the tissues. Place it on a cutting
board.
Pour the liquid from the baking pan, along with the
olives and onions, into a small saucepan. Place the
saucepan in the freezer for about 10 minutes, so that
the grease can quickly rise to the top. (this makes it
easier to remove.)
to serve: skim off the fat and reheat the sauce.
discard the onion and parsley from the cavity. Cut the
breast into thin slices and serve with the sauce.
JTA Wire Service
Latkes frOM Page 31
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Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
Life your Center for
The Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
is a barrier free and handicapped
accessible facility.
November 30th, 2012 Kislev 5773 | Welcome |
READERS
CHOICE
2012

1
s
t
P
l
a
c
e
-
3
Years
in
a
R
o
w
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades | 411 E. Clinton Avenue | Tenafly, New Jersey 07670 | 201.569.7900 | www.jccotp.org Find us on
facebook.com/KaplenJCCOTP
Presented by The National Yiddish Theatre - Folksbiene
Enjoy Music, Humor & Great Family Fun!
Performed in Yiddish, Ladino, Hebrew & English.
All the non-English lyrics are translated with Supertitle projections.
Fee Per Person $10 JCC members/$12 non-members Children age 2 and younger are free
Fee Per Family (parents & their children) $25 JCC members/$35 non-members Children age 2 and younger are free
For more info: call Robyn at 201.408.1429
Celebrate the 4th night of Chanukah with us!
Tuesday, December 11, 5 pm
C
h
a
n
u
k
a
h
C
o
m
mun
it
y
C
e
l
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b
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a
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n
pizza, donuts, arts & crafts, fun & more
For fees, tickets & to register,
contact Tina at 201.408.1438 or tschweid@jccotp.org
My Yiddishe Chanukah
and after the show, join us in the Rubin Wing for a
JS 113012_JS 113012 11/26/12 3:45 PM Page 1
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades | 411 E. Clinton Avenue | Tenafly, New Jersey 07670 | 201.569.7900 | www.jccotp.org Find us on
facebook.com/KaplenJCCOTP

For info call Stephanie at 201.408.1411
or email scangro@jccopt.org
For info call Judi Nahary at 201.408.1470
or email jnahary@jccopt.org
$8 JCC members, $10 non-members
James H. Grossmann Memorial Jewish Book Month
With
editors Barbara Vinick
& Shulamit Reinharz
With
author Larry Smith
Today I am
A Woman:
Stories of Bat Mitzvahs
Around the World
Six-Word Memoirs
on Jewish life:
Oy! Only Six? Why Not More?
Sunday, December 2,
4-6 pm, Free
Tuesday, December 4
7:30 pm
Co-sponsored with the Teen Department
Book sale & signing after presentation
The online storytelling community SMITH Magazines
enormously popular Six-Word Memoir project examines a
subject bursting with Jewish life words: Jewish Life. With
contributions from machers like Larry David, Jonatahn Safran
Foer, Henry Winkler, Elizabeth Wurtzel, Gary Shteyngart,
Maira Kalman, Walter Mosley and Mayor Ed Koch, along with
hundreds of first-time writers, Six-Word Memoirs of Jewish Life
offers stories of faith and family, duty and identitiy,
celebration and tsuris that will inform, delight and inspire
in exactly six words at a time.
Recollections of the first bat mitzvah at the only synagogue
in Indonesia, a poignant bat mitzvah memory of World
War II, Italy, and an American bat mitzvah shared with girls
in an Ukrainian orphanage these are a few of the resonant
testimonies about the transition from Jewish girl to Jewish
woman collected in Today I Am a Woman.
Group rates available! Tickets sold at JCC front desk
No refunds/exchanges. Limited space! Call 201.408.1493
Harry the Dirty Dog
Artspower
The Musical
Sunday,
December 2, 2 pm
A musical based on the very funny childrens classic
about a mischievous pet with a mind of his own. He is
a cute white dog with black spots but he hates taking
baths. One day when he runs off to play in the dirt, he
comes back as a funny black dog with white spots.
His family doesnt recognize him until...
$10 advance sale
$15 day of performance
Professional ChildrensTheater Series
Free and Open to the Community
Waltuch Art Gallery - 2nd floor
Come join in the pride of viewing these wonderful
works of art from the JCC Guttenberg Center for
Special Services participants and individuals with
special needs from the community.
Call Teresa, 201.408.1490, for information.
On displayDecember 2-26
Opening Reception
Sunday, december 2, 1-3 pm
Waltuch Art Gallery
Special Talents
Art Show
JS 113012_JS 113012 11/26/12 3:45 PM Page 2
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades | 411 E. Clinton Avenue | Tenafly, New Jersey 07670 | 201.569.7900 | www.jccotp.org Find us on
facebook.com/KaplenJCCOTP
Get NKDC, Get Smiles!
Enroll today for 2013
Get $500 off!
Offer good through January 14
th
, 2013
Offer will be prorated for enrollment of less than 8 weeks.
Cannot be combined with any other discount.
Plus Take Advantage
of Sibling Discounts:
$350 off 2
nd
child
$500 off 3
rd
& 4
th
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5
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201.567.8963 nkdc@jccotp.org www.jccotp.org/nkdc
N
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Ages 3-11, June 24 August 16, 2013
For more information call 201.408.1465
Sunday, December 9, 2 pm
Eric Brown Theater
Theater show for children ages 4-8
Sunday, 12/9, 11:30 am
Fee per person: $14 JCC members, $17 non-members
Call for group rates.
(in Hebrew)
$15 JCC members, $18 non-members
SHIRAH Community Chorus
on the Palisades
Matthew Lazar, Founding Director & Conductor
One of the largest and most respected Jewish choral
groups in the country. The Record
Featuring traditional Chanukah favorites and much more.
Celebrate Chanukah with Orna Porat Theater, straight from
Israel. A hungry beggar arrives at a small village, hoping to
get some food. To his surprise, the village people stay in
their homes and ignore him. He decides to open their hearts
by making them soup made of buttons!
2012 Chanukah Concert
Marak Hakaftorim
Made possible in part by founders Bernie & Ruth
(zl)
Weinflash and their
SHIRAH Endowment Fund in Tribute to Matthew Lazar, the Ethel & Irving Plutzer
Endowment Fund for the SHIRAH Choir, and the Rhoda Toonkel
Endowment for the SHIRAH Choir
For more information call Aya, 201.408.1427
or email ashechter@jccotp.org
JS 113012_JS 113012 11/26/12 3:45 PM Page 3
...a
nother grea
t rea
son to join the JC
C
tod
a
y!
201.408.1448 join@jccotp.org www.jccotp.org
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades | 411 E. Clinton Avenue | Tenafly, New Jersey 07670
Find us on
facebook.com/KaplenJCCOTP
Jo
in
in
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*Restrictions apply
To take advantage of this offer please visit
the membership office to tour our facility.
Offer applies to a full year membership
No building fund or bond required. Individual,
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The latest strength training, resistance,
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Free! 70+ group exercise classes
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Outdoor water park & pools
CPR-trained swim instructors & lessons for all ages
Infant & Toddler and Nursery School
Neil Klatskin Day Camp ACA accredited
Learning, Lifestyle & Leisure programs
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JS 113012_JS 113012 11/26/12 3:45 PM Page 4
JS-37*
Maccabee's
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Maccabee's
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RSVP: events@ssdsbergen.org
Interested in learning about
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Call 201-262-9898 x213

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Monday,
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SSDS Third PG ADS-2012.indd 14 11/28/12 12:02 PM
Oh, its frying time
again but it
doesnt have to be
Chavie Lieber
G
one are the days when the Chanukah holiday
meant an eight-day binge fest of all things fried.
The Festival of Lights, which commemo-
rates the Maccabean revolt against the Greeks, has a
longstanding tradition of oily foods such as latkes and
doughnuts in remembrance of the miracle of the Temple
oil, which lasted eight days instead of the expected one.
But for some, the holiday has become an excuse to inhale
fried potato pancakes and custard-filled pastry.
People have a misconception of the tradition to fry on
Chanukah, Yosef Silver, author of the popular blog This
American Bite, said. The concept is to remember the oil,
but that doesnt necessarily mean frying. Weve gotten
so wrapped up with frying, but there are ways to make
Chanukah food, like latkes, just using oil.
These days, with everyone from the first lady on down
drawing attention to our widening waistlines, Jewish
foodies have plenty of options for consuming traditional
holiday fare without packing on the pounds.
Silver was raised on the old way frying everything.
But now he prefers to bake latkes rather than fry them.
If you prefer to use the traditional potato latke reci-
pe, the best way to make it healthy would be to pan-fry it
with an oil substitute like Pam, Silver said. If you want
to incorporate oil, add only a tablespoon and lightly
pan-fry it.
For those who prefer a fried taste, Silver suggests
swapping potatoes for healthier vegetables that provide
vitamins and nutrition instead of starch.
CHANUKAH
See Frying page 38
Swapping potatoes for other vegetables, like carrots,
zucchini and sweet potatoes, is one way to cut calo-
ries on the eight-day frying festival of Chanukah. Sam
Felder/Creative CommonS
JewiSh Standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 37
JS-38
38 JewiSh Standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
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My favorite latke variety to make is my variation
using rutabaga and turnip, Silver said. Rutabaga is a
starchy vegetable, but its not actually a carb. It gives a
similar consistency to potatoes and is delicious.
Shaya Klechevsky, a personal chef from Brooklyn
who writes the kosher cuisine blog At Your Palate, says
there are ways to make healthier doughnuts, or sufgani-
yot also a traditional Chanukah food though it gener-
ally is more popular in Israel than the United States. But
Klechevsky warns about playing too much with recipes.
When making the batter, you can use a little bit of
whole wheat if you want to veer away from white flour,
but you need to be careful because too much whole
wheat will turn your doughnuts into bricks, Klechevsky
said. You can also substitute sugar with honey.
Rather than altering the recipe for the dough,
Klechevsky says the best way to make healthy donuts
is to use healthy fillings, like sugar-free jams, nuts, fruit
and granola.
The best option is to bake doughnuts rather than fry
them, Klechevsky said. The taste wont be the same,
but it will be close. You can buy little round molds and
fill them with batter.
Erica Lokshin, a wellness dietitian at Sloan Kettering
Cancer Center in New York, points out that baked
doughnuts have half the calories and one-third the fat
of the fried variety.
Chanukah foods loaded in oil are high in choles-
terol, which can be really bad for your heart, and eating
them for eight says straight increases risks, Lokshin
said.
Lokshin says that when serving toppings to go with
latkes, reduced-fat sour cream and unsweetened apple-
sauce are the best options. And since no one wants to
feel deprived around the holidays, she suggests picking
one night to indulge.
Its better to designate which night of the holiday
you will enjoy latkes and doughnuts, and stick to your
regular eating routine on the other nights, Lokshin
said. Otherwise, youre picking at a doughnuts here
and a latke there, and over an eight-day period you will
probably consume more than you hoped you had and it
will throw off your eating routine in the long run.
Here are a couple of healthier latkes recipes.
rOASTED gingErED
CArrOT LATKES
(Shaya Klechevsky)
Ingredients:
6 cups coarsely grated peeled carrots
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons whole wheat flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
7 teaspoons finely grated peeled fresh ginger
3 large eggs, beaten to blend
Blended olive oil (for frying)
Preparation:
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with
foil and spray with olive oil, or take a pastry brush
dipped in olive oil and lightly coat the foil. Place grat-
ed carrots in a large bowl; press with paper towels to
absorb any moisture. in another bowl, combine flours,
salt, baking powder and pepper, and blend together.
add carrots, ginger and eggs to the flour mixture and
combine. Mixture shouldnt be too wet or too dry.
when forming patties, the mixture should stick to
itself and not come apart. if its too wet, add a little bit
more flour; if its too dry, add more beaten egg. allow
to stand for 10-12 minutes for ingredients to absorb
into each other. Place patties, about 3 1/2-inch rounds,
onto the greased baking sheet. Leave a little room
around each one. Place tray into middle rack of oven
and roast for 10-12 minutes per side, or until golden
brown. Makes about 15 latkes.
rUTABAgA AnD TUrniP LATKES
(Yosef Silver)
Ingredients:
2 rutabaga, shredded
2 turnips, shredded
1 large onion, shredded
1 egg, plus one egg white
1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper
Preparation:
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Mix all the ingredi-
ents, then shape the latkes so they are approximately
the size of your palm and about 1/4-inch thick. Grease
a cookie sheet with olive oil if you want to keep with
tradition, or substitute coconut oil for a lighter alterna-
tive. Place the latkes on the cookie sheet with space
between them. Once the oven has heated, bake the
latkes until golden brown.
JTA Wire Service
Frying frOM PaGe 37
JS-39
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 39
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FIRE
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NORWOOD PUBLIC SCHOOLS
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WILL
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Hands On Demonstration
ARMY FOOTBALL
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MON., NOV. 26TH 12 NOON
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THURS., NOV. 29TH 7PM
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FIRE
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NORWOOD PUBLIC SCHOOLS
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Hands On Demonstration
ARMY FOOTBALL
EVENT
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271 Livingston St., Northvale (Next to Applebees) 201-784-2665
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STAR OF
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FIRE
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NORWOOD PUBLIC SCHOOLS
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FIREMEN
WILL
READ
STORIES
Hands On Demonstration
ARMY FOOTBALL
EVENT
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of Sports Illustrated
MON., NOV. 26TH 12 NOON
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ANDY ROSE
THURS., NOV. 29TH 7PM
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271 Livingston St., Northvale (Next to Applebees) 201-784-2665
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FIRE
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NORWOOD PUBLIC SCHOOLS
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Fire Department
FIREMEN
WILL
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STORIES
Hands On Demonstration
ARMY FOOTBALL
EVENT
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FIRE
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NORWOOD PUBLIC SCHOOLS
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WILL
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Hands On Demonstration
ARMY FOOTBALL
EVENT
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MON., NOV. 26TH 12 NOON
BUDDY VALASTRO
ANDY ROSE
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Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 41
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French lawyer claims bias, asks
removal of Jewish judge
A Lyon lawyer petitioned the French citys civil court to
disqualify a judge because he is Jewish.
Alexis Dubruel asked the court last month to remove
Albert Levy from the bench in a case involving her client
and a man named Moises, the French version of Moses
or Moshe. The French daily Liberation published her
letter on its news site.
Dubruel based her petition, which has not yet been
answered, on Article 668 of the French penal code stat-
ing that a judge will be disqualified if circumstances
strong enough exist to suspect the judges impartiality.
The circumstances are paternal and familial,
Dubruel said.
The judge and my client have a patrimonial con-
nection evident in their names. The judge in question
is named Levy: The papa of the person name Moises,
the lawyer wrote, referring to the fact that the biblical
Moses was from the tribe of Levy.
Dubruel enclosed printouts of the Wikipedia pages
on the Levites and Moses to support her argument, ac-
cording to Liberation.
The client Dubruel represents is a grandmother
seeking visiting privileges with her grandchildren, her
daughters children, who live with their father, Moises.
The head of the Lyon office of the French bar asso-
ciation, Philippe Meysonnier, said he was outraged by
the petition. Liberation reported that unspecified mem-
bers of the bar are considering asking the bar to initiate
disciplinary action against Dubruel.
U.N. chief at Vienna meeting
offers hopes for lasting cease-fire
At a meeting promoting interfaith dialogue, United
Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said he hoped
the cease-fire between Israel and Gaza would hold.
Jewish interfaith leaders joined Muslim and
Christian leaders for Tuesdays meeting in Vienna,
which came in conjunction with the opening of the
King Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz International Centre for
Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue, a project
sponsored by the Saudi royal family.
Along with his hopes on the Egypt-moderated cease-
fire ending more than a week of escalated conflict, Ban
also said that understanding and dialogue between
peoples of all faiths was essential to resolving ethnic
strife across the globe.
Rabbi Marc Schneier, president of the Foundation
for Ethnic Understanding and vice president of the
World Jewish Congress, was among the Jewish leaders
who attending the meeting.
While we all looked on with deep concern at the
recent events, we know that the strong bonds that exist
between our religions will not be defined by violence,
he said. Our goal is to ensure that the vast majority of
the Muslim world, which practices peaceful interaction
with peoples of all faiths, will continue to be our part-
ners in promoting greater tolerance and dialogue across
the international community.
Along with Schneier, Jewish leaders attending the
meeting included his father, Rabbi Arthur Schneier,
president of the Appeal of Conscience Foundation;
Rabbi David Rosen, director of interreligious affairs
at the American Jewish Committee; the chief rabbi
of Moscow, Pinchas Goldschmidt, who also serves as
president of the Conference of European Rabbis; and
Lawrence Schiffman, chairman of the International
Jewish Committee on Interfaith Consultations.
JTA Wire Service
Bri efs
World
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A Likud lament
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN
T
urns out I was correct in my final Aliyah Diary
column (Fifth aliyaversary becomes the new
normal, Oct. 12) when I predicted that I would
have more to report about our lives in Israel.
Hence my first installment of Letters from Israel,
which picks up where our five-year settling-in process
from Teaneck to Maaleh Adumim ended.
It was not the arrival of our third Jerusalemite grand-
child in October, nor Novembers
Operation Pillar of Defense, that
moved me to put fingers to keys
although both of these events
certainly are worthy of commentary. The muse struck
instead as I waited to vote for my favored Likud Party
candidates.
You may have heard that the Nov. 25 primary election
turned into a two-day affair thanks to massive computer
glitches caused by (a) hackers; (b) the party failing to
pony up enough shekels for proper bandwidth; (c) poor
planning on the part of the responsible service provider;
or (d) Gods enduring sense of humor. I will leave it to the
lawyers to figure out where to place the blame.
An unwieldy 97 candidates were competing for about
25 Likud seats in the 19th Knesset, and 125,351 party
members were eligible to vote for the 12 hopefuls of their
choosing.
Before every election, Likud candidates flood mem-
bers with SMS texts and automated phone calls. Our cell-
phones pinged all day long for weeks. When we picked
up the ringing land line during dinner, the voice on the
other end was often a party hack rather than our grand-
children wanting to say night-night. My list of 12 bore
no relation to those annoying communiqus.
Steve dubbed the evening of Nov. 25 Dinner and
Democracy Night. Lists in hand, we took an invigorat-
ing two-mile walk to the polling station a local event
venue and a restaurant in the mall next door.
The last time wed voted, I had gone ahead of Steve and
called to instruct him to find the L table (for Leichman).
This well-intended piece of advice has become a family
joke, as there is no L in the Hebrew alphabet. Whoops, I
meant Lamed.
We knew that in Jerusalem that day, hundreds of vot-
ers waited for hours due to malfunctioning voting ma-
chines. Many others gave up and left. When we arrived
at the Maaleh Adumim event hall, we walked through
the gauntlet of campaign workers to a short line where
a woman with a clipboard was taking names. Because
of the computer problems, our turn was about an hour
away. So dinner came before democracy.
With bellies full of the hearty Aroma caf fare, we
returned an hour later and we were called within min-
utes. There were no alphabetically arranged tables this
time. We were assigned to a cluster of two voting stations
consisting of laptops shielded by Likud-blue cardboard
screens. The nice ladies who took our ID cards (they
agreed to take my drivers license as I discovered in a pan-
ic that my all-important ID card was missing) directed
me to Station 1 and Steve to Station 2.
So far so good. When Station 1 finally booted up, I
followed the simple instructions and chose my 12 can-
didates. On the next screen, headshots of each of my
choices appeared, and I could finalize my vote or go back
and make changes. It was all pretty high tech, a far cry
from the pieces of paper we deposited in envelopes dur-
ing the last election.
Alas, slips of paper would have proved much more ef-
ficient. Station 2s laptop never registered Steves choices,
and no amount of prodding by the house techie could get
it moving. Steve joked in Hebrew to the frazzled, apolo-
getic poll-watcher ladies that the venues bar should have
been open for both voters and volunteers. A little booze
might have put a humorous spin on the scenario that
was playing out at voting stations all across the room.
Eventually, a pantsuited and ponytailed young female
Likud official informed Steve that hed have to come back
the next day. Even without a glass of wine, we had a good
laugh and walked back through the gantlet out into the
cool night air for our walk home.
Possibly the worst part of this fiasco was that it pro-
longed by 24 hours the punishing procession of text mes-
sages and phone calls. Two times I picked up the phone
to hear Bibi Netanyahus recorded baritone apologizing
for the glitch and reminding me of the extended voting
hours. Many of the 97 candidates bombarded my Nokia
in renewed pleas for my vote.
But I do have some good news about Israeli bureau-
cratic efficiency. The next morning I was at the local
Interior Department branch to apply for a replacement
ID. There was nobody on line. I filled out a form, paid
115 shekels, got my picture taken, and signed the receipt.
Within 10 minutes my new teudat zehut was in my bag.
Will somebody at Likud headquarters kindly call these
folks for some pointers?
LETTERS
FROM ISRAEL
The screen reads Start. MOTTI KIMCHI/YNET
JS-43*
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 43
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www.heritagepointeofteaneck.com
Heritage Pointe of Teaneck
600 Frank W. Burr Boulevard, Teaneck, New Jersey
Thats the Pointe.
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Studying in a war zone
americans in israel are shaken but undeterred
Ben SaleS
TEL AVIV When the first two sirens
went off, Shoshana Leshaw ran from her
second-floor bedroom down to the bomb
shelter in the basement. By the time the
third and fourth sirens wailed, she went no
farther than the stairwell.
Its almost like youre sick of the sirens
interrupting your sleep, Leshaw said. You
just want to get it over with and go back to
what youre doing.
Fifteen air-raid sirens in total rang out
in the southern Israeli city of Beersheva on
the night of Nov. 14, the first night of Israels
Operation Pillar of Defense aimed at bring-
ing an end to Palestinian rocket fire from
Gaza. The sirens repeatedly woke Leshaw,
a junior at Queens College in New York,
and most of the 25 other study-abroad stu-
dents at Ben-Gurion University.
They were among the thousands of
young Americans who come to Israel each
year to study or work, but found them-
selves instead scurrying for cover last week
as Hamas rained missiles on Israel.
Students said they never feared for their
physical safety; they had been trained on
how to react in the event of a missile strike.
But many said that living in cities targeted
by missiles gave them a new appreciation
of the realities of life in Israel, and some
found themselves quickly copying the
casual approach to war that Israelis have
cultivated over decades of living under
military threat from their neighbors.
In Tel Aviv with Oranim-Israel Way, an
internship program, Stephen Fox was sur-
prised to find his Israeli co-workers joking
about the missiles. After a while, though,
he found himself thinking of the sirens as
a fire drill. A few days after last weeks bus
bombing in Tel Aviv, Fox, 23, boarded his
bus to work without a second thought.
Halfway through it I was like, Should I
be taking the bus? he said. It didnt even
occur to me. The restaurants and bars were
still going, people were out shopping. It
was like normal.
Oranim, which has a division in the
southern city of Ashdod, brought all of its
participants to Tel Aviv after fighting broke
out. One participant left the program and
four others returned home for two weeks
with plans to come back. Michal Ben-Ari,
Oranims Tel Aviv coordinator, said one of
the weeks biggest challenges was reassur-
ing parents that their children were safe.
Parents told us, I dont see anything
on the news, so Im imagining the worst,
Ben-Ari said. As soon as we gave them in-
formation on what was going on in Tel Aviv,
they felt a lot better.
Other programs with students in south-
ern Israel also took measures to remove
them from the path of incoming rockets.
The day after Pillar of Defense began, Ben-
Gurions study-abroad program took stu-
dents on a trip to Masada, then relocated
them to Sde Boker, another Ben-Gurion
campus out of rocket range. Program staff
quickly arranged for students to continue
coursework there if necessary for the
rest of the semester.
Youre not just bored, but you feel
like you cant change things, said Abby
Worthen, a University of Pennsylvania
student taking her junior year abroad. We
felt like there was nothing we could do, and
that was hard.
Worthen, like other students, was shak-
en the first time she heard a siren a feel-
ing she said separated the study-abroad
students from their Israeli classmates,
many of whom were reservists called to
serve in the Israeli army.
Im almost jealous of Israelis, Worthen
said. They have this way about them thats
calm and rational, and I dont.
Even programs considered safely out
of range were impacted by the fighting.
Nativ, a Conservative movement post-high
school program in Jerusalem, prohibited
participants from traveling to Israels south
or metropolitan Tel Aviv, both areas tar-
geted by rockets. Oranim asked its partici-
pants to notify staff whenever they left Tel
Aviv. Often stuck at home, the Americans
turned to talking politics too much, ac-
cording to Fox.
The intense focus on the fighting,
though, reminded Worthen of the physical
and emotional distance between Israel and
the United States.
Its so hard listening when there are
real things going on in the world, that
Hostess is going out of business, she said.
JTA Wire Service
An Israeli policeman inspects a house that was hit by a rocket in Beersheva. MiriaM
alster/Flash90/Jta
JS-44*
44 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
New Jersey Yachad
invites those who have a brother or sister with a
disability to
Sibling Connections
(for adults ages 21+)



For more information and to RSVP please contact Chani Herrmann at
herrmann@ou.org or 201-833-1349


Topics include:
Aging Parents, Sibling Responsibilities, Balancing
Family & Sibling Time, Decision Making and
more.
Spouses are welcome and encouraged to attend.
Dinner will be served
Yachad- Because SIBLINGS Belong
Bergenfield, NJ
Saturday, December 22
nd
, 8pm
Barak leaves politics
Questions about his legacy and future remain
Ben SaleS
TEL AVIV Is Ehud Barak a calculating political survivor
or a military man who, in his own words, never had any
special desire for political life?
Will he be remembered as a warrior or as a seeker of
peace?
And what will he do next?
Baraks announcement of his retirement from politics
on Monday raised more questions than answers, both
about what his departure means for Israel and about how
Israelis will look back on his legacy.
I have exhausted the practice of politics, Barak,
Israels defense minister, said at a news conference.
There is space to allow new people to enter senior posi-
tions in Israeli politics. Replacing those in positions of
power is a good thing.
But Baraks political career may have been over
even if he had not decided to retire. His small, centrist
Independence Party faction was polling poorly before
Israels Jan. 22 election, and it is possible that Barak
would not have made it into the next Knesset had he de-
cided to run again.
He understood that he has a political horizon,
Gideon Rahat, a political science professor at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, said. He has no more chance to
keep his job or to advance. Hes already stayed too long,
much after he lost political strength. He doesnt really
have a party.
Barak, who said he will stay on as defense minister
until a new government is formed, will leave behind a
complicated political legacy.
As prime minister from 1999 to 2001, Barak withdrew
Israeli forces from southern Lebanon and offered un-
precedented Israeli concessions, including in Jerusalem,
to Yasser Arafat and the Palestinians at the unsuccessful
Camp David peace summit. In the 2001 elections fol-
lowing the outbreak of the second intifada, Barak was
soundly defeated by Ariel Sharon and then resigned as
head of the Labor Party.
In 2007, Barak mounted a political comeback, recap-
turing the leadership of the weakened Labor Party. He
returned to government as defense minister, a post from
which he has emphasized the threat from Irans nuclear
program and ordered two military operations in Gaza
2008s Cast Lead and the recent Pillar of Defense.
Barak brought credibility to the position of defense
minister, which he earned as a result of his distinguished
military career. He served as the Israeli Defense Forces
chief of staff in the 1990s and became the most decorated
soldier in Israeli history.
Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak announces his
retirement from politics at a news conference at
the Defense Ministry office in Tel Aviv. Roni SchutzeR/
FlaSh90/Jta
JS-45
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 45
Please contact Robin Rochlin
for more information about
Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jerseys
Donor Advised Fund program.
201-820-3970
robinr@jfnnj.org
Lets plan together.
OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY
Jewish Federation
Year-end tax planning strategy:
Establish or add to your
Donor Advised Fund
Please join us as we commemorate the first
Yahrzeit, marking one Year since the Passing
of
Dr. charles h. felDman, z"l
BeloveD husBanD, father anD saBa
monDaY, DecemBer 10, 2012
27 kislev 5773
8:00 Pm
congregation keter torah
600 roemer avenue
teaneck
raBBi DaviD silBer, Dean anD founDer of
Drisha institute, will Deliver
the memorial lecture
Dessert collation to follow
we welcome Your attenDance
rella felDman
estie, michael, Daniel, josePh anD minDY
He was proud of his decades of service in the elite
commando unit Sayyeret Matkal, and would tell stories
about his secret missions targeting terrorists includ-
ing a famous one in which he entered Beirut dressed as
a woman.
In the end, though, politics may have done him in.
A close relationship with right-wing Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu dating back to the days when
Barak was Netanyahus commander in Sayeret Matkal
pulled Barak progressively further from many in his
center-left Labor Party. In 2011, he split off with four
other Labor Knesset members to form the Independence
faction.
The move was widely seen as a self-serving political
ploy.
He doesnt know how to work with people, Rahat
said. He used to be prime minister, and he ended with a
five-person party. He always cared about himself.
Before Barak announced his retirement from politics,
Independence was polling at anywhere between zero to
4 seats in the next Knesset, though Baraks performance
in the Pillar of Defense campaign boosted his popularity.
But his decision not to run for re-election may not
necessarily mean the end of his career in government.
Some political observers speculate that if Netanyahu is
re-elected, he could reappoint Barak as defense minister
even though he wont hold a Knesset seat.
Hebrew University political science professor Shlomo
Avineri told the New York Times that Baraks move maxi-
mizes his chances of being the next defense minister,
adding, If he got 2 percent, it would be difficult to ap-
point him. Now hes not running, its easier. He is consid-
ered by the Israeli public to be a responsible adult.
Others argue, however, that the Likuds shift rightward
in this weeks primary election for the party candidates
list makes such an outcome less likely.
If Netanyahu has a comfortable coalition, hell call
him back, said Bar-Ilan University political studies pro-
fessor Shmuel Sandler. Chances of that dont seem good
because the Likud candidates list is very right wing.
Likud leaders are said to prefer Strategic Affairs
Minister Moshe Yaalon, a Likud member and former
army chief of staff who is to Baraks right.
Barak had been a key player on the issue of Iran. He
was generally seen as a close ally of Netanyahu in advo-
cating an aggressive stance toward the Islamic Republics
nuclear program, but also was considered a potential
restraining force on the prime ministers impulses.
Sandler said the governments policy toward Iran
wont necessarily change with Baraks departure.
Yaalon was against an attack, Sandler said.
Netanyahu is for an attack. It will depend on how much
sanctions work and on the U.S.
Notwithstanding the failure at Camp David, Sandler
said that Barak kept his focus on the issues that were
at the center of his past peace efforts. He remained op-
posed to west bank settlements as defense minister,
refusing to grant official university status to a so-called
university center in the settlement of Ariel and stress-
ing the urgency of negotiations or unilateral Israeli action
to end the conflict.
Barak also placed a high value on maintaining strong
U.S.-Israel relations, even breaking with Netanyahu ear-
lier this year when the prime minister publicly criticized
the Obama administrations handling of the Iranian
nuclear issue. Rahat suggested that Baraks departure
could cause a bit of a setback in relations between the
Netanyahu government and the Obama administration.
Our relations are based on a lot more than people,
but Barak was more accepted in the While House than
Netanyahu or Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman,
Rahat said. Itll make it a little harder, but its not the end
of the world.
JTA Wire Service
Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak announces his
retirement from politics at a news conference at
the Defense Ministry office in Tel Aviv. Roni SchutzeR/
FlaSh90/Jta
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The two faces of Morsi:
Power-hungry peace broker?
Ron Kampeas
WASHINGTON Is Morsi morphing into Mubarak?
Last week Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi earned
U.S. kudos that were quickly followed by expressions of
concern.
The kudos were for brokering the truce that ended
the Israel-Hamas mini-war, the concern was because he
then decreed himself absolute powers.
Its a sequence of events that has some people in
Washington wondering whether Morsi aims for the kind
of tradeoff relationship that helped prop up his predeces-
sor, Hosni Mubarak, for decades until the 2011 revolu-
tion: regional stability in exchange for unfettered rule by
Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamist move-
ment that brought him to power.
It is unclear whether this represents a mistake or
an overreach, said Jon Alterman, the director of the
Middle East program at the Center for Strategic and
International Studies, referring to Morsis declaration
over the weekend removing judicial oversight of his deci-
sions until a constitution is in place.
Alterman leaned toward mistake, noting that Morsi
and his aides have scrambled to reassure opponents
that the decree is temporary. But Alterman added that
such a move inevitably reminded Egyptians of Mubaraks
excesses.
From what he said and how he talked about it, it
seems he was principally motivated by the threat to con-
tinuing the process posed by deep disagreements over
the constitution rather by a desire to have unchecked
power, Alterman said. The problem is that in doing so,
he raised the worst fears of the return of Mubarak-style
governance.
Others were less sanguine. Eric Trager, a fellow at
the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, argued
that the Obama administrations hopes for a Muslim
Brotherhood leadership that would respect democracy
were naive.
Washington ought to have known by now that dem-
ocratic dialogue is virtually impossible with the Muslim
Brotherhood, which is now mobilizing throughout
Egypt to defend Morsis edict, Trager wrote in the New
Republic. The reason is that it is not a democratic party
at all. Rather, it is a cultish organization that was never
likely to moderate once it had grasped power.
On Nov. 21, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton
lavished praise on Morsi for his role in ending the fight-
ing between Israel and Hamas.
I want to thank President Morsi for his personal
leadership to de-escalate the situation in Gaza and end
the violence, Clinton said in Cairo. This is a critical mo-
ment for the region. Egypts new government is assuming
the responsibility and leadership that has long made this
country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace.
Israeli leaders also praised the Egyptian presidents
role in securing the cease-fire. Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu expressed his appreciation, and
Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman said that Morsi de-
serves a word of thanks.
The expressions of gratitude were striking given the
Israeli leaderships strong suspicion of the Morsi govern-
ment in light of the Muslim Brotherhoods traditional an-
imosity toward Israel and affinity for Hamas, an offshoot
of the Egyptian Islamist movement.
Such concerns were heightened after the
Brotherhoods top leader called in October for a jihad
for the recovery of Jerusalem and the surfacing of video
of Morsi nodding along to an imams anti-Jewish sermon.
And in his speech at the opening of the U.N. General
Assembly, Morsi omitted an affirmation of the Arab
Leagues initiative for a comprehensive peace with Israel
that had been present in an advance copy of his remarks
distributed by Egypts U.N. mission a fact later discov-
ered by JTA.
Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, right, meets with
Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh in Cairo on July
26. MohaMMed al-ostaz/Flash 90/Jta
JS-47
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 47
During the Gaza conflict itself, Morsis government
expressed strong public support for Hamas and con-
demned Israel. Egypts prime minister traveled to Gaza in
a show of solidarity during the early days of the fighting.
But Morsis assistance in brokering the cease-fire offered
a measure of reassurance that his government would
take a pragmatic approach toward dealing with Israel.
The day after the cease-fire deal was reached, how-
ever, international gratitude morphed into expressions of
concern about Morsis path at home.
On Nov. 22, Morsi issued his decree removing judicial
review, sparking massive protests in Egypt and causing
Clinton to voice concerns the next day about the moves
implications for Egyptian democracy.
The decisions and declarations announced on
November 22 raise concerns for many Egyptians and for
the international community, she said in a statement.
One of the aspirations of the revolution was to ensure
that power would not be overly concentrated in the
hands of any one person or institution.
Jason Isaacson, the international affairs director for
the American Jewish Committee, said that Morsi posed
a dilemma for Israel and its American allies who want
to maintain the 33 years of peace between Egypt and
Israel and fear imposition of a Muslim Brotherhood
dictatorship.
The attempt to change the power structure appears
to have been in the works for some time, Isaacson said
Monday, speaking from Cairo, where he had just met
with Egyptian government officials, diplomats, and
members of the countrys tiny Jewish community.
It did not disrupt the achievement of the cease-fire,
for which you just give them credit. But obviously, [the
decree] raises concerns about human rights and the
rule of law. Those who have a stake in protecting the
principles of democracy and in human rights, and in pre-
serving the Egyptian role in the Middle East peace treaty
should stay engaged with Egypt and express concerns
when concerns are felt.
U.S. lawmakers already were threatening to redi-
rect assistance from Egypts military to democracy
promotion.
This is not what the United States of America and
taxpayers expect, and our dollars will be directly related
to the progress towards democracy which you promised
to the people of Egypt when your party and you were
elected president, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) told Fox
News Sunday.
Ori Nir, a spokesman for Americans for Peace Now,
the American affiliate of the dovish Israeli move-
ment established in the wake of the Israel-Egypt
peace agreement, said that cutting U.S. aid would be
counterproductive.
Our focus in terms of aid to Egypt has to do with
fulfilling the terms of the peace agreement Egypt signed
with Israel, he said, adding that outside actors would
likely not be able to influence Morsis domestic policies
in any case.
The extent to which he will be another dictator has
to do with the dynamic between him and the Egyptian
public and less so his foreign relations, Nir said. One
has to hope that the Egyptian public, which has shown
incredible fortitude and courage, will reapply that and
will demand democracy and leadership that is account-
able to the public.
That, Alterman of CSIS said, is already playing out,
noting the persistent protests against Morsis decree.
The fact that this became contentious is a good
thing and reflects a broader trend in Egypt that people
are much more willing to protest than was ever the case
before, he said.
JTA Wire Service
JS-48
48 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
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T H E S I S T E R R O S E T H E R I N G F U N D
F O R E D U C A T I O N I N J E WI S H - C H R I S T I A N S T U D I E S
Course listing for Spring 2013
The following courses are recommended for teachers
applying for scholarship assistance.
Take note of changes in days and times listed in our course brochure:
J C S T 6 0 1 7 Jewish-Christian Foundations for Social Service
Wednesday, 4:30 6:40 p.m.
J C S T 7 0 4 1 Jewish Roots of Jewish Spirituality
Tuesday, 6:30 8:40 p.m.
J C S T 7 0 4 7 Philosophical Perspectives on the Holocaust
Thursday, 5 7:10 p.m.
J C S T 7 5 6 0 The Land of Israel in the three Faiths
Monday, 4:30 6:40 p.m.
J C S T 7 5 7 3 Strategies for Healing in Jewish-Christian Relations
Tuesday, 5 7:10 p.m.
Teachers, K-12, in public, private and parochial schools
are eligible for tuition scholarships.
Deadline - December 15, 2012
C O N T A C T administrator at 973-0761-9006
(marilyn.zirl@shu.edu) for further information or www.shu.edu/go/sisterrose.
WASHINGTON A moment of silence.
Thats what Jews worldwide were demanding at last
summers London Olympics in memory of the 11 Israeli
Olympians killed by Palestinian terrorists at the 1972
Munich Olympics.
The Obama White House wasted little time releasing a
statement supporting the gesture.
But Mitt Romney, the Republican challenger, who had
been the director of the Salt Lake City Olympics, said vir-
tually nothing.
For that he was openly criticized by Barbara Berger,
a Maine resident and the sister of the late David Berger,
one of the Munich 11.
At some time in the top-floor office of the
Woodley Park public relations firm of Rabinowitz/Dorf
Communications, a detailed research document not-
ing Bergers criticism of Romney was put together and
distributed.
It would prove to be one of thousands of such docu-
ments, news releases, op-eds and social network sites
that were directed at undecided Jewish voters.
And using the word office in describing the working
space is generous. Standing up in what the group called
the Jewish Media Hub meant not hitting his or her head
on a rafter.
In that small space, a staff of 10 full- and part-timers
generated information. It was done under the radar.
There was a battle, if not a war, going on with the
Republicans for the undecided Jewish vote. On the floors
From left to right, Rabinowitz/Dorf staffers Jason Berger, Elizabeth Leibowitz, and Aaron Keyak at their office
in Washington. Courtesy AAron KeyAK
How a Hub chased down undecided Jewish votes
Phil Jacobs
see HuB page 50
JS-50
50 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
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Sunday, December 9 ~ 9:30 am


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below, Steve Rabinowitz and Matt Dorf
were still working independently with
their clients, and it was business as usual.
On the top floor, though, getting a
message to Jewish voters was the priority.
That message drove whatever favorable
press they could provide concerning the
presidents re-election bid and conversely
what unfavorable information they could
disperse about Romney.
Rabinowitz had to raise half a million
dollars to fund the effort. They were up
against the tens of millions of dollars
going for the same vote provided by the
Sheldon Adelsons of the world. The game
breaker could have been Romneys trip
to Israel last summer, backing up his
rhetoric against Iran. The Obama admin-
istration had provided Iron Dome protec-
tion to Israel as well as other significant
support, yet the street and Shabbos-table
word was that it wasnt enough.
The Hub was a 501(c)(4), a nonprofit
loosely affiliated with the National Jewish
Democratic Council. It could send op-eds
and press memos pointing out positive
aspects of Obama and negative points
on Romney. To remain a nonprofit, it
couldnt urge that a voter choose one can-
didate over another.
Two weeks before Election Day, with
the campaigns sprinting toward Nov. 6,
the Hub went into overdrive, drafting
and/or placing more than 15 op-eds,
including pieces by former New York
Mayor Ed Koch; Democratic National
Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman
Schultz; former U.N. Ambassador Nancy
Soderberg; Stuart Milk, the nephew of the
late civil rights leader Harvey Milk; the
last three presidents of JCPA; an Israeli
and a Palestinian writing on Romney and
Middle East peace; NJDC leader David
Harris; former Rep. Mel Levine; the three
Rabbis for Obama co-chairs; and noted
attorney and author Alan Dershowitz.
That was just in two weeks.
The Hub also wrote, edited, and pub-
licized a Barbra Streisand video for NJDC
that garnered more than 75,000 YouTube
views. The Hub promoted a viral email
from Michigan Sen. Carl Levin that was
sent to more than 150,000 Jews in the
battleground states. It also arranged in-
terviews with Jack Lew, the presidents
chief of staff.
The Hub started in early July when
Aaron Keyak was hired to be its leader,
managing more than 10 staffers. Keyak
told the Washington Jewish Week that the
goal was to talk to Jews where they live.
We were basically a rapid response
media war room, said Keyak, who came
to the Hub after serving on the staff of
former New Jersey Rep. Steve Rothman.
We were responding at times minute by
minute to events of the day. We had all
the data and research at our fingertips. If
there was an issue on Romney and Iran,
we were able to move faster and in a
smarter way than anyone else doing me-
dia outreach.
The Hub had prepared documents
such as op-eds in anticipation of some
subjects that would come up in the me-
dia, such as the debates or Romneys trip
to Israel or daily issues.
We were also proactive, because we
had a specialty area, Keyak said. We
were churning out all of these memos
and we were in constant contact with
reporters.
He said the Hub was fluent when it
came to such issues as the presidents
support for Israel. That fluency also cov-
ered issues such as Iran and the Middle
East, but the Hub knew that Jewish voters
also held social issues near and dear.
We knew that 90 percent of Jews are
pro-choice, he said. We knew that 80
percent of Jews were in favor of same-sex
marriage, so it wasnt difficult to paint
Romney as out of step with the Jewish
voters. But we had to get that message
out. We were more than happy to engage
in issues of Israel and Iran, but the biggest
differences between the two were social
issues. As the Republicans worked to
reach out to its base, it only pushed away
Jewish voters in even greater numbers.
This was all about informing the
Jewish voters about their choices in this
election. With all of the predictions from
the right-wing media, Obama got over-
whelming support from the Jewish com-
munity, despite tens of millions of dollars
to attempt to smear his record on Israel.
Keyak, who also had worked for the
NJDC, had been talking with Rabinowitz
for a while about the project. Both knew
that the GOP was going to come after the
Jewish vote.
We wanted to make sure we
combatted their smear campaign against
Obama to the best of our ability, Keyak
said. Its something Steve has done for
his whole career.
The Hub worked with reporters cov-
ering the story of the Jewish vote in na-
tionally known newspapers such as the
Washington Post, the New York Times, the
Jerusalem Post, and others. It also placed
articles or op-eds in Jewish newspapers
reporting on battleground communities.
Op-eds included bylines from former
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Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 51
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and current members of Congress and
other high visibility supporters, including
Sen. Frank Lautenberg (New Jersey), Rep.
Adam Schiff (California), and Rep. Jan
Schakowsky (Illinois), and former Reps.
Ron Klein (Florida) and Robert Wexler
(Florida). Also, former Ambassador
Stuart Eizenstadt, Dr. Zeke Emanuel,
former AIPAC President Steve Grossman,
philanthropist Edgar Bronfman, Rabbi
Jeffrey Wohlberg (former president of
the Rabbinical Assembly), and former
presidents of Hadassah, Jewish Women
International, and the National Council of
Jewish Women.
The Hub also created websites such
as Israelquiz.org, which compared the
Israel records of presidents Bush, Reagan
and Obama with Romneys. It created
a video of Sderot residents praising the
president on the Iron Dome anti-missile
system. (Sderot is the development town
on Israels border with Gaza and the target
of Hamas terrorism.)
On Facebook, a Hub graphic asked
Romney what he meant by doing the
opposite of President Obama on Israel.
There was also the Jewish Test, a site
asking people to respond with their posi-
tions on 10 issues.
All of this was in addition to some-
times hourly advice to key campaign peo-
ple, the Democratic National Committee,
the White House and other 501(c)(4)s
on how to send a message to the Jewish
community and remain in touch with the
most widely read reporters covering the
Jewish vote, as much as the law permit-
ted, said Rabinowitz.
Rabinowitz said he felt the Obama
campaign was taking the challenge seri-
ously, hiring Ira Forman a year and a half
before the election as a connection to the
Jewish community.
Somehow, though, Rabinowitz and
Dorf thought there was a tremendous
need for more.
Obama was under tremendous attack
from the right, Rabinowitz said. There
was a lot of money behind the attacks
from people who were more concerned
about bringing down Obama than keep-
ing Israel as a bipartisan issue. Theyve
spent years attacking Obama. And it
had to be responded to. We had to do
something.
That something resulted in the hir-
ing of Keyak, a member of Georgetowns
Kesher Israel. They headed upstairs to the
attic.
They cranked out content,
Rabinowitz said. They talked to report-
ers all day long. We had rapid response,
and wed also put out attacks. Wed put out
stuff about Romney and Ryan. NJDC got
Barbra Streisand to do a video. The Hub
wrote the script and helped distribute it
to the battleground states.
Forman, the Jewish outreach director
for President Obamas re-election staff,
told WJW that the Hub was amazing.
Getting back to the Olympics moment
of silence, the Hub staff saw an opening.
Romney had been completely silent
on it, Rabinowitz said. We thought we
could make some hay of it. The White
House went ahead and issued a state-
ment in support of the moment of si-
lence. Romney was hammered pretty
well, including by David Bergers sister.
We could be critical of Romney; we
just couldnt say dont vote for him, but we
could be hypercritical. Everything else we
did, though, was informational.
One Obama staffer who requested
anonymity said the campaign had a very
good communications operation. But on
any campaign, you never have enough
resources. We would have been at a disad-
vantage without these guys. The Hub was
just brilliant.
Both Rabinowitz and Keyak felt exhila-
rated and a bit tired when it was all over.
We had a good time, we worked hard,
the NJDC did great stuff as did the cam-
paign, Rabinowitz said. We tried to help
them along.
JTA Wire Service Washington Jewish Week
Petitions call on Stevie Wonder to cancel Friends of IDF gig
An online petition calling on Stevie
Wonder to cancel his performance at a
fundraiser for the Israel Defense Forces
has garnered more than 3,600 signatures.
The petition was launched more than
a day ago on the change.org website.
Wonder is scheduled to headline the
Friends of the Israeli Defense Forces an-
nual gala in Los Angeles on Dec. 6. The
event raises millions of dollars annually
to support the Israeli military.
You were arrested in 1985 protest-
ing South African Apartheid, now we ask
you: please remember that apartheid
is apartheid, whether it comes from
White Afrikaaner settlers of South Africa
or from Jewish Israelis in Israel, the
petition reads. Desmond Tutu has rec-
ognized that Israels Apartheid is worse
than South Africas will you stand with
us against apartheid and cancel your
performance at the IDF fundraiser.
A second petition, launched by
the U.S. Campaign to End the Israeli
Occupation, calls on Wonder to (p)lease
continue your legacy of speaking out
for the oppressed. Please be a full-time
lover of justice by standing on the right
side of history and canceling your per-
formance for the Israeli army.
Bri ef
JS-52*
gallery
1
Yavnehs Academys fourth-graders worked on a
banner to show their love and support for Israel.
Debbie AbrAmowitz
2
Gary S. Lipman, the Bergen County YJCCs
chief executive officer, and Paula Cantor, a past
president, stand amid the truckload of food and
supplies donated by YJCC member families and
community members in response to the need created
by Hurricane Sandy. Items were donated to the Center
for Food Action. Courtesy yJCC
3
Religious school students at the Glen Rock
Jewish Center participated in Hurricane Sandy
leaf cleanup in their neighborhoods. Courtesy GrJC
4
The senior class of the Jewish Educational
Centers Rav Teitz Mesivta Academy in Elizabeth,
whose students come from areas including Bergen
and Rockland counties, are pictured at the Jewish
Community Relations Council-sponsored Stand for
Israel rally in Manhattan. The schools Israel guidance
coordinator, Rabbi Michael Parnes, and its director of
student activities, Rabbi Ami Neuman, accompanied
the students. Courtesy JeC
5
More than 70 Jewish day school leaders from
62 schools, including educators from the Frisch
School, Yeshivat Noam, Ben Porat Yosef Yeshiva
Day School, the Moriah School, and the Rosenbaum
Yeshiva of North Jersey, gathered on Yeshiva
Universitys Wilf Campus last week for a conference to
pool experiences, ideas, connections, and resources.
The conference was organized by YUs Institute for
University-School Partnership. Michael Zauderer,
director of educational operations at the Frisch
School, left, is shown with the assistant principal of
middle school Judaic studies at Yeshivat Noam, Rabbi
Tavi Koslowe, and Rabbi Aaron Levitt, Judaic studies
principal at the Robert M. Beren Academy. Courtesy yu
6
On Nov. 14, students from Yeshiva University
High School for Boys went to Sea Gate, Brooklyn,
to help with cleanup efforts in communities damaged
by Hurricane Sandy. Among the houses students
visited was that of iconic Jewish musician Mordechai
ben David, who joined the boys. MTA juniors Shaya
Kestenbaum of Teaneck, left, and Dani Davis of
Passaic are shown. Courtesy yu
7
The social action committee and members of
Congregation Bnai Israel in Emerson recently
participated in an Alzheimers walk in Van Saun
Park in Paramus to raise awareness and funds for
Alzheimers care, support, and research. The annual
walk is coordinated by the Alzheimers Association-
Greater New Jersey Cwhapter-Northern Regional
Office in Oradell. Courtesy Cbi
1
5
2
6
3
7
4
52 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
JS-54
54 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 30, 2012
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Vayishlach: The rape of Dinah
Koren Publishers Jerusalem
www.korenpub.com
Talmud isnt just black & white
rabbi steinsaltzs
Brilliant commentary
Announcing
THE NO EDITION
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Rabbi Randall MaRk
Congregation Shomrei Torah, Wayne, Conservative
T
he rape of Dinah is rarely discussed. Im sure this
is in part because of the difficulty of the subject
matter, but also because of the troubling nature
of the response by her brothers and then the interaction
between Jacob and his sons. We read, Now Dinah, the
daughter whom Leah had borne to Jacob, went out to
visit the daughters of the land. Shechem son of Hamor
the Hivite, chief of the country, saw her, and took her and
lay with her by force. (Genesis 34:1-2)
Traditional Jewish sources on this passage find fault
with Dinah because she went out, meaning she was
too outgoing, too forthcoming. However, I would hope
in this day and age that everyone would agree that rape is
a heinous crime that should be abhorred by one and all.
And yet, rapes still happen. There are men who so hate
women that they are willing (and sadly able) to violate
them in the most intimate and devastating of ways. But
let me be clear there, is no justification for forcing sex
upon someone.
I suspect more common, but equally deplorable, in
our communities are cases of date rape, where a man
somehow does not understand that no means no.
Instead, he thinks that what he wants is more impor-
tant than what the woman wants, that he is entitled to
take something not offered and defiling something that
should be sacred to both participants. It does not matter
if it is an acquaintance or a couple who are dating; they
may even be in an intimate relationship. No one ever
owes someone else sex. If sex is forced upon someone
against their will, then that qualifies as rape.
Drug-facilitated sexual assault is also a problem,
where someones drink is spiked without their knowing
it with a substance that alters their mental state, making
them vulnerable to attack and perhaps unable to recall it
as well. The predators could just be on the prowl for a vic-
tim, but half of all assaults come at the hands of someone
known to the victim. It could be a co-worker or someone
at a party. It is important to remain vigilant.
Forcing sex on someone can never be justified. It is
never the fault of the victim. It does not matter what
clothing they wear, what they say or what they do; there
is no valid reason for forcing sex upon someone. It is
d var torah
simply wrong. Using a position of power, drugs or alco-
hol are never acceptable tools for abusing a relationship
and forcing sex. It is a crime, sadly, an underreported
crime, but a crime nonetheless. Never blame the victim.
Dinahs brothers respond to this attack by tricking and
killing not only Shechem, but all the men of his city. Im
certainly an advocate of punishing criminals, but scope
and the viciousness of the brothers response is difficult
to justify. And Jacobs response to them is admittedly
practical, but lacks the moral outrage that I would hope
to find and shows no concern for Dinah and what she
experienced at the hands of her perpetrator. There are
times when the text of the Torah inspires us, but this is
one of those moments where the text is difficult for us
and challenges us. While the Torah provides many eter-
nal truths, it also has parts that reveal the historic context
of our ancestors, though their actions repel rather than
inspire. But we can learn from the actions of others,
sometimes to emulate them but at other times to avoid
following in their footsteps.
When I read this story my sympathies are not with
Jacob nor with Shimon and Levi, but rather with Dinah,
the victim. My heart goes out to her both for what she
experienced and then for the lack of support evidenced
in the text. My hope and prayer today is that any time we
encounter someone who has had the misfortune of be-
ing raped that we will provide what support and comfort
we can offer them as they struggle to overcome the dam-
age inflicted upon them. And may the day come when
never again will someone be forced to have sex against
their will.
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 55
MIRIAM RINN
T
he new production of My Name Is Asher Lev at the Westside
Theatre is very well acted and directed, and its perfectly con-
ventional approach to the big issues of Art and Religion should
ensure its success here just as it did in Long Wharf, where the play was
produced last year.
Directed by Gordon Edelstein, the play puts three actors on stage
in front of an evocative set to tell the story of the 1950s Brooklyn
chasidic prodigy Asher Lev and his struggle to express his innermost
feelings on canvas.
Adapted from a novel by Chaim
Potok, Aaron Posners script
takes a chronological approach,
beginning when little Asher first
exhibits talent as a 6-year-old. His
compulsive drawing all over his
siddur gets him in trouble with his
father, a Chabad-like emissary for
their sects rebbe. An animal cant
help it, roars Ashers father Aryeh
in response to the boys excuse for
his drawings. As Aryeh and other
characters, Mark Nelson tends to
overact, but he skillfully creates four different men with no more than
a change of costume and tone of voice. Ari Brand is just as effective
as the title character, who changes from a little boy to an adult. His
pronounced Brooklyn accent even becomes subtler as Asher grows
more cosmopolitan and established in the art world.
The great conflict at the heart of the play is between Ashers
devotion to visual art and his fathers allegiance to the Torah and its
moral code. Art is seen as the amoral realm of the self, while Aryeh
upholds the ethical teachings of generations of chasidic rabbis. Of
course, Ashers art teacher insists that he learn the tradition of art,
at least the European tradition, just as Aryeh wants him to know the
traditions of Judaism. Asher is pulled between aesthetic tradition and
Jewish tradition, between beauty and prayer. The artist is responsible
to no one but himself, says Jacob Kahn, Ashers mentor, while Aryeh
insists that all is for the sake of heaven.
Between these two stands Ashers sensitive mother Rivkeh,
sympathetically portrayed by Jenny Bacon. Tormented by depression
following her beloved brothers death, Rivkeh tries to reconcile her
son and husband, or at least help them to understand each other.
Her emotional sacrifice becomes the subject matter of Ashers most
controversial paintings.
The neat divisions in the play bring out the themes in sharp relief,
but they dont help to create fully developed characters. We dont
really know Asher or his parents as complex human beings, but we
understand them as symbols for the positions they represent. Each
of the adults in Ashers life refers to him as my Asher throughout
the play, as if they could claim ownership over him. Although Asher
says hes deeply moved by Michelangelos Pieta, he doesnt reflect
on the fact that the sculptor did this, as he did most of his work, on
commission, not to express his innermost feelings. The vision of the
artist that Kahn preaches is a particularly modern one, and would
have made no sense to the great Renaissance artists whom he urges
Asher to study. Art is actually a stand-in in the play for individualism,
the need for autonomy that is a threat to a communal-based society
such as the chasidic world. If Asher is to listen only to his own inner
voice, he wont listen to the rebbe.
Despite these misgivings, My Name Is Asher Lev is enjoyable
theater, and even moving in parts. The cast and Edelstein deserve
much of the credit for a swiftly passing hour and a half.
Arts & culture
JS-56*
56 JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 30, 2012
My Name Is
Asher Lev
JOAN MARCUS
Above, Ari Brand plays Asher Lev; inset, Asher with his mother, played by Jenny Bacon. JOAN MARCUS
JS-57*
JEWISH STANDARD NOVEMBER 30, 2012 57
Arts & culture
HILARIOUS!
NY Daily News NY Times Village Voice Backstage Variety
HAPPY CHANUKAH!
8 SHOWS A WEEK.
WHY NOT SEE IT EVERY NIGHT?
The Westside Theatre 407 West 43rd Street
Tel echarge.com / 21 2-239-6200 www.oj tj onstage. com
OJTJ.5x7.holiday.4C.indd 1 11/9/12 12:25 PM
An interview with Adena Potok
MIRIAM RINN
T
he Chosen might have been the name of
a painting.
The beloved Jewish novelist Chaim
Potok originally was a visual artist, his widow Adena
Potok said. He drew when he was a young child, took art
lessons during the Depression, then moved on to pastels
and watercolors. Once he approached bar mitzvah age,
however, it came to a halt. His father decided this was
enough already; its all narishkeit, nonsense, she said.
Potok grew up in a strictly observant home, and his
father worried that art was taking him away from his
studies. The elder Potok was not interested in art. The
art that was in museums was not Jewish, Adena Potok
said of her father-in-laws approach. It was either
pagan or Christian. He didnt have the same reaction to
literature, though. If his son wrote stories, that was fine
as long as it didnt take him away from his studies.
As an adult, Chaim Potok put that early love of the
painted image into his 1972 novel My Name Is Asher
Lev, the story of a religious Jewish boy who is consumed
with art and grows into a famous and controversial
painter. The novel was adapted as a play several years
ago and had its maiden performance in Philadelphia
at the Arden Theatre. Now My Name Is Asher Lev is
being performed at the Westside Theatre in New York.
The play stars Ari Brand, who appeared in The Diary
of Anne Frank and Broadway Bound, and is directed
by Gordon Edelstein, artistic director of the Long Wharf
Theater.
Adena Potok collaborated with Aaron Posner, who
had worked with her husband to adapt his best-known
novel, The Chosen, for the stage. The two began to talk
about adapting Asher Lev as well, but Chaim Potok
died before he could complete the task. He talked to me
about this, and I gave him what I thought was the spine
of the book, his widow said. She acted as consultant
to the production crew as well. I found working with
[Aaron] was a delight. We argued well.
Adena Potok was her husbands first reader
throughout his writing career, giving him her reactions
and insights. The two met at Camp Ramah in the
Poconos, where both were counselors, and when they
married, she moved to California, finishing her social
work degree at UCLA.
Asher Lev struggles to satisfy his parents as well as
being true to his artistic self. He comes under the sway
of an art teacher who insists that a true artist is dedicated
only to his own feelings and ideas. Thats a conception
of the artist that came to the fore during the Romantic
period; it would have seemed bizarre to the classical
artists or those of the Renaissance, who created art to
glorify the gods or satisfy a patron. Chaim Potoks novel
is firmly in that Romantic camp, and Asher must choose
between his communitys norms and his own personal
integrity.
In the 50s, the artist was an individual who
expressed his feelings about many things, Adena Potok
said. That was when her husband grew up. In the novel,
Asher paints a work called Brooklyn Crucifixion, which
shocks his parents and teachers. Chaim Potok created
the same painting. He wanted to see if in fact as a work
of art it would stand up, his wife said.
Rena, Naama, Adena, Akiva, and Chaim Potok
CHAIM POTOK ARCHIVES
Calendar
JS-58*
friday [nov. 30]
Shabbat in Englewood Stephen J. Savitsky,
Orthodox Union chairman of the board and
a three-time president of the organization,
is the scholar-in-residence at Congregation
Shomrei Emunah through Saturday, Para-
shat Vayishlach, where, he will be the guest
of Rabbi Menachem Genack, CEO of OU
Kosher and rabbi of the congregation. Sav-
itskys visit is part of a Community Weekend
hosted by the OUs Karasik Department of
Synagogue Services. At a private home on
Friday night, the speakers will hold a town
meeting to discuss What Issues Could
Derail the Explosive Growth of Orthodoxy?
Savitsky will speak at the 8:40 a.m. Shacha-
rit service on A Lot More Than Kosher
Food. At seudat shlishit at the shul follow-
ing Mincha at 4:05 p.m., he will address,
Must It Take Sandy for Us to Achieve Ach-
dut? 89 Huguenot Ave. (212) 613-8351 or
synagogue@ou.org.
Shabbat in Teaneck Barry W. Holtz, dean
of the William Davidson Graduate School
of Jewish Education and the Theodore and
Florence Baumritter Professor of Jewish
Education at the Jewish Theological
Seminary, is the Rabbi Barry Schaeffer
scholar-in-residence at Congregation
Beth Sholom. His talks, Conflict and
Confrontation in the World of Family,
Friends and Community, and Danger and
Domesticity: Stories of the Rabbis at Home
and In The Beit Midrash, are scheduled
at 7:15 p.m., a dvar Torah after Shabbat
morning services, and again after lunch.
Meals are open to the public for a fee. 354
Maitland Ave. (201) 833-2620.
with Shir La La, arts and crafts. 180
Piermont Road. (201) 750-9997 or
ween@templeemanu-el.com.
Chanukah in Wayne The Wayne YMCA
holds a Chanukah festival, 12:30 p.m.,
with face painting, arts & crafts, chocolate
making, latkes, donuts, and a Scholastic
Book fair. Stretch the Silly Man will perform
at 1, and there will be a Chanukah story
in the Goldman Library at 2. Bring new,
unwrapped toys for a toy drive. Sponsored
by Jewish Federation of Northern New
Jersey. The Metro YMCAs of the Oranges is
a partner of the YM-YWHA of North Jersey.
1 Pike Drive. (973) 595-0100, ext. 250.
Music in Fort Lee Naomi Miller performs
Accents on Broadway at the Fort Lee
Public Library, 2 p.m. Along with Broadway
tunes, she will sing songs in Hebrew,
French, Greek, and Yiddish. 320 Main St.
(201) 592-3614.
Family concert The Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation Bnai Israel presents
Pajama Jam, a family concert featuring
the Hums, 4 p.m. The FLJC Book Fair will
open after the concert. (201) 796-5040 or
tots@fljc.com.
Latke and vodka in Fair Lawn The Mens
Club of Temple Beth Sholom offers Latke
and Vodka, 5:30 p.m. Event includes
hors doeuvres, homemade latkes, vodka,
and beverages. Bring a new, unwrapped
toy to donate. 40-25 Fair Lawn Ave.
(201) 797-9321.
Womens book club The Chabad Center
of Passaic Countys Womens Book Group
meets to discuss Ronald H. Balsons novel
Once We Were Brothers, at a private
home in Wayne, 7:30 p.m. 194 Ratzer Road,
Wayne. Refreshments. (973) 694-6274 or
Chanig@optonline.net.
monday [dec. 3]
Mind and body In honor of the new year of
chasidism, 19th of Kislev, Rabbi Laibl Wolf
discusses Finding Joy and Transformation:
Alters Training for Freedom of Mind and
Body, for Lubavitch on the Palisades
in Tenafly, 7:30 p.m. Adults only.
Dinner and live music. (201) 871-1152
or www.chabadlubavitch.org.
Cafe night Fair Lawns own Clare Cooper
performs original music and old favorites at
the Fair Lawn Jewish Center/Congregation
Bnai Israel, 7:30 p.m. She is the musical
director of Tony N Tinas Wedding, the
assistant musical director of Memphis, and
performing in Dont Tell Mama, a piano/
cabaret bar in NYC. Refreshments. 10-10
Norma Ave. (201) 796-5040 or info@fljc.com.
sunday [dec. 2]
Jewish parenting Temple Avodat Shalom
in River Edge hosts a Chanukah-themed
Mothers Circle minicourse on Jewish
parenting for mothers of other religious
backgrounds who are raising Jewish
children. Topics include how to create a
Jewish home, a Jewish childs lifecycle
events, and an overview of the Jewish
holidays. Group meets at the shul, 9 a.m.
Made possible by a joint grant to the Jewish
Outreach Institute and the synagogue from
the Adler Family Innovation Fund. 385
Howland Ave. Stephanie, (201) 489-2463,
ext. 202 or administrator@avodatshalom.net.
Tsimbl music in Jersey City Cong. Bnai
Jacob offers Loxn Learning, 9:30 a.m.,
featuring tsimbl player and recording artist
Pete Rushefsky, most recently heard on
Itzhak Perlmans newly released CD of
Jewish music. Bagels and lox and wine
and cheese. Family Chanukah workshop.
Babysitting available. 176 West Side Ave.
(201) 435-5725 or bnaijacobjc.org.
War veterans meet in Teaneck The
Teaneck/New Milford Post #498 Jewish
War Veterans has a breakfast meeting at
the American Legion Building, 9:30 a.m.
Prospective members welcome. 650
American Legion Drive. Past Commander
Stan Hoffman, (201) 836-0814.
Preschool class The JCC of Paramus offers
Candle Club, a monthly pre-K holiday class
with stories, music, dance, arts and crafts,
and kosher nut-free refreshments, 9:45 a.m.
Coffee and bagels for parents at 9:30.
East 304 Midland Ave. (201) 262-7733 or
edudirector@jccparamus.org.
Chanukah in Oakland The Gerrard Berman
Day School Solomon Schechter of North
Jersey holds Mosaic Menorah Magic,
for 2- to 8-year-olds, 10-11:30 a.m.
Magic show, music, and doughnuts
sponsored by local Dunkin Donuts,
JFSNJ, and Artistic Tile. 45 Spruce St.
Amy Shafron, (201) 337-1111, ext. 302, or
ashafron@gmail.com.
Chanukah in Hackensack Ben Porat
Yosef offers Reading Rocks at
Barnes & Noble, Riverside Square
Mall, 10 a.m.-4 p.m, including author
presentation, scavenger hunt, puppet show,
and face painting. (201) 845-5007, ext. 16,
or www.benporatyosef.org.
Zionism talk in West Orange The Jewish
Cultural School & Society offers a talk,
Jewish Alternatives to Zionism, with
Bennett Muraskin, secular humanistic
Jewish movement author, at the JCC
Metrowest, 10 a.m. Chanukah party on
Dec. 16. 760 Northfield Ave. (973) 233-0714
or jcss-nj.org.
Holiday boutique Congregation Gesher
Shalom, the Jewish Community Center of
Fort Lee, holds its annual vendor holiday
boutique, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 1449 Anderson
Ave. (201) 947-1735.
Chanukah in Closter Temple Emanu-
El of Closter hosts its Chanukah bash
& volunteer expo, 10:30 a.m. Concert
Shabbat in Englewood Cliffs Shaar
Communities hosts music-filled
services, 7:30 p.m. (201) 213-9569 or
joanne@shaarcommunities.org.
saturday [dec. 1]
Shabbat in Bayonne Temple Emanu-El
celebrates 25 years with Rabbi Clifford
B. Miller. Service with Cantor Marshall
Wise and guest speaker Dan Friedman,
managing editor of the Forward, discussing
Twenty-Five Years of Jewish American
Culture, 9:15 a.m. Kiddush. 735 Kennedy
Boulevard. (201) 436-4499.
Shabbat in Closter Arnold Eisen, chancellor
of the Jewish Theological Seminary, is the
scholar-in-residence at Temple Emanu-El,
9 a.m. Babysitting, 9:30; tot Shabbat, 10:15.
180 Piermont Road. (201) 750-9997.
Shabbat in Teaneck Temple Emeth offers a
Shabbaton, 3-5 p.m, including a screening
of the film Song of Life. Mimica Tsezana-
Hyman, a member of the group who helped
produce the film and a descendant of the
Jewish community upon which it is based,
will discuss it, and her daughter, Sabrina,
will perform a song inspired by it. 1666
Windsor Road. (201) 833-1322.
Music in Leonia Eugene Marlows Heritage
Ensemble performs Jewish melodies in
various jazz, Afro-Cuban, Brazilian, and
neoclassical styles at Congregation Adas
Emuno, 7 p.m. Cantorial soloist Shira Lissek
will perform as a guest vocalist. Coffee and
dessert. 254 Broad Ave. (201) 592-1712 or
www.adasemuno.org.
58 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
The Jewish Museum in New York City presents its annual Chanukah Family Day,
Sunday, Dec. 9, noon to 4 p.m. Highlights include performances by Yosi and
The Superdads, an art workshop, and gallery tours. This event is for children
age 3 and up, accompanied by adults. 1109 Fifth Ave. (212) 423-3200 or
TheJewishMuseum.org/specialfamilydays. Courtesy jewish museum
JS-59*
tuesday [dec. 4]
Book discussion The Fair Lawn Jewish
Center/Congregation Bnai Israel holds
a book review with Pat Davidson of the
Park Avenue Synagogue discussing Julie
Orringers, The Invisible Bridge, noon.
10-10 Norma Ave. (201) 796-5040.
Music in Teaneck Bernard Weinflash
presents a musical journey of his life for
the New Beginnings group at the Jewish
Center of Teaneck, 1:30 p.m. The group
is sponsored by the Elisabeth Heilbronner
Chesed Fund. 70 Sterling Place.
(201) 833-0515.
wednesday [dec. 5]
Caregiver support A support group for
those caring for the physically frail or
suffering from Alzheimers disease meets
at the Gallen Adult Day Health Care
Center at the Jewish Home at Rockleigh,
10-11:30 a.m. Topics include longterm care
options, financial planning, legal concerns,
and the personal toll of caregiving. Shelley
Steiner, (201) 784-1414, ext. 5340.
Menorah lighting in Paramus A menorah
will be lit at Borough Hall, 7 p.m. 1
Jockish Square. (201) 265-2100 or
www.paramusborough.org.
Chanukah in Tenafly Rabbi Reuven
Kimelman, Judaic scholar-in-residence at
the Kaplen JCC on the Palisades, discusses
Our Chanukah Versus the Chanukah
of History, the Talmud, and the Siddur,
at the JCC, 8:15 p.m. (201) 408-1429 or
www.jccotp.org.
thursday [dec. 6]
Shalom Baby Chanukah Shalom Baby
offers a Chanukah party at the Fair Lawn
Jewish Center/CBI, 9:30-10:45 a.m. The
group offers a way for moms and dads
of newborns or newly adopted children
through age 3 to connect with each other
and the Jewish community through a
monthly series of play dates with play,
music, storytime, snacks, and crafts
projects. Administered by Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jerseys Synagogue
Leadership Initiative and co-funded by
the Henry and Marilyn Taub Foundation.
10-10 Norma Ave. Ellen Finkelstein,
(201) 820-3917 or ellenf@jfnnj.org.
Tricky tray in Bayonne The Jewish
Community Center of Bayonne holds
a tricky tray to benefit the Lauren
Wendroff Early Enrichment Center,
7 p.m. 1050 Kennedy Boulevard. Sandra,
(201) 436-6900.
Weinberg speaks State Sen. Loretta
Weinberg details The Adventures of Being
a State Senator and a Jewish Grandmother
for the rosh chodesh womens group at
Temple Emeth, 7:30 p.m. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 833-1322 or www.emeth.org.
live entertainment, casino games, and
raffle for luxury prizes. Funds to benefit
FIDFs Dignity Program. www.fidf.org/
YLNYgala2012.
saturday [dec. 8]
Chanukah dance party The North Jersey
Jewish Singles group (45-60) at the
Clifton Jewish Center hosts a Chanukah
Boomers Dance with a DJ, 7-10:30 p.m.;
doors open at 6:30. Refreshments. Bring
a grab bag gift value $5-$10. Martine or
Karen, (973) 772-3131 or www.meetup.com
(use group name).
friday [dec. 7]
Shabbat in Wyckoff Temple Beth Rishon
ushers in Chanukah with a congregational
dinner and services, 6 p.m. The Strauss/
Warschauer Duo performs with Cantors
Ilan Mamber and Jenna Daniels along
with the Kol Rishon adult choir and the
Zemer Rishon teen choir. (201) 891-4466 or
www.bethrishon.org.
Shabbat in Closter Temple Emanu-El of
Closter holds a congregational Chanukah/
new member dinner, 6 p.m. 180 Piermont
Road. (201) 750-9997.
Shabbat in Closter Temple Beth El offers
services with the Shabbat Unplugged
Band, 7:30 p.m. 221 Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112.
Shabbat in Paramus The Young Jewish
Families club of the Jewish Community
Center of Paramus hosts a family-friendly
service and program for young families
and children, 13 and younger, 7:30 p.m.
Oneg/playtime in the gym follow. East
304 Midland Ave. (201) 262-7691 or
yjf@jccparamus.org.
i n new york
sunday [dec. 2]
Family Chanukah program Hershel and
the Hanukkah Goblins: A Family Hanukkah
Program offers storytelling, songs, arts and
crafts, and concert by Play Me a Story, at
the Museum of Jewish Heritage A Living
Memorial to the Holocaust, Manhattan,
2 p.m. The group includes Israeli born
duo of teacher/actress Maya Blank and
instrumentalist Uri Sharlin. Made possible
through a gift from the Margaret Neubart
Foundation Trust. (646) 437-4202 or
www.mjhnyc.org.
tuesday [dec. 4]
Winter book programs The Museum of
Jewish Heritage A Living Memorial
to the Holocaust begins a program with
three fiction and nonfiction book events
about Jews in America, at 7 p.m., with
author Jonathan Sarna discussing When
General Grant Expelled the Jews. Program
continues Wednesday, Dec. 12 at 7, with
writers Jami Attenberg (The Middlesteins)
and Joshua Henkin (The World Without
You) discussing their new books; and
Wednesday, Dec. 19 at 7, with author
Joshua Eli Plaut presenting A Kosher
Christmas: Tis the Season to Be Jewish.
(646) 437-4202 or www.mjhnyc.org.
si ngLes
saturday [dec. 1]
Young professionals meet Bergen
Connections hosts an event in Teaneck
for modern Orthodox professional
singles, 21-29, with Charlie Harary
discussing Strategies for Success in
Todays Economy, 7:30 p.m. Food
from Carlos & Gabbys Glatt Kosher
Mexican Grill. (201) 837-0164 or
bergenconnections1@gmail.com.
Winter bash in NYC The 92nd Street Y
offers an event for singles, 40-55, at the Y,
7:30 p.m. Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street.
(212) 415-5500 or www.92Y.org.
Casino night Friends of the Israel Defense
Forces New York Young Leadership Division
hosts its 10th annual gala themed At the
Gatsby, at the Metropolitan Pavilion in New
York City. Gourmet food, networking,
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 59
Film recalls Kutshers in the Catskills
The Glen Rock Jewish Center presents
Welcome To Kutshers: The Last Catskills
Resort, on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 4 p.m.
The films directors, Ian Rosenberg
and Caroline Laskow, will be on hand to
tell stories about Kutshers and talk about
making the award-winning documen-
tary. One of the legendary Borscht Belt
hotels, Kutshers Country Club is the last
surviving Jewish resort in the Catskills.
The film premiered at the New
York Jewish Film Festival at Lincoln
Center and was the winner of the Best
Documentary Audience award at the
Miami Jewish Film Festival 2012. Call
(201) 652-6624 for more information.
JWV brings bingo to vets
The Lt. James I. Platt-Jewish War Veterans
Post 651 in Fair Lawn has been run-
ning bingo games at the New Jersey
Veterans Home of Paramus on the
third Wednesday of the month for the
past 20 years. The group contributed
$1,000 for furnishings for the new con-
struction at the home. For informa-
tion, call Commander Mel Kaplan at
(201) 796-3795.
BergenPAC benefit concert
The Bergen Performing Arts Center
in Englewood presents Beyond The
Storm, a concert to benefit Hurricane
Sandy victims, on Sunday, Dec. 9, at
7 p.m.
Performers include Broadway stars:
Savion Glover and HBOs Def Poet, Carlos
Andrs Gomz; performers from The
Lion King, Mystery of Edwin Drood,
Les Misrables, West Side Story, and
Fiddler on The Roof; Bill Berloni and
Sandy, the canine star of Broadways
revival of Annie; local teen stars Liz
Gillies, who plays Jade on Victorious,
and singer/songwriter/actress Heather
Braverman; Shreks Little Fiona, Scarlett
Diaz; Ali Stroker from The Glee Project;
and the 2012 Englewood Idol winner,
Brian Park.
ABC Eyewitness News reporter Nina
Pineda will emcee.
All money raised will be donated to
the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief
Fund, Pet ResQ, and the Moonachie and
Little Ferry school districts.
For more information, call (201) 227-
1030 or go to www.bergenpac.org.
One-woman show in Fair Lawn
The Off Broadway show, After Anne Frank, written and per-
formed by Carol Lempert and directed by Janice L. Goldberg, will
be staged at Temple Beth Sholom in Fair Lawn on Sunday, Dec. 2,
at 2 p.m. 40-25 Fair Lawn Ave. (201) 797-9321, ext. 415.
Chief British rabbi
to speak in Manhattan
Chief Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks of the
United Hebrew Congregations of the
Commonwealth will deliver this years
Ruth B. Wildes Memorial Lecture at
MJE (Manhattan Jewish Experience),
on Saturday, Dec. 1, at 7:30 p.m. His
talk will be Multiculturalism and
Jewish Identity: Reconciling Jewish
Pride and Choseness with Diversity
and Pluralism. 131 W. 86 St., New
York City. http://jewishexperience.org/
rabbi-sacks-at-mje.
Lifecycle
JS-60*
60 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
MOHEL
Rabbi Gerald Chirnomas
TRAINED AT & CERTIFIED BY HADASSAH
HOSPITAL, JERUSALEM CERTIFIED BY
THE CHIEF RABBINATE OF JERUSALEM
(973) 334-6044
www.rabbichirnomas.com
Celebrate your simcha
we welcome announcements of readers bar/bat mitzvahs, engage-
ments, marriages and births. announcements are free, but there
is a $10 charge for photographs, which must be accompanied by
a stamped, self-addressed envelope if the photograph is to be
returned. there is a $10 charge for mazal tov announcements plus a
$10 photograph charge.
Please include a daytime telephone number and send to:
NJ Jewish Media Group
1086 Teaneck Rd.
Teaneck, NJ 07666
pr@jewishmediagroup.com
Bissli
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Lisa Prawer - Glen Rock, NJ 201-321-4995
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EngagEmEnt
Yael Schusterman and Marc Adler
Yael Samantha Schusterman,
daughter of Marcy and Herb
Schusterman of Fort Lee, and
Marc Jeffrey Adler, son of Joy
and Scott Adler of Towaco, were
engaged on Nov. 17.
The future bride, a
University of Arizona graduate
and former Jewish Standard in-
tern, is the director of market-
ing for Momentus Ventures.
The future groom, a
University of Rhode Island
graduate, is founder/owner of Amoney Sportz Inc. and works in
his family business, Ruta Supplies Inc.
A November 2013 wedding is planned.
Bnai mitzvah
Gavin Caine
Gavin Caine, son of Pamela and
Paul Caine of Tenafly and brother
of Samantha and Ryan,
celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on Oct. 13 at Temple
Sinai of Bergen County in Tenafly.
Benjamin
Epstein
Benjamin Epstein, son of Robin
and Steven Epstein of Tenafly
and brother of Jacob and Olivia,
celebrated becoming a bar
mitzvah on Nov. 24 at Temple
Emanu-El in Closter.
Claire Fink
Claire Fink, daughter of Jodee
and Larry Fink of Cresskill and
twin sister of Regina, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on Nov.
24 at Temple Emeth in Teaneck.
Regina Fink
Regina Fink, daughter of Jodee
and Larry Fink of Cresskill and
twin sister of Claire, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on Nov.
24 at Temple Emeth in Teaneck.
Yoav Hayut
Yoav Hayut, son of Cantor
Regina and Avishay Hayut of
Tenafly and brother of Alon, cel-
ebrated becoming a bar mitzvah
on Nov. 24 at Temple Beth Or in
Washington Township.
Emily Melnick
Emily Melnick of Cresskill,
daughter of Jill and Ron Sedley,
and Cliff Melnick, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on Oct.
20 at Temple Sinai of Bergen
County in Tenafly.
Gabrielle Rahmin
Gabrielle Rahmin, daughter of
Iris Kopeloff and Michael
Rahmin of Woodcliff Lake and
sister of Samantha and Austin,
celebrated becoming a bat mitz-
vah on Nov. 24 at Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack Valley in
Woodcliff Lake.
Raquelle
Rothschild
Raquelle Rothschild, daughter
of Laura and Alex Rothschild
of Paramus, celebrated
becoming a bat mitzvah on
Nov. 24 at Temple Israel &
Jewish Community Center in
Ridgewood
OBituariEs
Bronislava
BurkhBurshmoy
Bronislava BurkhBurshmoy,
99, of Oradell died on Nov. 19.
Arrangements were by Louis
Suburban Chapel, Fair Lawn.
Bea Fleischman
Bea Fleischman, ne Amolitsky,
95, of Jersey City died on Nov. 20
at Mercy Hospital in Miami, Fla.
Born in Hoboken, she owned
Beas Discount Shop in Jersey
City before retiring. She was a
past president of the Deborah
Hospital Chapter in Jersey
City, the Ladies Auxiliary of the
Jewish Home & Rehab Center
in Jersey City, and Hadassah of
Hudson County. She was Jersey
City Senior Citizen of the Year
in 2001 and was a member of
Chevra Ein Jacob of Hoboken.
Predeceased by her husband,
Samuel, in 1982, she is survived
by children, Norman of Miami
Springs, Fla., Carol Huysman
of Key Biscayne, Fla., Steven of
Verona, and Annette of Easton,
Pa.; and three grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Eden
Memorial Chapels, Fort Lee.
Judith
Kais-Fuchs
Judith Kais-Fuchs, 75, of
Bergenfield died on Nov. 22 at
home.
She is survived by her
husband, Saul; daughters,
Hilary and Penni; and three
grandchildren.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.
Obituaries
are prepared with
information
provided by funeral
homes. Correcting
errors is the responsibility
of the funeral home.
JS-61
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 61
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Yetta Massarsky
Yetta Massarsky, ne Steinberg, 92, formerly of Fort Lee,
Oradell, Weehawken, and Mount Freedom, died on Nov.
21 in Englewood.
Before retiring, she managed her husbands dental
office.
Predeceased by her husband, Ashur, and a son,
Steven, she is survived by daughters, Ellen Gertler (Dr.
Richard), and Marilyn Massarsky (David Judovin); sis-
ters, Florence Schimel and Marlene Milkman; six grand-
children; and 10 great-grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Gutterman and Musicant
Jewish Funeral Directors, Hackensack.
Sam Rosenblum
Sam Rosenblum, 91, of Hackensack, formerly of Teaneck,
died on Nov. 19 in New York City.
Born in Paterson, he was a World War II Army Air
Force veteran. A graduate of Columbia Law School, he
practiced in New York and New Jersey. He was a member
of the Teaneck Democratic Club, the Teaneck Citizens
for Public Schools, Jewish War Veterans Post #498 New
Milford/Teaneck, and former president of the Teaneck
Political Assembly. He served on the Teaneck Board of
Adjustment for over 20 years.
Predeceased by a daughter, Lisa, he is survived by his
wife, Ruth; daughter, Gene Rosenblum (Mitchel Ostrer);
and three grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Gutterman and Musicant
Jewish Funeral Directors, Hackensack.
This weeks
Torah commentary
is on page 55.
Erik Izraelewicz, a top French-Jewish journalist, dies suddenly at 58
Erik Izraelewicz, the editorial director of the French daily
newspaper Le Monde, collapsed and died in his Paris of-
fice from a sudden heart attack. He was 58.
Izraelewicz was found unconscious Tuesday at his
office.
An author and veteran journalist, he was born to a
Polish-Jewish family, according to the daily Dernieres
Nouvelles dAlsace. He began his stint as editorial direc-
tor two years ago at Le Monde, which may be Frances
most influential daily.
Richard Prasquier, the president of CRIF, the umbrella
organization representing French Jewry, had a working
lunch with Izraelewicz hours before his death.
Erik Izraelewicz was, I think, a man of dialogue and
balance, Prasquier wrote in a statement. Shocked by
his sudden departure, I would like to express my appre-
ciation and offer condolences to his family, friends and
colleagues.
French President Francois Hollande described
Izraelewicz in a statement as a renowned economist, a
distinguished professional and a man as demanding as
generous. Izraelewicz had written several books, includ-
ing two volumes about the rising economic power of
China.
Before working at Le Monde, Izraelewicz was a top
editor at two French business dailies, Les Echos and La
Tribune. With Izraelewicz as editorial director, Le Monde
featured articles about pressing economic matters, espe-
cially the euro crisis, prominently on the front page.
In its obituary, Le Monde described Izraelewicz as
having been from a pragmatic generation of French so-
cialists eager for reforms that shape the world as it is, for
better or worse.
Before joining Les Echos and La Tribune, Izraelewicz
had worked as a journalist at Le Monde, where one of his
postings was in New York.
JTA Wire Service
www.jstandard.com
(201) 837-8818
JS-34
Classifieds
62 Jewish standard november 30, 2012
JS-62
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Jewish standard november 30, 2012 63
JS-63
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Join MAZONs effort to ensure that no one goes hungry.
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JS-64*
64 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
SERVING BOCA RATON,
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RESIDENTS

Dec 2nd OPeN HOUSeS
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1237 Sussex Rd, Tnk $419,000 12:00-2:00pm
550 W Englewood Ave, Tnk $399,000 12:00-2:00pm
1292 Taft Rd, Tnk $399,000 12:00-2:00pm
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*36 Dudley Dr, Bgfld $769,000 12:00-2:00pm
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201-837-6220
VillageHomesNJ.com
Martense Avenue
Teaneck
$315,000 3 bedrooms,
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Lincoln Place
Teaneck
$359,000 3 bedroom,
2 baths, charming
colonial in great location.
Hardwood oors
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customize what you want. House to be complete Summer 2013.
Recently Sold Houses
99 Sussex Rd, Bergeneld 205 14th St, Wood Ridge
403 Wildrose Ave, Bergeneld 228 Zabriskie Pl, River Edge
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REAL ESTATE & buSi nESS noTES
Concert to benefit victims of Sandy
A star-studded performance, Beyond the Storm, will
raise funds to provide relief for victims of Hurricane
Sandy.
The lineup includes such Broadway stars as Savion
Golver and HBOs Def Poet Carlos Andres Gomez. ABC
Eyewitness News reporter Nina Pineda will serve as em-
cee. The event takes place on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 7 p.m. at
Bergen Performing Arts Center in Englewood.
Other performers at the benefit include those from
the cast of The Lion King, The Mystery of Edwin
Drood, Fiddler on the Roof, as well as a special appear-
ance by Sandy, the four-legged star of Broadways cur-
rent smash revival of Annie. Haworth native Liz Gillies,
from the sitcom Victorious, and 2012 Englewood Idol
Winner Brian Park will also be on hand.
Tickets cost $25 and $100 and all funds raised will be
donated to the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund,
Pet ResQ, and the school districts of Moonachie and
Little Ferry.
Tickets are available at www.ticketmaster.com. Call
(201) 227-1030 or visit bergenpac.org for information.
Local to take part in Art Miami
Local real estate broker-owner Marlyn Friedberg of
Friedberg Properties will participate in a showcase
property exhibit at Art Miami in South Florida during Art
Week on Dec. 4-9.
Friedberg Properties, an affiliate of Christies
International Real Estate, will be among 127 brokerages
showcasing luxury residential property at a booth during
Art Miami and its new sister event, CONTEXT Art Miami,
an emerging, cutting-edge contemporary art fair con-
nected to the Art Miami Pavilion. Christies is the official
luxury real estate partner of the Miami art week.
The fair attracts thousands of collectors, dealers, cura-
tors and artists and features 190 galleries from 21 coun-
tries. Paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography and
prints from around the world, in addition to numerous
specialty exhibits will be on display.
Friedberg Properties exclusively represents the
Christies brand in eastern Bergen County.
For more information call Marlyn Friedberg at (201)
894-1234 or email marlynf@friedbergproperties.com.
Flip the switch on heating
and lighting costs
a sensor system from israel monitors energy use throughout commercial
spaces to slash expenses and keep users comfortable.
Karin Kloosterman
A
bout 20 percent of the opera-
tional expenses in office build-
ings, schools and hospitals
goes toward energy HVAC (heating,
ventilation and air conditioning) and
electricity. Usually a default tempera-
ture is set for all year round, and the
HVAC system and lights stay on even in
unused rooms.
Now an Israeli company, Beemtech,
aims to keep managers aware of how
the space is being used in order to
control the temperature and lighting
more efficiently, and reduce costs
dramatically, says CEO Nati Freiberg.
Overall, our number one goal
is to provide high energy savings
for commercial buildings non-
residential schools, hospitals, you name
it by nearly half. In lighting alone we
have six strategies, Frieberg says.
Beemtechs smart sensor system, which requires very
little rewiring, monitors in real time what spaces are
being used and by how many people. Is it too bright or
too hot in the room? If the HVAC is turned off in half the
building, how will this affect the other side?
Access to this data could enable better decisions
on how to control the heating, cooling, lighting, and
even how frequently the rooms need to be cleaned,
explains Frieberg, who believes many companies and
organizations are wasteful and ignorant about their
energy consumption.
Beemtech is now in full sales mode in Israel and New
York, where it is running two pilot sites and wooing
customers.
Controlled individually, remotely
Using small sensors that can measure carbon dioxide
levels from breathing, movement, temperature, and a
range of other programmable parameters, Beemtech
either sends alerts or automatically adjusts heating, cool-
ing and lighting.
People using the space also have their say: Those
authorized can use their smart phones to answer surveys
about the comfort levels of lighting and temperature
in their private or shared space, so that settings can be
adjusted accordingly.
Beemtech is also starting to work
with energy savings companies so
that clients can reduce and report
their carbon footprint savings. This is
especially relevant for companies that
want to improve their sustainability
reports and public image.
The cost of a system setup and
maintenance depends on the scale:
Over 10 years, it will cost about one
years worth of energy savings, plus
about 10 percent of annual energy
savings for ongoing management and
support that the company provides.
Improving green images
Beemtech is an 18-person company
headquartered in the Science Park
in Rehovot, a satellite city about a
40-minute drive from Tel Aviv. It also has an office in
Manhattan. The company has been privately funded un-
til now, but seeks $5 million to $10 million in order to put
its smart sensors into mass production.
Beemtech is currently installing a system for a
10,000-square-foot office building in Raanana, Israel.
This space will require about 80 sensors to gather huge
amounts of information says Frieberg.
If they have 200 meeting rooms, it is most likely that
80% of these rooms are empty most of the time. We can
know how to manage every 100 square feet and can
reduce costs by telling facility managers how to manage
them.
Urban planners and architects, he notes, can use
information collected by Beemtech to better understand
how spaces are really being used. Are open-concept
offices working for a firm, or are employees scurrying
to private meeting rooms instead? Does the new floor
really need to be renovated or can office staff be moved to
unused meeting rooms?
Its a bit funny that organizations spend so much
money to control their assets like cars and computers,
but energy, which is 20% of their budget for operation
expenditures, is not done. We can promise to cut energy
usage by 30 or 40 percent, says Frieberg.
Israel21c.org
Nati Freiberg, CEO of
Beemtech, a Rehovot-based
company that offers a tech-
nology solution and a service
to help operations managers
get a handle on how energy is
being used.
www.jstandard.com
Informative, newsworthy,
interactive, user-friendly
well-designed
and, well
cool!
JS-65
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 65
240 Grand Avenue
Englewood, NJ 07631
T: 201.568.3300
F: 201.808.2711
E: info@anhaltrealty.com
NEW MILFORD
Colonial on beautiful &
quiet section of New
Bridge Rd, West of
Roemer. Grand 2 story
entrance hall, lovely
hardwood oors & over
sized windows. Exquisite
gourmet kitchen. FDR,
LR, 4 bedrooms, 3 full
baths, Finished basement
with 2 nished rooms,
4 zoned gas heat, 2 zone AC, 2 car garage. Stone patio. Near buses,
house of worship, school & shopping. Lot size 75 x 110
ENGLEWOOD EAST HILL
New construction!
Spacious home, large
living room, formal din-
ing room, 5 bedrooms,
6 full baths, attached
garage, elevator, central
vacuum, large backyard
with stone patio and
more! 3 zoned gas heat
and air conditioning.
Construction needs
to be completed. Option to bring your own builder/contractor. Near
houses of worship, NYC bus and shopping in downtown Englewood.
Lot size 80 x 228
Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389
TENAFLY
894-1234
TM
CLOSTER CHARMING $389,000
Mint 3 bedroom split cape on lovely tree-lined street in great neighborhood,
living room has built-in shelves, eat-in kitchen overlooks private yard, gleaming
hardwood floors, newly painted, new appliances, basement
with rec room, near buses, schools & Houses of Worship.
ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS
568-1818
TENAFLY
894-1234
CRESSKILL
871-0800
ALPINE/CLOSTER
768-6868
RIVERVALE
666-0777
TEANECK 1-3 PM
736 Mildred St. $1,125,000
Once in a Lifetime Opportunity!!! First Time Offered.
Spectacular 286 Deep Prop. Beautiful Street. Charming 4 BR
3 F/2H Bth Tudor Col. Grand LR/Fplc, Den + Florida Rm. Brkfst
Rm. Vaulted Ceil Fam Rm/Fplc. BONUS: 5 Rm Prof Suite or
In-Law Suite. 2 car Gar. C/A/C. Close to All.
780 Newbridge Rd. $329K
Updated Col. Lg Prop. Apx 1/3 Acre. Cov. Porch. LR, Den, DR,
EIK/Granite Counters, S/S Appliances. 4 BRs, 2 FBths. C/A/C.
Fenced Yd.
922 Country Club Dr. $559,900
Beaut. C/H Col. LR/Fplc, FDR, Den, Newer EIK, 3 BRs, 2.5 Bths.
Bsmnt Playroom, & Fam Rm. Sprinklers. 2 Zone C/A/C, Gar.
Inground Heated Pool.
1101 Dartmouth Street $420s
Charming, slate roofed Colonial. Sitting Pretty Great street,
Hardwood floors. LG LR/fplc fdr Den Deck, 3 bdrms 3.5 bths
Fin bsmt Att Gar Perfect for Extended Families.
BERGENFIELD 1-3 PM
39 Glenwood Dr. S. $599K
Teaneck Border. Lg LR, FDR, Den, Mod EIK/ Dbl Appliances,
Deck.4 BRs, 2.5 Bths. Fin Bsmnt. C/A/C. , Laundry, Utility Room.
HACKENSACK 1-3 PM
100 Buckingham Rd. $499,900
Hospital Area. Lg. BiLevel. 80 x 160 Prop. Fam Rm, Office, LR,
DR, EIK, 4 BRs, 2.5 Updated Bths. H/W Flrs,C/A/C. 2 Car Att.
Gar. Inground Pool.
For Our Full Inventory & Directions
Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com
(201) 837-8800
READERS
CHOICE
2012
FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY
Allan Dorfman
Broker/Associate
201-461-6764 Eve
201-970-4118 Cell
201-585-8080 x144 Offce
Realtorallan@yahoo.com
Fort lee - the colony
Serving Bergen County since 1985.
1 BR 1.5 Baths. $139,900
1 BR. 1.5 Baths. Total Renovation.
$229,900
2 BR. 2.5 Baths Totally Renovated.
Rarely Available. R Line. $549,000
3 BR. 2.5 Baths, Renovated Kitchen
and Baths. $559,000
We now have a movie theater!
Wendy Wineburgh Dessanti
Weichert Presidents Club
Weichert Tenafly/Teaneck Office
201-310-2255 (cell) 201-541-1449, ext. 192
wendydess@aol.com
Wendy delivers great results in every market!
NJAR 10 YR Distinguished Sales Club
Open HOuse sun Dec 2nD 12-4 pM
57 Grayson Pl Teaneck
New listing! Desirable Queen Anne Rd
area. Very special col, spectacular
great rm, elegant fdr, 5 brs, 3 bths,
newly finished bsmt. Tremendous
space & value $549K
new Listings - By Appt
Teaneck W. Eng area, 1st flr br, 2 bth $329K
Englewood Jones Rd gourmet kit, mbr suite $359K
Happy Chanukah!
BergenPAC offers holiday promotion
Bergen Performing Arts Center is offering 20 different
shows for $20 a ticket as a holiday promotion. Starting
with Chef Irvine Live in December and continuing
through the spring, tickets are available for shows at
the Englewood performing arts center. The offer can-
not be combined with any other discounts and is not
retroactive.
In addition to the Chef Irvine show, the offer includes
Chris Botti; The Little Prince; Queen Extravaganza;
Savion Glover; Kansas; Colin Mochrie and Brad
Sherwood; The Whisperers; Pink Floyd Experience; Blues
at the Crossroads; The Highs and Lows of Janis Joplin;
Clifford the Big Red Dog; Preservation Hall Jazz Band;
Paul Taylor Dance Company; Queensryche; the Irish
Tenors; Marshall Tucker Band; Physical Graffiti; Jerry
Lewis; and Charlie Daniels Band.
To order visit www.bergenpac.org or call (201)
227-1030.
Concert to benefit victims of Sandy
A star-studded performance, Beyond the Storm, will
raise funds to provide relief for victims of Hurricane
Sandy.
The lineup includes such Broadway stars as Savion
Golver and HBOs Def Poet Carlos Andres Gomez. ABC
Eyewitness News reporter Nina Pineda will serve as em-
cee. The event takes place on Sunday, Dec. 9, at 7 p.m. at
Bergen Performing Arts Center in Englewood.
Other performers at the benefit include those from
the cast of The Lion King, The Mystery of Edwin
Drood, Fiddler on the Roof, as well as a special appear-
ance by Sandy, the four-legged star of Broadways cur-
rent smash revival of Annie. Haworth native Liz Gillies,
from the sitcom Victorious, and 2012 Englewood Idol
Winner Brian Park will also be on hand.
Tickets cost $25 and $100 and all funds raised will be
donated to the Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund,
Pet ResQ, and the school districts of Moonachie and
Little Ferry.
Tickets are available at www.ticketmaster.com. Call
(201) 227-1030 or visit bergenpac.org for information.
Local to take part in Art Miami
Local real estate broker-owner Marlyn Friedberg of
Friedberg Properties will participate in a showcase
property exhibit at Art Miami in South Florida during Art
Week on Dec. 4-9.
Friedberg Properties, an affiliate of Christies
International Real Estate, will be among 127 brokerages
showcasing luxury residential property at a booth during
Art Miami and its new sister event, CONTEXT Art Miami,
an emerging, cutting-edge contemporary art fair con-
nected to the Art Miami Pavilion. Christies is the official
luxury real estate partner of the Miami art week.
The fair attracts thousands of collectors, dealers, cura-
tors and artists and features 190 galleries from 21 coun-
tries. Paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography and
prints from around the world, in addition to numerous
specialty exhibits will be on display.
Friedberg Properties exclusively represents the
Christies brand in eastern Bergen County.
For more information call Marlyn Friedberg at (201)
894-1234 or email marlynf@friedbergproperties.com.
Flip the switch on heating
and lighting costs
a sensor system from israel monitors energy use throughout commercial
spaces to slash expenses and keep users comfortable.
Karin Kloosterman
adjusted accordingly.
Beemtech is also starting to work
with energy savings companies so
that clients can reduce and report
their carbon footprint savings. This is
especially relevant for companies that
want to improve their sustainability
reports and public image.
The cost of a system setup and
maintenance depends on the scale:
Over 10 years, it will cost about one
years worth of energy savings, plus
about 10 percent of annual energy
savings for ongoing management and
support that the company provides.
Improving green images
Beemtech is an 18-person company
headquartered in the Science Park
in Rehovot, a satellite city about a
40-minute drive from Tel Aviv. It also has an office in
Manhattan. The company has been privately funded un-
til now, but seeks $5 million to $10 million in order to put
its smart sensors into mass production.
Beemtech is currently installing a system for a
10,000-square-foot office building in Raanana, Israel.
This space will require about 80 sensors to gather huge
amounts of information says Frieberg.
If they have 200 meeting rooms, it is most likely that
80% of these rooms are empty most of the time. We can
know how to manage every 100 square feet and can
reduce costs by telling facility managers how to manage
them.
Urban planners and architects, he notes, can use
information collected by Beemtech to better understand
how spaces are really being used. Are open-concept
offices working for a firm, or are employees scurrying
to private meeting rooms instead? Does the new floor
really need to be renovated or can office staff be moved to
unused meeting rooms?
Its a bit funny that organizations spend so much
money to control their assets like cars and computers,
but energy, which is 20% of their budget for operation
expenditures, is not done. We can promise to cut energy
usage by 30 or 40 percent, says Frieberg.
Israel21c.org
www.jstandard.com
Informative, newsworthy,
interactive, user-friendly
well-designed
and, well
cool!
JS-66*
66 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
NEW MILFORD
1134 KORFITSEN ROAD
Updated 4 BR/2BTH Colonial.
TEANECK
111 GRAYSON PLACE
Updated. Open oor plan.
TEANECK
193 VANDELINDA AVENUE
Exquisite Center Hall Colonial.
ENGLEWOOD $725,000
289 SUNSET AVENUE
SUNDAY OPEN HOUSE, 12:30 -2:30
ENGLEWOOD
360 AUDUBON ROAD
Large updated Tudor Colonial.
TENAFLY $1,550,000
29 FARVIEW ROAD
Picturesque 0.97 acre.
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Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us for your complimentary consultation
We specialize in residential and commercial rentals and sales.
We will be happy to assist you with all your real estate needs.
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
GREEPOINT
199 HURON ST, #5-A
2 BR Condo. Private roof deck.
TRIBECA
110 DUANE ST, #PH-3S
Posh Penthouse. Prime location.
CHELSEA
456 WEST 19TH ST, #45-C
1 BR/2 BTH Condo. Doorman bldg.
WILLIAMSBURG
34 NORTH 7TH ST, #2-D
Stylish luxury bldg. Heart of Brooklyn.
DUMBO
205 WATER ST, #2-J
Brand new construction. Sauna.
UPPER WEST SIDE
200 WEST 108TH ST, #2-B
Charming Co-op. Pre-war bldg.
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SELLING YOUR HOME?
Call Susan Laskin Today
To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
2012 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com Cell: 201-615-5353








EnglEwood East hill
Majestically set on rarely available 4.3 acres.
This stately colonial home ofers 9 bedrooms and 6.5
baths, 7 freplaces, tennis court, indoor and outdoor
pools, cabana and carriage house with 4 car garage.
Mature fenced grounds with gated entry. Near houses
of worship. Not ofered for sale in over 45 years!
Vincent Volpe, Jr.
640 Palisade Avenue
Englewood Cliffs, NJ
201-567-8700
Gala raises funds to fight autism
More than 400 businesses and individuals at-
tended the 2012 annual Garden Academy Gala
to support the organizations mission to make
a difference in the lives of those affected by
autism.
Garden Academy is a nonprofit school for
children with autism located in Essex County.
On average, the annual cost of living is
twice as high for children and adults with
intellectual disabilities than for others, said
Craig Montanaro, Kearny Federals president
and chief executive officer, who attended the
event. Garden Academy and its programs help
individuals with autism reach their full potential.
It is an honor for us to be part of a process that
often leads to dramatic improvement in the lives
of children with autism, he added.
Thomas DOvidio, left, presi-
dent of the board of directors
of Garden Academy, and Craig
Montanaro, president and CEO
of Kearny Federal Savings
Bank.
Calling all fashionistas to a school benefit
Have some fashion forward fun at a fash-
ion show to benefit the Elisabeth Morrow
School endowment for faculty.
The luncheon and fashion show
will take place from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.,
Thursday, Jan. 31 at Neiman Marcus at
the Garden State Plaza, Paramus. The
program is open to parents and friends
of the school, and is sponsored by its par-
ents association.
The Elisabeth Morrow School is a
78-year-old independent, coeducational
country day school in Englewood. Its
students come Bergen, Passaic, Morris,
Essex, Union, Hudson, and Rockland
counties and New York City.
For tickets and information contact
Maureen York, or (201) 568-5566, ext.
7223.
Six ways to a healthy home
During the winter months, its important
to take extra care of your home, your fam-
ily and especially yourself.
Luckily, there are a number of simple,
yet impactful ways to keep the entire
household in good health. Here are six
examples to get you and your family on
the right track toward winter wellness.
Pencil in cleaning
Routine household cleaning keeps clutter
and germs at bay. Corral loose items
into decorative bins and baskets, then
use disinfecting wipes on common high-
touch areas such as faucets, door knobs,
and light switches to reduce the spread
of viruses and bacteria. Be sure to dust
regularly, as dust particles often contain
pet dander, chemicals, or other irritants
that have the potential to aggravate aller-
gies. If you have any sensitivity to clean-
ing products, try a natural solution of
equal parts water and distilled white vin-
egar to clean everything from windows to
appliances.
For the dogs
Pets are extensions of our families and
should be treated as such even when
it comes to bathing. These four-legged
friends have the tendency to bring many
allergens into the home. To minimize this
problem, dogs should be bathed regularly
and wiped down with a damp cloth when
they come in from outside.
Sweeping surprise
For years, we have counted on our vacu-
ums to get rid of dust and allergens in
our homes. But, it turns out that the ma-
chines we rely on to clean our floors and
furniture may actually be making them
dirtier. A recent study by researchers from
Queensland University of Technology
in Brisbane, Australia found that many
vacuums especially older models
actually suspend harmful allergen par-
ticles in the air, increasing our exposure
to them. If you have an older vacuum,
consider upgrading to a new one with a
HEPA (High-Efficiency-Particulate-Air)
filter, which releases less dirt and bac-
teria into the air than a standard model.
Regardless of the age or features of your
vacuum, clean it regularly to ensure a
healthier sweep.
Door etiquette
Dirt and pollen are often brought into a
house on the shoes of guests and fam-
ily members. Adding a door mat on both
sides of a door and having everyone
promptly remove their shoes upon enter-
ing can significantly cut back on what is
being tracked inside. The Carpet and Rug
Institute estimates that up to 80 percent
of dirt and allergens can be caught with a
washable door mat keeping your fam-
ily healthy and your floors clean.
Air it out
One area many homeowners might not
consider when it comes to a healthier
home is the mattress. Although changing
your sheets weekly is an important ritual,
delay putting on clean linens to allow
time for mite-friendly moisture to evapo-
rate. Now youll have a clean mattress to
go along with your clean sheets.
Winter workouts
The perfect prevention for winter illness
from cold and flu viruses to a case of
the winter blues is exercise. According
to Neil Schachter, a professor of pulmo-
nary and critical care at the Mount Sinai
School of Medicine, any kind of moder-
ate daily exercise can improve lung and
immune function by enhancing the abil-
ity of virus-attacking white blood cells
to ramp up the immune response. If you
cant get outdoors for a daily walk during
the colder months, consider purchasing a
treadmill or stationary bike, beef up your
workout video library, or pick up an active
game, like Just Dance or Dance Central,
for your motion-activated gaming system
to kick germs to the curb.
By following these helpful hints, you
and your family will be better prepared
during the long winter months
preventing the spread of germs and
making wellness a top priority.
ARA
JS-67
Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012 67
NEW MILFORD
1134 KORFITSEN ROAD
Updated 4 BR/2BTH Colonial.
TEANECK
111 GRAYSON PLACE
Updated. Open oor plan.
TEANECK
193 VANDELINDA AVENUE
Exquisite Center Hall Colonial.
ENGLEWOOD $725,000
289 SUNSET AVENUE
SUNDAY OPEN HOUSE, 12:30 -2:30
ENGLEWOOD
360 AUDUBON ROAD
Large updated Tudor Colonial.
TENAFLY $1,550,000
29 FARVIEW ROAD
Picturesque 0.97 acre.
S
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Jeff@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com
Ruth@MironProperties.com www.MironProperties.com/NJ
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.
Contact us for your complimentary consultation
We specialize in residential and commercial rentals and sales.
We will be happy to assist you with all your real estate needs.
Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ
NJ: T: 201.266.8555 M: 201.906.6024
NY: T: 212.888.6250 M: 917.576.0776
GREEPOINT
199 HURON ST, #5-A
2 BR Condo. Private roof deck.
TRIBECA
110 DUANE ST, #PH-3S
Posh Penthouse. Prime location.
CHELSEA
456 WEST 19TH ST, #45-C
1 BR/2 BTH Condo. Doorman bldg.
WILLIAMSBURG
34 NORTH 7TH ST, #2-D
Stylish luxury bldg. Heart of Brooklyn.
DUMBO
205 WATER ST, #2-J
Brand new construction. Sauna.
UPPER WEST SIDE
200 WEST 108TH ST, #2-B
Charming Co-op. Pre-war bldg.
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68 Jewish standard nOVeMBer 30, 2012
RCBC
Mashgiach Temidi / Open 7:00 am Sunday through Friday
Now closing Friday at 2:00 pm
1400 Queen Anne Rd Teaneck, NJ 201-837-8110
SEE OUR FULL CHANUKAH DISPLAY
Menorahs, Dreidels, Candles, Latkes,
Jelly Doughnuts, Candy, Toys and More!
NEW AT GLATT EXPRESS!
Ninja Roll
Jacks Gourmet Facon &
Spicy Italian Style Salami
Crunchy Kani Salad
Sheila Gs
Brownie Brittle
Godzilla Roll
Simply Bar
As your community
store with hundreds of
suppliers, there is nothing
we cant carry for you. Let us
know what you want and
we will aim to get it.
SUSHI
TAKE OUT
NEW PRODUCTS