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Mapped Meshing

Problem Statement:

When using the finite element method, it is often helpful to have complete control of the size and shape of the elements . This can allow you to concentrate elements in areas of interest while having a sparse mesh in other areas. Finite element solutions of large nonlinear problems can take hours or days even for the latest computers. So, it is sometimes important to design a mesh to make the most effective usage of computing power. Mapped meshing allows you to specify the mesh design. In this tutorial, we will use mapped meshing to generate a quarter model of the body shown below.

4 in 2 in 8 in
4 in
2 in
8 in

The region to be modeled is shown below.

4 in 1 in
4 in
1 in

2 in

ANSYS procedure:

1. Preprocessor >Element type > Add/Edit/Delete > (Add) > (Solid) > (Quad 4 node 42) > OK

2. Preprocessor > Material properties > Material models > Structural > Linear > Elastic > Isotropic Enter EX = 29 6 and PRXY = 0.30

3. Preprocessor >Modeling > Create > Key points > In active CS (assume z = 0 for all keypoints)

Key point

X coordinate

Y coordinate

1

0

0

2

1

0

3

2

0

4

4

0

5

4

2

6

2

2

7

0

2

8

0

1

4. Preprocessor > Modeling > Create > Lines >Lines > Straight lines > ( click on the key points to make corresponding lines )

Line

Key point

Key point

1

2

3

2

3

4

3

4

5

4

5

6

5

3

6

6

6

7

7

7

8

5. Preprocessor > Modeling > Create > Arcs > By End KPs & Rad > Select key points 2 and 8 > OK > Select key point 1 > OK > RAD = 1

6. Preprocessor > Modeling > Operate > Booleans > Divide > Lines w/ options > Select arc > OK> ( Set NDIV = 2 and RATIO = 0.5 ) > OK ( To divide arc into two arcs L8 and L9 )

7. Preprocessor > Modeling > Create > Lines >Lines > Straight lines > Pick key points 6 and 9 to create line (L10) > OK

Create > Lines >Lines > Straight lines > Pick key points 6 and 9 to create

8. Preprocessor > Meshing > Size Cntrls > Manual size > Lines > Picked lines > Select lines 8, 5 and 3 > OK > NDIV = 5

9. Preprocessor > Meshing > Size cntrls > Manual size > Lines > Picked lines > Select lines 9 and 6 > OK > NDIV = 10 and SPACE = .1

10. Preprocessor > Meshing > Size cntrls > Manual size > Lines > Picked lines > Select lines 1, 10 and 7 > OK > NDIV = 10 and SPACE = .1

11. Preprocessor > Meshing > Size cntrls > Manual size > Lines > Picked lines > Select lines 2 and 4 > OK > NDIV = 3 and SPACE = .5

2 and 4 > OK > NDIV = 3 and SPACE = .5 12. The SPACE

12. The SPACE option allows elements to be smaller at one end of a line compared to the other end. It is used for generating a fine mesh in regions where stress gradients are expected to be relatively large.

13. Preprocessor > Meshing > Size ctrls > Manual size > Lines > Flip bias > Select lines > OK (lines 1 and 2 as shown in the figure above should be flipped since we need smaller elements closer to the hole)

14. Preprocessor > Modeling > Create > Areas > Arbitrary > By lines > Select lines to create 3 distinct areas

Modeling > Create > Areas > Arbitrary > By lines > Select lines to create 3

15. Preprocessor > Meshing > Mesh > Areas > Mapped > 3 or 4 sided > Pick all > OK

16. Apply loads and solve as usual

NOTES:

all > OK 16. Apply loads and solve as usual NOTES: • Notice that the smallest

Notice that the smallest element is at the top of the hole, which is the area where we expect the highest stresses if the body is loaded with an axial load in the horizontal direction at the ends. The area where we want the most densely packed elements depends on the loading.

If the body is loaded at the right end with a distributed load, then the appropriate symmetry boundary conditions would be uy = 0 along lines 1 and 2 and ux = 0 along line 7. Displacements are always fixed perpendicular to symmetry cut lines. If displacements are fixed in this way and a pressure of 1000 is applied to line 3, the x component of stress will vary as shown below.

the x ‐ component of stress will vary as shown below. This tutorial was developed by

This tutorial was developed by David Hall and Sai Ravi Kanth Tummala © 2008