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HUBBARD COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE
Saint Hill Manor, East Grinstead, Sussex
HCO POLICY LETTER OF 23 MAY 1989RB
Issue I
Revised 5 May 2001
Remimeo
All Orgs
Academies
Missions
HOWTO
CONFRONT AND SHATI'ER SUPPRESSION
PTS/SP COURSE
"An SP confronted by someone who knows and can use
all the tech concerning SPs would shatter." - LRH
NAME: --0.- --'__ ORG: _ . ~ ._.---=-----
POST: _
DATE STARTED: -4---_ DATE COMPLETED: _
This course contains the vital technology regarding the suppressive person
(SP) and potential trouble source (PTS), including their detection and
handling. It is' studied' by those desiring a thorough understanding of the
mechanics and effects 'of suppression, as well as the basic handlings for it.
Note: A separate course, the PTS/SP Detection, Routing and Handling
Specialist Course, exists for auditors, Ethics Officers and De-PTSers which
includes all of the material in this course as well as organizational handling of
SPs and audited handlings of PTSes.
PREREQIDSITE: The Student Hat or Basic Study Manual
(HQS Course and/or a TRs Course recommended)
STUDY TECH: Study tech is to be applied in full throughout this course. The
materials are to be studied and drilled in sequence. By initialing the blank after
each checksheet entry, you are attesting that you fully understand and can
apply the data. DRILLS ARE TO BE DONE FULLYTO THEIR RESULT. If you are
not a fast flow student, you must star-rate check out on all items marked with
an asterisk (*). (Ref: HCOB 13 Aug. 72RC, FAST FLOW TRAINING) The course
does not require twinning.
MATERIALS: Pack:
Lectures:
Books:
PTS/SP Course pack
PTS/SP Course Lectures
Science of Survival
The Problems of Work
Scientology: The Fundamentals of Thought
What Is Scientology?
Unpublished work: ~ created 1989, revised 1996, 2001 L. Ron Hubbard Library. All Rights Reserved.
HCO PL 23.S.89RB I
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Booklets: A Description of the Scientology Religion
L. Ron Hubbard: A Profile
Video: Introduction to Scientology
Recording: Can We Ever Be Friends?
You are required to maintain a standard course schedule. Study and work
during your class periods and outside of class. You have a lot to study and get
checked out on in order to complete this course. You cannot afford to waste
time.
You may be credited with materials you have studied on previous
checksheets.
TECHNICAL TRAINING FILMS:
Before you may graduate from this course, you must view any film assigned
to it along with the student body in regularly scheduled showings.
(NOTE: Since missions do not have Technical Training Films, this
checksheet requirement is waived for students doing the course in a mission.)
The Tech Films are listed twice in the course checksheet. They first appear
in Section 00, and they also appear at the appropriate point on the checksheet
categorized with other technical material similar to that contained in the Tech
Film.
The reason the checksheet is laid out in this fashion is because students are
not expected to wait to see the Tech Film until they arrive at that point on the
checksheet. Unlike other written material or tape lectures, students watch the
Tech Films with the entire student body, not individually. With dozens of Tech
Films making up the full Tech Film library, it is necessary that the org play
them on a rotating schedule so that each film gets shown. Due to the number
and length of films, each film only gets shown once over a period of days.
Therefore, while on this course, you must arrange to see Tech Films (along
with the student body) as time and space permit in the film room. And then, by
the time you get to the section of the checksheet that includes all other
technical materials pertinent to that Tech Film, you should have already seen it
and will not then be held up on your course, having to wait for the next
showing of that particular film.
The sequence of study for viewing Tech Films is as follows:
1. Read the glossary (available at Course Admin) for the Tech Film ypq are
going to see, prior to seeing the Tech Film.
2. View the Tech Film along with the rest of the student body.
3. After viewing the film, clear any misunderstoods you picked up dUring
the film with Method 3 Word Clearing. (Most words will have been
covered in the glossary.) 1
4. Watch the Tech Film again at the next scheduled showing, along with
the student body.
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5. Later in your checksheet when you reach an item that calls for viewing a
Tech F i l m ~ you should have already seen it. However, you may then take
that opportunity to watch the Tech Film again.
6. Do the drills assigned to that Tech Film. You must have seen the Tech
Film prior to doing any of the drills for that film.
6A. CONDITIONAL: Under no circumstances are you allowed to do the
drills covering a film if you have not seen the film. If you do get to a
section of the course covering a Tech Film and drills related to that film,
but have not yet seen the film, and it is not scheduled for immediate
viewing, you must skip that entire section and move on to the next
section of the checksheet, while arranging to see the Tech Film you
missed at the very next showing. Then, after you have seen the film,
return at once to the section you had to skip. This is not the optimum
way to do your studies, so arrange to see the required films ahead of
time.
7. You may view each film as many times as needed to ensure you have
fully grasped the tech presented in it. Viewing these films more than
once is recommended: number of times over the material equals
certainty and results.
(NOTE: IF ANY TECHNICAL FILM IS NOT AVAILABLE IN YOUR ORG FOR
SHOWING, DUE TO DAMAGE, INOPERATIONAL PROJECTOR OR ANY
OTHER REASON-KNOWN OR UNKNOWN-YOU MUST WRITE A REPORT
ON THE MATTER TO THE INSPECTOR GENERAL NETWORK OF RELIGIOUS
TECHNOLOGY CENTER UNDER THE CHARGE OF TECHNICAL DEGRADE.)
STANDARD TECH DRILLS: This checksheet contains the Standard Tech Drills
for PTS/SP tech. At the end of each section containing drills, additional spaces
have been included to write in any new drills released in the future. The Course
Admin should fill in these spaces when you route onto course. If this did not
occur, bring it to the attention of the Supervisor so you can be sure your
checksheet is totally up-to-date.
PRODUCT: A person who lmows PTS/SP tech and who is able to detect
suppressive persons and PTS situations and handle them causatively.
CERTIFICATE: On completion of this checksheet you may be awarded a
PTS/SP COURSE GRADUATE certificate.
LENGTH OF COURSE: 3 weeks full time
SECTION 0: KEEPING SCIENTOLOGY woRKING
*1. HCOPL 7 Feb. 65 KSW Series 1
KEEPING SCIENTOLOGY
WORKING
__--w- {/
2. HeOPL 17 June 70RB I KSW Series 5
Rev. 25.10.83 TECHNICAL DEGRADES
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
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3.
4.
5.
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SECTION 00: TECHNICAL TRAINING FILMS
EM 2: The Tone Scale
1. Read the glossary for E-Meter Instruction Film Number 2,
The Tone Scale, and clear any misunderstoods.
---
2. Film: E-Meter Instruction Film
Number 2, The Tone Scale
3. WORD CLEARING: Method 3 Word Clearing on E-Meter
Instruction Film Number 2, The Tone Scale: Look up any
misunderstoods you encountered in viewing this film. '
Once all Mis-Us are cleared, rewatch the film. Handle any
further Mis-Us you note.
---p--
4. Film:
5.
6.
7.
E-Meter Instruction Film
Number 2A, The Tone Scale
Drill Film
SECTION I: ORIENTATION
PRODUCT: A student who knows the basic definitions
of PTS and SP and why he is studying this course.
1. Clear the following words using the glossary in your course
pack.
Suppressive Person
Potential Trouble Source
Roller Coaster
Suppress
Suppression
------__ v
--_ II
-"'\
*2. HCO PL 30 Jan. 83 KSW Series 28
YOUR POST AND LIFE
Heo PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
3. HCOB 20 Oct. 76R I
Rev. 25.8.87
-5-
PTSDATA
4. ESSAY: Write down why you are studying this course and
what you are going to get out of it.
5.
6.
7.
-----,.---
SECTION II: THE TONE SCALE AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR
PRODUCT: A student with a full knowledge of the
Tone Scale, as contained in Science of Survival and the
Hubbard Chart of Human Evaluation, who can use it to
accurately predict human behavior..
A. The Tone Scale
*1. HCOB 25 Sept. 71RB TONE SCALE IN FULL
Rev. 1.4.78
EM 2: The Tone Scale
2. Read the glossary for E-Meter Instruction Film Number 2,
The Tone Scale, and clear any misunderstoods.
.,------
___ II
3. Film: E-Meter Instruction Film
Number 2, The Tone Scale
---;--
(If this film is not scheduled for immediate viewing, go .right
onto section II-Band arrange to see this film at the very
next showing. Once you have seen the film, return at once
to this section and complete all items.)
4. WORD CLEARING: Method 3 Word Clearing on E-Meter
Instruction Film Number 2, The Tone Scale: Look up any
misunderstoods you encountered in viewing this film.
Once all Mis-Us are cleared, rewatch the film. Handle any
further Mis-Us you note.
5 Film: E-Meter Instruction Film
Number 2A, The Tone Scale
Drill Film
- - ~ / -
6. DRILL: Do Technical Training Film Drill EM 2-1
(FLM-EM2-1J, The Tone Scale Patter.
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7. PRACTICAL:
-6-
a. With another student or students, go out on the streets
and places where there are lots of people and LOOK,
LOOK, L0251 noting down all the different tones you V?J_ I 0 SFP. (),
observe. -U.... C';.:I
b. Return to the org and watch EM 2A, The Tone Scale Drill rr::r__
Film. -JEL_
" I , r
, .
;
, / y ./
. , I '
; " 9.
10.
c. Repeat steps (a) and (b) until you can rapidly and easily
spot the tone level of a person without uncertainty or
hesitation.
4.

B. Science of Survival and Human Behavior
Book: Science of Survival
\ f\ d\ r. P:
-?1. Introduction rTJ7 / J; .s e .
\j \.1
2. Read Chapter One, ClThe Tone Scale," referring to Column A ,.r;n I r _ ,/1+-
of the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study. _v_or__/_
3. CLAY DEMO: Work out in clay the mechanics behind the
following: F&t 1-'1- -
leFrom 0.0 to 2.0 we have the band of operation of the /
reactive mind. Between these points on the Tone Scale, th - I [J- C1
reactive mind is in command of the organism." . / _ _ /
Read the Dianetic evaluation given for each level in d-"::r /6 ,p
Column B of the Chart of Human Evaluation. _ ()I
Read Chapter Two, "Dianetic Evaluation,:" referring to f {b
2
L+-
Column Bof the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.'1 I' r
6. Read each level in Column C of the Chart of Human
Evaluation.
7. Read the psychiatric range given for each level in Column D
of the Chart of Human Evaluation.
. 8. Read Chapter Four, "Psychiatric Range," referring to
Column D of the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.
9. SKETCH: Diagram out how engrams can cause a person to
appear to have a place on one or two columns of the chart
which does not hold true for the majority of characteristics.
HCO PL 23.S.B9RB I
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----
10. ESSAY: Describe how you would establish the level of
sanity of an individual on the Chart of Human Evaluation.
11. Read the medical range given for each level in Column E of
the Chart of Human Evaluation.
12. Read Chapter Five, ltMedical Range," referring to Column E
of the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.
13. Read Chapter Six, ltThe Basic Laws of Theta,
Affinity-Reality-Communication. n
14. CLAY DEMO: The axiom "Entheta in sufficient quantity
brought into proximity with theta will enturbulate that
theta."
15. PRACTICAL: Write down three specific instances where
you observed a high quantity of theta brought ihto-
proximity with entheta, and the effects this had. Turn your
write-up in to the Supervisor. .
16. Read the emotion given for each level in'Column F of the
Chart of Human Evaluation.
17. Read Chapter Seven, uEmotion," referring to Column F of
the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.
lB. CLAY DEMO: What misemotion is.
19. Read each level of affinity given in Column Gof the Chart
of Human Evaluation.
20. Read Chapter Eight, "Affinity," referring to Column G of
the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.
21. PRACTICAL: Using the data in this chapter, write down
three instances where you have observed affinity at the
level of 4.0. Then write down three instances where you
observed affinity at the level of 1.1. Turn your write-up in
to the Supervisor.
22. Read each level of Column Kof the Chart of Human
Evaluation.
23. Read Chapter Thirteen, cCSpeech: Talks-Speech: Listens,"
referring to Column Kof the Chart of Human Evaluation as
you study.
---------
24. PRACTICAL: Observing people's level of communication.
With a coach, the student talks to people, paying particular
attention to the points covered in each level of Column Kof
the Chart of Human Evaluation. After each corom cycle is
completed, and the person talked to is no longer p r e s e n t ~
the student looks at the chart to estimate the person's
position on Column Kas demonstrated by his manner of
HCO PL 23.5.B9RB I
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speech and listening. This is repeated until the student has
found a variety of positions on the chart and is certain of
his ability to spot someone's level of cOlllmunication.
---
25. Read each level of Column L of the Chart of Human
Evaluation.
---
26. Read Chapter Fourteen, Subject's Handling of Written or
Spoken Communication When Acting as a Relay Point,"
referring to Column L of the Chart of Human Evaluation as
you study.
---
27. Read each of the different levels of reality given in Column M
of the Chart of Human Evaluation.
---
2B. Read Chapter Fifteen, UReality (Agreement)," referring to
Column M of the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.
---
29. SKETCH: Sketch out where an individual's thought and
perception would be directed at 4.0 on the Chart of Human
Evaluation. Then sketch out where an individuars thought
and perception would be directed at each descending point
on the Chart of Human Evaluation, including how this
relates to time-past, present and future.
---
3D. Read each level of Column P of the Chart of Human
Evaluation.
---
31. Read Chapter Eighteen, "Sexual Behavior, Attitude toward
Children," referring to Column P of the Chart of Human
Evaluation as you study.
---
32. Read each level of Column Qof the Chart of Human
Evaluation.
---
33. Read Chapter Nineteen, "Command over Environment,"
referring to Column Qof the Chart of Human Evaluation as
you study.
---
34. Read each level of Column Rof the Chart of Human
Evaluation.
---
35. Read Chapter Twenty, "Actual Worth to Society Compared
to Apparent Worth," referring to Column Rof the Chart of
Human Evaluation as you study.
---
36. ESSAY: Explain why there can be a false apparency of an
individual's worth to society and how, using the Chart of
Human Evaluation, you can accurately determine
someone's worth to society.
---
37. CLAY DEMO: How it is that "In this column on the chart,
anyone, regardless of his potential value, below the line of
2.0 as evaluated by other columns, has a negative value to
the society. Anyone above this line goes from zero value
upward in a positive direction."
---
HCO PL 23.5.89RB r -9-
Rev. 5.5.2001
38. Read each of the ethic levels given in Column S of the
Chart of Human Evaluation.
---
39. Read Chapter Twenty-One, CCEthic Level," referring to
Column S of the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.
---
40. Read each level of the handling of truth given in Column T
of the Chart of Human Evaluation.
---
41. Read Chapter Twenty-Two, uThe Handling of Truth,"
referring to Column T of the Chart of Human Evaluation as
you study.
---
42. PRACTICAL: Using the data in this chapter, write down
three instances where you have observed the handling of
truth of an individual above 2.0 on the Chart of Human
Evaluation including the manifestations which you
observed. Then write down three instances where you
observed the handling of truth of an individual below 2.0
and what manifestations you observed. Turn your write-up
in to the Supervisor.
---
43. Read each of the levels of courage given in Column Uof the
Chart of Human Evaluation.
---
44. Read Chapter Twenty-Three, UCourage Level," referring to
Column U of the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.
---
45. PRACTICAL: Write down three instances where you have
observed the mechanism of a high-toned man or woman
seeking out and defending the pitiful and weak or,
reversely, the low-toned person seeking out a person high
on the Tone Scale. Explain the results of this association in
each instance. Turn your write-up in to the Supervisor.
---
46. Read each level of responsibility given in Column Vof the
Chart of Human Evaluation.
---
47. Read Chapter Twenty-Four, CCAbility to Handle
Responsibility," referring to Column Vof the Chart of
Human Evaluation as you study.
---
48. ESSAY: Describe how, no matter how convincing a showof
responsibility is put forth, one can detect a level of
responsibility of an individual at 1.1. Include exactly what
you would look at and how the person's actual level of
responsibility would manifest itself.
---
49. Read each level of persistence on a given course given in
Column W of the Chart of Human Evaluation.
---
SO. Read Chapter Twenty-Five, c'Persistence on a Given
Course," referring to Column Waf the Chart of Human
Evaluation as you study.
---
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S1. Read each level of reception of statements given in Column X
of the Chart of Human Evaluation.
52. Read Chapter Twenty-Six, ((Literalness with Which
Statements or Remarks Are Received," referring to Column X
of the Chart of Human Evaluation as you study.
53. Read each of the levels of methods used to handle others
given in Column Y of the Chart of Human Evaluation.
54. Read Chapter Twenty-Seven, "Method Used by Subject to
Handle Others," referring to Column Yof the Chart of
Human Evaluation as you study.
55. CLAY DEMO: The three general categories the methods of
handling others can be assigned to:
a. Enhancement
b. Punishment drive, domination
c. Nullification
56. PRACTICAL: For each level of Column Y, write down an
instance where you observed an individual manifesting
those characteristics. Continue this practical until you are
totally certain of how to spot where a person is at on
Column Yof the chart. Turn your write-up in to the
Supervisor.
57. PRACTICAL: Using what you have learned from the
preceding chapters of Science of Suroival, and the Hubbard
Chart of Human Evaluation, choose someone you have
known or 0 bserved and establish that person's position on
the Chart of Human Evaluation. Make a written report on
this, explaining why you arrived at that conclusion. Then
repeat this for at least five other persons you have known
or observed, until you are totally confident of your ability
to do this. Turn your write-up in to the Supervisor.
58. PAB 13 (ca. mid-Nov. 53) ON HUMAN BEHAVIOR
S9. PRACTICAL: Take each of the things the aberrative
personality does, as given in the above PAB, and write down
an instance when you have seen that characteristic in play:
a. "Everything bad that happened to the preclear was
(a) ridiculous, (b) unimportant, (c) deserved."
b. "Everything the preclear and others did to the
aberrative person was (a) very important, (b) very bad,
ec) irremediable."
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c. "Those things which the preclear could do (a) were
without real value, (b) were done better by the
aberrative personality or by
d. "Sexual restraint or perversion."
e. t'Inhibition of eating."
Then repeat this with more instances where you have
observed these characteristics until you are confident of
your ability to spot them. Turn your write-up in to the
Supervisor.
60.
61.
62.
C. Obnosis and the Tone Scale
*1. HCOB 26 Oct. 70 II OBNOSIS AND THE TONE
SCALE
2. PRACTICAL: Seeing what is there. The coach points out
someone in the course room for the student to look at and
then has the student tell him what he sees-Le., "seeing
what is there" per HCOB 26 Oct. 70 II, OBNOSIS AND THE
TONE SCALE. The student must answer with what he sees.
The coach accepts nothing that is not' plaicly visible'. He' ," ,"
asks 'questions to help the student improve his obnosis of
other people, as covered in HCOB 26 Oct. 70 II. The
student does this to the point where'he can look at another
person and see exactly what is ..: . , '
3. PRACTICAL: Obnosing tone levels. With a coach, the
student walks around in the streets and buildings nearby
and talks to strangers and spots them on the Tone Scale.
The student takes a clipboard with a series of questions
written on it (as per HCOB 26 Oct. 70 II) and paper to note
observations. He spots the tone level of each person he
talks to. The student does this with at least ten different
people until he feels confident in his ability to spot tone
levels. When finished, he makes a written report on each
person observed and what he would predict about them
based on the Chart of Human Evaluation and turns this
write-up in to the Supervisor.
4. PRACTICAL: Matching tones. With a coach, the student
walks around in the streets and buildings nearby and
interviews at least fifteen people.
a. With the first five, he matches their tone as soon as he's
spotted it.
;\
f," j
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b. With the next five, he drops below their chronic tone
and sees what happens.
c. For the last five, he puts on a higher tone than theirs.
The student makes a written report on each, explaining
what he observed about the effect a person of higher or
lower tone had on others and turns this write-up in to
the Supervisor.
s.
6.
7.
SECTION III: THE ANATOMY OF SUPPRESSION
PRODUCT: Astudent with an understanding of what a
suppressive person is and the mechanics of why an SP
behaves as he does.
A. The Antisocial Personality
1. HCO Info Letter 2 Apr. 64 TWO TYPES OF PEOPLE
2. Certainty, Vol. 13 NO.2 PSYCHOTICS
2 Feb. 66
3. CLAY DEMO: Show in clay how it is that "The true
psychotic is one who causes hysteria, apathy,
misconceptions and the reactions of stress in others."
4. Lecture: 6608C25 "The Antisocial Personality"
S. ESSAY: Describe the value of knowing cold the twelve
characteristics of the antisocial personality. Include what
could happen to a person who does not know them, versus
the value to a person who does know them.
*6. HCO PL 27 Sept. 66 THE ANTISOCIAL
PERSONAUTY, THE
ANTI-SCIENTOLOGIST
7. CLAY DEMO: Work out in clay the basic reason the
antisocial personality behaves as he or she does.
8. CLAY DEMO: How a social personality could react with
momentary flashes of antisocial conduct and why etone
must examine the good with the bad before one can truly
label the antisocial or the social."
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
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9. A. DRILL: Do PTS Patter Drill! (PTS-P-l), Antisocial
Characteristics.
B. DRILL: Do PTS Theory Drill 1 (PTS-T-l), Antisocial
Personality Traits.
C. DRILL: Do PTS Patter Drill 2 (PTS-P-2), Social
Characteristics.
D. DRILL: Do PTS Theory Drill 4 (PTS-T-4), Social
Personality Traits.
E.
F.
G.
10.
11.
12.
B. The Continuing Overt Act
*1. HCOB 29 Sept. 65 II THE CONTINUING OVERT
ACT
2. Lecture: 6608C02 CCSuppressives and GAEs"
3. eLAY DEMO: Work out in clay how a suppressive person
is stuck in an incident on the track and how this relates to
his committing continuous averts in present time.
4. eLAY DEMO: Work out in clay the mechanism of a person
switching into a suppressive valence.
5.
6.
7.
c. Suppressive Elements in Society
1. PAB 62 (30 Sept. 55) PSYCHIATRISTS
2. HCOB 28 May 60 BY THEIR ACTIONS ...
3. Certainty, Vol. 7 No.2 WHY SOME FIGHT
1960 SCIENTOLOGY
4. Lecture: 6312ClO "Scientology Zero"
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
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5. ESSAY: Describe what the dangerous environment is and
how the chaos merchant works to bring it about.
6. PRACTICAL: Go through a newspaper or newsmagazine
and locate at least ten items that make the environment
appear to be dangerous. Write up what you learned from
this. Turn your write-up in to the Supervisor.
7.
8.
9.
D. Psychosis
*1. HCOB 28 Nov. 70 CIS Series 22
PSYCHOSIS
2. CLAY DEMO: The definition of insanity: "THE OVERT OR
COVERT BUT ALWAYS COMPLEX AND CONTINUOUS
DETERMINATION TO HARM OR DESTROY."
3. SKETCH: The apparent pattern of behavior of the insane.
4. CLAY DEMO: Show in clay:
a. Why the psychotic reacts by caving himself in when he
realizes he is harming things he shouldnJt.
b. Why the psychotic reacts by running if he is afraid he
will be found out.
c. How saying cCNOI" to a psychotic can cause these
reactions.
5. DRILL: Do PTS Patter Drill 15 (PTS-P-15), Psychosis.
6. HeOB 9 May 77 II PSYCHOSIS, MORE
ABOUT
---
*7. HCOB 10 May 72 ROBOTISM
---
8. eLAY DEMO: The exact mechanism of "needing orders"
including how this mechanism is an outgrowth of
psychosis.
---
*9. HCOB IS Sept. 81 THE CRIMINAL MIND
---
10. DRILL: Do PTS Patter Drill 16 (PTS-P-16), The Criminal
Mind.
*11. HeOB 5 Nov. 67 CRITICS OF SCIENTOLOGY
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12. CLAYDEMO: Showin clay why hidden crimes cause a
person to be critical of Scientology.
13. HCOB
14.
15.
16.
10 May 82 OTLEVELS
SECTION IV: SP DETECTION, ROUTING AND HANDLING
PRODUCT: A student who knows how to detect an SP
and the standard routing and handling of one.
A. Detection of SPs in Organizations
*1. HCO PL 7 Aug. 65 I SUPPRESSIVE PERSONS,
MAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF
2. DRILL: Do PTS Patter Drill 17 (PTS-P-17), Suppressive
Persons, Main Characteristics Of.
*3. HCO PL 6 Mar. 66 I REWARDS AND PENALTIES
HOW TO HANDLE
PERSONNEL AND ETHICS
MATTERS
4. CLAY DEMO: The law "WHEN YOU REWARD DOWN
STATISTICS AND PENALIZE UP STATISTICS YOU GET
DOWN STATISTICS."
S. CLAY DEMO: How the law on rewarding down statistics
and penalizing up statistics can be applied in detecting
suppressive persons, and the reason SPs do so.
---
6. HCOPL 15 Aug. 67 I DISCIPLINE, SPs ANDADMIN,
HOW STATISTICS CRASH
---
7. HCOPL 1 Oct. 67 USES OFORGS
---
8. CLAY DEMO: The two uses to which Scientology orgs can
be put.
a. Show in clay how, "To forward the advance of self and
all dynamics toward total survival" is used by the decent
being.
b. Show in clay how, "To use the great power and control
of an org over others to defend oneself' is used by the
suppressive.
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*9. HCO PL 16 Oct. 67
-16 -
SUPPRESSIVES AND THE
ADMINISTRATOR, HOW TO
DETECT SPs AS AN
ADMINISTRATOR
10. DRILL: Do PTS Patter Drill 18 (PTS-P-18), How to Detect
SPs as an Administrator.
* 11. HeOB 12 Mar. 68
*12. HCO PL 29 July 71 I
MISTAKES, ANATOMY OF
WHY HATTING?
13. CLAY DEMO: Work out in clay how posting and hatting
proof a person up against suppression.
14. ESSAY: Explain how and why an SP would instinctively
not hat others, hat them wrongly or tend to transfer and
move them about.
15. HCaB 5 Feb. 77 CIS Series 100
JOKERS AND DEGRADERS
16. CLAY DEMO: Why it is important that a joker and
degrader in an org is detected and handled.
17. HCaB 1 May 58
18. Hea PL 13 Jan. 83
SIGNS OF SUCCESS
THE BUSINESS OF ORGS
19. A. DRILL: Do PTS Theory Drill 3 (PTS-T-3),
Characteristics of Suppressives.
B.
C.
D.
20.
21.
22.
B. SP Ronting and Handling
*1. HCO PL 5 Apr. 65 I
HANDLING THE
SUPPRESSIVE PERSON, THE
BASIS OF INSANITY
2. CLAY DEMO: Show in clay why a suppressive person
doesn't make case gain and how that is the best way to
locate an SP.
HCO PL 23.S.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
*3. HCO PL 5 Apr. 65 II
- 17-
THE NO-GAIN-CASE
STUDENT
4. CLAY DEMO: The three categories of "tough cases":
a. uThe Roller Coaster Case"
b. ""The Withholdy Case"
c. ""The Suppressive Person"
5. Lecture: 6505C18 '''Organization and Ethics"
6. CLAY DEMO: The purpose of ethics.
7. HCO PL 23 Dec. 6SRB SUPPRESSIVE ACTS,
Rev. 8.1.91 SUPPRESSION OF
SCIENTOLOGY AND
SCIENTOLOGISTS
8. HCO PL 29 June 68
9. HCO PL 18 June 68
10. HCO PL 7 Dec. 69 I
*11. HCO PL 22 July 82R
Rev. 9.8.2000
ENROLLMENT IN
SUPPRESSIVE GROUPS
ETHICS
ETHICS, THE DESIGN OF
KNOWLEDGE REPORTS
12. ESSAY: Explain how Knowledge Reports are an effective
handling for suppressive persons within a group.
13.
14.
IS.
c. Justice and Third Party Tech
1. HCO PL 24 Feb. 69
2. HCO PL 26 Dec. 68 I
JUSTICE
THE THIRD PARTY LAW
3. CLAY DEMO: Show in clay how a third party can, through
false reports, act to suppress an individual or whole area
and how this is guarded against.
4.
5.
6.
RCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
-18 -
SECTION V: MECHANICS OF THE POTENTIAL TROUBLE SOURCE
PRODUCT: A student who understands the mechanics
ofPTSness.
A. The Anatomy of a Problem
*1. HCOB 14 Oct. 65 POTENTIAL TROUBLE
SOURCE, MECHANICS OF
2. CLAY DEMO: The definition of a problem.
3. CLAY DEMO: Showin clay how problems relate to a PTS
condition.
*4. HCOB
S. HCOB
6. HCOPL
8 Nov. 65
31 Mar. 60
18 Dec. 82
SUPPRESSIVES AND HIDDEN
STANDARDS
THE PRESENT TIME
PROBLEM
ETHICS CONDITIONS:
HANG-UP AT DOUBT
7. SKETCH: Diagram how PTSness can result in indecision.
8.
9.
10.
B. Overts and Responsibility
*1. HCOB 23 Dec. S9 RESPONSIBILITY
2. CLAY DEMO: How it is that "When one falls away from
responsibility on the various dynamics, he can then
become less and less able to influence those dynamics and
therefore becomes a victim of them. JJ
*3. HCOB 21 Jan. 60 I JUSTIFICATION
4. CLAY DEMO: The mechanism of justification.
5. HCO PL 2 Nov. 70 III RESPONSIBILITY
6. HCOB
7. HCOB
5 Oct. 61
8 Sept. 64
CLEAN HANDS MAKE A
HAPPY LIFE
OVERTS, WHAT LIES
BEHIND THEM?
HCOPL 23.5.B9RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
-19 -
*8. HCOB 20 May 68 OVERT-MOTIVATOR
SEQUENCE
9. CLAY DEMO: The overt-motivator sequence.
10. HCO PL 3 May 72RA
Rev. 7.9.2000
ETHICS AND EXECUTIVES
11. ESSAY: Explain how irresponsibility, overts and
justifications on the part of the PTS person relate to
PTSness.
12.
13.
14.
c. Degraded Beings
*1. HCO PL 22 Mar. 67 I ALTER-IS AND DEGRADED
BEINGS
2. HCOB 15 Dec. 73 THE CONTINUOUS MISSED
W/H AND CONTINUOUS
OVERT WITH DATA ON
DEGRADED BEINGS AND
FALSE PTS CONDITIONS
3. CLAY DEMO: Showin clay how someone could be falsely
labeled PTS due to continuous missed withholds or averts.
4.
5.
6.
D. Policy on PTSes
*1. HCO PL 27 Oct. 64R
Rev. 15.11.87
POLICIES ON PHYSICAL
HEALING, INSANITYAND
SOURCES OF TROUBLE
2. HCOPL 26 Dec. 66 PTS SECTIONS, PERSONNEL
AND EXECS
*3. RCO PL 7 Aug. 76 II PRODUCT-ORG OFFICER
SYSTEM, WANT YOUR
PRODUCT
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 20-
4. CLAYDEMO: Showin clay how someone whose intentions
are aimed at destruction, and not at creation, cannot
achieve anything as a product officer or staff member, and
how this datum can be applied in locating suppressives
and PTSes.
5. CLAY DEMO: The mechanism of the potential trouble
source sliding into the valence of the antagonistic person
and thus not being able to achieve anything.
*6. HCO PL 12 May 72R
Rev. 27.10.82
PTS PERSONNEL AND
FINANCE
7. CLAY DEMO: Showin clay how and why a PTS person will
dramatize a or an reenforced overt-have" on
others.
8. ESSAY: Write up how each of the following could manifest
and why each is a symptom of PTSness:
a. Chronic problem
(Ref: HCOB 8 Nov. 65, SUPPRESSlVES AND HIDDEN STANDARDS)
b. Alter-is
(Ref: HCO PL 22 Mar. 67 I, ALTER-IS AND DEGRADED BEINGS)
c. Makes mistakes
(Ref: HCOB 12 Mar. 68, MISTAKES, ANATOMY OF)
d. Will dramatize a or an ((enforced
overt-have"
(Ref: HCO PL 12 May 72R, PTS PERSONNEL AND FINANCE)
e. A low level of production
Production is an CCovert product"
Doesn't want a creative and valuable product
(Ref: HCO PL 7 Aug. 76 II, PRODUCT-ORG OFFICER SYSTEM,
WANT YOUR PRODUCT)
f. Indecision
(Ref: HCO PL 18 Dec. 82, ETHICS CONDITIONS:
HANG-UP AT DOUBT)
9.
10.
11.
Heo PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 21-
,
SECTION VI: HANDLING THE POTENTIAL TROUBLE SOURCE
PRODUCT: A student who understands how to handle
PTSness and can use the tools for handling antagonism
and suppression competently.
A. PTS Handling Basics
*1. HCOB 10 Aug. 73 PTS HANDLING
2. CLAY DEMO:
a. Why u all illness in greater or lesser degree and all
foul-ups stem directly and only from a PTS condition."
b. Why U getting rid of the condition requires three
basic actions: (A) Discover; (B) Handle or disconnect."
3. A. DRILL: Do PTS Patter Drill 8 (PTS-P-8), PTS Handling
Stable Data.
B. DRILL: Do PTS Theory Drill 8 (PTS-T-8), PTS Handling
(HCOB 10 Aug. 73) Theory Drill.
C.
D.
E.
4. Lecture: 6506C08 "Handling the PTS"
5. ESSAY: Describe why a PTS, who is connected to someone
actively suppressing him in present time, is handled with
ethics and not auditing.
*6. HCOB 24 Nov. 65 SEARCH AND DISCOVERY
7. SKETCH: Showthe difference between an actual SP and an
apparent SP.
8. CLAY DEMO: The three types of PTS:
a. "Type I is the easy one. The SP on the case is right in
present time, actively suppressing the person."
b. "Type II is harder for the apparent suppressive person
in present time is only a restimulator for the actual .
suppressive."
c. "The Type III PTS is mostly in institutions or would be.
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 22-
ceIn this case the Type Irs apparent SP is spread all over
the world and is often more than all the people there
are-for the person sometimes has ghosts about him or
demons and they are just more apparent SPs but
imaginary as beings as well."
9. A. DRILL: Do prs Patter DrillS (PTS-P-S), Search and
Discovery.
B. DRILL: Do PTS Theory Drill 5 (PTS-T-S), Types of
PTSness.
C.
D.
E.
*10. HCOB 20 Oct. 76 II PTS HANDLING
11. CLAY DEMO: I-Iow unhattedness, ignorance of Scientology
basics for handling life, past bad auditing uncorrected as
well as unhandled bad intentions and personal out-ethics
can make a person appear to be PTS when he is not.
*12. HCO PL 28 Feb. 84R
Rev. 10.11.2000
*13. HCOB 21 May 8SR
Rev. 23.4.2001
CIS Series 118
PRETENDED PTS
Cover-up and Justification of
Black PR and Evil Purposes
CIS Series 121
TWO TYPES OF PTSes
14. CLAY DEMO: Work out in clay the mechanism of
pretending to be PTS so as to cover up black PR and evil
purposes or justify them, and how to detect this.
15.
16.
17.
B. Handling Antagonism and Suppression
*1. HeO PL 5 Apr. 72RD
Rev. 10.9.83
PTS TYPE AHANDLING
2. CLAY DEMO: How a PTS Type A situation can stem from
something the prs person did to bring about the
antagonism in the first place, and how to handle.
3. eLAY DEMO: Show in clay the consequence of someone
taking the easy course and merely disconnecting
""temporarily,'" for the time of their training or processing,
and so not in actual fact handling the condition in their
lives which was upsetting them as Scientologists.
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 23-
\
*4. RCOB 10 Sept. 83 PTSnessAND
DISCONNECTION
s. CLAY DEMO: Show in clay the mechanism of
disconnection and why it is sometimes necessary.
6. Book: The Problems of Work, Chapter Six, CJAffinity, Reality
and Communication
U
*7. HCOB 8 Mar. 83 HANDLING PTS SITUATIONS
B. PRACTICAL: Write down an example of something which
could be communicated by an antagonistic terminal and
then, using the data from The ProbleTns of Work and HCOB
8 Mar. 83, write a letter in response to that communication.
Repeat this until you are totally confident of your abilitytb
handle antagonism through such communication. Turn
your write-ups in to the Supervisor.
*9. RCOB 16 Apr. 82
10. RCO PL 21 Mar. 89
11.
12.
13.
MORE ON PTS HANDLING
i
PTS PEOPLE AND LEAVES
c. Tools to Use in Handling and Preventing PTS Situations
*1. HCOB 31 Dec. 78RB I OUTLINE OF PTS
Rev. 28.10.2000 HANDLING
2. HCO PL 11 May 71 II
*3. HCO PL 21 Nov. 72
BLACKPR
HOW TO HANDLE BLACK
PROPAGANDA
4. CLAY DEMO: The law CJWHERE THERE IS NO DATA
AVAILABLE PEOPLE WILL INVENT IT. U
S. DRILL: Do PTS Patter Drill 19 (PTS-P-19), How to Handle
Black Propaganda.
Book: Scientology: The Fundamentals of Thought
6. Chapter: CJThe Vital Statistics of Scientology"
7. Chapter: "Basic Principles"
8. SKETCH: The actual cycle of action, including all of its
parts and the sequence in which they progress.
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 24-
9. Chapter: tiThe Conditions of Existence"
10. Chapter: "The Eight Dynamics"
11. Chapter: "The ARC Triangle"
12. ESSAY: Explain why the ARC triangle is not an equilateral
triangle and why communication is the most important
part of the triangle.
---
13. Chapter: tiThe Reason Why"
---
14. ESSAY: Explain how "These four elements-freedom,
barriers, purposes and power of choice-are the guiding
elements of life."
---
IS. Chapter: "The Parts of Man"
---
16. DEMO: The following parts of man and their relation to
each other: the spirit, the analytical mind, the reactive
mind, the somatic mind and the body.
---
17. Chapter: "Causation and Knowledge"
---
18. DEMO: Demonstrate each of the Axioms 1-10:
1. ___
2.
---
5.
---
6.
---
9.
---
10.
---
19. Chapter: "Know and Not-Know"
20. Chapter: "The Goal of Scientology"
21. Chapter: "Scientology Processing"
3. _
7. _
4. _
8. _
22. ESSAY: Describe how any hope or promise in Scientology
is conditional upon its good use by the individual and its
use in particular within the limits of the Auditor's Code
and the Code of a Scientologist.
23. C h a p t e r ~ "Exact Processes"
24. Appendix: nThe Aims of Scientology"
25. PRACTICAL: Work out and write down at least five ways
you could use the book Scientology: The Fundamentals of
Thought, to fill the vacuum on Scientology. Turn your
write-up in to the Supervisor.
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 25-
Filmed Interview: Introduction to Scientology
26. Watch the filmed interview Introduction to Scientology.
Booklet: A Description of the Scientology Religion
27. Study the booklet A Description of the Scientology Religion
from The Scientology Handbook.
28. PRACTICAL: Work out an example of how you would use
the information from this booklet in handling an
antagonistic source who challenges the validity of
Scientology as a religion. Actually write out exactly what
you would say or write in such a circumstance. Turn your
write-up in to the Supervisor.
Booklet: L. Ron Hubbard: A Profile
29. Study the booklet L. Ron Hubbard: A Profile.
Book: What Is Scientology?
30. Study the Chapter ccThose Who Oppose Scientology" of the
book: What Is Scientology?
31. Study Part Twelve CCA Scientology Catechism" of the book:
What Is Scientology?
32. A. DRILL: Do PTS Tech Training Drill 9 (PTS-TD-9),
Handling Questions Using What Is Scientology?
B.
c.
D.
Recording: Can We Ever Be Friends?
33. Listen to the recording Can We Ever Be Friends?
34. Read the Can We Ever Be Friends? documentary
supplenlent.
35.
36.
37.
38.
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 26-
Final Practical on Use of Tools in PTS Handlings
39. Restudy HCOB 31 Dec. 78RB I, OUTLINE OF PTS
HANDLING, in full.
40. PRACTICAL: Work out and write down how you would use
each of the tools you have studied in this section to handle
ahtagonistic sources. Specifically and in detail cover how
you could go about using one or more of these tools to
handle each of the following:
a. An antagonistic neighbor.
b. A co-worker who has black PRo
C. An uninformed family member.
d. An official who is asking barbed questions about
Scientology.
e. Someone you are attempting to disseminate Scientology
to who brings up false data they have received.
f. A family member who has cut comm due to false
information about Scientology and having been
mishandled in the past.
Turn your write-up in to the Supervisor.
D.TRs
(Note: If the student has previously done TRs 0-4 on a
standard checksheet, he is not required to do the TRs listed
in this section of the checksheet.)
*1. HCOB 16 Aug. 71R II TRAINING DRILLS
Rev. 5.7.78 REMODERNIZED
2. DRILL: With a coach, the student drills each of the TRs
0-4. Each TR is drilled as laid out in the above bulletin. The
student and coach start on an easy gradient and cycle
through the TRs, getting abit stiffer each time through. The
student does these TRs until he has achieved confidence he
can use them to confront PTSness and suppression and
handle it with communication.
3.
4.
s.
OTTRO
TRO
TROBB
TR 1
TR2
TR 2
1
/2
TR3
TR4
b
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
E. Drills on PTS Handling
- 27-
\
1. A. DRILL: Do PTS Theory Drill 10 (PTS-T-IO), Handling
the PTS Theory Drill.
B. DRILL: There are three versions of the following drill.
Each version contains the same data, but
questions are in a different sequence. If the
student flunks Version Aas explained in the
drill instructions, he goes on to another version
of the drill. If he flunks on the next. version,
even once, there is another which he then does.
The student rotates through the versions over
and over until he can answer each question
correctly from item 1 through to the end of the
drill with no flunk, comm lag or hesitation. He
only must complete one version since all
versions cover the same data. His pass can
occur on any version.
Since twinning is used on these drills, each one
is done on a "turnabout" basis. For instance,
Student A does Version Aof the drill. Then they
turn about and Student Bdoes Version Bof the
drill. Then they turn around, and Student A
does Version Cof the drill, then when they turn
around, Student Bdoes Version A of the drill.
Then Student A does Version Band so forth.
This is repeated until they both pass the drill.
If one student passes the drill while his twin
flunks, he would remain as coach taking his
twin through the drill and its various versions
until he, too, passes.
Do PTS Standard Tech Procedure Drill lOA
(PTS-STP-IOA), Basic PTS Handling, Version A.
Do PTS Standard Tech Procedure Drill lOB
ePTS-STP-IOB), Basic PTS Handling, Version B.
Do PTS Standard Tech Procedure Drilll0C
(PTS-STP-IOC), Basic PTS Handling, Version C.
C. DRILL: Do PTS Standard Tech Procedure Drill 10
(PTS-STS-IO), Basic PTS Handling, In
Sequence.
D.
E.
F.
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
2.
3.
4.
- 28-
SECTION VII: FINAL COURSE PRACTICALS
1. PRACTICAL: Obtain newspapers or newsluagazines froDI
the Course Administrator and go through these to spot
PTS/SP phenomena. Spot at least ten of the below
indicators of PTS/SP phenomena:
a. Entheta
Covert Invalidation
Generalities
(Ref: HCO PL 7 Aug. 65 I. SUPPRESSIVE PERSONS, MAIN
CHARACTERISTICS OF)
b. Stamping on up statistics and condoning or rewarding
down statistics
(Ref: HCO PL 6 Mar. 66 I, REWARDS AND PENALTIES, HOW TO
HANDLE PERSONNEL AND ETHICS MATTERS)
c. Cowed or ill personswho are behaving in a crippled
manner in life, failing, not succeeding
Selecting the wrong target
Cannot finish a cycle of action
Free confession to the most alarming crimes but with
no faintest sense of responsibility for them
Support of destructive groups and raging against and
attacking any constructive or betterment group
Approves only of destructive actions and fights against
constructive or helpful actions or activities
(Ref: HCO PL 27 Sept. 66, THE ANTISOCIAL PERSONALITY, THE
ANTI-SCIENTOLOGIST)
d. Spreading wild, false and alarming stories about key
personnel
(Ref: HCO PL 15 Aug. 67 I, DISCIPLINE, SPs AND ADMIN,
HOW STATISTICS CRASH)
e. Sellhlg a dangerous environment
(Ref: Lecture 6312CIO, "Scientology Zero")
f. Chronic problem
(Ref: HCOB 8 Nov. 65, SUPPRESSIVES AND HIDDEN STANDARDS)
g. Makes mistakes
(Ref: HCOB 12 Mar. 68. MISTAKES, ANATOMY OF)
Heo PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 29-
h. Will dramatize a "can't-have;' or an "enforced
overt-have"
(Ref: HCO PL 12 May 72R, PTS PERSONNELAND FINANCE)
i. A low level of production
Production is an "overt product"
Doesn't want a creative and valuable product
(Ref: HCO PL 7 Aug. 76 II, PRODUCT-ORG OFFICER SYSTEM.
WANT YOUR PRODUCT)
j. Indecision
(Ref: HCO PL 18 Dec. 82. ETHICS CONDITIONS: HANG-UP AT DOUBT)
k. Accidents
Under stress
(Ref: HCOB 10 Aug. 73, PTS HANDLING)
Make a written report of your observations on each. Turn
your write-up in to the Supervisor.
2.
3.
4.
SECTION VIII: FLOURISH AND PROSPER
PRODUCT: Astudent who understands the
principle of flourish and prosper.
*1. HeO PL 1 Dec. 79 I
2. Ron's Journal 34
13 Mar. 82
FLOURISH AND PROSPER
THE FUTURE OF
SCIENTOLOGY
3. ESSAY: Describe how and why flourishing and prospering
should be used in the face of suppression.
4.
5.
6.
SECTION IX: STUDENT COURSE COMPLETION
1. STUDENT COMPLETION:
I have completed the requirements of this checksheet and I know and
can apply this material.
STUDENT ATIEST: DATE: _
HCO PL 23.5.89RB I
Rev. 5.5.2001
- 30-
I have trained this student to the best of my ability and he has completed
the requirements of this checksheet and knows and can apply the
checksheet data.
SUPERVISOR ATTEST: DATE: _
2. CONDITIONAL:
If the student has not completed Method 1 Word Clearing and Student
Hat, an examination is fully passed in Qual on the materials of this
checksheet.
STUDENT EXAMINER:
_________DATE: _
3. STUDENT ATTESTATION AT C&A:
I attest:
a. I have enrolled on this course,
b. I have paid for this course,
c. I have studied and understand all the materials on this
checksheet,
d. I have done all the drills on this checksheet,
e. I can produce the results required in the materials of this
course.
STUDENT ATTEST:
__________DATE:
C&A: DATE:
-----------------
4. CERTS AND AWARDS:
The student is awarded the certificate of PTS/SP COURSE GRADUATE.
C&A: DATE:
(Route this form to the Course Administrator for filing in the student's folder.)
L. Ron Hubbard
Founder
Revision assisted by
LRHTechnical Research
and Compilations
(The directions, drills and study assignments which make up this course checksheet were written by LRH
Technical Research and Compilations staff. The compilation of this checksheet was done according to specific
LRH advices on what materials should be on this course, as well as LRH policies and instructions which
prescribe the standard format for course checksheets.)
HCO, Student Hat, Standard Tech, Scientology, E-Meter, Hubbard, and J.:Rf! are
service marks owned by Religious Technology Center and are used with Its permIssIon. SClentologlst IS a
collective membership mark designating members of the affiliated churches and missions of Scientology.