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Advertising & Brand Communication

Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Course Handbook for Stages 1 & 2 Students only 2007/08

CONTENTS

About Your Course Handbook...3 Introduction to your course ............................................................................................. 4 List of staff for your course ............................................................................................. 5 Course Diagram.............................................................................................................. 6 Course Philosophy, Aims and Outcomes ....................................................................... 7 Stage 1 units ................................................................................................................. 9 Stage 2 units ............................................................................................................... 38 Stage 3 units ............................................................................................................... 71 How your work is marked.............................................................................................. 85
Assessment Methods ................................................................................................................ 85 Marking Descriptors .................................................................................................................. 89

Learning, Teaching & Academic Guidance for your course.......................................... 93 Glossary ....................................................................................................................... 97

About Your Course Handbook


This Handbook is intended to provide you with a description of the philosophy, aims and objectives of your course. It also explains how your course is structured and organised, and provides a description of your course units, including the assessment requirements which you must satisfy in order to achieve your target award. The University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester takes considerable pride in the academic quality of its courses. In this context, your course is subject to a process of rigorous quality assurance, entailing continuous monitoring and improvement. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained within your Handbook. However, the University College reserves the right to introduce changes to the information given, including the addition, withdrawal or restructuring of courses. In view of the possibility of future changes, details relating to your course of study as contained in this Handbook are not intended to form part of any contract between the University College and yourself. The regulations, policies and procedures applicable to your studies at the University College are stipulated in full within the Student Regulations Handbook. You should read both this Course Handbook and your Student Regulations Handbook thoroughly, and consult your Course Leader or College Registrar on any points that require further clarification or expansion.

Introduction to your course


Integration is a key theme on this course. Integration starts with our course structure. The Advertising & Brand Communication course is one of the very few courses in this country that takes an integrative approach to advertising and branding. Where most courses choose to specialise in one single field: advertising or branding and within that choose to look at one single discipline: creative or strategic thinking, the Advertising & Brand Communication course looks at the inter-relatedness of advertising and branding and it aims to give you full knowledge of both the creative and strategic process. We do this safe in the knowledge that advertising and branding are closely related to each other. Creative and strategic thinking are two faces of the same coin. You cannot really excel in one unless you have a firm grasp of the other. Integration is also reflected on how to approach technical skills. You are not given equipment and left to find out for yourself how to use it. You learn how to use it in the context of advertising production, under guidance, so that particular techniques are linked directly to specific outcomes. This has the practical advantage of overcoming any fear of technical equipment, which can be a problem, particularly if your previous academic background makes you unfamiliar with the creative environment. Finally, integration continues at course team level. All members of the course team work closely together to ensure that complementary material is taught across different units concurrently. We draw your attention to the inter-relatedness of concepts to ensure the transference of skills. In this way, reflective practice is encouraged and a deeper understanding achieved. Another particular feature of the course is simulation of industry practice. This sort of real time simulation is essential in any course that aims to prepare students for jobs in advertising and branding as it provides experience of the industry. We take this approach to next level. As a student in this course you will feel you are part of an advertising agency from day one. You will be dealing with real-life scenarios from Year 1. By the time you graduate, you will know very well how an agency works and you will have all the relevant skills to work in one in your chosen specialist area. As the division between new and old media blurs, the separation of roles between creative and strategist people fades away and industry demands graduates with increasing technical skills, you will find this course the most appropriate to ensure you are ready for employment by the time you graduate.

List of staff for your course


Head of College Deputy Heads of College Paul Coyle Roni Brown Bill Foulk Sarah Jeans Francesco Cerminara Gareth Pitman Sarah Louise Ford Jo Moore Tom Portlock Adrian Bland Craig Martin Chrissi Newall Gary Allen Penny Boyd Adrian Bland Tom Griffin Aimee Read Richard Jones Tim Savage

Director of Studies Course Leader Contributing Staff

Contextual Studies

Librarian Academic Counsellor IT Technician

Resources Manager Resources Co-ordinator, Media & Communication Resources Co-ordinator, Stores & IT College Registrar PA to Head of College Senior College Administrators

Tipu Miah

Michele Maher Caroline Steels Carol Fricker Kelly-Marie Garner Anthea Bailey Katie Prendergast

College Administrator College Office Assistants

Course Diagram
Summary of Stage One

HE Credit Level 1 Potential Award CertHE


Semester 1 Introduction to Advertising and Branding 15 credits (1.0) FABC1001 Creative Thinking and Visualising 15 credits (1.0) FABC1002 Principles of Marketing 15 credits (1.0) FABC1003 Design Discourse 1: Historical and Critical Contexts 15 credits (1.0) FCTX1003 Semester 2 Communication Theory 15 credits (1.0) FABC1004 Digital Communication 15 credits (1.0) FABC1005 Brands Strategy & Creative Branding 15 credits (1.0) FABC1006 Design Discourse 2: Object Analysis 15 credits (1.0) FCTX1004

Summary of Stage Two

Credit Level 2 Potential Award DipHE


Semester 3 Advertising Strategy 1: the Client Brief 15 credits (1.0) FABC2001 Consumer Behaviour 15 credits (1.0) FABC2002 Experiential Branding 15 credits (1.0) FABC2003 Visual Communication in Context 15 credits (1.0) FCTX2009 Semester 4 Advertising Strategy 2: the Creative Brief 15 credits (1.0) FABC2004 Career Planning & Work Placement 15 credits (1.0) FABC2005 Art Direction and Copywriting or Media Planning 15 credits (1.0) 15 credits (1.0) FABC2006 FABC2007 The Uses of Things: Design, Consumption and Identity 15 credits (1.0) FCTX2010

Summary of Stage Three


Semester 5 Dissertation 30 credits (2.0) FINS3002 The Creative Campaign 30 credits (2.0) FABC3001 Semester 6 Major Project 30 credits (2.0) FABC3002 Brand Sector Analysis 15 credits (1.0) FABC3003

Course Philosophy, Aims and Outcomes


The Advertising and Brand Communication course presents a unique blend of creative and business problems, recognising that the success of any communication is based on the strategic use of both creative and business skills. Throughout their studies students are encouraged to think creatively and develop innovative solutions. The curriculum is built around two main pillars: strategic thinking and creative development explored through advertising and brand communication. Students may choose to specialise in either the creative or strategic field, depending on their personal aspirations for the future. The course works very closely with the advertising and branding industry to ensure it remains abreast with industrys developments (such as the rise of digital advertising) and that students are also equipped with the relevant skills to succeed. A strong emphasis on transferable skills allows students to widen your career ambitions to the communication industry as a whole, as well as marketing. The design of the curriculum supports graduate employability in a number of ways: all students have the opportunity for at least one industry placement and this is recognised as a crucial factor in students gaining networks with employers. The course recognises the importance of a range of key skills, in particular the curriculum promotes the need for effective team working, creative and business problem-solving, high-level written and oral communication as well as sound academic skills and an enthusiasm for intellectual enquiry. The course is supported by Contextual Studies, a series of units that provide a cultural, theoretical and professional context for specialist study. These units play a key role in developing the skills of critical analysis and evaluation. They support students in developing an appropriate theoretical discourse within which to frame debates about their outcomes. The curriculum is designed to provide students with a well-structured knowledge base on advertising and branding and to promote interconnections within this knowledge base. Understanding is itself the realisation that what is separate in ignorance is connected in knowing. The course team aims to create a learning environment where students feel free to admit error so that their knowledge can be probed as it is being constructed in order to set right any misunderstandings in the formative stage. Creating such an environment allows students to become aware of their own knowledge construction. The use of learning journals captures their developing awareness in this respect. Teacher-directed activities are predominantly employed in stage one to focus on prioritized content aimed at providing students with a solid introduction to advertising and branding. Peercontrolled activities, such as problem-solving groups, are introduced in stage two to elaborate, broaden understanding and to provide different viewpoints and perspectives. Studentcontrolled activities, such as the use of student learning agreements, are finally introduced in stage three to develop in-depth understanding and independent learning.

Course Aims
The aims of the course are to: A1 To develop highly creative and entrepreneurial practitioners of advertising and branding which meet the skills needs of the industry

A2 To ensure the employability of graduates by providing a range of direct industry experiences, knowledge and key skills that are applicable to a range of graduate careers in advertising, branding, marketing, media and communications A3 To provide opportunities within the curriculum for students to develop a specialist focus and application for their work A4 To provide a curriculum that encourages critical and analytical skills and the knowledge to challenge media conventions and ideology A5 To provide a highly contextualised curriculum model drawing on contemporary international media practice, relevant historical, theoretical and cultural material

Course Learning Outcomes


On completion of the course, students gaining the award BA (Hons) Advertising & Brand Communication will be able to demonstrate: Knowledge and understanding LO1 Systematic and detailed knowledge of the structure and culture of the advertising and branding industrys and associated professions LO2 Systematic and detailed knowledge of communication strategies within advertising, branding, design, marketing, and client environments LO3 Systematic and detailed knowledge of key historical and contemporary exemplars, case studies, and other important media and academic texts Skills and Other Attributes LO4 The ability to apply knowledge creatively and in a critical way, evaluate and extend arguments supported by thorough and detailed research LO5 The conceptual and perceptual skills necessary for developing and solving complex communication tasks, and challenge conventional approaches and assumptions to communication problems LO6 The ability to exercise initiative, personal responsibility, leadership, team and other professional skills in the context of employability and continuous learning and development LO7 The ability to use conventions and intellectual skills necessary for sustained research and analysis of complex problems, and for interpreting and evaluating the impact of research on the discipline

Stage 1 units
Introduction Stage 1 introduces you to each of the main elements of the course, to the skills necessary for successful study and to the general ethos of the University College and its approaches to teaching, learning and assessment. In the first semester, you learn about the general environment of the Advertising and Branding industries, the way they function, the different roles within these industries and the range of media practices that are used in advertising and branding agencies. You will also learn how to develop and communicate creative concepts through word and image and will be introduced to basic concept in marketing. In semester two, you are introduced to the theories of communication, learn how to decode the meaning of adverts and explore the legal, social and economic factors that influence the advertising and branding industries. You begin to understand how brands generate communication strategies and how to develop them creatively. You will also learn the new media developments and how these are influencing advertising and brand communication. This stage will also provide you with an opportunity to familiarise themselves with the necessary tools to deliver advertising and branding messages with emerging technologies. You will also receive an introduction to a number of IT packages such as MS Office and Adobe Creative Suite. During Stage 1 it will be important for you to develop a range of research and study skills, to use library resources effectively, and to use IT as a tool for research and for the presentation of academic work. Stage 1 units are designed to provide a balanced entry point to degree level study. The work will help you to develop personal and organisational skills, enabling you to learn effectively and to make full use of the University College's resources. You will also be introduced to the importance of self-managed and independent study. Aims

A1 To develop a broad understanding of the scope and remit of Advertising and Brand industries, including the legal, economical and social context of these industries A2 To gain an understanding of a range of theoretical approaches for the analysis of advertising, media products and markets A3 To develop a range of practical and conceptual skills for developing and communicating creative ideas A4 To develop a set of basic management, IT and personal organisational skills to meet the demand of the course and academic study generally
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A5 To gain an understanding of the developments of new media and its influence on advertising and branding communication. Learning Outcomes By the end of Stage 1, you should have learned how to do the following: Knowledge and Understanding LO1 demonstrate that you can apply, interpret and evaluate the concepts and key areas of knowledge introduced during Stage 1 of the course LO2 research, evaluate and present information, develop arguments and make judgements on information consistent with the theoretical approaches introduced in Stage 1 LO3 demonstrate an awareness of the qualities and skills necessary for employment within Advertising and Branding industries Skills and other Attributes LO4 take personal responsibility for achieving study goals, working effectively with peers and independently to achieve these LO5 demonstrate the ability to communicate the results of units effectively, using study skills, academic conventions and IT introduced during Stage 1.

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Stage 1 Unit Descriptors


Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version Introduction to Advertising and Branding FABC1001 Farnham Level 1; (15 Credits) Semester 1 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit will introduce you to the culture and nature of advertising and branding. You will be given an historical overview of the development of advertising and brands, taking into account the development of consumer culture, and the commercial and ideological factors that have seen the expansion of advertising from traditional print media, through to time-based, multimedia and ambient forms. You will also be introduced to the structure, shape and size of advertising and brand industries, examining the roles and responsibilities of individuals and departments within organisations, and the collaborative and team-working practices common within the industry (for example the interface between clients, advertising agencies, media production companies etc). Through a series of case studies, lectures and seminars discussions you will also be introduced to the learning environment, to gathering information, sorting, collating and evaluating information that demonstrates a critical insight into the context and contemporary environment of advertising and brands. The syllabus will cover: What is advertising What are brands How did advertising and brands evolve: social, economic, technological context Case studies to examine critical shifts in advertising philosophy and practice The development of media and communications The development of consumers and consumer culture Key ideological shifts in ideas about communications The structure of the advertising and branding industry today How brands are built How brands can be analysed How strategic brand analysis links to creative branding

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to familiarise yourself with the historical, social, economic and ideological context of advertising and brands
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A2 A3 A4 A5

to demonstrate the links between technological, economic, cultural, social and creative factors in the development of successful brands and advertising campaigns to familiarise yourself with the structure and organisation of the industry, advertising agencies and design groups to develop an understanding of the culture of study, and the skills for research, comparative analysis, presentation and evaluation of findings to demonstrate how brands can be defined and analysed.

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate a critical and contextual understanding of a range of advertising forms, genres and communication channels LO2 demonstrate an understanding of the ideological and conceptual shifts in advertising strategy through reference to social, cultural, economic and technological factors LO3 demonstrate an understanding of the way the advertising and brand industries are structured through reference to particular agency models and industry information LO4 demonstrate an ability to research, compare and contrast, present and evaluate findings using the academic conventions introduced during the unit LO5 demonstrate an ability to use branding methodology and tools to analyse brands. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars and tutorials. Assessment Requirement Individual Branding presentation (50%) Group written Advertising assignment (1,500 words) (50%) Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Contextual understanding (LO1) Theoretical understanding (LO1, LO2) Historical and contemporary practice (LO2, LO3) Understanding through application of: Analysis and deduction (LO2, LO4) Technical and applied skills: Written, oral and visual communication (LO5) Application of academic and professional skills (LO4)

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Reference Material Essential Jones, John Philip. (1999). The Advertising Business. London: Sage. Fowle, Jib. (1996). Advertising and Popular Culture. London: Sage. Department of Culture Media and Sport. (1998). Creative Industries Mapping Document. http://www.culture.gov.uk/creative/mapping.html Department of Culture Media and Sport. (2001). Creative Industries Mapping Document. http://www.culture.gov.uk/creative/advertising-pdf.html Recommended Holme, Bryan. (1982). Advertising: Reflections of a Century. London: Heinemann. White, Roderick. (2000). Advertising. 4th ed. London: McGraw-Hill. Sinclair, John. (1989). Images Incorporated: Advertising as Industry and Ideology. London: Routledge. Web-based material www.ipa.co.uk (Institute of Practitioners of Advertising) www.hatads.org.uk (History of Advertising Trust)

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Creative Thinking and Visualising FABC1002 Farnham Level 1; (15 Credits) Semester 1 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus Advertising is a problem solving activity; it brings together creativity, planning and strategy to service a clients business needs through communication. This unit introduces you to creative thinking and visualising techniques. This unit introduces you to the creative process itself ways to solve a communication problems and express your ideas in visual form using words and images with a step-by-step approach that will enable you to generate appropriate solutions to visual communication problems in advertising and branding whatever the medium. Through case studies, workshops, demonstrations and practical assignments you will explore idea-generating methods, such as creative brainstorming, vertical and lateral thinking techniques and use different visual media to express your ideas as layouts, mood boards and storyboards. Practical workshops will introduce you to industry-standard software packages like PhotoShop and Illustrator and show you how to use them to generate and manipulate images and text. You will generate and manipulate images and text through a variety of production techniques not only digitally. Practical workshops will help you to develop knowledge of the graphic print process and understand the print and image making process. You will learn to use graphic elements such as: colour, type, layout and composition to communicate your message. In doing so you will need to consider the relationship between image and text, visual hierarchy, narrative and tone of voice. You will also explore the use of humour, drama, emotion and mood or atmosphere to communicate with your audience in the most powerful and engaging way. Learning journal: throughout this unit, you will be required to collect evidence of your thought process, ideas, research, strategy and concept development and to use it to reflect on your own learning and self-development in a learning journal that you will submit at the end of the unit. Your learning journal will also include a timesheet detailing the time spent working on your project. The learning journal will form part of your assessment providing evidence and reflection of your own personal contribution to the teamwork. The syllabus will cover: The creative process (determining objectives, developing a strategy, success criteria, research, concept generation, development and realisation) Brainstorming, vertical and lateral thinking techniques Visualising and image manipulation methods/techniques: tear sheets, mood boards, marker visuals, collage/montage, story boards, photocopies, omnichroms

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Visual planning methods Graphic elements: colour, layout, composition, scale, cropping, the use of white space, typography (readability/legibility), signs/symbols The relationship between image and text, visual hierarchy, captions, narrative, telling a story, ad and page layout Graphic print and image making process Illustration and photographic images; art direction of photography, commissioning illustration, image banks and photo libraries Tone of voice, drama, humour, emotion, atmosphere/mood Abstraction, juxtaposition, illusion, style (period/historical influences) metaphor, and analogy Evaluation of ideas using screening criteria Appreciation of audience and context of communication Presentation of creative concepts and work in progress

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to provide an opportunity for you to develop creative thinking skills and problem solving abilities in advertising and brand communications A2 to experiment with a variety of visualising techniques/processes and convey an idea/message in a visual format digital included using words and images A3 to develop an appreciation of the stages involved in the creative process and to apply this methodology to a communications task A4 to use visual language to communicate a message to an audience in a way that is appropriate and engaging and meets communication objectives. Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 through experimentation demonstrate your ability to apply a variety of thinking techniques/brainstorming methods to generate solutions to a communications problem LO2 demonstrate your ability to manipulate visual and graphic elements to communicate an idea/message in layout, mood board and story board and digital format LO3 investigate possible creative routes to resolve a communication problem in order to demonstrate your ability to employ creative thinking and visualising methods in a step by step approach LO4 through visual experimentation and interrogation of a brief, demonstrate your ability to use appropriate visual language to communicate an original idea/message that meets the objectives of a brief and is engaging to a particular audience LO5 apply software skills in the development of visual communication, using basic graphic and digital imaging tools. Teaching and Learning Methods Case studies, workshops and tutorials.

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Assessment Requirement Project work (85%) Learning journal (15%) Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Idea generation tools and processes (LO1, LO3) Print and image making process (LO2) Brand communication processes (story boarding etc) (LO1, LO2, LO3) Communication concepts and strategy (LO1, LO4) Theories and concepts (marketing, brand, consumers) (LO1, LO3) Understanding through application of: Criticism and evaluation of creative processes and concepts (LO2, LO3, LO4) Interpretation (LO2, LO3, LO4) Technical and applied skills: Materials, media and process to express creative ideas (LO2, LO3, LO5) Written, oral and visual communication and presentation (LO2, LO3, LO4) Graphic and digital imaging tools (LO2, LO5) Reference Material Essential Buzan, T. (Revised Edition, 2006) Use Your Head. London: BBC Books. Cahan and Associates. (1999). I am Almost Always Hungry. New York: Princeton Architectural Press. De Bono, E. (1993) Serious Creativity: Using the Power of Lateral Thinking to Create New Ideas. London, Harper Collins. Fletcher, Alan. (1999). The Art of Looking Sideways. London: Phaidon Press. Hall, Peter and Bierut, Michael. (Eds.). (1998). Tibor Kalman: Perverse Optimist. London: Booth-Clibborn Editions. Landa, Robin. (1998). Thinking Creatively, New Ways to Unlock your Imagination. Ohio, Cincinnati: North Light Books. Parts 1 & 2. Recommended Berger, Warren. (2001). Advertising Today. London: Phaidon Press. De Bono, E. (1970). Lateral Thinking: a Textbook of Creativity. Harmondsworth: Penguin. De Bono, E. (1972). Po: Beyond Yes or No. Harmondsworth: Penguin.

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Designers and Art Directors Association of the United Kingdom. (2000). The Copy Book. Crans-Pres-Celigny: Rotovision Edwards, B. (2001). The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain. London, Harper Collins. Gibson, T. (1996). The Power in Our Hands. London, Jon Carpenter Publishing. Hawkins, B. (1999). How to Generate Great Ideas: Brainstorming and Creativity for Business Success. London, Kogan Page. McAlhone, Beryl and Stuart, David. (1998). A Smile in the Mind; Witty Thinking in Graphic Design. Revised ed. London: Phaidon Press. Monahan, T. (2002). The Do-It-Yourself Lobotomy: Open your mind to greater creative thinking. New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Ruggiero, V (2006). The Art of Thinking: A Guide to Critical and Creative Thought Harlow Pearson Higher Education Simmons, John. (2000). We, Me, Them and It; the Power of Words in Business. London: Texere. Stokes, P. (2006) Creativity from Constraints: the Psychology of Breakthrough. New York, Springer Publishing. Sullivan, Luke. (1998). Hey Whipple, Squeeze This; A Guide to Creating Great Ads. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons. Vaske, H. (2002) Why Are You Creative? Maplewood, Mass., Press. Fivedegreesbelowzero

Vrontikis, P. (2002). Inspiration = Ideas: a Creativity Sourcebook for Graphic Designers. Gloucester, Mass., Rockport Publishers. Weston, A. (2006). Creativity for Critical Thinkers. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Journals/Web-based material Adline, Gordon Young Publishers, Birmingham Ads International, Saffron Waldon, Essex, Market Link Publishing Baseline, Kent, Bradbourne Publishing Blueprint, Chelmsford, Essex, Whittington Publishing Ltd British Design and Art Direction (1982 to present) Campaign, London, Haymarket Publications Creative Review, London, Jess MacDermot http://www.AD-MAD.COM/ http://www.bestadsontv.com/menu.html http://www.creativeclub.co.uk/prelogin/ipa/ipa.html
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http://www.ipa.co.uk/ www.luerzersarchive.net www.designwritingresearch.org

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Principles of Marketing FABC1003 Farnham Level 1; (15 Credits) Semester 1 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit will provide you with an overview of basic marketing techniques, theories and strategies to support your understanding of the commercial and business environment of advertising and brands. You will be introduced to the subject of marketing and marketing research in terms of its historical development through selected case studies. The unit will also introduce you to concepts of consumers and consumption by examining demographic information and trends, market segments and consumer behaviour patterns including buyer motivation, cultural and psychological factors. In addition you will be expected to put into practice basic marketing techniques by considering the positioning and repositioning of certain brands. The unit will include a team project to launch a new brand, and students will be expected to research and analyse the positioning of their brand against existing products in the sector. Knowledge and understanding of brand identity gained through Brands Strategy and Creative Branding will support the work you do during this unit. The syllabus will cover: Basic definitions and a brief history of marketing: will consider examples of marketing above, below and through the line, and marketing of different client types, for example Big Business, The Church, The Police, A Charity Segmentation and targeting: will consider demographics, geographics and behaviour patterns Product positioning and repositioning: case studies as standard and innovative exemplars, positioning and repositioning, marketing mix, planning, SWOT analysis and marketing objectives, marketing strategies and tactics Buyer behaviour: motivation and buyer psychology, the mental stages of making a purchase, cultural and personal factors Business to business marketing Market research: introduction to qualitative and quantitative approaches

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Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to introduce you to concepts of marketing and marketing research A2 to familiarise you with concepts concerning the consumer and patterns of consumption A3 to develop an understanding of the importance of product and brand positioning A4 to develop an understanding of the different marketing concerns and strategies of a range of client types A5 to develop an understanding of a range of marketing research tools and the relevant contexts for the application of these. Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate knowledge of a range of marketing tools and processes LO2 demonstrate a theoretically informed understanding of marketing and market research from the point of view of clients and consumers. LO3 demonstrate an understanding of brand positioning and repositioning. LO4 demonstrate an ability to make a basic analysis of a product sector and construct a new brand generating a convincing market proposition Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, workshops and seminars.

Assessment Requirement Written assignment (30%) Team project (70% of which 10% is peer assessed)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Marketing tools and processes (LO1, LO2) Theories and concepts (Marketing, brand, consumers) (LO2) Understanding through application of: Research into brand sectors (LO3, LO4) Analysis, evaluation and reflection (LO3, LO4) Technical and applied skills: Marketing research tools and methods (LO3, LO4) Team working (LO4) Communication and presentation (LO4)

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Reference Material Essential Reading Underhill, Paco. (2000). Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping. London: Texere. Kotler, Philip and Armstrong, Gary. (2004). Principles of Marketing. 10th Ed. London: Pearson/Prentice Hall. Cannon, Tom. (1996). Basic Marketing: Principles and Practice. 4th Ed. London: Cassell. Fill, Chris. (1999). Marketing Communications: Contexts, Contents and Strategies. 2nd Ed. London: Prentice Hall Europe. Recommended Reading Charter, Martin and Polonsky, Michael Jay. (1999). Greener Marketing: A Global Perspective on Greening Marketing Practice. 2nd Ed. Sheffield: Greenleaf. East, Robert. (1997). Consumer Behaviour: Advances and Applications in Marketing. London: Financial Times Prentice Hall. Popcorn, Faith. (2001). EVEolution: The Eight Truths of Marketing to Women. London: HarperCollinsBusiness. Web-based material www.ipa.co.uk (Institute of Practitioner of Advertising) www.adassoc.org.uk (Advertising Association) www.warc.com (World Advertising Research Company) www.e4m.biz/ (Marketing Council) www.mch.co.uk (Marketing and Creative Handbook) www.precisionmarketing.co.uk (Precision Marketing) www.marketing.haynet.com/ (Marketing) www.warc.com (International Journal of Marketing Research)

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Design Discourse 1: Historical and Critical Contexts FCTX1003 Farnham Level 1; (15 Credits) Semester 1 15 weeks 150 13/04/2005 13/04/2005

Content and Syllabus This unit introduces design discourse as a framework by which changes in design practice might be better understood. With a focus on design history since the time of the Industrial Revolution, the unit will detail a number of contexts in order to examine the possible relationships between form and meaning. Through an analysis of the production and consumption of specific objects, materials and environments, and with the aid of key texts to develop an appreciation of both historical and theoretical practices, an account will be given of the rapport between social, cultural and economic determinants and the values to be found within a variety of creative practices. From this, you will independently develop a specific case study in order to evaluate the relationship between theory and practice. You will follow one of the following pathways, according to course of study: Pathway A (for Three Dimensional Design, Interior Design, Product Design for Sustainable Futures and Textile Design students). With a focus on the role of ornament, pattern and decoration within changing design practices, this pathway gives evidence of innovative design changes since the time of the Industrial Revolution. With reference to a variety of architectures, interiors and objects that will be seen to chart developments within production and consumption practices, it will seek to articulate the development of design as a profession and consider the role of theory from a variety of perspectives. Pathway B (for Advertising and Brand Communication and Graphic Communication students). With a focus on the historical development of a variety of communication media, this pathway gives evidence of the changes in technology that have impacted on the production and consumption of images. With reference to a variety of reprographic processes including printmaking, photography and film, from the invention of lithography to the digital age, it will seek to articulate innovation within communication practices and consider the role of theory from a variety of perspectives. The syllabus will cover: Pathway A Factory production, standardisation and the division of labour Design reform: decoration and morality The machine aesthetic: form and function
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Modernism: ornament as crime The expendable object: popular culture and mass consumption Subcultures: expression and identity Post-modernism: style, lifestyle and product differentiation Design research and writing Pathway B The poster: graphic design and mass consumption The impact of photography Propaganda: communication and manipulation Modernism in graphic design: theory and practice Developments in advertising The moving image Post-modernism and digital futures Communication Design research and writing Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to introduce design discourse through historical analysis A2 to introduce a variety of contexts relevant to the study of design, and to identify changing practices within production and consumption and account for your impact A3 to initiate pertinent and focused analysis and evaluation with regard to the study of design and its social import. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the unit you will be able to: LO1 identify key developments within the history of design LO2 locate design styles and practices within changing patterns of production and consumption LO3 address the possible relationships between design theory and design practice LO4 demonstrate an ability to research, evaluate and present a written argument according to academic convention.

Teaching and Learning Methods Lecture, tutorial and independent study.

Assessment Requirement 1500 word essay (100%)

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Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Historical and theoretical constructs, and critical debate within design discourse (LO1, LO2, LO3) Understanding through application of: analysis, deduction, interpretation and evaluation (LO2, LO3, LO4) Technical and applied skills through: application of academic and professional skills using written communication (LO4)

Reference Material Essential Pathway A Brett, David. (1997). On Decoration. London: Lutterworth Press. Dormer, Peter. (1993). Design Since 1945. London: Thames and Hudson. Gorman, Carma. (2003). Industrial Design Reader, U.S: Allworth Press. Sparke, Penny. (2004). An Introduction to Design and Culture: 1900 to the Present. London: Routledge. Woodham, Jonathan. (1997). Twentieth Century Design. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pathway B Aynsley, Jeremy. (2001). A Century of Graphic Design. London: Mitchell Beazley. Crowley, David & Jobling, Paul. (1996). Graphic Design - A Critical Introduction: Reproduction and Representation Since 1800. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Hollis, Richard. (2001). Graphic Design: A Concise History. London: Thames and Hudson Meggs, Philip. (1998). A History of Graphic Design. London: John Wiley. Woodham, Jonathan. (1997). Twentieth Century Design. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Recommended Pathway A Brett, David. (1997). On Decoration. London: Lutterworth Press. Dormer, Peter. (1993). Design Since 1945. London: Thames and Hudson. Gorman, Carma. (2003). Industrial Design Reader. U.S: Allworth Press. Sparke, Penny. (2004). An Introduction to Design and Culture: 1900 to the Present. London: Routledge.

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Woodham, Jonathan. (1997). Twentieth Century Design. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Pathway B Aynsley, Jeremy. (2001). A Century of Graphic Design. London: Mitchell Beazley. Crowley, David & Jobling, Paul. (1996). Graphic Design - A Critical Introduction: Reproduction and Representation Since 1800. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Hollis, Richard. (2001). Graphic Design: A Concise History. London: Thames and Hudson. Meggs, Philip. (1998). A History of Graphic Design. London: John Wiley. Woodham, Jonathan. (1997). Twentieth Century Design. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Recommended Pathway A Forty, Adrian. (1987). Objects of Desire: Design and Society 1750-1980. London: Thames and Hudson. Hebdige, Dick. (1990). Subculture: The Meaning of Style. London: Routledge. Whiteley, Nigel. (1995). Design for Society. London: Reaktion Books. Pathway B McQuiston, Liz. (1995). Graphic Agitation: Social and Political Graphics Since the Sixties. London: Phaidon. Poyner, Rick. (2003). No More Rules: Graphic Design and Postmodernism. London: Laurence King. Whiteley, Nigel. (1995). Design for Society. London: Reaktion Books.

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Communication Theory FABC1004 Farnham Level 1; (15 Credits) Semester 2 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit provides you first with the theoretical and analytical tools to make effective interpretation of advertising and brand communications, it then builds on this understanding to explore the key conceptual strategies employed within advertising and branding. The unit is organised around two themes. In the first one, you will be introduced to cultural studies methodology. You will be encouraged to develop your own models for the analysis of advertising and brand communication. Seminars and workshops will provide you with the opportunity of challenging common-sense of communication and to develop a better understanding of the complexity of communication within contemporary culture, including online advertising and branding. The second theme of this unit introduces you to some of the key ways in which advertisers persuade audiences about the value of a brand. The unit will look at how some of these devices (such as pleasure, irony, parody, etc.) are dependent on contemporary socio-cultural factors; in this respect you will explore how online advertising and branding has provided advertisers with a new range of devices to engage audiences. You will be provided with opportunities to apply theoretical and analytical tools to a range of examples of contemporary advertising, including online, and these interpretations will become the starting point for research into the marketing context of creative campaigns. This unit will also help you to gain confidence in qualitative research and develop observational skills in relation to advertising and brand communication. The syllabus will cover: Definitional issues: popular, mass, low/high, avant-garde culture A basic guide to the development of communication theory: Pierce, Saussure, Levi-Strauss, Barthes, Baudrillard, Williamson et al Case studies and workshops in analytical models and the application of these to advertising and brand communication Discursive practice: the use of race, gender/sexuality, imperialist, dominant, agitational agendas in advertising and brand communication The use of pleasure, humour, irony, parody, satire, pastiche, nostalgia, celebrities in advertising and brand communication

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Using communication theory to frame the marketing context of advertising and branding: consider audience, brand values, market position etc. Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to familiarise yourself with the key academic texts associated with the development of communication theory A2 to develop a critical and analytical interpretation of advertising and brand communication through practical workshops and discussion activities that draw on academic texts and own observations A3 to demonstrate the importance of visual data in the research process, and to develop observational, deductive and interpretative skills in visual analysis A4 to develop a theoretical understanding of the key strategies advertising and brand communication employs to engage audiences. Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate an understanding of the development of communication theory LO2 demonstrate an understanding of advertising and brand communication within the field of media and cultural studies LO3 demonstrate an understanding of a range of conceptual tools and devices used within advertising and brand communications LO4 apply established and own models for analysis of advertising and brand communication LO5 demonstrate a rigorous approach to visual analysis and data collection, and to the discussion and presentation of findings LO6 apply appropriate academic conventions, present and communicate assignments and other learning tasks effectively. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops/studios. Assessment Requirement Presentation (50%) Written Assignment (1,500 words) (50%) Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Context, concepts and theory (LO1) Contemporary practice (LO2, LO3)

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Understanding through application of: Research and criticism (LO4, LO5) Analysis, deduction and interpretation (LO5, LO6) Technical and Applied Skills through: Written, oral and visual communication (LO5, LO6) Application of academic and professional skills (LO6) Reference Material Essential Frith, Katherine. (1998). Undressing the Ad: Reading Culture in Advertising. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. Frith, Katherine and Mueller, Barbara. (2003). Advertising and Societies: Global Issues. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. Leiss, William. Jhally, Sut. Kline, Stephen. Botterill, Jacqueline. (2004). Social Communication in Advertising: Persons, Products and Images of Well-Being. London: Routledge. Berger, John. (1995). Ways of Seeing. London: Penguin Books. Williamson, Judith. (1978). Decoding Advertising: Ideology and Meaning in Advertising. London: Marion Boyars. Packard, Vance. (1991). The Hidden Persuaders. Revised Ed. London: Penguin. Recommended Cook, Guy. (2001). The Discourse of Advertising. 2nd Ed. London: Routledge. Crone, Tom. (1995). Law and the Media: An Everyday Guide for Professionals. 3rd Ed. Oxford: Focal Press. Davidson, Martin. (1992). The Consumerist Manifesto: Advertising in Postmodern Times. London: Routledge. Wernick, Andrew. (1991). Promotional Culture: Advertising, Ideology and Symbolic Expression. London: Sage. Wands, Bruce. (2002). Digital Creativity: Techniques for Digital Media and the Internet. New York: Wiley. Sinclair, John. (1989). Images Incorporated: Advertising as Industry and Ideology. London: Routledge. Goffman, Erving. (1988). Gender Advertisements. Harper Collins College Division.

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Web-based material www.warc.com World Advertising Research Centre www.adassoc.org.uk The Advertising Association www.adbusters.org Adbusters Culture

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Digital Communication FABC1005 Farnham Level 1; (15 Credits) Semester 2 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit offers a theoretical introduction to the digital landscape and the opportunity for you to explore in practice how to use the new media landscape within advertising and branding communications. The unit is organised around three themes. The first provides you with a conceptual map of the new media landscape. As new media appear, old media are redefined, take up new roles and reach new audiences. The key aim of this strand is to help you realise the multi-channel approach business adopt to reach different market sectors at different times. You will get an introduction to the history of the net, the early cultures, the arrival of the web, hypertext and online multimedia, the dotcom boom and bust, the development of Web 2.0 and its new services Google, mySpace, YouTube, iTunes, Wikipedia, P2P technologies, social networking, blogging. Building on the history, this strand will stress a number of key distinguishing features about the new landscape, including convergence, participatory, personal media, network society, the culture of control vs the culture of exposure, the attention economy. The second theme of the unit focuses on advertising. User control online means approaches to advertising and branding have had to change. Businesses are still working out how best to communicate in the new media landscape. This strand will cover some of the options that have been tried to date: The arrival of advertising on the web with banners Spam, pop-ups and the return of intrusive advertising Search engines and key words Viral marketing the development of virals ads as social currency users are happy to circulate peer to peer marketing Google Ads the new micro-advertising economy mySpace, social networking and the music business

Building upon the knowledge and understanding gained in Principles of Marketing, you will be analysing how marketing is also evolving in the new media landscape. A case study on Amazon will highlight the new approaches to retail business can take online.

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The third and final aspect of the unit provides you with an opportunity to explore in practice ways to infiltrate online communities for advertising and brand communication purposes. As part of this you will learn how to develop your own blog, design a personalised page on mySpace and upload media content on YouTube. Case studies-based workshops will introduce you to popular software packages like Flash and Dreamweaver, widely used in digital communications, and show you how to use them in the context of advertising and branding. Working collaboratively you will employ one of the Web 2.0 services to generate creative concepts using some of the new advertising options shown in class. Learning journal: throughout this unit, you will be required to collect evidence of your thought process, ideas, research, strategy and concept development and to use it to reflect on your own learning and self-development in a learning journal that you will submit at the end of the unit. Your learning journal will also include a timesheet detailing the time spent working on your project. The learning journal will form part of your assessment providing evidence and reflection of your own personal contribution to the teamwork. Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to provide a conceptual map of the new media landscape A2 to identify the specifics characteristics of the Internet in general, and Web 2.0 in particular, and to develop an appreciation of advertising and brand communication in the new media context A3 to introduce and investigate examples of influential works of advertising and brand communication in the new media landscape A4 to develop the skills of image manipulation and visual communication within the new media context A5 to provide an opportunity for you to develop advertising and brand communication in the new media landscape. Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and conceptual shifts in advertising and branding communication through reference to the development of the Internet and Web 2.0, in particular LO2 understand and appreciate examples of advertising and brand communication in the new media landscape LO3 demonstrate an ability to research, compare and contrast, present and evaluate findings using appropriate academic conventions LO4 apply software skills in the development of advertising and brand communication, in the new media landscape, using basic graphic and digital imaging tools. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials.

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Assessment Requirement One individual essay (1,500) words from a selection of titles relating to the unit (40%) Group presentation of pratical work (40%) Learning Journal (20%) Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Contextual understanding (LO1, LO2) Theoretical understanding (LO1, LO2) Historical and contemporary practice (LO1, LO2) Understanding through application of: Debate and criticism (LO1, LO2, LO3) Research, analysis and deduction (LO2, LO3) Technical and applied skills: Written, oral and visual communication (LO3, LO4) Graphic and digital imaging tools (LO4) Application of academic skills (LO3) Reference Material Essential Godin, Seth. (2007). Permission Marketing. Pocket Books. Hughes, Mark. (2005). Buzzmarketing. New York: Portfolio. Surowiecki, James. (2005). The wisdom of crowds. London: Abacus. McCraken, Grant. (2006). Flock and Flow. Indiana University Press. Anderson, Chris. (2006). The Long Tail. Random House Business Books. Recommended Gladwell, Malcom. (2000). The Tipping Point. London: Abacus. Jenkins, Henry. (2006). Convergence Culture. New York: New York University Press. Web-based material www.wired.com (Wired magazine)

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Brands Strategy & Creative Branding FABC1006 Farnham Level 1; (15 Credits) Semester 2 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit is designed to build on the Introduction to Advertising and Brands unit by linking brand strategy and positioning to brand creative. In this unit you will be able to investigate brands in a variety of ways: through lectures, case studies, research, workshops and practical design work in the studio. Brands are one of the cultural phenomena of the society we live in; their images and brand communication surround us and pervade our lives. Brands, like people, have identities and personalities. Successful brands are those that are able to command instant recognition. Brand communication serves to establish a relationship with consumers. Brands embody a powerful set of tangible and intangible values - their appeal stretches beyond the physical into the psychological. Through a series of workshops you will explore and analyse how brands and brand personality are constructed and expressed through all brand communication; how visual and sensory elements have been used to generate brand appeal. Research and analysis of brands will also highlight some of the social and economic factors that inform the relationship between consumers and brands and influence the society we live in. Visual research and design experimentation will introduce you to the foundations of a brand. You will then apply this knowledge in a personal self-branding assignment: to create a representation of yourself as a brand using visual language that talks to a particular target audience in a particular context. The syllabus will cover: Brands, Branding, Brand Identity Brand values the foundations of a brand Brand character, personality and tone of voice Agency/design consultants, media and consumers Visual language of Brands Brand analysis core studies Exploration of brand personalities through visual research; preparation of presentation boards that describe the brandscape, market and category equities Brand strategy and how brands are developed Palette boards for typography, colour, image, graphic elements and tone of voice to appeal to the chosen target audience Production of 2D or 3D concept visuals for a new brand for presentation

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Aims The aims of this unit are: A1 A2 A3 to investigate the strategic relationship between brands, markets and consumers to explore how a brands identity, the foundations of the brand and personality are constructed to provide an opportunity for you to employ creative conceptual thinking graphic elements, words, images and shape to construct a representation of a new brand using different 2D or 3D visualising techniques to create concept visuals.

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate an understanding of the relationship that exists between brands and consumers through your analysis of existing brands and their markets LO2 demonstrate an understanding of how a brands identity and personality are constructed LO3 demonstrate an understanding of how a brand strategy and resulting creative concepts are developed. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars, case studies and studio work. Assessment Requirement Strategy Presentation (50%) Creative Presentation (50%) Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Brand communication: strategies and concepts (LO1, LO3) Brand communication process (LO2, LO3) Understanding through application of: Research and analysis (LO1) Deduction and criticism (LO2, LO3) Technical and applied skills through: Materials, media and process skills (LO3)

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Reference Material Essential Southgate, Paul. (1994). Total Branding by Design. London: Kogan Page. Cowley, Don ed. (1996). Understanding Brands: By 10 People Who Do. London: Kogan Page. Landa, Robin. (1998). Thinking Creatively: New Ways to Unlock your Visual Imagination. Cincinnati: North Light. Spiekermann, Eric. (2003). Stop Stealing Sheep and Find Out How Type Works. 2nd Ed. Berkeley: Adobe Press. Mollerup, Per. (1999). Marks of Excellence: the History and Taxonomy of Trademarks. Revised Edition. London: Phaidon. Recommended Pavitt, Jane. (Ed.). (2000). Brand New. London: Vanda Publications. Klein, Naomi. (2001). No Logo. London: Flamingo. Lury, Giles. (1998). Brandwatching. Dublin: Blackhall. Lury, Celia. (1996). Consumer Culture. Cambridge: Polity Press. Pedersen, Martin. (Ed.). (1995). Graphis Ephemera/1. Zurich: Graphis Press. Pedersen, Martin. (Ed.). (1994). Graphis Paper Promotions/1. Zurich: Graphis Press.

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version Content and Syllabus

Design Discourse 2: Object Analysis FCTX1004 Farnham Level 1; (15 Credits) Semester 2 15 weeks 150 May 2004 May 2004

Framed within the parameters of design discourse, this unit gives an account of the variety of contexts by which design might be better understood. Taking as its starting point the belief that objects and images need to be studied both specifically and in relation to your social, cultural and economic environments, the unit offers a series of contextual and practical research tools that will allow for detailed and involved analysis to be applied to the evaluation of designed objects. Fundamental to object analysis is the role of the case study as a means by which to account for the possible relationships between production, mediation and consumption. You will be introduced to methods of primary and secondary research and will then be guided through an evaluation of your usefulness in generating meaning and understanding. Having negotiated the boundaries for research, you will then apply this knowledge to the analysis and evaluation of a specific object and will communicate your evidence both verbally and in written form. An examination of the tools for effective communication will form an integral component of teaching and learning, as will the development of critical and lateral thinking. The syllabus will cover: Design discourse, object analysis and the role of the case study Provenance and meaning Primary and secondary research methods, including information gathering, literature reviews, questionnaires and surveys Critical analysis, deduction and evaluation Verbal, visual and written communication

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to introduce a range of approaches for the analysis of objects and images in the light of social, cultural and economic determinants A2 to give a broad understanding of how to apply a variety of research tools within design discourse A3 to provide an opportunity to select and apply appropriate methods of verbal and written communication A4 to develop the skills for the critical evaluation of the work of others and of self.

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Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the unit you will be able to: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 engage with a critical evaluation of design through an interdisciplinary approach select, evaluate and apply appropriate research methods within design practice identify, select and structure appropriate and effective communication methods communicate research both verbally and in written form.

Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars, tutorials and independent study. Assessment Requirement Presentation (50%) Written assignment (50%)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Design discourse and object analysis (LO1) Research tools and communication methods (LO2, LO3) Understanding through application of: Analysis, deduction, interpretation and evaluation (LO1, LO2, LO3) Technical and applied skills through: Written, oral and visual communication (LO3, LO4) Application of academic and professional skills (LO3, LO4) Reference Material Essential Conway, Hazel. (1987). Design History: A Student's Handbook. London: Routledge. Heskett, John. (2002). Toothpicks and Logos. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Walker, John. (1990). Design History and the History of Design. London: Pluto Press. Recommended Cottrell, Stella. (1999). The Study Skills Handbook. London: MacMillan. Wright, Chrissie. (1995). Communication Skills. London: MacMillan.

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Stage 2 units
Introduction During this stage of the course you will engage in a critical way with the process of generating an advertising campaign. You will begin this process in semester three by writing a client brief presenting an overview of business and marketing factors from the client perspective. You will continue this in semester four translating the marketing objectives set out in the client brief into advertising objectives and then formulating the creative brief setting out effective ways to resolve a range of communication problems. You will explore in detail how attitudes are formed and changed by marketers and how culture and lifestyle shape consumer decisions. You will learn how to use the five senses to develop branding experiences that communicate in a more engaging way with consumers. You are expected to apply the knowledge and understanding gained in Stage 1 to build on this throughout Stage 2. This will allow you to explore advertising and branding in more details, including the online aspects of it. Stage 2 also encourages you to define your strengths and career goals. In semester four the curriculum offers you opportunities to develop a critical understanding of your own core skills in relation to the ones required in your chosen career path. The opportunity to undertake a work placement in semester four will strengthen your employability. In semester four you will further define your specialist focus through choosing between either Art Direction and Copywriting - for students wishing to develop your application of conceptual creative skills - or Media Planning - for students developing strategic skills in relation to account planning. Contextual Studies During this stage the units will focus on the development of theoretical dialogues concerning the practice of design within specific economic, social, cultural and professional contexts. Units will encourage you to develop a range of academic skills and an ability to debate your own specialist practice drawing upon historical and contemporary case-studies and theoretical models. Aims A1 To develop a critical understanding of consumers and the critical and reflective skills necessary to apply it to resolve communication problems and set your own practice within the advertising and branding context To gain an insight into the strategic and creative functions of advertising, and to the factors of effective communication To develop a clear sense of your career goals, and to identify your own professional strengths and subject interests To provide opportunities for you to develop external contacts, and to develop an appreciation of the qualities and skills required by employers

A2 A3 A4

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A5

A6

To recognise the intellectual rigour required of them in Stage 2, and the management and communication skills necessary to demonstrate this within coursework, assessment requirements and career planning activities To bring to your work detailed knowledge of the novelty approaches in advertising and branding communication.

Learning Outcomes By the end of Stage 2, you should have learned how to do the following: Knowledge and Understanding LO1 demonstrate a critical understanding of the theories, concepts and principles relating to advertising and branding, and an ability to apply these to independently studied problems LO2 identify and use appropriate methods for collecting information LO3 demonstrate critical knowledge of contemporary practice in advertising and branding, and a refined awareness of strategic issues affecting the future of these industry Skills and other Attributes LO4 solve business and communication problems effectively, using established industry-based methods, analyse and reflect on the approaches used LO5 analysing data and communicating findings LO6 work independently, establish study and career goals, locate appropriate internal and external resources and advice.

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Stage 2 Unit Descriptors


Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version Advertising Strategy 1: the Client Brief FABC2001 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 3 15 weeks 150 17/05/2007 17/05/2007

Content and Syllabus Advertising Strategy 1: the Client Brief and Advertising Strategy 2: the Creative Brief, provide you with the opportunity to study the advertising development process through all stages in the planning cycle; from the definition of business and marketing objectives to brand planning and the formation of the creative brief itself. Brand building through advertising/communications arises out of the specific circumstances of a brand and is designed to achieve specific commercial objectives. The Client Brief examines the first part of the process, the identification of a need for advertising intervention by a client. It asks you to consider the status of a brand in the marketplace and in the consumers mind and define the role for advertising in a business and marketing context from a clients perspective. Through case studies, research and practical assignments the unit will increase your understanding of the management and planning functions in marketing and brand management. You will also develop an appreciation of the roles of the brand manager, researcher and marketing executive on the clients side as you identify business and marketing objectives for brand advertising/communications. Working in cross-functional teams of up to three people you will undertake an investigation of an existing fmcg brand by describing the market and building a picture of the relationship that exists between your brand and consumers. The first stage of your study will research the brands circumstances: the size and condition of the market, the needs of the consumer, market share, the competition, pricing and distribution. The second stage will use consumer research and brand personality interrogation to deepen your understanding of the brand and its relationship with consumers. This study will enable you to investigate the associations your brand has for consumers and consider where these meanings come from: the product itself, its packaging, previous advertising or the social context in which the brand is consumed. During the third stage of the assignment you will determine the business and marketing objectives for advertising and consider target audience, media (above the line/below the line, new media and other channels of communication) and define the role for advertising/communications in the context of your assignment. Throughout the unit you will be expected to present work in progress to your tutors and peers to share findings, discuss proposals and agree a strategy. As a team you will present your research findings, marketing objectives and communication strategy as a PowerPoint presentation (with a bound hard copy of your report) to tutors and the year group in a formal presentation client setting. This will be assessed. Your proposals will form the client brief for a different team of you to develop in next semesters unit from an agency perspective: Advertising Strategy 2: the Creative Brief.

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The syllabus will cover: The planning cycle: the status of the brand, business and marketing objectives Market analysis including size and condition of market, consumer needs, market share, competitive brand audit, pricing and distribution Qualitative consumer research and brand personality interrogation Brand positioning and brand equity Consideration of the role of media/communication platforms to include: above the line, through the line, below the line, interactive marketing, public relations, direct mail, ambient media etc. Target audience definition Identification and definition of the role for advertising/communications in the context of business and marketing objectives Production and presentation of the client brief

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 to conduct an in-depth investigation into a brands market using quantitative research methods and market data to conduct an in-depth investigation into the human/social context in which a brand is located using qualitative consumer research and brand personality interrogation methods to develop a brand communications proposal based upon an evaluation of communication channels in relation to specific business and marketing objectives to produce and present the client brief that details market/consumer research findings, marketing and communication objectives to work in cross-functional teams and experience the roles and responsibilities of the brand manager, researcher and account planner in developing an advertising/communications strategy for your brand.

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate your ability to conduct an investigation of a brands market and show through your analysis of findings an understanding of the commercial factors that frame brand advertising/communications LO2 demonstrate your ability to conduct an investigation into the human/social context of a brand and show through your analysis of findings an understanding of the brand, its meaning and its relationship with existing/potential consumers LO3 demonstrate your ability to develop an appropriate communications strategy for your brand in response to specific business and marketing objectives LO4 demonstrate your ability to develop a client brief for brand advertising in response to business and marketing objectives LO5 demonstrate your ability to work as part of a cross-functional team, meet deadlines and produce a body of work to high standards.

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Teaching and Learning Methods Team working assignment, case studies, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Assessment Requirement The Client Brief (80% of which 10% is peer assessed) Presentation of proposals (20%)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Contextual understanding (brands, markets, commercial factors, theoretical context) (LO1, LO3, LO4) Research methods and tools (LO2, LO3) Brand communication: media, consumers, strategies and concepts (LO1, LO3, LO4) Understanding through application of: Research, analysis, synthesis and evaluation (LO1, LO2) Technical and applied skills through: Communication and presentation (written, oral and IT) (LO3, LO4) Project Management skills (LO4, LO5) Team working (LO5) Reference Material Essential Cowley, Don. (Ed.). (1996). Understanding Brands: By 10 People who Do. London: Kogan Page. Butterfield, Leslie. (Ed.). (1999). Excellence in Advertising: The IPA Guide to Best Practice. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Randall, Geoffrey. (2000). Branding: A Practical Guide to Planning your Strategy. 2nd Ed. London: Kogan Page. Recommended Sullivan, Luke. (1998). Hey, Whipple, Squeeze This: A Guide to Creating Great Ads. Chichester: Wiley. Grant, John. (2000). The New Marketing Manifesto: The 12 Rules for Building Successful Brands in the 21st Century. London: Texere. Schmitt, Bernd. (1999). Experiential Marketing: How to get Customers to Sense, Feel, Think, Act and Relate to your Company and Brands. New York: Free Press. Lury, Giles. (1998). Brandwatching: Lifting the Lid on the Phenomenon of Branding. Dublin: Blackhall.

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Consumer Behaviour FABC2002 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 3 15 weeks 150 16/07/2007 16/07/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit will build on the knowledge and skills gained in Principles of Marketing and Market Research by extending the range of tools for conducting market analysis, and by building further your understanding of consumers and marketing philosophies. In particular this will emphasise the way market (or target) groups are understood within the advertising industries, and the definitions, in socio-economic terms given to these. As well as quantitative data, such as how much certain target groups earn, the unit will develop your understanding of market groups through the use of qualitative data. This type of data will reveal, for example, what people feel about a product or lifestyle, and how they might react to a product represented in a particular way. In addition to the type of research into consumer behaviour conducted before an advertising or brand proposition is developed, the unit will consider post-campaign research, which is a crucial tool for client companies and advertising consultancies, allowing them to measure the effectiveness of a campaign. During the unit you will be expected to put into practice the tools acquired during taught sessions and to test your understanding of a particular market group through live research that you have developed the methodology for. You will be expected to draw on existing quantitative data held on market research databases. The syllabus will cover: An introduction to consumer behaviour: case study, supermarket psychology Targeting the Consumer Demographics Class Age Definitions of A,B,C1,C2,D,E Look at you, pensioners, and Premier buyers Socio-economic breakouts Targeting the Consumer by Specific Markets Grey Market Pink Market

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Youth Market European market

Status Conspicuous consumption Aspirations how are they reflected in the media? Leaders, early adopters The way people are defined by what they consume Take a product jeans and define the user by brand Research Qualitative and quantitative Pre campaign research give your buyer an identity to fit the brand Post campaign research how do we know the campaign has worked? Measuring effectiveness, including a hard-to-measure campaign, for example rear seat belts Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 to introduce you to concepts of consumer group classification to give you an understanding of the research process before and after a campaign to introduce you to quantitative and qualitative research tools and a range of research resources to develop your understanding of the relationship between brands, consumers, the broader market and business objectives to provide an opportunity for you to test methods, concepts and theories of the market through practical research exercises.

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 understand the concept of buyer behaviour, through an understanding of the psychology of buying decisions LO2 be able to classify a consumer by applying socio-economic norms and tools LO3 demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the relationship of brands to market groups and segments LO4 devise a method for market research and use quantitative and qualitative research tools to bring about an accurate reading of a market group or segment. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars and tutorials.

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Assessment Requirement Written Assignment (2,000 words) (30%) Team Project (70% of which 10% is peer assessed)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Market concepts and theories (LO1, LO3) Research methods and tools (LO2, LO4) Understanding through application of: Debate and criticism (LO2, LO3) Research, analysis, synthesis (LO2, LO3, LO4) Technical and Applied Skills through: Research methods and processes (LO3, LO4) Team, academic and professional skills (LO3, LO4) Reference Material Essential Solomon, M Bamossy, G. and Askegaard, S. (2002), Consumer Behaviour: A European Perspective. London: Financial Times Prentice Hall East, Robert. (1997). Consumer Behaviour: Advances and Applications in Marketing. London: Financial Times Prentice Hall. Chapters: 5,10 Wright, L. and Crimp, M. (2000). The Marketing Research Process. 5Th Ed. London: Financial Times Prentice Hall. Chapters: 1, 4, 5, 7, 9, 14 Tvede, Lars. (2001). Marketing Strategies for the New Economy. Chichester: Wiley. Recommended Proctor, Tony. (2000). Strategic Marketing: An Introduction. London: Routledge. Gunter, Barrie and Furnham, Adrian. (1998). Children as Consumers: a psychological analysis of the young peoples market. London: Routledge. De Chernatony, Leslie. (1998). Creating Powerful Brands in Consumer, Service and Industrial Markets. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Smith, Ian. (1997). Meeting Customer Needs. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.

Web-based material www.bmrb-tgi.co.uk Target Group Index

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www.mori.co.uk Mori www.mrs.org.uk Market Research Society www.bmra.co.uk British Market Research Association www.henleycentre.com/ Henley Centre for Future Forecasting

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Experiential Branding FABC2003 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 3 5 weeks 150 16/07/2007 16/07/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit provides you with the opportunity to investigate how successful companies using goods as props and services as the stage create experiences that engage customers in an inherently personal way. During seminars and workshops you will be exploring from a rich and varied mix of case studies from online communities to airport parking - how businesses design memorable events for which they charge admission. Lectures will guide you on a creative, step-by-step script to help you understand how to go beyond the traditional communication strategies and provide you with a blueprint to create differentiation by experience in advertising and branding communication. This unit provides an opportunity for you to understand the business and creative potential of staging marketing experiences in branded environments be it online or offline. You will be able to extend your use of specialist software to generate concepts for online and digital material. You will be expected to identify examples of brands using online and offline branded environments as part of an integrated communication strategy to provide a critical overview and business analysis of the benefits this approach brings. Further to this, you will consider a full range of sensory and interactive new media devices including space, movement, sound, touch, light, heat and smell, as well as image and word to create concepts for an online and offline environment within which a brand of your choice comes to life. You will be expected to work collaboratively to create an exhibition of the outcomes of the unit to tutors, peers and invited externals during the final two weeks of the semester. Evidence Book: throughout this unit, you will be required to collect evidence of your thought process, ideas, research, strategy and concept development and a timesheet detailing the time spent working on your project in an evidence book that you will submit at the end of the unit. This will also form part of your assessment providing your tutor with the evidence of your own personal contribution to the teamwork. The syllabus will cover: The development and evolution of the experience economy Brands and branding in a blended online, offline environment Online and offline consumer experience of branded environments

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Experiential branding, virtual words, Web 2.0, sensory-based marketing experiences, social networking marketing: case studies Software workshops: Flash, Dreamweaver, Director, Premiere

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 to develop your awareness of the business and creative potential of experiential branding to develop an understanding of how to create differentiation by experience in advertising and brand communication to provide an opportunity for you to integrate a range of theoretical perspectives within the context of online and offline advertising and brand communication to encourage you to develop your own unique approach to design a marketing experience in a branded environment to develop the skills of image manipulation to a more sophisticated level.

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate an understanding of experiential branding within the context of online and offline advertising and branding communication LO2 demonstrate a theoretical understanding of the impact of experiential branding in advertising and brand communication LO3 apply experiential branding to generate innovative and creative concepts in response to problems LO4 apply appropriate software skills in the development of creative concepts using graphic and digital imaging tools LO5 demonstrate effective time-management and team-working skills to achieve study goals.

Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars, workshops and discussions. Assessment Requirement Presentation (50%) Written report (1,500 words) (35%) Evidence book (15%)

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Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Context, concepts and theory of experiential branding (LO1, LO2) Contemporary practice (LO2) Understanding through application of: Research and analysis (LO3) Deduction and criticism (LO3) Effective and creative concepts (LO3, LO4) Technical and applied skills through: Graphic and digital imaging tools (LO3, LO4) Written, oral and visual communication (LO3, LO4) Time-management and team-working skills (LO6)

Reference Material Essential Pine, Joseph and Gilmore, James. (1999). The Experience Economy. Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Schmitt, Bernd. (1999). Experiential Marketing. New York: Free Press. Gobe, Marc. (2001). Emotional Branding. New York: Allworth Press. Lindstrom, Martin. (2005). Brand Sense. London: Kogan Page. Himpe, Tom. (2006). Advertising is Dead Long Live Advertising! Thames & Hudson, London. Recommended Zaltman, Gerald. (2003). How customers think. Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Pine, Joseph and Gilmore, James. (2000). Markets of One. Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Meyers, Herbert M and Gerstman, Richard. (2001). Branding @ the Digital Age. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Lindstrom, Martin and Andersen, Tim Frank. (2000). Brand Building on the Internet. London: Kogan Page. Clifton, Rita and Maughan, Esther (Eds.). (2000). The Future of Brands: Twenty-Five Visions. Basingstoke: Macmillan Business. Temporal, Paul and Lee, K.C. (2000). Hi-tech Hi-touch Branding. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons.

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Wands, Bruce. (2002). Digital Creativity: Techniques for Digital Media and the Internet. New York: Wiley and Sons. Web-based material http://adbusters.org web site of Canadian magazine Adbusters; (social activist movement re abuses of the info age e.g. manipulative advertising) http://www.gap.com/ (get dressed interactive=Gap clothing co) http://www.reuters.com/ (multimedia news - weekly industry briefing on selected topics) http://media village.mediated.co.uk/ (linked sites of advertising agencies) http://www.emap.com/ (advertising, resource listings, magazines, media-esp. consumer magazines and business periodicals) http://www.zenithmedia.com/zenith.htm (groups, lists and links to media/commercial sitessearching for companies etc) http://www.sky.com/sky com/channellayout/homepage - British Sky Broadcasting http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/functions/mcs.html - British-based gateway to resources/media and communication tv/film/gender/class and ethnicity/mass media/theory/articles/teaching

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Advertising Strategy 2: the Creative Brief FABC2004 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 4 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus Advertising Strategy 2: the Creative Brief provides you with an opportunity to continue the study of brand advertising/communications by examining the second part of the strategic process: the development of the creative brief. Working in cross-functional teams of up to three people you will undertake the development of a brand communications strategy for an existing fmcg brand. You will take as your starting point for this assignment the client brief, produced by an earlier team in Advertising Strategy 1: the Client Brief at the moment when the brief is passed to account management and account planning teams in an agency. It will be your task to develop an advertising/communications strategy for the brand you are given one that fits with the marketing objectives of your client; create a proposition that is true to the product, motivating to the consumer and distinctive from the competition; and generate the creative brief. Through case studies, research and practical assignments the unit will increase your knowledge of the management and planning functions in Advertising and Brand management. You will also develop a deeper understanding of the roles of the account manager and account planner in advertising as you work in cross-functional teams to define the creative brief. Throughout the unit you will be expected to present work in progress in tutorials to your tutors and peers in order to share findings, discuss proposals and agree strategy. The first stage of your study will start by interrogating the product to develop an understanding of the product and the brands target audience by using informal research methods (reading reviews/market reports, talking to people who make/sell it, watching people buy/use it). The second stage will analyse the brand in relation to its competition through advertising mapping, brand mapping, store visits etc. This will also include case studies of competitive brands: you will be asked to take a campaign and work backward to find the advertising idea; then work backward to find the advertising strategy, positioning and proposition. The third stage will develop the proposition, a clear, unambiguous core message what you want the target audience to take out of the advertising and executional considerations such as tone of voice and treatment. As a team you will present your proposals in the form of a creative brief to the course team and peers at a creative briefing. Your brief and its presentation should inspire and inform; both will form part of your assessment. The syllabus will cover: The planning cycle: the role for advertising strategy Informal research methods: product interrogation, target audience understanding Competitive brand study including: advertising mapping, brand mapping, store visits

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Case studies of competitive brand advertising Brand proposition Tone of voice, creative treatment The creative brief Presentation of advertising strategy at creative briefing

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 A2 A3 to use informal research methods to interrogate the product and develop an understanding of the target audience to generate a competitive brand analysis through advertising/brand mapping, informal research and case studies to develop a strategy for brand advertising/communications that fits with the clients marketing objectives in the form of a creative brief specifying communication objectives, media requirements, brand proposition, tone of voice and treatment to present the creative brief at a briefing session to tutors and peers to work in cross-functional teams and experience of the roles and responsibilities of the account manager and account planner in an agency.

A4 A5

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate your ability to conduct an interrogation of the product using informal research methods and show through your analysis of findings an understanding of the brand and its target audience LO2 demonstrate your ability to conduct a competitive brand analysis through advertising/brand mapping using informal research methods and case studies LO3 demonstrate through your analysis of findings an understanding of the motivation behind product purchase and consumption LO4 demonstrate your ability to generate a creative brief that is compatible with the clients marketing objectives and specifies communication objectives, media requirements, brand proposition, tone of voice and executional issues LO5 demonstrate your ability to present the creative brief to tutors and peers at a creative briefing in a manner that is engaging and inspiring LO6 demonstrate your ability to work as part of a cross-functional team, meet deadlines and produce a body of work to high standards. Teaching and Learning Methods Team working assignment, case studies, seminars, workshops and tutorials.

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Assessment Requirement The creative brief (80% of which 20% is peer assessed) Presentation at creative briefing (20%)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Contextual understanding (brands, markets, commercial factors, theoretical context) (LO1, LO2, LO4) Research methods and tools (LO1, LO2, LO3) Brand communication: media, consumers, strategies and concepts (LO1, LO3, LO4) Understanding through application of: Research, analysis, synthesis and evaluation (LO1, LO2, LO3, LO4) Technical and applied skills through: Communication (written and oral) (LO4, LO5) Presentation/IT skills (LO5) Project management skills (LO5, LO6) Team working (LO5, LO6) Reference Material Essential Cowley, Don. (Ed.). (1996). Understanding Brands: By 10 People who Do. London: Kogan Page. Butterfield, Leslie. (Ed.). (1999). Excellence in Advertising: The IPA Guide to Best Practice. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Randall, Geoffrey. (2000). Branding: A Practical Guide to Planning, Organizing and Strategy. 2nd Ed. London: Kogan Page. Recommended Grant, John. (2000). The New Marketing Manifesto: The 12 Rules for Building Successful Brands in the 21st Century. London: Texere. Sullivan, Luke. (1998). Hey, Whipple, Squeeze This: A Guide to Creating Great Ads. Chichester: Wiley. Schmitt, Bernd. (1999). Experiential Marketing: How to get Customers to Sense, Feel, Think, Act and Relate to your Company and Brands. New York: Free Press. Lury, Giles. (1998). Brandwatching: Lifting the Lid on the Phenomenon of Branding. Dublin: Blackhall.

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Career Planning & Work Placement FABC2005 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 4 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit provides you with an opportunity to reflect, under the guidance of your tutor, on the knowledge and skills you have so far developed and to start planning your career through a work placement. During the course of this unit you will be carrying out a skills mapping exercise to assess your current skills and to better understand the set of skills you will require to develop your career within the communication industry. You will be working on your CV and portfolio with the support of your unit tutor, the University Colleges Career Services and leading recruitment consultants. You will develop your communication skills and make contacts, through networking opportunities, which may enhance your future employment prospects. Undertaking a work placement will develop your understanding of professional practice within the communication industry. A report will enhance your research and written skills whilst provide an opportunity for you to reflect upon your future career development. A presentation will provide you with an opportunity to self-reflect on your existing skills and to plan how best to develop them given your career aspirations. PDP or personal development planning is implicit in this process through both teaching and learning methods and assessment criteria are identifying your skills and knowledge, reflecting on your achievement and further describing your career aspirations. Reflective skills are needed to build the presentation for assessment outlining how you set yourselves goals and critically evaluate how you reached these goals. Through skills mapping, preparation the CV and the interview process and the period of work experience itself you will further develop your employability skills tutorial support throughout this unit will further support you to identify your learning needs and charter your progress and achievement. The work placement must be between two and three weeks duration and it will usually occur between semester weeks 10-14. The placement may be with up to two companies, on either the client or agency side, within the communication industry. Placement opportunities will be identified and negotiated by individuals with potential employers and the course team through a series of work placement preparation seminars and workshops conducted at the beginning of semester 4. It will be your responsibility to make your own arrangements for work placements, travel to and from work and, if necessary, accommodation. Generally speaking, companies do not pay salaries to you on work placements (although they are often prepared to pay travel and some expenses).

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Whilst on placement it will be your responsibility to maintain contact with the course team. Throughout the placement you will keep a personal diary detailing the tasks and projects you have undertaken and record on a form the skills and techniques you employ and develop on placement. You will also produce a 2000 word report on your placement that describes the company, the nature of your business and working methods. This report should reflect upon your work experience from a personal viewpoint and comment upon how you feel the experience has benefited your work and aspirations for the future. If you are unable to secure or complete a work placement, you will be required to produce and present an investigative report on a company within the communication industry of your choice that is equivalent to the requirements of this unit. Finally, you will present to your tutor and colleagues, during semester week 15, a critical evaluation of your skills and development needs in the context of your career planning and personal development. The syllabus will cover: Carrying out a skill mapping exercise to assess your current skills base Developing your CV and portfolio Identification and negotiation of a work placement Working as part of a team on industry projects developing interpersonal, team working and organisational skills Keeping a diary detailing work and progress and the skills employed and developed on placement Producing a report on the work placement that describes the company and reflects upon the ways that experience has benefited your work and aspirations for the future Presenting an assessment of your current skills base reflecting upon your career aspirations in the context of your work experience, expertise and required skills

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 A2 A3 A4 to introduce you to first hand experience in the work place and gain valuable insights into professional working practices and knowledge of the industry to enhance your communication skills and learn skills involved with teamwork and working with others in a professional context to enhance further your research and documentation skills in a live situation to appreciate the importance of time management, planning and prioritisation related to job handling and encourage initiative in dealing with new and established tasks.

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 understand more fully the practice, function and purpose of advertising and brand communication LO2 understand more fully the skills and qualities required to work successfully in a team in the industry
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LO3 use the people and team skills you have acquired to greater effect in producing/discussing your work with colleagues and tutors and approach your work with increased professionalism LO4 produce a report/presentation on your employer and your work placement experience that is appropriate to this level of study LO5 use appropriate methods and technology to fulfil a self-initiated assignment LO6 clarify your own career direction in the light of the work experience. Teaching and Learning Methods Work placement, workshops, seminars and tutorials. Assessment Requirement A body or work comprising either an illustrated written report (2,000 words) on your work placement or an investigative report on an agency or company of your choice (70%) A presentation demonstrating a critical self-evaluation of your skills and development needs in the context of your career planning and personal development (30%)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Contemporary practice (LO1, LO2) Contextual understanding (brands, markets, commercial factors) (LO1, LO2) Understanding through application of: Personal experience (LO2, LO3, LO5) Evaluation and reflection (LO2, LO4, LO6) Technical and applied skills through: Application of professional skills (LO1, LO2, LO4, LO5) Communication (written and oral) (LO3, LO4, LO5, LO6) Presentation (LO4, LO5) Team working (LO3, LO4, LO5) Self-management skills (LO3, LO5) Reference Material Essential Neidle, Andrea. (2002). How to get Into Advertising: A Guide to Careers in Advertising, Media and Marketing Communications. 2nd Ed. London: Cassell. Van den Brink-Budgen, Roy. (2000). Critical thinking for students: learn the skills of critical assessment and effective argument. London: How to Books. Butterworth, John and Carver, Simon. (2005). Thinking skills. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

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Mangieri, John and Collins-Block, Cathy. (2003). Yale Assessment of Thinking: a selfassessment of your skills in the areas of reasoning, insight and self-knowledge. 2nd Ed. New York: Jossey Bass Wiley. Ogilvy, David. (1995). Ogilvy On Advertising. London: Prion Books. Web-based material http://www.mad.co.uk the website for centaur communications - publications include Design Week and Creative Review. NB. Access this web site from the LLRC only (otherwise a subscription is payable) www.surrart.ac.uk/careers the website for the University Colleges Career Advisory Service. http://www.surrart.ac.uk/index.cfm?articleid=1704 here you can find a useful career employment toolkit http://www.surrart.ac.uk/index.cfm?articleid=1704 for information on jobs and placements http://www.surrart.ac.uk/index.cfm?articleid=1731 for a downloadable PDF file with specific career information for the Advertising and Brand Management course http://www.windmillscourse.com/ the University of Liverpools Graduate into Employment Unit virtual career coach http://www.ipa.co.uk the website for the trade body and professional institute for leading agencies in the UK's advertising industry http://www.nabs.org.uk the website for the advertisings charity organisation providing impartial career advise

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Art Direction and Copywriting FABC2006 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 4 15 weeks 150 16/07/2007 16/07/2007

Content and Syllabus At this stage in the course you are able to choose between two units: Art Direction and Copywriting or Account and Media Planning. Both units involve the study of advertising and brand communications. However, they examine the problem from different perspectives and have different outcomes creative or strategic. Art direction and copywriting is a team project that provides the opportunity for art directors and copywriters to develop creative proposals for advertising and brand communications. Through a series of case studies you will examine the communication strategy of existing brands in terms of your advertising, media and target audience in a particular market. You will assess brand character, personality and positioning in relation to the core message of the communication, consider the use of media and examine how the advertising has been constructed, its tone of voice and visual treatment. This investigation will inform the creative practice of this unit. Practical workshops will give opportunity to work from a creative brief that details the business/marketing objectives of a brand, its advertising and media strategy, to produce creative concepts for an advertising campaign. Technical workshops will allow you to develop further your knowledge of industry-standard software packages, like PhotoShop and Illustrator, and show you how to use them in the context of art direction and copywriting in advertising and brand communication. The task for your assignment will be to work on a creative brief to produce several creative routes to a campaign idea that works both online and offline. It is expected you will be working in teams of two on your assignment: art director and copywriter to replicate industry practice. Teams should present your creative proposals at a client meeting to the course team and the year group; your presentation will be assessed. Learning journal: throughout this unit, you will be required to collect evidence of your thought process, ideas, research, strategy and concept development and to use it to reflect on your own learning and self-development in a learning journal that you will submit at the end of the unit. Your learning journal will also include a timesheet detailing the time spent working on your project. The learning journal will form part of your assessment providing evidence and reflection of your own personal contribution to the teamwork.

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The syllabus will cover: Case studies that examine the communication strategy of existing brands in terms of your advertising, positioning, personality, media and target audience - in the context of competitive brands, consumers and the marketplace The creative brief: objective, goal, tone and attitude, theme/background story, channels of communication, insights, key thought, what people walk away with, executional issues, activity plan and timeline, summary of requirements Analysis of brand character, personality and proposition through brand planning techniques Market/consumer understanding Conceptual thinking and screening of ideas Development of creative proposals based upon an appropriate core idea that is informed by an in-depth understanding of market and consumer requirements Visualisation of your idea across media-channels, including digital media Image and text digital generation and manipulation Production of presentation visuals and support material Presentation of proposals

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to identify and understand creative strategies used to respond to a specific creative brief A2 to provide an opportunity for you to generate creative concepts in response to a brief A3 to develop further technical skills to generate creative concepts - within advertising and brand communication using digital tools. A4 to develop several creative routes to a campaign idea that works both online and offline. Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate an understanding of advertising and brand communication through your ability to assess and evaluate existing creative work in relation to the brand, media, target audience, marketing and communication objectives LO2 demonstrate your ability to employ innovative solutions using visual communication language to meet the objectives of a creative brief LO3 demonstrate your ability to take a brief and develop it across several creative routes to a campaign idea that works both online and offline LO4 apply software skills in the development of original creative concepts, experimenting with distinctive graphic and imaging tools Teaching and Learning Methods Case studies, workshops and tutorials.

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Assessment Requirement Creative concepts (60%) Peer assessment (15%) Learning journal (25%) Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Contextual understanding (brand, markets, commercial factors, theoretical context) (LO1, LO2) Contemporary practice (LO1, LO2, LO3) Idea generation tools and processes (LO1, LO2, LO3) Brand communication creative processes (LO1, LO2, LO3) Communication concepts and strategy (LO2, LO3) Understanding through application of: Evaluation and critical insights (LO1, LO2, LO3) Research, analysis and synthesis (LO1, LO2, LO3) Technical and applied skills: Materials, media and process to express creative idea (LO2, LO3, LO4) Written, oral and visual communication and presentation (LO2, LO3, LO4) Graphic and digital imaging tools (LO2, LO3, LO4) Team working (LO2, LO3) Reference Material Essential Designers and Art Directors Association of the United Kingdom. (1995). The Copy Book. Crans-Pres-Celigny: Rotovision. Berger, Warren. (2001). Advertising Today. London: Phaidon Press. Tokuda, Yuji. (2005). Advertising Collection with Impact. Tokyo: Pie Books. Simmons, John. (2000). We, Me, Them and It: The Power of Words in Business. London: Texere. Sugarman, Joseph. (2007). The AdWeek copywriting handbook. John Wiley & Sons Inc. Recommended Landa, Robin. (2002). Thinking Creatively: New Ways to Unlock Your Visual Imagination. Cincinnati: North Light. Kalman, Tibor. (1998). Tibor Kalman: Perverse Optimist. London: Booth-Clibborn Editions. Cahan and Associates. (1999). I am Almost Always Hungry. New York: Princeton Architectural Press.

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Grant, John. (2000). The New Marketing Manifesto: The 12 Rules for Building Successful Brands in the 21st Century. London: Texere. Sullivan, Luke. (1998). Hey, Whipple, Squeeze This: A Guide to Creating Great Ads. Chichester: Wiley. Designers and Art Directors Association of the United Kingdom (DandAD). British Design and Art Directors Annuals. Web-based Material: www.dandad.org

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Media Planning FABC2007 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 1 15 weeks 150 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus At this stage in the course you are able to choose between two units: Art Direction and Copywriting or Media Planning. Both units involve the study of advertising and brand communication; however, they examine the problem from different perspectives and have different outcomes creative or strategic. Media Planning focuses on the relationship between media and the consumer and considers the strategic role media has in the communication process. Through a series of case studies you will examine the communication strategy of existing brands in terms of your advertising, positioning, personality, media and target audience - in the context of competitive brands, consumers and the marketplace. You will consider the relationship consumers have with media: the way consumers choose and use media, the fragmentation of audiences and the proliferation of media (including ambient and new media). Central to this study will be an appreciation of the role media planning has in the development of advertising and branding communication. You will also consider the cost of advertising through different media channels and media effect - the extent to which a medium can enhance or diminish the effectiveness of a piece of communication and the standing of a brand featured in that communication. The assignment for this unit will allow you to explore how media planning is related to advertising planning and how one influences the other. Working in line with the marketing and communication objectives for a brand of your choice you will produce a media strategy and buying brief. Through your proposals you will demonstrate your understanding of the relationship between brands, consumers and media in a specific market, and build an effective media strategy that ensures you reach the right people in the right place at the right time - with the right message. You will present your proposals at a client meeting to the course team and the year group; your presentation will be assessed. The syllabus will cover: Case studies that examine the communication strategy of existing brands in terms of your advertising, positioning, personality, media and target audience - in the context of competitive brands, consumers and the marketplace Medias changing role, the media landscape, growth of new and ambient media Media choice, the consumer-media relationship, behavioural shifts, segmentation and fragmentation of audiences Inter-media and intra-media decisions

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The relationship between account and media planners in the strategic development process The media role in strategy development, a framework for strategic analysis (Leslie Butterfield) Requirements of the media planner Who are you trying to reach; how, when and where should you reach them Target audience, definition and segmentation Media consumption, media effect, cost of media Brand-consumer-media relationships Media objectives and strategy Media buying brief

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 A2 A3 A4 to study the relationship between consumers and media in advertising and brand communications to develop an understanding of the social, economic and cultural factors that frame media consumption to develop an understanding of the role of the account and media planner in advertising and brand communications to develop a media strategy and buying brief in response to an advertising strategy.

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate an understanding of how consumers use or choose media through your ability to develop an effective media strategy for a brand that identifies the strategic role for media in the communication process LO2 demonstrate your understanding of the roles and relationship between account planners and media planners through your ability to integrate advertising and media objectives and strategy in your proposals LO3 demonstrate your ability to develop a media buying brief that is coherent with the media strategy for a brand in response to specific marketing and communication objectives. Teaching and Learning Methods Case studies, seminars, tutorials and assignments. Assessment Requirement Presentation (100%)

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Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Contextual understanding (brands, markets, commercial factors, theoretical context) (LO1, LO2) Contemporary practice (LO1, LO2) Brand communication: media, consumers, strategies and concepts (LO1, LO2, LO3) Understanding through application of: Evaluation and critical insights (LO1, LO2, LO3) Research, analysis and synthesis (LO1, LO2, LO3) Technical and applied skills through: Communication and presentation skills (LO1, LO2, LO3) Reference Material Essential Damani, Ravi. (2005). Online Marketing. Imano Plc. Sissors, Jack. (2002). Advertising Media Planning. McGraw-Hill. Katz, Helen. (2003). The Media Handbook. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Butterfield, Leslie. (Ed.). (1999). Excellence in Advertising: The IPA Guide to Best Practice. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Recommended Randall, Geoffrey. (1997). Branding: A Practical Guide to Planning, Organizing and Strategy. London: Kogan Page. Lury, Giles. (1998). Brandwatching: Lifting the Lid on the Phenomenon of Branding. Dublin: Blackhall.

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Visual Communication in Context FCTX2009 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 3 15 weeks 150 13/04/2005 13/04/2005

Content and Syllabus This unit will address a number of theories and dialogues with regard to the practice of visual communication, advertising and branding through a variety of media in relation to both production and reception within the wider cultural sphere. Central to this unit is the development of technology, digital media in particular, and its role in communicative strategies. You will investigate, through a range of case studies, the various inter-relationships between technology, visual communication, and your manifestation in visual culture. You will also investigate how the essentialist idea of both technology and vision has been critiqued through alternative means of production in the field of communication and media practices. A variety of responses from designers working within the various fields of visual communication and media practice will be evaluated, and set in the context of the discourses, industries and markets within which they operate. Fully illustrated lectures will introduce a number of pertinent debates with regard to issues such as modernist and postmodernist visual culture, photographic truth, interactive media technologies, and the rebirth of craft, and these will be accompanied by key texts. During the unit, you will choose from a range of essay questions that reflect the theoretical underpinnings of communication technologies, and seminars will serve as a platform for further debate. The development of a specific and considered argument based on analysis and evaluation will be encouraged through both essay workshops and tutorials, and you will be expected to conceive, research and write an individual response which clearly applies theoretical concepts to examples of practice, and which demonstrates a sound understanding of academic convention as a means by which to support individual argument. The syllabus will cover: Lectures will introduce a range of contexts and theoretical constructs by which both historical and contemporary visual communication practices might be better understood. Topics may include: The technology of visuality in the Twentieth Century: modernism to postmodernism Photographic vision and the question of truth Global markets and local responses Enacting social responsibility Interactive Media Technologies: digital theories and your application Narratives in motion graphics

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Auditory culture and visual design: The battle of the senses Technologies of the hand: The return of craft Culture jamming The politics of vision: the language of the street Spaces of representation: graphic design and spatiality Design, ethnography and cultural appropriation

Aims The aims of this unit are: A1 A2 A3 A4 to provide an in-depth study of visual communication within the framework of, social, cultural, economic and environmental change to introduce an awareness of the packaging of meaning as it relates to issues of production and consumption within communication strategies to generate a body of knowledge and a critical vocabulary drawn from historical and contemporary practices to encourage individual analysis and evaluation as key tools of expression.

Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the unit you will be able to: LO1 locate the origins and themes of visual communication within a wider historical, social, economic and environmental framework LO2 formulate links between theoretical models and visual communication practices LO3 research and communicate complex information in written form and according to academic convention LO4 analyse and evaluate research findings in the pursuit of specific argument. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars, essay workshops, tutorials and independent study. Assessment Requirement 2000 word essay (100%)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Historical and contemporary practice Contextual and theoretical models and debates Understanding through application of: Research (LO2, LO3)

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Analysis, deduction, interpretation and evaluation Technical and applied skills through: Research management Application of academic and professional skills using verbal and written communication Reference Material Essential Bierut, Michael and Heller, Steven. (eds.). (1997). Looking Closer 2: Critical Writings on Graphic Design. New York: Allworth Press with American Institute of Graphic Arts. Dyer, Gillian. (1987). Advertising as Communication. London: Routledge. Lister, Martin. (ed.). (1995). The Photographic Image in Digital Culture. London: Routledge. McLuhan, Marshall. (2003). Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man. Critical ed. Corte Madera, Calif.: Gingko Press.

Recommended Jobling, Paul and Crowley, David. (1996). Graphic Design: Reproduction and Representation Since 1800. Manchester: Manchester University Press. Druckrey, Timothy. (ed.). (1996). Electronic Culture: Technology and Visual Representation. New York: Aperture. Holland, D. K. (ed.). (2001). Design Issues: How Graphic Design Informs Society. New York: Allworth. Lunenfeld, Peter. (ed.). (2000). The Digital Dialectic: New Essays on New Media. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT. Lupton, Ellen and Miller, J. Abbott. (1999). Design Writing Research: Writing on Graphic Design. London: Phaidon. Mitchell, W. J. T. (1995). Picture Theory: Essays on Verbal and Visual Representation. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press.

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

The Uses of Things: Design, Consumption and Identity FCTX2010 Farnham Level 2; (15 Credits) Semester 4 15 weeks 150 13/4/2005 13/4/2005

Content and Syllabus This unit focuses on a number of contemporary contexts in order to examine the variety of meanings and identities that can be constructed within what has come to be defined as a consumer society, with the emergence of a range of design professions at its core. Consumer behaviour provides the context by which a range of critical and theoretical constructs will be examined. Seeking to locate issues of modernity, post-modernity and taste within a broader discussion of social change, the unit examines the evolution of meaning and lifestyle within recent design discourse, and draws on a range of contemporary critiques of a society based on the promotion of insatiable desire in order to consider possible futures for design practices. A short series of introductory lectures will seek to outline the basic tenets of consumer culture, and offer a number of theoretical and contextual paradigms by which patterns of consumption and behaviour might be better understood. Following this, you will then further develop a number of key issues that can be seen to relate consumption to your particular course of study, with particular emphasis given to the social, cultural and economic implications of design decisions. With the aid of additional lectures given over to quantitive and qualitative research methods, including the role of interviews and questionnaires, and the use of library databases, you will then carry out an individual case-study in order to further evaluate the relationship between theory and practice within the framework of design and its consumption. This will then form a significant part of the final written assignment. The syllabus will include: A series of introductory and key lectures will examine: Definitions of consumer culture The role of meaning within contemporary design practice The construction of identities and lifestyles Taste as a social construct Quantitive and qualitative research methods The role of the case-study

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Following this, further lectures and seminars will be based on themes and variations according to specific design disciplines and individual interests. These may include:

The role of semiotic analysis in determining meaning Markets and market research Global pressures Branding and anti-branding Culture jamming Valuing the handmade Sustainability Display, promotion, and the creation of need Consuming desire Status and status anxiety Collectors and collecting

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to provide a variety of theories and contexts for the analysis of meaning within material culture A2 to analyse design practices within the context of previous and current social, cultural and economic environments A3 to challenge extant theories and practices with regard to possible future responses A4 to provide the necessary research tools for detailed analysis and evaluation.

Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the unit you will be able to: LO1 identify the role of meaning within contemporary design practices LO2 demonstrate an awareness of the relationships between society, methods of production and types of consumption LO3 demonstrate an awareness of the potential social, cultural and economic consequences of design decisions LO4 demonstrate the ability to research, evaluate and present findings in depth, using academic conventions. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminar, tutorials and independent study. Assessment Requirement 2000 - 2500 word written assignment (100%)

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Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: the production and consumption of meaning within design practices (LO1) theoretical models and your application (LO1, LO2, LO3) Understanding through application of: research (LO3) analysis, deduction, interpretation and evaluation (LO2, LO3) Technical and applied skills through: Self management (LO4) application of academic and professional skills using written communication (LO4) Reference Material Essential Lury, Celia. (1996). Consumer Culture. London: Polity Press. Miller, Daniel. (1987). Material Culture and Mass Consumption. Oxford: Blackwell. Slater, Don. (1997). Consumer Culture and Modernity. London: Polity Press. Recommended Baudrillard, Jean. (1998). The Consumer Society: Myths and Structures. London: Sage. Bourdieu, Pierre. (1984). Distinction. London: Routledge. Featherstone, Mike. (1991). Consumer Culture and Postmodernism. London: Sage. Klein, Naomi. (2000). No Logo. London: Harper Collins. Recommended Journals Cultural Studies Theory, Culture and Society

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Stage 3 units
Introduction During Stage 3 you are provided with the opportunity to develop critical and commercially aware approaches to communication problems. You will be encouraged to develop your own oeuvre and to have a keen understanding of where you should place your skills within a professional context. Stage 3 provides you with opportunities to refine a specialist interest (such as online advertising, for instance) and/or set of skills. All units in Stage 3 require you to define how you might apply and develop a particular knowledge base, anticipating that you may wish to concentrate on developing creative advertising and branding concepts, or you may wish to focus on defining market opportunities, brand or communication strategies. A core theme of Stage 3 is the Major Project, you will be required to demonstrate through application your understanding of advertising and brand communication in relation to the current trends and developments within the industry, including online advertising. This will provide you with an opportunity to revisit the entire curriculum and to synthesise your learning in the presentation of a project of your choice. A requirement in all creative-based units in Stage 3 is that you collect all your thoughts, ideas research, strategy and concept development relevant to a project in an evidence book. As part of the evidence book you may also be asked to note down in a group timesheet your own personal contribution, in terms of date and time span, against any team-based project. Team members must sign your group timesheet. Both the evidence book and the group timesheet will be submitted together with the assessment work. During Stage 3 you will be expected to manage your studies independently, to negotiate the content of your projects and to develop external networks in preparation for employment. In semesters six, a Student Learning Agreement is used within certain units to provide a structure for negotiated study projects. You may use this opportunity to plan further placement opportunities with agencies or client organisations in the commercial or public sector. The ability to synthesise theoretical, cultural and strategic information and to develop sophisticated approaches to communications problems will be the focal point of Stage 3 study. Scope of the Dissertation The dissertation is a major component of Stage 3 and accounts for one quarter of the marks available for award during the stage. The dissertation takes place in semester five, although you will be required to start identifying your proposed dissertation subject over the summer break between Stage 2 and 3. To help you in this process staff will provide appropriate support towards the end of semester four in Stage 2. Preparation of the dissertation is spread over 15 weeks, to help you to plan and prepare your work thoroughly, and for staff to be able to offer you appropriate help and support. The scope

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and procedures for research should be identified and a detailed synopsis and work plan made available for discussion. Your dissertation should be 8,000 to 10,000 words in length, and be presented in a typed or word processed form, incorporating relevant illustrations/charts/diagrams. The work should include a comprehensive bibliography. Two copies of your completed dissertation must be submitted for assessment.

Aims A1 To provide opportunities for you to develop highly sophisticated approaches to defining and solving complex communication problems both from a strategic business and creative perspective To develop the subject knowledge and skills necessary for placement within appropriate graduate careers and further learning destinations To define, locate, analyse and synthesise the information needed to bring study problems to effective conclusions To bring to your work, knowledge of the strategic branding techniques advertising agencies employs in the resolution of communication problems To provide an opportunity for you to take risks and develop innovative approaches to communication problems To provide an opportunity for sustained study and scholarship in an area of knowledge related to Advertising and Brands.

A2 A3 A4 A5 A6

Learning Outcomes By the end of Stage 3 you should be able to demonstrate: Knowledge and Understanding LO1 systematic and detailed knowledge of the structure and culture of the advertising industry and associated professions LO2 systematic and detailed knowledge of communication strategies within advertising, branding, marketing, and client environments LO3 systematic and detailed knowledge of key historical and contemporary exemplars, case studies, and other important media and academic texts Skills and other Attributes LO4 the ability to apply knowledge creatively and in a critical way, evaluate and extend arguments supported by thorough and detailed research LO5 the conceptual and perceptual skills necessary for developing and solving complex communication tasks, challenge conventional approaches and assumptions to communication problems LO6 the ability to exercise initiative, personal responsibility, leadership, team and other professional skills in the context of employability and continuous learning and development LO7 the ability to use conventions and intellectual skills necessary for sustained LO8 research and analysis of complex problems, and for interpreting and evaluating the impact of research on the discipline.
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Stage 3 Unit Descriptors


Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version Dissertation FINS3002 Farnham Level 3; (30 Credits) Semester 5 15 weeks
300 07/08/2006 07/08/2006

Content and Syllabus This unit consists of a substantial period of self-directed research on a subject that is related to the historical, theoretical or critical concerns of your discipline or professional area. The unit enables you to develop a range of research skills appropriate to your chosen topic. You will be expected to articulate a clear, cogent and sustained argument in an extended piece of writing that conforms to academic conventions and that demonstrates an understanding of the subject area through analysis and evaluation. The syllabus will cover: Indicative study skills content may include: research methods; library and internet research skills; developing a proposal; constructing an argument; using secondary sources; styles of academic writing etc. Subject specific content individually devised.

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 A2 to enable you to undertake in depth research into a subject of your own choice that is relevant to your course of study (subject to approval by your tutor) to provide an opportunity for you to demonstrate an understanding of the historical, theoretical or critical concerns of your discipline by applying them to a specified research question or case study to enable you to produce a clear, cogent and sustained written argument, supported by appropriate evidence that conforms to academic conventions illustrated where necessary.

A3

Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the unit you will be able to: LO1 explore in depth a subject-related academic enquiry showing an understanding of its historical, theoretical, or critical context LO2 demonstrate an ability to select, manage and integrate information from a variety of sources
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LO3 demonstrate the ability to analyse and evaluate sources, and use them to develop and support a clear cogent and sustained argument in written form LO4 demonstrate an ability to communicate ideas and information clearly in written form and to obey academic conventions (e.g. references, illustrations, bibliography, appendices).

Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars, group tutorials, individual tutorials and independent study. Assessment Requirement Two bound copies of a dissertation of 8,000-10,000 words

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: The historical, critical or theoretical context of your chosen subject area (LO1) Understanding through application of: Research skills: the ability to select, manage, and integrate information from a variety of sources (LO2) Critical analysis and evaluation (LO3) Technical and applied skills through The ability to develop a clear cogent and sustained argument in written form (LO3) The ability to use appropriate academic conventions (LO4)

Reference Material Essential Recommended Fairburn, Gavin & Winch, Christopher. (1996). Reading, Writing and Reasoning: A Guide for Students. Buckingham: Open University Press. Walliman, Nicholas. (2004). Your Undergraduate Dissertation: The Essential Guide for Success. London: Sage.

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

The Creative Campaign FABC3001 Farnham Level 3; (30 Credits) Semester 5 15 weeks 300 16/07/2007 16/07/2007

Content and Syllabus This double unit builds upon the skills and knowledge you have gained in stage 2, in particular: Advertising Strategy 1: the Client Brief, Advertising Strategy 2: the creative Brief and Art Direction and Copywriting. It provides you with the opportunity to create brand communication proposals in cross-functional teams of up to three members consisting of creatives and planners/account-handlers. This team-working methodology highlights the synergy and relationship between the creative and the strategic functions typical of the communication industry. This unit is split into two parts. Industry Brief: in the first ten weeks you will be working on three industry briefs (one of which, at least, will be live) that will require you to develop an innovative solution, in terms of both strategy and creative, to a communication problem. Working in your teams you will create a multi-channel communication proposal for an existing brand, developing your campaign across all stages in the production process from in-depth market/consumer research to creative concepts. This will allow you to further enhance your team-working and communication skills and provide an opportunity for you to gain first-hand experience of contemporary advertising and marketing practices. You will be able to interact with a brand-provider/advertising executive from industry at key presentation(s) during the assignment and demonstrate your ability to generate multi-channel communication with a core idea/message. D&AD Student Awards. The Design and Art Directors Association run the most prestigious student award scheme in the UK: the D&AD Student Awards. They offer a wide choice of live briefs covering many media platforms within advertising and brand communications and the opportunity for you to compete with students from other advertising courses on an international basis. The second part of this unit, covering the remaining five weeks will see you working in crossfunctional teams to creative innovation solutions to a communications brief selected from a portfolio of D&AD briefs. Your proposals will testify to your creative and strategic skills as communicators and demonstrate your ability to work effectively as a team in the context of an international award. Evidence Book: throughout this unit (i.e. during both part one and two) you will be required to collect evidence of your thought process, ideas, research, strategy and concept development and a timesheet detailing the time spent working on your Industry Briefs in an evidence book

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that you will submit at the end of the unit. This will also form part of your assessment providing your tutor with the evidence of your own personal contribution to the teamwork. Two components make up the assessment requirement for this unit: the Industry Brief, and the D&AD Student Awards Brief. Your unit tutor will also be looking at the Evidence Book you have kept on each of these two components when individually assessing them. The syllabus will cover: Four live project assignments: three industry briefs - and the D&AD Student Award Briefs Cross-functional team-working methodology bringing together creative and strategic functions Research and analysis of markets/consumers, together with competitive brand audit Sensory and visual brand planning techniques Brand template, brand positioning and proposition Development of the creative brief to identify: message content, must have criteria, tone of voice/treatment, target audience and media platforms Planning and organisation of targets, objectives and screening criteria Project management, time plan and methodology Presentation of strategic and creative campaign objectives Conceptual thinking and screening of ideas Development of creative proposals based upon an appropriate core idea that is informed by an in-depth understanding of market and consumer requirements Storyboarding, media treatment/visual execution Production and presentation of highly finished client standard proposals for your campaign

Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to provide an opportunity for you to work in cross-functional teams to promote a deeper understanding of the relationship between creative and strategic functions in brand advertising and gain first hand experience of contemporary industry practice to work within the parameters and restrictions of live project briefs to high professional standards and fixed deadlines to develop creative proposals based upon an appropriate core idea that meets communication objectives and is informed by an understanding of market and consumer requirements.

A2 A3

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate your ability to develop an original solution to a communication problem as part of a multi-disciplined team LO2 demonstrate your ability to develop innovative advertising and branding strategies together with original creative ideas that satisfy both the aesthetic and commercial criteria of a brief.

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LO3 demonstrate an accomplished level of professional skills and attitudes that is appropriate to the demands of an external brief LO4 demonstrate an in-depth and systematic level of critical analysis that is reflected in your ability to develop a communication proposal that is innovative, engaging and appropriate and meets stated objectives.

Teaching and Learning Methods Team working, 2 live assignments, tutorials and workshops. Assessment Requirement Three Industry Briefs: presentation of project proposals (40%) Self-reflective Journal (30%) D&AD Student Award Brief (30%)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Communication concepts and strategy (LO1, LO2) Brand and marketing context and theory (LO1, LO2) Understanding through application of: Research, analysis and synthesis of inherent information, concepts and theories (LO1, LO2, LO3, LO4) Criticism and evaluation of creative processes and concepts (LO1, LO2, LO3, LO4) Technical and applied skills through: Team and project management skills (LO1, LO3) Materials, media and processes to express creative idea (LO1, LO2, LO3) Reference Material Essential Marcantonio, Alfredo. (2006). Well-written and Red: the continuing story of the Economist poster campaign. 2nd Ed. Harriman House Publishing. Pricken, Mario. (2004). Creative Advertising: Ideas and techniques from the Worlds best campaigns. Thames & Hudson Berger, Warren. (2001). Advertising Today. London: Phaidon. Lury, Giles. (1998). Brandwatching: Lifting the Lid on the Phenomenon of Branding. Dublin: Blackhall Publishing. Butterfield Leslie. Ed. (1999). Excellence in Advertising: the IPA guide to best practice. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.

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Recommended Fletcher, Alan. (2001). The Art of Looking Sideways. London: Phaidon. Sullivan, Luke. (1998). Hey Whipple, Squeeze This: a Guide to Creating Great Ads. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons. Grant, John. (1999). The New Marketing Manifesto, the 12 Rules for Building Successful Brands in the 21st Century. London: Texere. Simmons, John. (2000). We, Me, Them and It: the Power of Words in Business. London: Texere. Schmitt, Bernd H. (1999). Experiential Marketing: How to Get Customers to Sense, Feel, Think, Act, Relate to your Company and Brands. New York: The Free Press. Designers and Art Directors Association of the United Kingdom. (D&AD). British Design and Art Direction Annuals.

Web-based Material

www.dandad.org

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Major Project FABC3002 Farnham Level 3; (30 Credits) Semester 6 15 weeks 300 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus The major project represents the culmination of study and provides an opportunity for you to demonstrate the fluency of your creative and analytical skills through an in depth critical inquiry into a self-selected topic in the area of advertising and brand management. Drawing upon your ability to think creatively and develop innovative solutions you will develop an advertising campaign or communications strategy that testifies to your potential as creatives, planners and strategists. The emphasis will be on the amalgamation of your creative, theoretical and management abilities along with in-depth research and analysis of markets and consumers in the development of a media strategy/communication proposal worthy of a final major project. The major project takes place over an extended period of study and will form an important part of your exit portfolio. You will be required to reflect upon your interests and postgraduate aspirations in order to inform the direction and scope of your major project. Personal tutorials will be held with the course team to discuss your statement of intent and ensure that your proposals are appropriate for a project of this importance. The object and focus of study for the major project will be decided by negotiation with tutors. Typically your project will entail the creation of a brand advertising strategy/campaign for an existing product or service, an organisation, a charity, a personality, an event or perhaps a geographical location such as a city or region. Your choice of brand, channels of communication and scope of inquiry will reflect your interests and postgraduate aspirations. As part of the research and development of your project proposals you may undertake a further period of work placement, for a period of up to three weeks duration or choose a client/brandprovider upon whom to base your study. Your working method, communications strategy and media platform and project objectives will be negotiated through a Project Proposal; creative teams (art directors and copywriters) may choose to work in pairs during this unit. Upon completion of the major project your proposals will be presented to the course team in a formal client presentation setting that will form part of your assessment. If appropriate, you will be encouraged to show your proposals to the client/brand-provider that you have based your study upon; however, this is optional and will not form part of your assessment). Evidence Book: due to the extent of independent study you will carry out as part of this project, you will be required to collect, throughout this unit, evidence of your thought process, ideas, research, strategy and concept development and a timesheet detailing the time spent working on your project in an evidence book that you will submit at the end of the unit. This will also part of your assessment providing your tutor with the evidence of your own personal contribution to the teamwork.
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The syllabus will cover: The content of the syllabus will be planned between you and the course team through the Project Proposal. Ultimately the object and focus of study should confirm your choice of career direction, whilst also demonstrating a broad intellectual, managerial and business/practical portfolio of skills. Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 to provide an opportunity in which to conduct an in-depth inquiry into a self-selected area of study within the field of Advertising and Brand management and apply managerial and organisational skills to a complex assignment and meet set deadlines to provide an opportunity for you to produce a brand advertising strategy/campaign that integrates creative and commercial factors appropriate to this level of study to provide a framework for you to confirm and consolidate career direction and produce a body of work for your portfolio that professionally confirms this choice to provide a forum for you to present your proposals in a formal client presentation setting.

A2 A3 A4

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of this unit you will be able to: LO1 demonstrate the capacity for sustained independent study towards established aims and objectives over an extended period of study LO2 demonstrate through your proposals the ability to develop a brand advertising strategy/campaign in a commercial context based on consumer and market research that displays your understanding of social and theoretical issues which frame your inquiry LO3 produce a body of work, to a high professional standard, that testifies to your potential as creatives, planners and strategists and will further your postgraduate aspirations LO4 demonstrate the ability to present, in a professional and finished manner, a body of work that represents the resolution of your project, the development of your thinking and the commercial and contextual factors that frame your inquiry. Teaching and Learning Methods Negotiated major project.

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Assessment Requirement Project (55%) Evidence Book (25%) Presentation (20%)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Contextual understanding (brands, markets, commercial factors, theoretical context) (LO1, LO2) Technologies and processes (LO1, LO2, LO3) Contemporary practice and career destination (LO2, LO3, LO4) Understanding through application of: Research, synthesis and deduction (LO1, LO2, LO3) Analysis and criticism (LO1, LO2, LO3) Technical and applied skills through: Materials and media (LO3, LO4) Self-management (LO1, LO3, LO4) Specialist methods and processes (LO2, LO3, LO4) Professional presentation and display of work (LO3, LO4) Reference Material Essential Butterfield, Leslie. (2000). Excellence In Advertising, The IPA Guide to Best Practice. 2nd Ed. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Grant, John. (2000). The New Marketing Manifesto, the 12 Rules for Building Successful Brands in the 21st Century. London: Texere. Schmitt, Bernd H. (1999). Experiential Marketing, How to Get Customers to Sense, Feel, Think, Act, Relate to your Company and Brands. New York: The Free Press.

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Unit Title Unit Code Location Level & Credit When Taught Duration Learning Hours Date first approved Date of this version

Brand Sector Analysis FABC3003 Farnham Level 3; (30 Credits) Semester 6 15 weeks 300 14/05/2007 14/05/2007

Content and Syllabus This unit builds on knowledge of brands and marketing gained during stages 1 and 2 of the course, to provide you with an opportunity for specialised, self-directed research into a particular brand and its brand sector. You will be encouraged to consider brands within an international context, or within particular national settings. The unit will support the development of your portfolio by demonstrating your ability to conduct a precise mapping of a brand sector, to show the performance of individual brands within the sector, and demonstrate where there are opportunities. You will also develop a brand plan outlining from both a strategic point of view what future path a brand should take. The research you conduct should provide a steer for the subject of the Final Major Project by identifying issues within markets, marketing research, consumer behaviour and brand positioning. The unit will also provide you with an opportunity to use industry relevant research tools, databases and existing consumer research to build a detailed and sophisticated knowledge of a brand sector and the exact relation of individual brands within the sector. Your research will culminate in an individual business report detailing your analysis of the brand sector and insights of the future consumer, a brand strategy for your chosen brand. The syllabus will cover: Take one brand and sector, and undertake a comprehensive and detailed research project that takes account of the following: The Market The history of the market The positioning of brands within that secto Look at the holding companies of the products and have an understanding of the way the sector is broken out by ownership The future of the market The Consumer Look at the trends and attitudes of the consumer within that sector Identify the demographics of the consumer and forecast the size of the market who is the new consumer?

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The Brands Using this knowledge Identify brand extensions that are cannibalising the main brands TGI Complete a cross-tab to identify the consumer Have an understanding of the consumer clusters Complete an elementary buying plan for the media The Brand Strategy Identify a brand plan to take your brand into the future Aims The aims of the unit are: A1 A2 to consolidate learning from previous stages in order to gain insight into particular brand and its sector to develop a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the performance of the individual brand within the sector, including your precise relation to one another, and to market groups to engage in self-initiated research and use a range of research tools and processes relevant to the nature of the research undertaken to provide an opportunity for you to consolidate your understanding of marketing concepts and theories and to apply these to a research project to provide an opportunity for you to develop a specialist focus for your studies, generating a series of key issues and insights for detailed exploration within the Major Project to encourage a holistic approach to the future vision for a chosen brand.

A3 A4 A5 A6

Learning Outcomes On satisfactory completion of the unit you will be able to: LO1 develop a detailed understanding of the structure and performance of a brand sector LO2 produce insights into a brand plan within a sector LO3 demonstrate a comprehensive and detailed understanding of the consumer and the future consumer within a particular brand sector LO4 demonstrate the use of TGI and other market research tools and data-bases in order to understand and target consumer groups LO5 plan an independent research project, use appropriate theoretical and conceptual models, make accurate and insightful deductions based on research carried out LO6 structure and develop a brand plan, creative brief and creative concept for a chosen brand in the future. Teaching and Learning Methods Lectures, seminars and tutorials.

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Assessment Requirement Individual Brand Plan/Report (2,500 words) (100%)

Assessment Criteria Through the assessment requirements you are assessed on your: Knowledge of: Marketing concepts and theories (LO1, LO2, LO5) Market research tools and processes (LO3, LO4, LO5) Contemporary practice (Brand Sector) (LO1, LO2, LO6) Understanding through application of: Research, analysis, synthesis (LO4, LO5) Evaluation and critical insights (LO2, LO5, LO6) Technical and Applied Skills through: Self-management skills (LO5, LO6) Research methods and processes (LO4, LO5, LO6) Communication and presentation of research/findings (LO6)

Reference Material Essential Gobe, Marc. (2001). Emotional Branding: the New Paradigm for Connecting Brands to People. Oxford: Windsor. Willmott, Michael. (2001). Citizen Brands: Putting Society at the Heart of your Business. London: John Wiley and Sons. Pringle, Hamish and Thompson, Marjorie. (1999). Brand Spirit: How Cause Related Marketing Builds Brands. London: John Wiley and Sons. Marconi, Joe. (2000). The Brand Marketing Book: Creating, Managing, and Extending the Value of your Brand. London: McGraw-Hill. Web-based material www.brandchannel.com Brandchannel www.britishbrandsgroup.com British Brands Group www.adbrands.net Adbrands www.brandrepublic.com Brandrepublic www.warc.com World Advertising Research Centre www.ipa.com/thinkbank Institute of Practitioners in Advertising

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How your work is marked


Assessment Methods
Formative assessment Formative assessment is an interim review of your work undertaken at key points during particular units. It provides an indicative measure of your progress, allows you to consider your work in relation to that of your peers, allows you to agree with staff any adjustments you need to make in order to satisfy course requirements, and is designed to help you improve your performance. It does not contribute to the final unit mark. Summative assessment Summative assessment is that carried out at the end of a unit. It provides an evaluation of your progress during the unit, generates a unit mark, and confirms the conditions for referral and retake.

The purpose of assessment


Assessment measures your performance in completed units. It is therefore retrospective and should not necessarily be taken as a guide to future success. Assessment can have the following purposes: to measure your performance over a specified part of the course by published criteria against a stated requirement; to provide you with feedback about your performance, helping you to identify strengths and weaknesses; to determine your suitability to progress to the next stage of the course; to determine the award of an appropriate qualification.

The assessment scheme is designed to recognise and credit achievement rather than to penalise failure. If you fail a unit you will have a further chance to improve your work and pass. You progress from stage to stage of your course by accumulating sufficient credit (i.e. by passing units). The final award requires students to accumulate credit in the same way. The Student Regulations Handbook contains more detailed information on the assessment scheme and regulations.

Assessment methods used on the course


Assessment practices adopted by the course are consistent with the University Colleges Assessment Policy. The Assessment methods employed are effective in permitting students to demonstrate course outcomes. Assessment Criteria specific to each unit and generic Grading Descriptors ensure a consistency of approach to assessment.

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A range of assessment strategies is used: formal examinations; essays; group production projects; individual production projects; production simulations to deadline; individual writing assignments; written critical evaluations; student presentations; individual student logs of project activity; tutor observation of student performance in extended group projects and real time production simulations; assessed work placements; and a dissertation. On practical units, whenever possible, assessments are integrated into the teaching and learning: extended production projects give scope for tutor guidance week by week, for example; or a final summative assessment will be based closely on earlier formative assessments which have given students scope to steadily build and develop skills assisted by tutor feedback. Considerable use is made of portfolio assessment in which group work and individual work for one unit can be combined, often with a written critical evaluation which fosters reflective learning, reflective practice and links between theory and practice. Care is taken by lecturers to try to ensure that all students engage in assessed group work. On such group assessments, individual student logs of activity are required and tutor observations of individual student contribution are recorded on assessment feedback sheets. Individual performance in group work is formally recognized in the assessment criteria for group assessments.

Unit assessment and Stage assessment


Unit assessment is the basic unit of assessment. Unit information will include a timetable for assessment and a clear statement of assessment requirements, assessment criteria and assessment methods appropriate to its outcomes and length of study. Throughout the course a range of assessment methods will be used. They may include reviews of coursework, presentations, written submissions and set examination papers. Peer and self-assessment are also used at appropriate points, to enable you to achieve an increasingly self-critical view of your work. Each unit is assessed on completion and given a percentage mark. These grades are subject to confirmation by the Unit Assessment Board at the end of the academic year (see 6.7 and 6.8). You will also receive verbal and written feedback from your tutors. The credit value of each unit is proportional to its study time. This provides weighting for the unit; unit marks contribute proportionately to the Stage mark. Units will normally be assessed within their duration. Exceptionally assessment may extend beyond the unit but a deadline will be set for the release of marks and the return of work. Stage assessment is the major summative assessment point which allows progression between stages of a course. Where appropriate it may form the basis for the recommendation of an award. The purpose of stage assessment is to consider the overall performance of students within a stage of a named course, to award credit where appropriate and to set any conditions for progression or retrieval of failure.

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Stage assessment collates the weighted marks from units to produce a single end of stage mark.

Formative review
Formative review is also operated on some courses. This is a major review of progress at the end of the first semester of each year. Its purpose is to allow students: to take stock of performance to agree with staff adjustments to their course of study that may be necessary to meet the requirements of an award or for progression at the year end to consider, with staff, the advisability of any change of course available at this point.

Assessment Boards
The Unit Assessment Board is responsible to the College Progression & Award Board for the conduct of all assessment associated with the course. The full College Progression & Award Board normally meets annually at the end of the academic year. Its membership includes the Deputy Rector or nominee (Chair), the relevant Director of Studies, the Head of College, the Deputy Head of College, the Head of Registry Services or nominee, the Chief External Examiner(s) and the College Registrar.

Confirmation of marks
External examiners are appointed by the University Colleges Academic Board. They moderate internal marks (where appropriate), ensure correct procedures are followed and proper standards maintained. The external examiner will consult with internal examiners and may examine samples of work submitted, or meet with students. However, external examiners do not need to see you personally or your individual work in detail for the Unit Assessment Board to reach a decision on your marks, or your classification of award. Final responsibility for determining marks rests with the Unit Assessment Board.

Difficulties with work


You may experience difficulties associated with practical projects, research methods or writing. There can be a variety of causes ranging from dyslexia to nerves. If you have such problems, you should inform your tutor at the earliest opportunity; the University College will then consider how it can best assist you. Student Services may also be able to provide help, advice and support. The course is designed to help you succeed in what you undertake, but if you have problems you must help the course team to help you. You should also disclose any health problems which might have implications for your course of study. It is your responsibility to make known to your Course Leader any circumstances which may have seriously affected your performance in assessment. This should be done by completing a Mitigating Circumstances claim form prior to submission so that such issues may be taken into account during assessment. Further information about the Mitigating Circumstances Policy is contained within your Student Regulations Handbook.

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Submission and return of work


You are advised to keep a copy of all work submitted for assessment, wherever feasible and appropriate. Make a note of the date and name of the person to whom you submitted your work, as this will make it easier to resolve any issues that may arise regarding submission. At the beginning of each unit, you will be notified of the date and time by which work must be submitted for assessment.

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Marking Descriptors

The marking descriptors show you what you need to achieve in your work to gain each grade.

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Learning, Teaching & Academic Guidance for your course


What do I need to know about this in relation to my course? All courses at the University College are founded on the principle that the most effective educational experience combines structured teaching and your own independent study. Your course is designed to give you maximum responsibility for the management of your own learning. The skills and abilities that will support you after graduation extend beyond your subject knowledge. This will require a high degree of commitment and personal organisation from you. It is important that you attend all taught sessions, making arrangements to cover material from any session which you are unable to attend (e.g. through illness). How can I manage my independent study time? During each unit, staff will explain to you what work you are expected to cover in self-managed study time. It is essential that you organise your time so that you can carry out the required amount of independent study. Failure to do this is likely to result in your being unable to complete the work required in the time available. If you feel you need further information or help with managing your studies, please alert your tutor who will be able to help. What is a Unit Handbook? A Unit Handbook will be given to you at the introduction of each unit. It will include a brief, timetable, assessment deadline, study plan (where relevant) and any further information such as technical notes, additional research and reference material that you may need in order to complete the unit. How will I be taught on my course? Several different learning and teaching methods are used at the University College, and may be used on your course. These are defined as follows: Projects Projects combine formal teaching and independent study on a focused task with a defined outcome. They may be initiated by staff, or jointly between staff and students. The outcomes of projects vary according to courses; for example, it may be a slide presentation, a written report or a product. Each project culminates in some form of review or critique. Practical Work projects will be set in a practical workshop situation, using materials, processes and techniques to generate research and an understanding of theoretical principles. Depending on the equipment and processes used, this may involve an introduction to safe working practices through technical demonstrations that you must attend before commencing personal practical work. Lectures Lectures are the principal teaching method used for the presentation and discussion of theoretical issues. They are used to focus on issues central to a unit and are often used in conjunction with seminars to extend and examine the issues raised. Your lecture notes are a valuable adjunct to other information sources and may prove useful to you long after completion of your course.

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Seminars Seminars provide an opportunity for dialogue and interaction between staff and students. Seminars may be used to support lectures, or may be central to practical delivery.

Tutorials Tutorials provide an opportunity to discuss your progress and to agree a further course of action. They may be used to address specific issues in your work, to follow up assessments or to discuss other factors affecting your progress. Informal and formal tutorials are held with each student. Each student is assigned a personal tutor. Following a tutorial, a copy of the tutorial form is given to you which records the discussion. You should retain a copy of the tutorial form for your own records so that you can assess your progress over a period of time.

Group work Group work is recognised as an important educational experience in its own right and is valued by many employers. Assessment aims to balance the merits of group achievement and individual performance.

Project Proposals Project Proposals are used on many courses. Project Proposals make it possible to focus your course in a way which reflects your own interests and aspirations, within the scope of the course. Project Proposals are one way of helping you to negotiate and plan your studies with staff, agreeing the aims of your work. Your Project Proposals and study plan will form part of the Unit Handbook for relevant units.

Student presentations Student presentations comprise one student or a group of students giving an illustrated talk on an agreed subject to a group of their fellow students. This enables students to share their experiences and learning, and develop the knowledge and understanding of the group as a whole. A primary function of presentations is to develop your skills and ability in verbal communication.

Self-managed independent study Self-managed independent study forms an essential part of your course. It is important that you develop an organised and effective approach to independent study to enable you to complete and extend projects and take full advantage of learning resources at the University College and elsewhere. Independent study may take place at your home, at the University College (for example, in the Library) or externally (for example, at museums or exhibitions). It is suggested that you keep a record of private study undertaken for discussion with staff.

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Study visits Study Visits may involve organised visits to any of the following: buildings, stores, companies and organisations, design practices, trade fairs, exhibitions, museums and galleries. They may take place in the UK or overseas, and may require financial contribution from you, in which case you will be notified of any costs well in advance of the visit.

Academic Guidance
The University College has identified threshold standards of academic guidance and support across all five campuses. While Colleges can quite rightly exercise local decisions on how these standards are supported, the policy identifies the appropriate commitment the University College makes to students to guarantee they receive sufficient opportunities for guidance on their progress through their courses. Accordingly, the University College has established Threshold Standards for Academic Guidance in three areas: a) Unit choice and change of unit b) Progress within units c) Progress within the course

Unit choice and change of unit

Threshold Standard: i) Colleges will provide students with timely and appropriate advice on unit choice Method: To meet this standard, Colleges will be required to provide: Advance information and advice about unit options including the process of making a choice, prioritising choices, the method of and timescales for logging and changing choices, and how the outcomes will be notified Clear indication of the latest advisable times by which a change of unit can be made

Progress within units

Threshold Standards: i) Students are entitled to know what additional support is available to them in the course of a unit in addition to timetabled teaching. Method: To meet this standard, Colleges will be required to: Provide clear information on how students can request assistance with a unit, which includes information on any scheduled tutorials, surgeries, staff availability and locations for advice.
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ii) Students on referral and/or retake should be provided with a timetabled personal tutorial to discuss what they need to do in order to retrieve failure. Method: To meet this standard, colleges will: Ensure that a date and time for a tutorial is provided in all referral and retake letters. Note attendance or non attendance at such tutorials on the students file Record the content of the tutorial on tutorial forms and log these forms appropriately.

Progress within the course

Threshold Standard: i) The course leader is responsible for monitoring the students overall progress within the course. All students will be provided with the opportunity to attend one scheduled personal tutorial to review their overall academic progress in Semesters I and 2 of each academic year. Method: To meet this standard, each college will: Ensure that a course specific personal tutor system is in place. Inform students about tutorials, and access to tutors and additional tutorial advice.

Monitoring Course leaders will be asked to comment on, and evaluate the efficacy of the Academic Guidance Policy during Annual Academic Monitoring.

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Glossary
Aims
The purpose behind your work. Aims are course-related and express the course's intentions at particular points, whether relating to individual projects, stages of your course or indeed the course as a whole. In each unit a list of aims, coded A, sets out the intended purpose of the unit. The formal procedure whereby prior learning which has taken place outside the University College, certificated or experiential, is accredited by the University College for the purpose of admission to or progression on a course of study. The formal procedure whereby you challenge a decision made regarding your performance in assessment. Disagreement with academic judgement does not constitute grounds for appeal. Details about the appeals procedure are contained within the Student Regulations Handbook. The processes and mechanisms through which the quality and standard of your work is measured and evaluated. Assessments are retrospective and do not credit future potential, although the feedback provided by marks and comments should be of assistance. A sample of marks from all units will be verified to ensure the quality of marking. Formative assessment is an interim review of your work undertaken at key points during particular units. It provides an indicative measure of your progress, allows you to consider your work in relation to that of your peers, allows you to agree with staff any adjustments you need to make in order to satisfy course requirements, and is designed to help you improve your performance. It does not contribute to the final unit mark. Summative assessment is that carried out at the end of a unit. It provides an evaluation of your progress during the unit, generates a unit mark, and confirms the conditions for referral and retake. Peer and Self-assessment requires you to assess your own work and that of fellow students. It encourages a sense of ownership of the process of assessment, assists you to become an autonomous learner, helps to develop a range of transferable skills and makes assessment part of the learning process rather than an adjunct to it.

AP(E)L

Appeal

Assessment

Assessment Board Assessment Criteria Assessment Requirement Award

The generic term for a board of examiners at the University College. The University College has a 2-tier assessment system, comprising Unit Assessment Boards and College Progression & Award Boards. The particular characteristics against which your work will be assessed. What needs to be done as a means of demonstrating attainment of a units learning outcomes. The academic qualification conferred upon a student who has successfully met and completed the requirements of a specific course of study.

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College Progression & Award Board

A sub-committee of the Academic Board, this Assessment Board has responsibility for determining the progression of students and, when students have met the requirements for the award, the level and where appropriate the title of the award to be received. The Board also determines Retake requirements. The member of staff responsible for the management and organisation of a course of study. A numerical value ascribed to a unit of study, related to the learning outcomes and the notional time judged necessary to achieve them. Each unit carries a credit rating: a unit is rated at 15 credit points; a double unit is rated at 30 credit points. The awareness, acquisition and application of subject-specific and generic knowledge and skills, as well as key personal qualities, to maximise potential through successful university study including postgraduate study, life-long learning and sustainable employment in a changing and competitive world. Relevant subject experts, either academic or professional, from outside the University College who moderate the assessment of students and contribute to the maintenance of academic standards in all courses of study of the University College. An indicative framework which sets out the typical levels of performance required to achieve grades at each level. A common framework applies across all undergraduate courses at the University College; the grading descriptors are set out in section 6 of this Handbook. That which has been learned or a student is able to do as a result of study or training. A list of learning outcomes coded LO is set out for each unit. Each unit carries a Level rating, which denotes the classification of the relative academic complexity of learning outcomes associated with units. The level rating does not necessarily coincide with the year/ stage of fulltime study. All students in stages 1 and 2 are assigned a Personal Tutor. The role of the personal tutor is to maintain an overview of an individual students profile and provide advice on a students overall progress. Personal tutors meet with their tutor groups following the publication of stage assessment profiles. Personal tutors also meet individually with any student who is perceived to have potential problems. The personal tutor may refer students to other sources of advice and support as appropriate.

Course Leader Credit

Employability

External Examiners

Grading Descriptors

Learning Outcomes Level

Personal Tutor

Reference material

The information which supports the aims of a unit and which students are advised to consult. Materials can take any form including visual, textual, websites etc. They may also be identified by the student or suggested by staff as work develops.

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Referral

The means whereby a student is granted a further opportunity to be assessed in a unit, following initial failure. The opportunity is subject to qualifying conditions, and so may not be available to every student (see Student Regulations Handbook). The means whereby a student is able to retrieve failure following Referral. This opportunity is subject to qualifying conditions, and may not therefore be available to all students (see Student Regulations Handbook). If a unit is failed due to the non-submission of an assessment requirement, there is no opportunity for referral, and a student will receive an automatic retake (this opportunity is also subject to qualifying conditions).

Retake

Stage Study Visits

The period of time leading up to a formal point of progression or award. Visits in the UK or overseas selected for specific educational and cultural purposes. Where they require a financial contribution, you will be notified of any costs well in advance. The list of topics or points to be covered by a block of study. A self-contained unit of study. Each unit has a set of specific learning outcomes. The member of staff responsible for the management and organisation of a designated unit. The unit leader is responsible for organising group and individual tutorials, as appropriate, to provide you with advice and guidance on progress on the unit.

Syllabus Unit Unit Leader

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