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January10, 2013 Gazette Priceless Everything Calvert County The Corner Store: Serving Huntingtown for Nearly 84
January10, 2013
Gazette
Priceless
Everything Calvert
County
The Corner Store:
Serving Huntingtown for Nearly 84 Years
Photo By Frank Marquart
Page 12
The Calvert Gazette Thursday, January 10, 2013 2 Also THE PIRANHAS Inside 3 County News
The Calvert Gazette
Thursday, January 10, 2013
2
Also
THE PIRANHAS
Inside
3
County News
ARE BACK!
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Crime
On The Cover
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Design Diaries
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Community
Friday,
January 11th
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Calendars
410-FYI-DUCK
Dale Bowen runs the back end of Bowen’s Grocery in Huntingtown.
(410-394-3825)
Dowell Rd and Route 4
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Happy’s Diner owner Hasan Sarikaya shows off his hot dogs.
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For residents only. Commercial
businesses will not be accepted.
This event will be held rain or shine.
Sponsored by the Calvert County Division of Solid Waste
410-326-0210 • www.co.cal.md.us/recycle
community
Ice skaters came out over the weekend to enjoy North Beach’s temporary ice rink at the end of the pier.

3

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

COUNTY NEWS
COUNTY
NEWS

Calvert County Has Clean Audit

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

The county had an overall loss of $500,935 in the last budget cycle, accord- ing to a presentation to the Calvert Board or County Commissioners at their Jan. 8 meeting.

The county contracted Murphy & Murphy, CPA, LLC to conduct the annual audit. John G. Crawford presented their findings. The general fund showed a budget- ary loss of $500,935. The largest com- ponent of this loss includes a negative variance in income tax of $550,956, ac-

cording to documents distributed to the commissioners. The end fund balance was $66.5 million, of which $18.6 million is a committed fund balance for the Cal- vert’s stabilization arrangement, Craw- ford said. He praised the Calvert Department of Finance and Budget for their coopera- tiveness during the audit. He said they disclosed all materials requested, and corrected misstatements quickly. Most misstatements were in transferring in- formation from an old format to the new one, and were not “material” in nature. The net position of the County is ap- proximately $207.9 million, a decrease of $100,000 from the prior year, Crawford said. This accounts for general funds and additional monies. Calvert County had a planned use of fund balance reserves of $2.1 million for the year. However, the County ended the year with a budgetary deficit of $500,000.

Lower than expected revenues for income taxes and other sources contributed to the deficit. Total expenditures were less than budgeted by $2.5 million, Crawford said. The decrease in revenue came up during presentations about Chesapeake Hills Golf Course in Lusby needing in- frastructure renovations, new practice facilities and landscaping. “I don’t have any problem with the concept, but where is the money going to come from?” asked Commissioner Susan Shaw. Commissioners unanimously ap- proved the master plan, but made no promises regarding future funding. Commissioners meetings are 10 a.m. every Tuesday. For more information, in- cluding agendas, visit www.co.cal.md.us.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

agendas, visit www.co.cal.md.us. sarahmiller@countytimes.net Photo by Sarah Miller North Beach Council Hears Cell Tower

Photo by Sarah Miller

North Beach Council Hears Cell Tower Proposal

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

The North Beach water tower may soon be home to an antenna corral, constructed with Verizon Wireless. “There is a need to bring additional service to North Beach…a water tower is always one of our first choices,” said Verizon Consulting Representative Barbara Pivec during a North Beach Town Council work session Jan 3. She touted the cost effectiveness of adding an antenna to an existing tower over building from scratch. Before anything progresses beyond paper, Verizon will develop a structural analysis of the tower. After installing the antenna Verizon will build a small housing at the base of the tower for a generator to provide backup power, Pivec said. North Beach will benefit from the project through use of the generator, revenue from Verizon and greater cell coverage. “We are not building a new tower and we are bringing a community revenue in a difficult time,” Pivec said. The council will discuss granting Verizon a building permit for the project at their meeting in February. In other business, town engineer John Hoffman said the lower pier addition is nearly ready to send out requests for proposals. He estimated the project could be complete by summer.

During public comment, former council member Bob McMahon expressed concern regarding the town continuous- ly purchasing land for passive parks, saying the more prop- erty the town owns and maintains means less tax revenue for North Beach. Town Mayor Mark R. Frazer addressed McMa- hon’s concerns, saying more development would compound North Beach’s already difficult parking situation during the summer. The work session is held the Thursday before the Town Council meeting. Meetings and work sessions are open to the public. The next meeting is Jan. 10 at 7 p.m. For more infor- mation, call 301-855-6681 or visit www.northbeachmd.org.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, January 10, 2013

4

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5 Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Calvert Gazette COUNTY NEWS Revenue, Health Care Issues on
5
Thursday, January 10, 2013
The Calvert Gazette
COUNTY
NEWS
Revenue, Health Care Issues on the Horizon

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

Transportation and healthcare topped the conversation at this year’s Chamber of Commerce State Legislative Break- fast held at the Rod and Reel in Chesapeake Beach.

2013 Legislative Session Underway By Sarah Miller Staff Writer Local senators and delegates started the
2013 Legislative
Session
Underway
By Sarah Miller
Staff Writer
Local senators and delegates started the 2013 Leg-
islative Session with tentative goals and objectives.
Senator Mike Miller’s primary concern is passing
a balanced budget without tax increases. In addition,
he plans to help the Calvert Board of County Commis-
sioners with the County’s budget. He said, working in
conjunction with Dominion Cove Point LNG and county
commissioners, issues concerning the natural gas plant’s
expansion and redistricting in Calvert will take time.
He will speak with the mayors of Chesapeake
Beach and North Beach and representatives from Jef-
ferson Patterson Park regarding funding for future
projects.
Delegate Mark Fisher said passing a balanced bud-
get is one of his top priorities. Other priorities include
working with projects that foster jobs throughout the
state.
Fisher hopes to help local community colleges,
which offer two-year degrees, to offer four-year de-
grees, providing an affordable way for students to earn
degrees and increase their marketability.
For more information, or to keep up with the ses-
sion, visit msa.maryland.gov.
sarahmiller@countytimes.net
Photos by Sarah Miller
Photos by Sarah Miller

During conversation about the transpor- tation fund and possible tax hikes to increase resources, Senator Roy Dyson said the re- placement/expansion of the Thomas Johnson Bridge between Calvert and St. Mary’s could cost between $463 and $627 million. He said the more expensive range would cover a span with room for walkers and bikers and a breakdown lane, while a less expensive option could still have four lanes and alleviate congestion. He said study groups could make forward progress during the summer. Delegate Tony O’Donnell warned assem-

bled commissioners, officials and community members that any revenue from increased gas and transportation taxes will either be funneled into other projects or go toward the red and purple Metro lines. He criticized Annapolis for facing the worst economy in 80 years and still advocating tax increases. Delegate Mark Fisher said the state has had a trend of reclassifying the definition of “rich.” He said in past years, lower amounts of earnings have been considered in a high- income bracket and taxed more. This trend will continue, and is a contributing factor to the net loss of population in Maryland. “There’s never going to be enough revenue to satisfy Annapolis,” Fisher said. Obamacare became another point of discussion. O’Donnell worried about doctors graduating from Johns Hopkins University and leaving Maryland. He said the health

Hopkins University and leaving Maryland. He said the health Senator Mike Miller Delegate Anthony J. O’Donnell

Senator Mike Miller

and leaving Maryland. He said the health Senator Mike Miller Delegate Anthony J. O’Donnell care bill

Delegate Anthony J. O’Donnell

care bill pushes responsibility on small businesses and ben- efits few individuals. Fisher agreed stating health care is best provided at the local level and not dictated “by a bunch of bureaucrats.” “You don’t jam a bill like this down the throats of the American people,” Fisher said. According to the Chamber’s invitation, “this breakfast provides a venue for Chamber members to hear from our state delegation about bills and legislation to be presented during the 2013 Legislative Session It is an excellent opportunity to learn about how some of these bills may impact our region. The Maryland General Assembly meets in Annapolis each year for 90 days to act on more than 2300 bills including the State's an- nual budget. The 433rd session begins on January 9, 2013.”

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Suicidal Suspect Apprehended in Prince Frederick By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Sheriff Mike Evans said
Suicidal Suspect
Apprehended in
Prince Frederick
By Guy Leonard
Staff Writer
Sheriff Mike Evans said a K-9
unit was able to flush a suspect out
of his hiding spot and into another
arresting deputy during a Jan. 8
chase.
The incident started when the
suspect threatened to harm himself
but his parents were able to get the
knife he was carrying away from
the duration of the search.
The suspect was found in the
woods.
“He never got as far as Calvert
High School,” Evans said.
“A K-9 spooked him and an-
other deputy got him.”
The suspect is “… in custody
and going to the hospital” for a psy-
chological evaluation, Evans said.
Sarah Miller contributed to this
report.
him. The suspect then fled and po-
lice began their search. Calvert
High School was on lockdown for
guyleonard@countytimes.net
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The Calvert Gazette Thursday, January 10, 2013 6 COUNTY NEWS Funding Available for Food, Shelter
The Calvert Gazette
Thursday, January 10, 2013
6
COUNTY
NEWS
Funding Available for Food, Shelter

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

The Emergency Food and Shelter National Board Pro- gram (EFSP) recently awarded Calvert County $9,685 to help local agencies serving community members in need. The application and forms needed have become increas- ingly more complex over the years, said Calvert United Way Director of Community and Resource Development Jennifer Moreland. To help groups work through the process, she will host a workshop before applications are due Jan. 25. The disbursement was announced late this year, More- land said. Traditionally county awards are announced in ear- ly summer, but during the last couple of years it has been pushed back. This makes it difficult for some organizations because it comes close to the end of their fiscal years. Mo- reland said the United Way has been receiving phone calls about the funds since summer. Normally six to eight agencies apply for money per year, Moreland said. Past recipients include Project ECHO, the Chesapeake Cares Food Pantry and Meals on Wheels. End Hunger applied for the first time last year.

EFSP is a Federal program administered by the U.S. De- partment of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Man- agement Agency and has been entrusted through the McKin- ney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 1987 “to supplement and expand ongoing efforts to provide shelter, food and sup- portive services” for hungry and homeless people across the nation, according to www.fema.gov. The United Way acts as a conduit for the funds, More- land said. The program’s objectives are to allocate funds to the neediest areas, ensure fast response, foster public-private sector partnerships, ensure local decision-making and to maintain minimal, but accountable, reporting, according to the website. Each jurisdiction receiving money through the program has to create a local board, and FEMA is specific about who should be represented on the board, Moreland said. The EFSP national board is chaired by FEMA with additional repre- sentatives from the American Red Cross, Catholic Charities USA, the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA, the Salvation Army, United Jewish Communities and the United Way of America. Local boards should reflect the national board, with a member of local government in place

of the FEMA representative. The board sorts through appli- cations and awards funds as allowable through FEMA. Money can be used to help agencies purchase food, run- ning a mass shelter, help individuals with rent, mortgage or utility bill payments, offset transportation costs associated with the provision of food or shelter or make minimal repairs to mass feeding and sheltering facilities. Rent and utility as- sistance is restricted, Moreland said. Organizations can write checks to electricity companies on an individual’s behalf, but cannot simply give money to an individual. Past projects included purchasing insulated bags for Meals on Wheels to transport food safely and building main- tenance for Project ECHO. Public or private voluntary agencies interested in ap- plying for Emergency Food and Shelter Program funds must contact Jennifer Moreland at United Way of Calvert County at 410-286-0103 or at impact@unitedwaycalvert.org for an application. The deadline for applications to be received is Jan. 25 at 2:30 p.m. Applications should be delivered to the United Way House at P.O. Box 560 or 530 Main Street, Prince Frederick, 20678.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Sheriff: Accident, New Traffic Light

On Jan. 6 at approximately 11 a.m. units from

the Sheriff’s Office responded to the area of North- bound Route 4 at Pond’s Wood Road for the report of a motor vehicle accident. Investigation revealed

a 2008 Mercedes operated by John Beal, 47, of

Huntingtown was traveling Northbound on Rt. 4.

There were two vehicles stopped for the red light

in that same lane of travel. The first vehicle was a

2003 Ford truck operated by Delano Poyser of Dis- trict Heights and the second vehicle was a 2006 Jeep operated by David Allen of Prince Frederick. Beal’s vehicle struck the Jeep in the rear forcing it to strike the Ford truck. Beal suffered no injuries. Allen and Poyser were both transported to Calvert Memorial Hospital. Allen was later transported to an area trauma center, where he is currently listed in serious condition. Sheriff Mike Evans asks all citizens to be aware of new traffic lights, as traffic issues are a concern and priority for the Calvert County Sher- iff’s Office. The sheriff’s office wishes retired Ser- geant/Special Deputy David Allen a speedy recov- ery and our prayers are with him and his family.

After Years Long Struggle, Home-Based Salon Awarded Permit

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

The Board of Appeals awarded the Harrison family – after an 18 month struggle – a permit for their home-run salon. The Harrisons first inquired about a home occupation permit in 2007, after they started a single chair salon in their Huntingtown home to enable Tracey Harrison to leave her position at an Anne Arundel County salon to remain closer to home. At that time, county employees told them no special permit was needed because the salon was a permitted use in their zoning area, said their lawyer, Mat- thew Tedesco with McNamee, Hosea, Jernigan, Kim, Greenan and Lynch P.A. After the county notified the Har- risons of their violation, and a $500 fine, the family was left trying to find where they erred.

Signs of stress from the last year and a half were evident when, after be- ing asked to give her side of the situa- tion, Harrison burst into tears. “We didn’t want to do anything wrong. We did everything we had to do,” she said. A sticking point for the permit has been gaining the approval of every homeowner on the shared driveway. Three neighbors, attending the Jan. 3 meeting to support the family and their business venture, testified to the board that they have no objection. One neigh- bor said the business has no real impact. Harrison said only one or two clients are at the residence at a time, and she does not accept walk-in clients. A 2010 ruling by the Calvert Coun- ty Commissioners required all residents in a subdivision send written permission for a home-based business to receive a permit.

In November 2011, a Calvert County Circuit Court ruled the action invalid and unenforceable. This ruling came after the county deemed the Har- risons in violation of the 2010 commis- sioner decision that “if road access to the home occupation is gained through another person’s property via an ease- ment-type road right-of-way, written ap- proval of those property owners shall be obtained.” Tedesco maintained the violation was invalid after the court’s findings. Since the business had this one charge, the attorney recommended granting the home occupancy permit. The board agreed, unanimously approving the permit application with the caveat that if Harrison hires any help, she must return to the board for the change.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Comedy Invasion

Graduation

for Project

Show Rating: PG13

n v a s i o n Graduation for Project Show Rating: PG13 February 22, 2013

February 22, 2013

Huntingtown High School Auditorium 4125 North Solomons Island Rd., Huntingtown, MD

Doors open at 7:00 p.m. - Show begins at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $25 per person $15 in advance for students ages 13-18. Seating is limited.

$15 in advance for students ages 13-18. Seating is limited. For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al
$15 in advance for students ages 13-18. Seating is limited. For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al
$15 in advance for students ages 13-18. Seating is limited. For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al
$15 in advance for students ages 13-18. Seating is limited. For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al

For more Info, Call 410-535-3733

13-18. Seating is limited. For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al Madrigal Jason Weems Tickets can be

Al

Madrigal

is limited. For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al Madrigal Jason Weems Tickets can be purchased at
is limited. For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al Madrigal Jason Weems Tickets can be purchased at
is limited. For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al Madrigal Jason Weems Tickets can be purchased at

Jason

Weems

For more Info, Call 410-535-3733 Al Madrigal Jason Weems Tickets can be purchased at CAASA Office,

Tickets can be purchased at CAASA Office, Prince Frederick Educate & Celebrate, Prince Frederick Floral Expressions, Owings Lotus Kitchen, and Solomons.

Sponsored by Calvert Alliance Against

Substance Abuse, Inc

Floral Expressions, Owings Lotus Kitchen, and Solomons. Sponsored by Calvert Alliance Against Substance Abuse, Inc

7

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

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Crime

Crime The Calvert Gazette Thursday, January 10, 2013 8 & Punishment Calvert Sheriff Seeks Assault Suspect

The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, January 10, 2013

8

&

Punishment

Calvert Sheriff Seeks Assault Suspect

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

Sheriff Seeks Assault Suspect By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Adam Foster land State Police helicop- ter

Adam Foster

land State Police helicop- ter rushed him there. In court papers Michelle Ramberg, the victim’s girlfriend, told police Irving was lean- inginto his car to retrieve something when two men dressed in dark clothing jump him and began the assault. Irving yelled at her to get help and when

she did the two assail- ants fled over a white picket fence near where the assault occurred. Police found a “large amount of blood” on the car and on the ground where the assault occurred. Charging documents reported Mark Eckenrode, co-owner of Capt. Bigs, told police that a cell phone dropped at the scene belonged to one of the two suspects. One deputy activated the phone and found that it belonged to Foster, police said. The witness found the phone lying on the ground between the victim’s vehicle and the white fence the alleged assailants jumped, charging documents stated.

Calvert sheriff’s deputies are on the look- out for a man, with an ac- complice who allegedly brutally attacked another man outside of a Chesa- peake Beach nightspot, Capt. Bigs. According to police

investigating the Jan. 1 incident the victim, Henry George Ir- ving, was walking to his car with his girlfriend in the early morning hours of New Year’s Day when two men, who he identified as Adam Foster and Matt Begley, attacked him. Begley has since been arrested and charged with first-and-second- degree-assault for the attack but Fos- ter remains at large, law enforcement

said. Charging documents filed against Begley state the victim had suffered five stab wounds to his back, severe lacerations to his head and had lost a significant amount of blood. Irving received treatment for his wounds at the Prince George’s Hospi- tal Center in Cheverly after a Mary-

guyleonard@countytimes.net

Local to Register as Sex Offender

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

In federal court last week, Joshua Blankenship, 25, of Solomons plead guilty to charges of producing child pornography. U.S. Attorney Rod Rosenstein’s office indicated the plea ended a yearlong court process. Blankenship’s plea agreement states in January 2011 he began an on-line relationship with a teenage girl on the social networking site Facebook and ex- changed text messages. By March Blankenship asked the girl for a nude photo which she obliged using her own cell phone to take the picture. Subsequently on July 4, 2011 the defendant sent another text message “de- manding 10 nude pictures and said that if she did not produce and send the pho- tos, she would go to jail because she had sent an illegal image on her cell phone,” prosecutors said in a statement. Blankenship told the girl over the next several days what kind of pictures he wanted her to send and threatened her with going to the police if she did not comply. The victim produced several dozen pictures and sent them as the defendant demanded, prosecutors stated. Since the victim, identified only as a 16-year-old girl, took the pictures outside of Maryland and sent them to Blankenship’s phone in state, prosecutors stated the case turned into a federal matter. In August 2011 investigators identified Blankenship, who admitted to forc- ing underage people to send him pornographic pictures. At the same time he created a fake profile on the Internet to gain access to pictures and videos of girls, prosecutors stated. Blankenship must register as a sex offender at his residence, place of work and where he takes classes as part of the Sex Offender Registration and Notifica- tion Act. He faces 12 years in prison and is scheduled for sentencing for March 15 of this year.

guyleonard@countytimes.net

POLICE BLOTTER

Theft from Vehicle

Dep. J. Migliaccio is investigating the theft of a catalytic converter valued at $1,200 from a vehicle parked at a business in the 7600 block of Investment Court in Owings. The theft oc- curred sometime between Dec. 26 and 31.

Disorderly Conduct

A man at a home

on Boothhaven Lane in Owings was arrested and charged with dis- orderly conduct and second-degree assault on Dec. 31 at 3:39 p.m. when family members called police and ad- vised the man was ex-

tremely drunk. Dep. J. Migliaccio arrived and made contact with the man, later iden- tified as Oscar Nathan Gray, 55 of Owings. Gray continued to yell and use profanity after repeatedly being asked by Migliaccio to stop. A relative of Gray’s advised that he had struck her. Gray was stumbling and at- tempted to take a swing at the deputy. He was then arrested.

Attempted Theft

a swing at the deputy. He was then arrested. Attempted Theft Oscar Gray Someone tried to

Oscar Gray

Someone tried to cut off the catalytic con- verter on a vehicle parked outside a home on Bedford Drive in North Beach between Dec. 30 and 31. The owner of the vehicle discovered it when she was driving. Cpl. J. Wahlgren is investigating.

Assault and Resisting Arrest

On January 1 at 2:06 a.m. Cpl. T. Phelps responded to Captain Bigs Restaurant in Chesapeake Beach for the report of a fight. He observed a large group of people in the middle of the road. When he ap- proached the subjects, a

man ran into him and pushed him, then started to punch him. Cpl. Phelps advised the man to stop and attempted to restrain him. The man resisted and a taser gun was used to assist in his arrest. He was identified as James Louis Horton, 32 of Lusby. Horton was charged with two counts of second-degree assault, resist- ing arrest, disturbing the peace and disorderly conduct.

Yamaha 4X4 Stolen

the peace and disorderly conduct. Yamaha 4X4 Stolen James Horton Someone stole a 2006 Yamaha Bruin

James Horton

Someone stole a 2006 Yamaha Bruin 4x4 four-wheeler ATV valued at $6,000 from the back yard of a home in the 9200 block of Ow- ings Manor Court in Owings between Dec. 31 and Jan. 1. Dep. J. Migliaccio is investigating.

Log Splitter Lifted

A Champion 22 ton log splitter valued at

$900 was stolen from the front yard of a home on Randle Avenue in Chesapeake Beach. Dep. Migliaccio is investigating.

Catalytic Converters Taken

Two vehicles belonging to a business on Binnacle Lane in Owings had the catalytic converters removed sometime between Dec. 28 and Jan. 3. Dep. M. Quinn is investigating.

Burglary and Theft from Vehicle

Sometime between 10:30 p.m. on Jan. 3 and 5:45 a.m. on Jan. 4, someone entered two unlocked vehicles parked outside a home in the 12000 block of Steven Lane in Dunkirk. The garage was also entered through an unlocked door and a vehicle parked inside had items stolen from it. Approximately $4,00 worth of cash and gift cards were taken. Dep. G. Gott is investigating.

Disorderly Conduct Case

On Jan. 4 at 6:16 a.m. while on patrol in the area of Frederick Av- enue and Sea Oat Court in North Beach, Dep. Y. Bortchevsky observed two men fighting on the lawn of a townhouse de- velopment. Joseph Al- len Jernigan, 24 of North

Beach, was arrested and charged with failure to

obey a lawful order and intoxication and endan- gering the property of the State of Maryland.

CDS Violation

gering the property of the State of Maryland. CDS Violation Joseph Jernigan On Jan. 4 at

Joseph Jernigan

On Jan. 4 at 8 p.m. Dep. T. Buck- ler observed a vehicle parked in the roadway on Maplewood Drive in Dunkirk. He made contact with the driver and observed her shove a bottle of rum under the passenger seat. There

was also a water bottle in the console that con- tained alcohol and suspected marijuana was found. The driver, Delia Jean Kenny, 18 of Bowie, was arrested for driving under the influ- ence of drugs and/or alcohol, and was cited for possession of marijuana, having an open con- tainer in a vehicle and drinking alcohol under the age of 21.

Smash and Grab

and drinking alcohol under the age of 21. Smash and Grab Delia Kenny Someone smashed the

Delia Kenny

Someone smashed the front door of World Gym in Owings overnight between Jan. 4 and 5 and stole $100 in cash. The Calvert Investiga- tive Team is investigating.

Destruction of Property

Three rear glass doors were damaged at the World Gym in Owings at 1:22 a.m. on January 6. Surveillance video shows a suspect at the doors, however, no entry into the gym was made. The damage to the doors is estimated at $2,100.

Business Break-in

The front door of Granados Tire Company

on West Dares Beach Road in Prince Frederick was smashed in and a suspect stole $125 in cash from the business sometime between Jan. 5 and

6. CIT is investigating.

9

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, January 10, 2013

10

N ewsmakers

PNC Senior VP Serves Entire Tri-County Area

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

“If you have the time and means to give back to the community, then volun- teer,” said Brian Compton, the new senior vice president at PNC Bank. Compton has served on Calvert Chamber of Commerce’s board of direc- tors and is currently a committee member with Ducks Unlimited in Charles County. He seeks a board membership to an organization serving the entire tri-county area, discussing some opportunities, but until he has been appointed he can’t dis- cuss specific boards. Compton is a native of Southern Maryland. He grew up on a tobacco farm in Port Tobacco, and left for a brief stint after college when he was stationed in Fort Carson, Colo. with the United States

Army from 1997 to 2001. He now lives in Charles County. After seeing growth in Southern Maryland over the years, he is passionate about preserving the social and economic character of the area. One way he preserves the area is through his involvement with Ducks Un- limited, which sponsors habitat projects such as restoring Chesapeake Bay’s wa- tersheds within Southern Maryland. Recently promoted to senior vice president at PNC Bank in Southern Maryland, Compton has been with PNC Bank for 10 years and has held various positions including branch manager, commercial lender and business bank- ing sales manager. In his new position, Compton will lead consumer and busi- ness banking for PNC in Charles, Calvert and St. Mary’s counties and serve as the regional manager.

The new position will have him on the road less and allow him opportunities to find new ways to volunteer in Southern Maryland. Working for a group like PNC has al- lowed him to familiarize himself with the business community, Compton said, and through the business community he has gotten to know the people in Southern Maryland. PNC is traditionally active in community organizations and he believes the backing of a group like PNC will help him further support Southern Maryland. “Getting to know people and find out how to help them is the best way you can help them achieve their hopes and dreams,” he said of his interest to find more ways into the community.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

New Shop Serves Classic American Foods for ‘G.I. Joe’

New Shop Serves Classic American Foods for ‘G.I. Joe’ Photo courtesy of PNC By Alex Panos

Photo courtesy of PNC

By Alex Panos Staff Writer

A new burgers and dogs eatery in Lusby, Happy’s Din-

er, offers old American favorites to customers. The restaurant, which features an order and pick-up window, serves well-known options including chicken fin-

gers, cheese steaks and Ruben sandwiches. Nothing on the menu costs more than $8.99.

In the morning, the eatery is open serving eggs, bagels,

pancakes, French toast and breakfast meats. “The prices are too reasonable,” joked owner Hasan Sarikaya. Known to many as ‘Happy Happy’ for his constant up- beat and comedic attitude, Hasan has held a number of jobs since moving to St. Mary’s County from Turkey. Hasan is the former owner of a laundromat, Jumping Jacks restaurant and has been a real estate agent. Hasan knew he had to eventually come back to food service after having to close down Jumping Jacks. “I feel comfortable here,” he said of the business he operates with his son and daughter, noting his favorite part of the job is catching up, joking and teasing customers in a light-hearted way. He calls nearly everyone that walks through the door “G.I. Joe.” Megan Sarikaya, part-time manager, says part of the

reason her father Hasan is known as “Happy Happy” is due

to his ability to connect with customers, calling him a “co- median” with them. Hasan sees it differently. “I’m known as ‘Happy Happy’ because I go school-to- school giving elementary kids ice cream.” From his days running Jumping Jacks, Hasan has al- ways enjoyed distributing ice cream to smiling young faces. The shop is decorated with giant ice cream cone posters from kids at local schools expressing their thanks.

“I just do it to connect with the kids,” Hasan said.

He hopes to add ice cream to his new shop as well, as he continues to develop the store. “It’s like a little secret here,” Michael Williams, a regu-

lar customer, said of the new location in Lusby. “He’s got a killer Reuben [sandwich].”

A large majority of Happy’s customers are the regulars

from Jumping Jacks in St. Mary’s who travel over the bridge each day to grab lunch. Megan believes people keep coming back because they know what to expect. In all his years in business Hasan has not changed the menu, and keeps it simple; burgers, dogs and sandwiches people want all hours of the day. “It’s basically homemade food,” Megan said. “It’s not steak-ums or anything like that.” Hasan, on the other hand, feels the hot dogs are reasons that people come to his place. Patrons chose from classics,

that people come to his place. Patrons chose from classics, like the Coney, Chicago and New

like the Coney, Chicago and New Yorker, made with fresh ingredients. “If you don’t eat foot long hotdogs, you’ve come to the wrong place,” Hasan said. Happy’s diner is located at 232 Town Square Drive in Lusby. Call 410-326-0400 for more information.

alexpanos@countytimes.net

410-326-0400 for more information. alexpanos@countytimes.net Owner Hasan and his daughter Megan Sarikaya. Photos by Alex

Owner Hasan and his daughter Megan Sarikaya.

Photos by Alex Panos

Hasan and his daughter Megan Sarikaya. Photos by Alex Panos Customers Wendy, left, and Michael Williams

Customers Wendy, left, and Michael Williams dine at Happy’s on Monday afternoon.

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Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

Thanks for Local Support of F.U.E.L. Empowerment Rally

On December 8 at Patuxent High School, F.U.E.L. Em- powerment Rally united area youth, grades 8th through 12th, who made a positive choice to have fun listening to live faith- based music and learn strategies to fire up their futures for suc- cess. F.U.E.L., which stands for Fire, Unite, Empowerment and Leadership, would not have been possible without all those who believed in the idea and stepped up to assist in making the event happen. Special thanks to Bishop Bus Service and Dwight Bishop for giving a monetary donation for T-shirts and provid- ing bus service. Thanks to the Calvert Collaborative for Chil- dren and Youth, which also provided monetary support, guid- ance, and its nonprofit status, and to Steve Whalen of Lusby for his generous contribution. Thank you students for attending and sharing comments on the event’s evaluation form such as; “The singers were great,” “very organized,” and several “do this event again.” Yes, our plan is to make F.U.E.L. an annual event and to rally more of the community to come together to support positive youth development programs in Calvert. And thanks to parents and community members, and the Lusby Business Association, who all supported F.U.E.L.

F.U.E.L., which also addressed abstinence from drugs,

is thankful for being awarded a grant from Calvert Alliance Against Substance Abuse, and for Lusby’s Community Bank

and Edible Arrangements, and Tri-County Youth Bureau for

donating funds. We greatly appreciate all the speakers and musicians who

donated their time and talents to make the event a success in- cluding; musicians of Scattered Leaves of Huntingtown’s Ches- apeake Church, Soul Soldiers of Lusby’s Church of God, and 2011 Patuxent High School graduate Liz Chambers. The speak-

ers included featured speaker, Youth Pastor Dave Showalter of

Lusby’s St. Paul United Methodist Church, emcee Internet Ra-

dio DJ Kenny Levister, behavior intervention counselor Ryan

Wright, 2000 Patuxent High School graduate Trayon Brady of

DC College Access Program, Dana Langley of Southern Mary-

land College Access Network, and Katee Joyner of Tri-County Youth Bureau. And thank you to Audio Plus of Huntingtown for your professionalism and in-kind donation. You all made the event top notch! A shout out needs to go to the Calvert County Public Schools for seeing value in the event and granting service learn-

T

to Editor the
to Editor the
in the event and granting service learn- T to Editor the ing credit hours for attending

ing credit hours for attending students, and to Principal Nan- cy Highsmith and her administra- tion, teachers and staff at Patuxent High School for their positive promotion and willingness to help. We would also like to thank those businesses that pro- vided in-kind donations for door prizes; Lusby businesses Sneade’s Ace Home Center, Moe’s Southwestern Grill, Ledo Pizza, Dunkin Donuts and Play N Trade, and Prince Frederick businesses The Greene Turtle, Dream Weaver Cafe, Smoothie King, Three Brothers Pizza, Apex Cinemas and Educate and Celebrate. And, thanks to the Lusby businesses that hosted fundraisers for F.U.E.L.; Ledo Pizza, Roy Rogers, Papa John’s Pizza and Fran Scenes Gift Shop. Thanks to all of you for your commitment to supporting our youth. May we as parents, teachers and community mem- bers realize that “all children and our children.” For information or to support F.U.E.L. visit Facebook page Christian Talk Magazine or email shanaegray@rocketmail. com.

Shanae Gray and Carol Harvat, Coordinators of F.U.E.L. Empowerment Rally Lusby

COMMissiOner’s I Care But Don’t Twitter COrner By Susan Shaw Calvert County Commissioner, District 2
COMMissiOner’s
I Care But Don’t Twitter
COrner
By Susan Shaw
Calvert County Commissioner, District 2
misunderstandings, and betrayals, but the characters could use
personal responsibility to deal with personal issues.
Now, we are focused on the global rather than the per-
sonal in the news cycle. For example, who doesn’t know about
Greece? Oh, I forgot that many of us are low information vot-

Recently, I had a revelation, not uncommon around New Year’s, as we assess how far we’ve come in the past year and make plans for the coming year. My revelation: I want to be a low information voter. What about you? Irregardless of your political party affiliation, Congress and the recently re-elected President, gave us an anxiety-filled end of the old year gift of something called the Fiscal Cliff. Popular words of our time are not supercalifragilisticexpealido- cius from Mary Poppins or Chitty, Chitty Bang, Bang from the Disney Movie of that name, but low information voter, fiscal cliff, kicking the can down the road. (I hope you can remember when children actually went outside and played kick the can. If not, you will probably think that I am making it up.) I don’t want all that anxiety. I don’t want to wait around to see where they kick the can down the road. I want nostal- gia and fun and laughter. I am not the only one who yearns for simpler dilemmas. I know because the Kennedy Center musicals for the Holiday season were White Christmas and Million Dollar Quartet, both set in post-World War II, when the emphasis was on counting your blessings instead of sheep and the beginning of Rock and Roll music. Oh, yes, there were

ers

and for us, Greece is where royals and Hollywood starlets

get

caught by the paparazzi sunbathing in the nude. Or was

that

so yesterday?

It’s ironic, isn’t it, that in an era of instant communication where we are bombarded with data, we have less real informa- tion. I am defining real communication as unbiased and fact- based. Not your opinion that you just tweeted to the universe, with no real information to back up your assertions. There is so much communication about where we are and what we are doing from moment to moment including photos on Facebook of what we had for dinner, that I wonder when we get to enjoy our own dinner. No wonder we end up with heads filled with minutiae and become low information voters. At the Maryland Association of Counties Conference, I learned that most 30 year olds and younger spend about 3 hours a day on social media. We were told that our constituents want to know that we care. We can convey our concern by bom- barding them with social media information on a daily basis, especially through the use of twitter. To say nothing of profes- sionally produced YouTube videos, like the one we were shown of a County Executive from a large Maryland County who was

making a friendly wager with a fellow County executive over a recent sports rivalry. The loser had to pick up trash along the road singing the signature song of the winning team. Fun, right? It must definitely mean he is a down- to-earth guy who cares and for whom you should vote. Silly me. I thought that doing the best possible job was what got respect. I am constantly reminded that modern politicians get elected using the superficiality of social media. There are day- long training classes on the nuts and bolts of this method. Why don’t I just adopt these techniques? Because, unlike the County Executives of the large Maryland Counties, or even the County Council Members, whose jobs are classified as full-time, I do not have a dedicated staff person to tweet under my byline, produce professional YouTube videos for me, or organize and monitor my social media databases for me. I don’t even have a dedicated administrative assistant. Nor could I justify raising your taxes to pay for a dedicated assistant, let alone a cadre of social media gurus. So, I am stuck trying to do the best job possible for our constituents while hoping that they recognize that I care. By the way, I STILL want less information about the fiscal cliff and kicking the can down the road. Here’s to more family time, fun, and laughter in the New Year!

Publisher Associate Publisher Editor Graphic Designer Junior Designer Office Manager Advertising Email

Thomas McKay Eric McKay Corrin M. Howe Angie Stalcup Kasey Russell Tobie Pulliam sales@somdpublishing.net info@somdpublishing.net

Phone

301-373-4125

Staff Writers

Guy Leonard

Law Enforcement

Sarah Miller

Government, Education

Corrin Howe

Community, Business

Alex Panos

Staff Writer

Contributing Writers

editorial interns:

Joyce Baki

Grace Millerick

Eric Franklin

Rebecca Sachs

Ron Guy

Alex Theriot

Laura Joyce Debra Meszaros

Photography intern:

Susan Shaw Evan K. Slaughenhoupt, Jr.

Stephanie Scott

Susan Shaw Evan K. Slaughenhoupt, Jr. Stephanie Scott Calvert Gazette P. O. Box 250 • Hollywood,
Susan Shaw Evan K. Slaughenhoupt, Jr. Stephanie Scott Calvert Gazette P. O. Box 250 • Hollywood,

Calvert Gazette

P. O. Box 250 • Hollywood, MD 20636

The Calvert Gazette is a weekly newspaper providing news and information for the residents of Calvert County. The Calvert Gazette will be available on newsstands every Thursday. The paper is published by Southern Maryland Publishing Company, which is responsible for the form, content, and policies of the newspaper. The Calvert Gazette does not espouse any political belief or endorse any product or service in its news coverage. Articles and letters submitted for publication must be signed and may be edited for length or content. The Calvert Gazette is not responsible for any claims made by its advertisers.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, January 10, 2013

12

Bowen’s Grocery Born from Great Depression

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

Since 1929, five generations of Bowens have served Huntingtown residents through a grocery and deli, established during the Great Depression surviving the influx of box stores to Calvert County. Bowen’s Grocery offers a little bit of ev- erything – Boars Head meat in the deli, 80 types of candy sold in bulk and a full selec- tion of ice cream. Owner Gordon Bowen and his wife, Gracie Bowen, purchased the store in May 1964 from Gordon’s grandmother, after his grandfather died in March 1964. “It was the next natural step. It was all [Gordon] knew, all he wanted to do. I was just along for the ride,” Gracie said of the acquisition. Not interested in farming, the other family business, Gordon said he has been in- volved with the store since his early teens and he has no plans to quit any time soon. “Retirement is not in his vocabulary,” Gracie said. “I’ll retire before he does,” their son, Dale Bowen said. The store recently celebrated the retire- ment of a woman who worked there for 30 years. Others have been with the store for nearly as long. Gordon said the key to em- ployee retention is a combination of treating them well and offering health care and retire- ment packages, something not many family- owned businesses are capable of in recent times. Dale has worked at Bowen’s Grocery most of his life, only leaving for a while to try something different when he was 16 “because nobody wants to work for their father at 16.”

“because nobody wants to work for their father at 16.” Bowen’s Grocery has served the community

Bowen’s Grocery has served the community since 1929.

He tried carpentry and farming before returning to the store. Now, Dale handles the back end of the business, such as taking de- liveries and working the deli, while Gordon works the front end and Gracie fills in the gaps. A fifth generation of Bowens is working weekends and summers at the store. Gordon’s grandfather built the business in its current location on Old Town Road in Huntingtown. According to Gordon, his grandfather came to Calvert County from Baltimore when he fell on hard times during the Great Depression. A meat cutter, he was told he would never find work because most families raised and slaughtered their own

Photos by Frank Marquart

animals. In response to naysayers, Gordon’s grandfather started the store and a combina- tion of “stubbornness, hard work and long hours” helped his grandfather succeed, Gor- don said. In the past 84 years the Bowens, watch- ing Calvert grow from an agricultural area to be more urbanized, changed the store’s offer- ings to accommodate different needs from the community. Gracie said they have found a “good combination of the old and the new.” Before Wal-Mart, Bowen’s Grocery sold a wide range, from cereal to clothes. In

Grocery sold a wide range, from cereal to clothes. In Gordon Bowen rings up a customer.
Grocery sold a wide range, from cereal to clothes. In Gordon Bowen rings up a customer.

Gordon Bowen rings up a customer.

Bowen’s Grocery offers a wide range of selection.

range, from cereal to clothes. In Gordon Bowen rings up a customer. Bowen’s Grocery offers a

13

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

STORY
STORY
13 Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Calvert Gazette STORY The bull has stood on top of
13 Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Calvert Gazette STORY The bull has stood on top of
13 Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Calvert Gazette STORY The bull has stood on top of

The bull has stood on top of the store since the 1980s with a yearlong vacation in 1995.

the store since the 1980s with a yearlong vacation in 1995. Dale, Gracie and Gordon Bowen

Dale, Gracie and Gordon Bowen represent the third and fourth generation of the family running Bowen’s Grocery in Huntingtown.

response to the national chain, the Bowens put a deli and ice cream counter in the store and began selling specialized items, includ- ing a selection of seasonal, locally grown produce. They recently upgraded the outdoor fuel pumps to take debit and credit cards and added a shelter. “People have been bargain shopping and we’re not a bargain store. We’re a quality and service store,” Dale said. Gracie said the store has a loyal cus- tomer base, with some coming from as far as Upper Marlboro and Ann Arundel County for candy and seasonal items. Since she and Gordon took over, Gracie said they have seen kids grow up and bring their children in to grocery shop. It’s not unusual to walk around the store and find customers chatting in the middle of an aisle, or gathering in the small seating area. The store hosted impromptu community forums, and is the birthplace of initiatives such as the lights strung up around Huntingtown during Christmas. Bowen’s has been the target of practi- cal jokes over the years, such as one in 1995, when Gracie and Gordon realized the fiber- glass bull, on the roof since 1987, had gone missing. Seniors from Bishop McNamara High School in Forestville, Md. played a role in the bull’s yearlong absence. One of the Bowen’s Wonder Bread delivery drivers found it when students put it on the roof during the last day of school as a senior prank. He contacted the school and arranged for Gracie and Gordon to come retrieve their property. Now, the bovine statue is fastened to the roof with an

The store offers dog food, candy and much more.

Bowen’s Grocery is located within five miles of six schools and offers support to all of them. “Very seldom have we ever turned any- one down,” Gordon said. One recent donation was a new score- board for the baseball field at Huntingtown High School.

The community is instrumental in keep- ing the store going and the store has an ob- ligation to support the community, Gracie

said. For more information, visit www.bow- ensgrocery.com or go to the store, located at 4300 Hunting Creek Road in Huntingtown.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

alarm system to prevent copycat pranks. The Bowens are active in their com- munity. Gordon is a founding member of the Huntingtown Volunteer Fire Department, and still retains a lifetime membership. Dale has served with same fire department for 27 years. Dale coaches football at Huntingtown High School.

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The Calvert Gazette Thursday, January 10, 2013 14 Spotlight On
The Calvert Gazette
Thursday, January 10, 2013
14
Spotlight On

Schools, County Encourage Kids to Move

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

During a yoga class that began Jan. 3, an instructor com- mented on the unusual number of participants in her class and wondered how many would stay through February as life be- gins to take a toll on the best of intentions. Local school curric- ulum addresses this lack of commitment to exercise, accord- ing Calvert Public Schools Supervisor of Health and Physical Education Britta Sparks. Instructors strive to instill the basics of physical educa- tion and healthy living in students, Sparks said. In elementary school, students learn basics of throwing and kicking accurate- ly. Each year students build on those skills, leading up to one required physical education course and a number of electives to appeal to student’s varied interests. The mandatory class is a survey course designed to teach students to create exercise and eating plans and expose them to different activities. “You have to give a spectrum of activities so each kid can find an interest,” she said. Not every youth enjoys competitive team sports, and finding recreational adult teams can sometimes be a challenge, Sparks said. To help them prepare for life out of school and organized activities, she said students are taught to exercise independently. Calvert’s goal is for graduates to “leave with skills and knowledge to be independent exercisers.” Calvert school’s physical education curriculum is in line with the state curriculum, which is based on United States De- partment of Health and Human Services findings and recom- mendations, Sparks said. While in high school students can take electives in team sports, recreational sports, weight training and conditioning, stretching and toning and aerobics. In addition, students learn a fitness pyramid model, similar to a food pyramid, with types of exercises and suggested frequencies and intensities. Exercise isn’t limited to the school gym, Sparks said. She encourages parents and role models to exercise 60 minutes per day. This gives students positive role models, and regular exercise is linked to decreased disease. Exercise can take more shapes and forms than going to the gym and hit- ting the treadmill or weight bench, Sparks said. Vacuuming, mopping, mowing with a push mower and other chores are “lifestyle activities” that count toward an individual’s hour of exercise daily. “As long as you’re off the couch and moving around, then something’s working for you,” Sparks said. A number of gyms offer babysitting or classes designed for younger participants, normally offered concurrently with adult classes. Nancy Crosby teaches one such class through Parks and Recreation. She took her daughter to an adult Zumba class once, and her daughter loved participating. Unfortunately, Crosby said the course was not designed for children. So she earned certification in Zumbatomic, a class designed for kids “packed with specially choreographed routines and the lat- est music, like hip-hop, reggaeton and cumbia,” according to www.zumba.com. Crosby taught the first course of Zumbatomic during fall 2012 at the Southern Community Center. She seeks registra- tions for the Spring 2013 classes on Thursdays from 5 to 5:45 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 to 10 a.m., next door to the adult Zumba classes. Zumbatomic offers sessions for kids in elementary and middle school, gearing the classes for kids 5 to 10 years old. Because Zumba is not a traditional dance class ending in a recital, Crosby said kids can join any time during the semester without feeling lost. To register for Zumbatomic, call 410-586-1101 or e-mail crosbynancy@ymail.com.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Badge Workshops Bring Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts to Library

Badge Workshops Bring Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts to Library More than 30 Junior Girl Scouts attended

More than 30 Junior Girl Scouts attended the Books Badge Workshop at Calvert Library in January 2012. The library has offered badge programs for Girl Scouts since 2009 and has had older Girl Scouts volunteer to assist with each workshop.

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

Local Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts don’t have to go very far to find ways to earn new badges. In Calvert, lo- cal libraries offer ways for kids and teens to earn badges while learning about resources at the library, meeting new people and networking with other scouts. One summer workshop drew more than 80 Boy Scouts from Prince Frederick, Lusby and Fredericks- burg, Va. after it was advertised in the regional Boy Scout newsletter, according to Calvert Librarian Leslie Bonner. Coming up for Girl Scout Cadettes is a brand new workshop to earn a badge from the recently up- dated workbook, according to Public Services Librarian Linda Buckley. Buckley was a Girl Scout herself, and later a troop leader. She said she has been coordinating workshops for Girl Scouts at the Prince Fredrick library for four years. The upcoming workshop is the first designed for Cadettes. The past workshops have been aimed at Brownies. Buckley said it was time to hold something for older scouts. The workshop will explore “the art of bookbinding and learn several book artist techniques,” according to a press release. During the workshop, girls will dissect books selected for recycling, create books to take home and learn about on-line resources, Buckley said. Participants will not receive badges at the work- shop, but will receive a form confirming completion of requirements, Buckley said. This is a new badge for Ca- dettes. Other badges are being cycled out. This year will be the last for Brownies to earn their “Reading Rocks” badge, which was phased out during a “major overhaul” of the 2012 workbook

out during a “major overhaul” of the 2012 workbook Junior Girl Scouts listen as Public Services

Junior Girl Scouts listen as Public Services Librarian Linda Buck- ley shares samples of all the different book formats available at Calvert Library.

all the different book formats available at Calvert Library. Junior Girl Scouts learn about different types

Junior Girl Scouts learn about different types of books as they match genre labels to the descriptions on their worksheets. Each scout also brought her favorite book to share during one of the workshop activities.

“Things are a lot different than they were a decade ago,” Buckley said. Along with Girl Scout workshops, the libraries host workshops for Boy Scouts. Bonner, involved with Boy Scouts since 1990, has coordinated Boy Scout workshops for five years. “It’s a natural fit to have programs at the library, since they have resources and space,” Bonner said. “It’s a real help to the Girl Scout community that there’s a place close to home at no charge,” Buckley

said. Boy Scouts use a library workshop as the last step in their journey to earn a badge. Bonner said they bring in “homework” and finish the process at the library. When they’re finished, they present their work to Bon- ner and she signs off. Workshops normally run in tandem with programs at the library, such as the Abraham Lincoln exhibit dur- ing the summer. Working with the Calvert Historic So- ciety, the Prince Frederick library helped 80 Boy Scouts from within the county and Virginia earn their Ameri- can History badge. Before attending the workshop, Bonner said the boys interviewed their families to learn about their per- sonal heritage, read books and watched informational films. At the workshop, the boys learned about aspects of local and American history and completed projects at eight stations. “It was very exciting,” she said. Workshops show kids how many resources are available at the library and offers them opportunities to meet new people and expand their horizons. For more information about the scout workshops call Buckley or Bonner at 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

15

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

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Student, Teacher Win Trip to France

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

“It’s good to know what your great-grandpar- ents have done for the world,” said Calvert High School junior Hannah Aris of an upcoming trip to France. This is the third year National History Day has sponsored the trip, the second year Sanner submitted essays to participate, and the first year a pair from Calvert County was chosen for a two- week study of WWII, culminating in a eulogy at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France. In June, Aris and Calvert High School social studies teacher Amie Sanner will be among 15 pairs from across the country to participate in the National History Day sponsored journey to France. According to www.nhd.org “students and teachers will be immersed in lectures presented by leading World War II historians, participate in a scholarly study of the war memorials in the D.C. area and walk in the footsteps of history on the beaches of Normandy.” Because there are so few slots, Sanner said the selection for the all expenses paid trip was a “big honor.” She is happy to go with Aris. “I love her to death,” Sanner said. She said she has known Aris since she was a freshman and has enjoyed seeing her grow as a student and a person.

Aris enjoys history, and is eager for the oppor- tunity to experience historical locations hands on, outside of a textbook. Sanner plans to bring home pictures and mementos, like sand from the beach at Normandy, to use in her classes. In preparation, Aris and Sanner will read eight books assigned by the National History Day organizations, and conduct a historical study of a soldier buried at the American cemetery in Nor- mandy. The study will go in a eulogy Aris will de- liver in Normandy. Though it will mean work outside normal classroom assignments and during the summer, Aris said she looks forward more about WWII and individuals who fought. They were individuals who helped change the world, and they deserve to be remembered, she said. Aris had to renew her passport for the trip, but for Sanner this will be her first time out of the country. The only part of the trip the women will pay for is transportation to George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and their souve- nirs. Travel to and from France, hotels and food are paid for through the National History Day organization. For more information, visit www.nhd.org.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

For more information, visit www.nhd.org. sarahmiller@countytimes.net H a n n a h A r i s

Hannah Aris

Photo by Sarah Miller

The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, January 10, 2013

16

The Calvert Gazette Thursday, January 10, 2013 16

Alice Coleman, 82

Alice Coleman, 82, of Chesapeake Beach passed away Jan. 1 at South River Health and Rehabilitation Center in Edgewater, Md.

She was born July 20, 1930

in Atlas, Penn. to Albert and

Mildred (Taney) Simmons.

She was raised in Pennsylvania and attended public schools. Alice moved to the Washing- ton, D.C. area in 1950 and was employed by

C & P Telephone Company as a telephone

operator for twenty-five years, retiring in

1981. She married Melvin E. Coleman on

June 21, 1967 and they have lived in Chesa- peake Beach for the past forty years. She was

a member of the Stallings-Williams Post 206

American Legion Auxiliary, and the St. An- thony’s Church Ladies of Charity. Alice was outgoing, loved life, enjoyed shopping, and being with her family and friends. She is survived by her loving husband Melvin E. Coleman, and children David Dal- latore and wife Marlene of Las Vegas, Nev., Robert L. Dallatore and wife Denise of Flem- ing, Fla., and Debbie McBride of Milton, Fla. Also surviving are two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren; and a sister Anna- may Londergan of Newark, Ohio. Family and friends were received Jan. 3 at Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., 8325 Mt. Harmony Lane, Owings, where services and

a celebration of Alice’s was be held Jan. 7. En- tombment will follow in Southern Memorial Gardens, Dunkirk. For additional informa- tion or to leave condolences visit www.raus- chfuneralhomes.com.

or to leave condolences visit www.raus- chfuneralhomes.com. Joseph Dent, 76 Joseph Alexander Dent, 76, of Lusby,

Joseph Dent, 76

Joseph Alexander Dent, 76, of Lusby, Md.

passed away on Dec. 20, 2012 at his residence. Joseph Alexander Dent, known to most as “Baby Joseph,” was born

to the late Eliza Gross Dent

and Joseph Dent Sr. on March 19, 1936. Joseph was educated in Calvert County Public Schools. Although he never married or had any children of his own, he was still known as a father, uncle, and babysitter to a host of his nieces and nephews. Joseph worked at the Virginia Saw Mill from the age of 17 until he was injured on

Virginia Saw Mill from the age of 17 until he was injured on the job. When

the job. When he was able to work again, he worked at the Warren Denton Oyster House and continued his employment there until retirement. Joseph was a longtime member of the Auxiliary at the Solomon’s Rescue and Fire Department. He could often be found in the kitchen keeping the dishes cleaned and the ladies smiling. His knack for prompting laughter whenever he was around, among his many other attributes will surely be missed by many. Joseph leaves fond memories and will be missed by his four sisters, Mary Gross (Par- ran), Rachel Johnson, Catherine Johnson, and Elizabeth Graham; one brother, Wilbur Dent (Ann); godchild, LaTrice Broome; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Funeral service was held on Dec. 28, 2012 Mt. Gethsemane Holiness Church, Huntingtown, Md. with Elder Robert Watts officiating. The interment was at Southern Memo- rial Gardens, Dunkirk, Md. The pallbearers were Marcus Chase, Henry Johnson, Albert Mackall, Brad John- son, Sherman Mackall and Terry Mackall. The honorary pallbearers were Bobby Earl Janey, Radmond Janey, Cliff Johnson, James Mackall, Larry Mackall and Calvin Rice. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick.

Dorothy Farrall, 73

Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick. Dorothy Farrall, 73 Dorothy Louise Far- rall, 73, of Lothian passed

Dorothy Louise Far- rall, 73, of Lothian passed away Jan. 1, 2013 at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. She was born July 31, 1939 in Brandy- wine to Harry and Eddie (Kelly) Harris. Dorothy was raised in Mitchellville and attended Frederick Sasscer High School. She married Clarence Stanley Farrall on April 30, 1958. They lived in Kentland, Md, later on a farm in Upper Marlboro, and have lived in Lothian for the past thirty years. Dorothy owned and oper- ated Dorothy’s Country Market in Wayson’s Corner for many years. She enjoyed running her market, spending time with her family, especially her grandchildren, and watching birds at her home. Dorothy is survived by her husband Clarence Stanley “Pete” Farrall Sr.; children Fuzzy Farrall and wife Kim of Port Republic, Regina Farrall of Lothian, and Brenda Far- rall Cusato and husband Tony of Lothian.

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Also surviving are grandchildren Clay and Pam Farrall, Jason and Melissa Langeluttig, Ammie Fox, and A.J. and Kelly Cusato; eight great-grandchildren; and siblings Pauline Windsor of Upper Marlboro, Stanley Har-

ris of Lusby, Robert Harris of Cheverly and Gene Kelly of Upper Marlboro. Dorothy was preceded in death by siblings, Manley, Nel- son, Glen, Earl Harris, Helen Bury and Joe and Susie Kelly. Family and friends were received Jan. 3 at Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., 8325 Mt. Harmony Lane, Owings, where services and

a celebration of Dorothy’s life were held Jan. 4. Interment followed at Southern Memo- rial Gardens, Dunkirk, Md. Memorial con- tributions in Dorothy’s name may be made

to Hospice of the Chesapeake, 445 Defense

Highway, Annapolis, MD 21401. For addi- tional information or to leave condolences visit www.rauschfuneralhomes.com

Bryan Sylvester Gross, 42

Bryan Sylvester Gross, 42, of Lanham, Md. passed away on Dec. 27, 2012 at his residence. He was born March 29, 1970 to the late Mary Lou

Gross. Bryan was diagnosed with cerebral pal-

sy and lived most of his life from the seat of

a wheelchair. After a period of time, it was determined that Bryan’s home care needed to be supple- mented with additional professional medical

services; therefore, his care was trusted to the Great Oak Center in Silver Spring, Md. Dur- ing his stay, the family still has fond memo- ries of spontaneous home visits on weekends, holidays, and during the summer breaks. The long road trips were well worth the drive, while asking Mom, “Are we there yet?” For long-term care, Bryan was trans- ferred to the Cameron House in Lanham,

Md. from 1995 until his passing. During his stay he attended the Arc

of Bridges Program, located In Largo, Md.

where he enjoyed receiving his daily mas-

sages and various therapeutic activities. His favorites were his warm, vibrating pillow and vibrating bed. Bryan also enjoyed music, movies, and stimulating storytelling. Although, Bryan could not respond verbally, he was always a great ear for conversation. Bryan had his own personal caregiver,

Mr. Daniel Oyewole, with whom he shared

a special bond. During their daily strolls

through the neighborhood, Bryan awaited his neighbors to say “Hello Bryan.” His smile was warm and radiant because he knew he was the center of attention. In his own way,

Bryan let it be known to other staff he needed

Mr. Daniel’s special touch. He was Bryan’s

traveling earthly Angel. Bryan leaves to mourn his siblings Robert Gross (Rita), Glenn Gross, Linda Commodore (Obbie), Michael Gross, Marlo Hawkins (Donnie), Angela Dixon (Mat- thew); his caretaker, Mr. Daniel Oyewole; and his caseworker, Sharlett Onyemenem, as well as a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral service was held on Jan. 4 at Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, Md. with Pastor Michael Fields officiating. The interment was at Holland Cem-

Fields officiating. The interment was at Holland Cem- etery, Huntingtown, Md. The pallbearers were Donte’

etery, Huntingtown, Md. The pallbearers were Donte’ Hawkins, Jonathan Gross, Jamar Gross, James Vaughn and Marquis Jones. The honorary pallbearers were Terrance Height and Ernest Campbell. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, Md.

Melvin Gross Sr., 69

Melvin Amos Gross Sr., 69, of La Plata, Md. passed away on Dec. 4, 2012 at Genesis Healthcare-LaPlata, La Plata, Md. He was born on May 6, 1943 to the late Matilda and Harry Gross Sr. of Lusby, Md. Melvin was educated by the Calvert County Public School System. He began working early in life, many different jobs. However, there were certain jobs that re- mained consistent in Melvin’s life, such as working for several farms, especially, The Briscoe Family Farm, cutting tobacco and Warren Denton Seafood, shucking oysters. Melvin made an honest living doing these various jobs that required hard work, dedi- cation, and self-reliance to succeed in these types of work environments. Also in his later years, he enjoyed landscaping for different families in St. Mary’s County until his health began to decline. Although, Melvin battled with a chronic illness, he never complained about any adversities. He was truly an inspi- ration to many how he relied on his faith in God to see him through. Melvin was joined in holy matrimony to Debra Broome in 1968. There was one son, Melvin Amos Gross Jr. born of their union. Melvin was a loving hus- band, caring father, and a good provider for his family. Melvin was the kind of person who never passed a judgment about anyone and gave everybody a fair chance to be his “friend or buddy”. He was always willing to lend a helping hand whenever he could. Mel- vin truly cherished his friendship with Rever- end Alfred E. Statesman for many years. He also considered Joseph Gantt, Sylvester Ball and the late Joseph Ball as special friends in his life and his niece Gail Gantt. In addition, one hobby Melvin enjoyed was watching his favorite baseball team, the Baltimore Orioles, and football team, the Dallas Cowboys on television. He also loved spending time with family, attending church, driving his car, playing spades and bingo and enjoying his fried chicken with a Pepsi soda. Melvin will be truly missed by all who knew him, especially, his devoted son Mel- vin Jr. and sisters Olivia, Doris, Mildred, and Bertha. Melvin’s wife, Debra Gross, and seven siblings preceded him in death: Harry Gross Jr., Matilda Gross, William Gross, James Gross, Mary Gross, Rosie Gantt and Margaret Gross. He leaves to cherish his fond memories: one son Melvin Gross Jr., four sisters, Olivia Gross, Doris Harris, Mildred Gross, Bertha Gross, one Aunt Rhatta John- son, six sisters-in-Iaw, Evelyn Gross, Eva Gross, Bonnie Hawkins, Wendy, Bernella, and Phyllis Broome, three brothers-in-law, George Harris, Lonnie Broome, Melvin Hawkins and a host of beloved nieces, neph- ews, cousins, in-laws, and special friends. Memorial service was held on Dec. 22, 2012 at Southern Community Center, Lusby, Md. with Rev. Alfred Statesman officiating. The interment was private. Funeral arrange- ments provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, Md.

17

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

17 Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Calvert Gazette

Bernice Harris, 91

Bernice Evelyn Har- ris, 91, of Prince Frederick, Md. passed away on Dec. 25, 2012 at Georgetown Univer- sity Hospital in Washington,

25, 2012 at Georgetown Univer- sity Hospital in Washington, D . C . Bernice was born

D.C. Bernice was born in Paris, Md. on May 18, 1921 to the late Cephas Randall Jr. and Helen V. Rawlings Randall. She was the eldest of five children. She later married Gilbert Franklin. From that marriage she gave birth to Nathan- iel Eugene Franklin. Then one day she was looked upon by Preston Harris. He took her hand, gave her his love and from that mar- riage six children were born. (Preston Harris preceded her in death on May 1, 2008). She was a homemaker much of her life; she loved cooking, caring for her husband, children, and grandchildren. When Bernice could no longer cook her meals she would ask a couple of her nieces, her grandson, and her daughter, Myrtle, to cook her favorite dishes. She would tell you if your cooking did not taste good and when it did; ask her granddaughter, Corinda. Bernice was a very generous and giv- ing person. She gave to her children, grand- children, great-grandchildren and others. She would give her last knowing that the Lord would bless her. Bernice grew up in a Christian atmo- sphere. As children, she and her sisters used to sing at church while their brother played the guitar. Her mother made their clothes for all occasions. As an adult, Bernice rededicat- ed her life to the Lord. She loved to worship and praise God. She loved to sing and play the piano. Bernice loved to travel. She and her husband did a lot of traveling in their younger years. With her daughter Earlene driving, she attended RW Schambach Camp meetings, Benny Hinn meetings, National Church of God, and many more. Bernice watched God TV and other inspirational channels daily. She loved the Lord and was bold enough to tell you that she was going to remain in her home un- til she went home to be with the Lord. Bernice was a woman of faith, which made her a strong woman. She was a very special lady. Those that had a special bond with Bernice knew the love she had for them. Bernice was an avid Bible reader; her favorite being Psalm 91. She lived by Psalm 91 daily. Bernice encouraged many people and sometimes would end her conver- sation by telling them to read Psalm 91. Who would have ever known that once she reached the age of 91 she would depart this life. Bernice transitioned from earth to heaven leading the way for her seven children: Na- thaniel (Pat), Earl, Earlene, Jewell (Jimmy), Myrtle (Michael), Gretchen and David. Her legacy also includes 13 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren. Her brother and sisters, Thomas Randall, Mary Kent and Mattie Wat- kins preceded her in death; one sister, Dorothy Adams, a host of nephews, nieces, cousins, and a host of other family members and friends will cherish and share her lifetime memories. Lifted from this temporary earthly realm and resting with our Lord and Savior, but never ever from our hearts. Salute to Bernice Evelyn Harris, well done thou good and faithful ser- vant. To God be all the Glory. Funeral service was held on Jan. 2 at Dunkirk Baptist Church, Dunkirk, Md. with Pastor Fletcher Wright officiating. The interment was at Carroll Western Cemetery, Prince Frederick, Md. The pallbearers were family and friends. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, Md.

Donald Preston Hurley, 63

Home, Prince Frederick, Md. Donald Preston Hurley, 63 Donald Preston Hurley, 63, of Prince Frederick, Md.

Donald Preston Hurley, 63, of Prince Frederick, Md. passed away on Dec. 27, 2012 at University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Md. His final days were spent surrounded by family. Donald was born April 11, 1949 in Chesa- peake Beach, Md. to Charles and Inez Hurley. He was a loving father and a loyal friend who loved to make people laugh. He was fond of traveling and always had a colorful story to share about his adventures. When not travel- ing, he could be found doing other things he loved such as cooking, fishing, and reading. Donald is survived by his wife, Lillian; his daughter, Donnise; his son, Donald; his stepdaughter, Tina; his grandchildren, Jordon, Arianna and Asia; his brothers, Wilbur, Amos, Eugene, Charles, Mansfield, Ronald, and Le- land; his sisters, Joyce, Darlene, and Susie; and numerous brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, nieces, nephews, cousins, and loving friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, his brother, Kermit, and sister-in-law, Patricia. Donald met many people on his journey of life. He will be deeply missed by all. Funeral service was held on Dec. 31, 2012 at St. Edmonds UM Church, Chesapeake Beach, Md. with Rev. Joan Jones officiating. The interment was at private. The pallbearers were Donald Hurley Jr., Calvin Holland, Chester Pinkney, Keith Hol- land, Douglas Ray, Alexander Holland and Amos Holland Jr. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, Md.

Cora F. Jones, 96

Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, Md. Cora F. Jones, 96 Cora F. Jones, 96, of Edgewater,

Cora F. Jones, 96, of Edgewater, Md. passed away on Dec. 29, 2012 at South River Health & Rehabilita- tion Center, Edgewater, Md. Cora Florence Jones was the second of 14 children born to Lawrence Shafer Jones and Alverta Gross Jones on August 15, 1916. Cora, who was known as feisty, indepen- dent, outspoken, courageous, and goodhearted (she was also known for her yodeling) left her Calvert County home at the age of 18. She went to Washington, D.C. to work as a housekeeper, first for a medical doctor in Mount Pleasant and then for Louie and Minnie Yudelevit on Haw- thorne Place, in the Palisades. She remained an asset and integral part of that family and the Palisades Community for more than 50 years. From her conversations, her family understood that she had extended her family and commu- nity to include the “Palisades Village”. There she helped raise the Yudelevit children and their children. Cora was known to put the finishing touches on many children of the Palisades’ families and saw them off to college and ca- reers. “She is loved and revered by them today and many are still in touch with her,” cited the Northwest Current, in an editorial authored by a few of her neighbors upon her leaving them to return to relatives in Calvert County, where she was lovingly cared for until her death. Cora’s New Year’s Day brunch, which she hosted and commanded the presence of all her family, is a savored and collective memory. It is where they went to taste, for the first time, a gourmet dish introduced to them by their “citi- fied” relative. Some dishes: cheese balls, egg- plant casserole, German chocolate cake, and roasted brisket. While Cora was a stalwart worker, she had

her fun too. On her day off, “back in the day”, she was known to go to three movies, a live performance of song and dance at the Howard Theater and a stop-in at a swinging cabaret. She was fortunate enough to live in an era where stars like Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Mom’s Mabley, Lena Horne, Nat King Cole and numerous others were easy to come by. In her later life she had friends who introduced her to stars and celebrities; she had pictures taken with some including Elizabeth Taylor. Her spiritual life for her first ten years in D.C. was supported at the Craig Memorial Community Church in Chapel Oaks, Md.; the same church in which her sister Sadie remains a member. Since 1981, she was a faithful member of Palisades Community Church in NW Wash- ington, D.C. She embraced this church by serv- ing in many capacities: usher, member of the social committee, and member of the executive board. She was a big fundraiser for the church and led a campaign to buy an industrial stove for it, which is still in use today. Cora leaves to cherish her memory four sisters: Sadie Coates, Mary Claggett, Alice Carroll and Clarice Hall; five brothers, Os- car Jones (Lucy), Lawrence Jones (Dorothy), James Jones (Dorothy), Robert Jones (Ida) and Lambertine Jones. She also leaves a multitude of nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. She was preceded in death by her mother and father, Alverta and Lawrence Jones, sisters Annie Robinson, Ruth Gray, Ruby Chase and Grace Rawlings, and brother Asbury Smith. Funeral service was held on Jan. 3 at St. Edmonds UM Church, Chesapeake Beach, Md. with Rev. Joan Jones officiating. The interment was at St. Edmonds UM Church Cemetery, Chesapeake Beach, Md. The pallbearers were Louis Claggett, Johnathan Reid, Eric Coates, Clyde Claggett, Jamar Gross, and Rod Holland. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, Md.

John S. Ratcliff, 79

John S. Ratcliff of Hun- tingtown, Md. He was born on Sept. 3, 1933 to Henry and Margaret Ratcliff of Mohe- gan, W.V. and passed away on Jan. 2 at the age of 79. He is

the beloved husband of Caro- line Munaretto Ratcliff and the loving father of John S. Ratcliff Jr. He is also survived by his siblings Angelo (Geral- dine) Ratcliff, Cruiz (Lucille) Soto and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents. Mr. Ratcliff enlisted in the United States Air Force in 1952. While stationed at Scott Field AFB in Cheyenne, Wyo., he obtained his G.E.D. in 1953. He then furthered his education by training in Cryptography, Teletype, Radio and Telephone in Belleville, Ill. Then in 1969 he attended the New York Institute of Finance and became a Licensed Stock Broker with the New York Stock Exchange in New York, NY. He went on to become the chief operations manager with DRS. During his lifetime John was a world travel- er. While serving with the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, he traveled through Germany, Italy, Malta, Libya, Greece and Turkey. After leaving the military he continued to travel and visited Jamaica, Bahamas, New Mexico and sev- eral other places throughout the United States. Mr. Ratcliff has many artistic talents, which included playing the piano and dancing. He was inducted with his wife, Caroline, into the National Boppers Hall of Fame, a national dance organization in 2001. He was known as

Fame, a national dance organization in 2001. He was known as a smooth dancer and became

a smooth dancer and became Vice President of the Maryland Hand Dance Club for a number of years and was head of numerous committees. In his 20’s John liked to box. However, in the later years John was an avid reader and fisherman. Friends will be received on Tues., Jan. 15 from 2-4 and 6-8 pm at Lee Funeral Home Calvert, P.A., 8200 Jennifer Lane (Route 4 and Fowler Road) Owings, where funeral services will be held on Wed. Jan. 16 at 11:00 am. Inter- ment with military honors will follow in Mary- land Veterans’ Cemetery, Cheltenham, Md. Memorial Contributions may be made in John’s Honor to Dare to C.A.R.E. Foundation:

2002 Medical Parkway, Sajak Pavilion, Suite 520, Annapolis, MD 21401

Josephine Reed, 65

Josephine Hattie Reed, 65, of Lusby passed away on Dec. 16, 2012 at Calvert County Nursing Center, Prince Frederick. Josephine was born on

Nov. 12, 1947 to the late Aar- on Reed Sr. and Ruth (Rice) Reed in Calvert County. She graduated from W.S. Brooks High School in 1966. She started her career at The Naval Ordinance Station in Indian Head, Md. and then moved and started working for Capital Center, which later became Monumental Sports and Entertainment, for over 36 years and retired in June 2011. She also worked part-time at Old Field Inn Restaurant in Prince Frederick for many years. She was an ac- tive member of St. Edmonds United Methodist Church participating on the Young Adult Choir and Usher Board. Josephine was a devoted single mother to her children and later helped to raise her grandchildren. She loved her fam- ily very much and cherished her grandbabies. She also enjoyed cooking, family get-together’s, helping other people and going to church. She leaves to cherish her loving memo- ries, her children: Melissa Johnson, LaShawn Reed, Stephanie Savoy, Corey Reed and Casey Reed. Nine grandchildren: Raekwon Savoy, Khaleel Thompson, Monique Savoy, Tymeesha Johnson, Carina Reed, Joshua Johnson, Dayon- na Jones, Yolonda Evans and adopted grandson Camren Jones. One brother Winfield Reed and one brother-in-law George Jones; two sisters that proceeded her in death: Carolyn (Reed) Jones and Andrea Reed; and one adopted sis- ter, Phyllis Harrod; one niece, Alicia Coates and three nephews: Ray Harris Sr., Lionel and George Jones. She has four godchildren:

Jonathan Rice, Ra’shon Harris, Amaya Wil- son and Shiye Rice; one uncle, Genest Reed, of Chesapeake Beach; five aunts: Vernell Reed Hartwell of New Jersey; Lillian Reed Moore of Baltimore; Clarice Reed Hall of Dunkirk; Ei- leen Rice of Sunderland and Corina Reid. Her extended close family also considered as her brothers and sisters: Mr. and Mrs. Curtis and Doris Gross and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur and Elva Pratt and family. Two close friends, Marthalene Holland and Janice Gross and numerous cous- ins, co-workers and friends. Funeral service was held on Dec. 22, 2012 at St. Edmonds UM Church, Chesapeake Beach with Pastor Joan Jones officiating. The interment was at St. Edmonds UM Church Cemetery, Chesapeake Beach. The pallbearers were Dennis Brooks, Curtis Gross, Oscar Holland Jr., Arthur Pratt, Leo Rice and Roosevelt Rice. The honorary pallbearers were Ray Har- ris, George Jones, Lionel Jones, Ellis Pratt, Casey Reed, Corey Reed and Malcolm Rice. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick.

Pratt, Casey Reed, Corey Reed and Malcolm Rice. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince

The Calvert Gazette

Community

Thursday, January 10, 2013

18

Hospital Pursues Baby-Friendly Designation

This month, Calvert Memorial will kick off a hospital-wide campaign to pro- mote breastfeeding as the healthiest op- tion for infants and mothers. It is part on an ongoing effort to pursue “baby-friendly” designation. Although breastfeeding is one of the most effective preventive health measures for infants and mothers, half of US-born babies are given formula within the first week, and by nine months, only 31 percent of babies are breastfeeding at all, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Pre- vention (CDC). The “Baby-Friendly” Hospital Initia- tive, established by the World Health Or- ganization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in 1991, recog- nizes facilities that foster a culture of sup- port for breastfeeding mothers. Currently, the United States has 149 baby-friendly hospitals out of the estimated 3,250 birth facilities in the country. Calvert Memorial offers prenatal in- struction in breastfeeding and has certified lactation consultants on staff that provide one-on-one instruction as well as outpa- tient lactation services for breastfeeding moms who need assistance after they go home. A free breastfeeding support group meets weekly at the hospital. The baby- friendly designation will enhance the cur- rent services. To earn this designation, hospitals must successfully integrate a series of 10 steps to encourage breastfeeding. These in- clude having a written breastfeeding policy, informing all pregnant women about the benefits of breastfeeding, helping moth- ers initiate breastfeeding within one hour of birth, and giving no pacifiers to breast-

feeding infants. Additionally, they encour- age breastfeeding on demand and rooming in – to allow mothers and babies to remain together, as well as referring mothers to breastfeeding support upon discharge. “Evidenced-based research tells us that breast milk is best for babies,” said Betty Ellis, certified lactation consultant at CMH. “Good eating habits start at hour one for a lifetime of health and well-being. Our goal is to give every family the best start possible.” Breastfeeding has multiple health ben- efits for both infants and mothers. For in- fants, it decreases the incidence and severity of many infectious diseases, reduces infant mortality, and optimally supports neuro- development. It also decreases the infants’ risk of becoming obese later in childhood. For mothers, breastfeeding decreases the risks of breast and ovarian cancers, diabe- tes, rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease. Ellis said the pathway to baby-friendly designation has four phases that typically take about two years to complete. CMH has just finished the discovery phase and is moving forward with the development phase, which involves creating a task force and a work plan. This is followed by the dis- semination phase that involves collecting

data and training staff before the on-site as- sessment that leads to designation. Accord- ing to Holly Dooley,

director of Maternal Health Services at Calvert Memorial, the hospital is collaborat- ing with physician of- fices to provide early

collaborat- ing with physician of- fices to provide early Calvert Memorial offers a free weekly support

Calvert Memorial offers a free weekly support group for breastfeeding moms.

education about options for feeding meth- ods. “As healthcare professionals, we pro- vide the best information so that parents can make an informed decision.” She went on to add, “We recognize that

it is the mother’s choice to breastfeed or sup- plement. It is never our intent to make the mothers feel guilty. If mom opts to bottle feed or supplement, the hospital will have formula available.”

North Beach Features Boardwalk Ice Skating

North Beach Features Boardwalk Ice Skating Jorja Cunningham plays on the ice. Nicole and Donovan Thomas

Jorja Cunningham plays on the ice.

Boardwalk Ice Skating Jorja Cunningham plays on the ice. Nicole and Donovan Thomas enjoy ice-skating. Photos

Nicole and Donovan Thomas enjoy ice-skating.

Photos by Sarah Miller

North Beach, along with Prince Frederick-based Fantasy World, set up a synthetic ice rink on the pier the weekend of Jan. 4-7. Fantasy World Events Manager Chuck Rimer said 150 individuals came out Friday eve- ning, another 430 skated Saturday and more than 100 skated Sunday afternoon. Skaters hit the ice in bunches for 15-minute intervals. When their time was up, skaters left the rink and could get in line for another turn or head home.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net

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19

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

CLASSIFIEDS

Placing An Ad

Email your ad to: cindijordan@countytimes.net or Call: 301-373-4125 or Fax: 301-373-4128. Liner Ads (No artwork or special type) Charged by the line with the 4 line minimum. Display Ads (Ads with artwork, logos, or special type) Charged by the inch with the 2 inch minimum. All private party ads must be paid before ad is run.

Publication Days

The Calvert Gazette is published each Thursday. Deadlines are Tuesday at 12 noon Office hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm

Important Information

The Calvert Gazette will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The Calvert Gazette reserves the right to edit or reject any classified ad not meeting the standards of The Calvert Gazette. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day of the first publication ran.

Real Estate

for Sale

What an elegant home in beautiful Harbor Point in Solomons.Enjoy water access living and keep your boat in the community - deepwater boat slip included. This home has been nicely updated-gleaming wood floors on entire first floor, new carpet, upgraded hardware & lighting,more. The professional landscaping is magnificent & creates a wonderful extended outdoor living space. Perfect! Price: $474,900. Call Susan Thompson 410-707-6265 direct 410-394-0990 office.

Real Estate Rentals

LANDLORDS Do you need a tenant? RENTERS Call us about Rentals! RENTAL KING

301-737-7854

Apartment

Rentals

Prince Frederick, MD office. Please fax your Hunting Meadows Apartments (301) 994-0100: 1 bedroom starting at $560.00. 2 bedrooms starting @$580.00. Office hours Mon, Tues and Thur 9-2. Quiet neighborhood, no pets allowed .

Large waterfront, furnished, one bedroom apartment. Quiet location with a beautiful view. Electric, Sat TV, Wi-Fi all included. Washer and dryer, dish washer included. Approx. 15 min. to Pax River, 5 min. to NESA, 5 min to St. Mary’s College. Single non smoker professional preferred. Rent: $920. If interested, please call 240-298-0443 for more information.

Employment

RN’s/LPN’s Needed

HomecaRe NuRsiNg comPaNy

Day/night shifts avail. peds./young adult homecare Calvert & St. Mary’s Co. Must have 1+years exper. Professional Nursing Services, Inc. 410-683-9770 / 888-329-0887

RSA lic. # RO2298 DHMH/OCHQ

FT-Endoscopy Tech/ CNA needed for busy Busy and fast paced automotive repair facility in Lexington Park has an immediate opening for a Lube Technician. Candidate should have at least 3 years experience, excellent customer service skills and the ability to work Sundays. Competitive salary and benefits offered. precisiontune.com

Employment

Food Lion Career Fair!

Hiring For LoCaL retaiL StoreS.

Wednesday, Jan 16th 10a-6p. Holiday Inn: Solomon’s Conference Center & Marina: 155 Holiday Drive, Solomon’s Island, MD 20688. Also apply online: www.foodlion.com Bring Resume, Onsite Interviews! EOE and Drug Free Environment.

Vehicles

1996 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT Laramie 4x4 Extended Cab. V8, automatic, power windows and locks, heat, tow pkg, 8ft bed, 4WD, A.R.E. cap, truck runs perfect, some

rust on doors. 160k miles, call Jay 240 466

1711. Price: $2695.

• NOW HIRING? GOT A LAWNMOWER TO SELL? • AN APARTMENT FOR RENT? • A
• NOW HIRING?
GOT A LAWNMOWER TO SELL?
• AN APARTMENT FOR RENT?
• A HOME TO SELL?
People still turn to the Classifieds first.
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goods and services
in SOMD Publishing?
So the next time
you want something
seen fast, get it in
writing
get
it in
the Classifieds!
• Readers are actively
looking for your listing.
• Our newspapers are also
online for everyone to see!
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clip and save your ad.
Calvert Gazette
Everything Calvert County
The County Times
Serving St. Mary’s
To Place Your Ad Call Cindi @
301-373-4125 • countytimes.somd.com

TEL: 301-373-4125 • FAX: 301-373-4128 • cindijordan@countytimes.net

The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, January 10, 2013

20

The Calvert Gazette is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail sarahmiller@countytimes.net.

entertainment section, e-mail sarahmiller@countytimes.net. Dinner Theater Guests Solve Murder Mystery By Sarah Miller

Dinner Theater Guests Solve Murder Mystery

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer The Alumni Players, while rais- ing money for Our Lady
By Sarah Miller
Staff Writer
The Alumni Players, while rais-
ing money for Our Lady Star of the Sea
School, plan to entertain dinner theater
guests with an interactive murder mys-
tery, a first for the troupe.
An overly helpful single woman at
a couple’s seminar, a cop in search of a
murder and a questionably effective mo-
tivational speaker are among the cast of
characters for “Friends to the End,” by
Bob Crawford. The murder’s premise re-
volves around a couple’s seminar present-
ed by Dr. Zoey Wynne, played by Peggy
Thomason of Lusby.
The murders don’t happen until after
the show starts, much to the consternation
of police officer Floyd Cashewickiewick-
iepeliume, who shows up before the first
shots are taken in search of a murder to
investigate.
Entertainment
The audience participates with a
mismatched group of suspicious charac-
ters to solve not one but two murders.
Solomons resident Ron Thompson,
playing the small town officer, has been
an Alumni Player for 20 years; joining
shortly after its start in the 1980s. He said
he enjoys the group because it’s a way to
have fun while raising money for the fine
arts program at Our Lady Star of the Sea
school.
Some actors have been in the group
as long as he has. Others have come and
gone over the years. He said they draft
anybody who shows some interest in the
Alumni Players.
Peggy Thomason, a seven-year
member of the group, said after working
with some actors for so long they can an-
ticipate one other.
Nita joined a few years after Ron and
their daughter started acting in the annual
dinner production. She started with little
roles, becoming increasingly involved un-
til she was asked to direct last year’s play.
She enjoyed the experience so much that
she was ready and willing to go again this
Photos by Sarah Miller
Zoey Wynne (Peggy Thomason) and Ruth Prickle (Barbara Rohe) talk about therapy.
Calendar
year. This is the first time this adaptation
of “Friends to the End” hits the stage.
Director Nita Thompson said she
and Ron first saw the play during a mur-
der mystery weekend getaway. While
searching for a suitable play she wrote
to Bob Crawford, asking him to consider
condensing the script “from two days to
two hours.” He wrote back saying he had
done so for other groups in the past and
was happy to help the Alumni Players,
Nita said.
Thomason said this year’s play is dif-
ferent from years past. Before, the group
followed a traditional format of dinner
then a play. She is looking forward to this
year’s play and seeing how the audience
reacts.
Thomason’s son Charles joined the
group this year to run the lights and sound-
board. Charles said his mother signed him
up. This is his first time running tech for
a play, though he said he has experience
with the boards in other capacities.
For more information, or to reserve
tickets, call 410-326-3008. Tickets are $33
each and dates are Jan. 25 and 26 and Feb.
1 and 2. Doors open at 6 p.m. and Thomp-
son’s Seafood is catering the evening.
sarahmiller@countytimes.net
is catering the evening. sarahmiller@countytimes.net Friday, Jan. 11 Live Music: “The Piranhas” Ruddy Duck

Friday, Jan. 11

Live Music: “The Piranhas” Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 12

Live Music: “Angie Miller” Running Hare Vineyard (150 Adelina Road, Prince Frederick) – 1 p.m.

Live Music: “Hydra Fx” The Tavern in St. Leonard (4975 St. Leonard Road, St. Leonard) – 9 p.m.

Live Music: “Dominic and Benji” Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.

Sunday, Jan. 13

Live Music: “GrooveSpan Trio” Running Hare Vineyard (150 Adelina Road, Prince Frederick) – 1 p.m.

Tuesday, Jan. 15

Open Mic Night Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6:30 p.m.

Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6:30 p.m. Rose Green (Geri Reynolds) administers first aid

Rose Green (Geri Reynolds) administers first aid to Ruth.

Rose Green (Geri Reynolds) administers first aid to Ruth. Thunder Saxon (Greg McMinn) is confused in

Thunder Saxon (Greg McMinn) is confused in the wake of the first murder.

21

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

21 Thursday, January 10, 2013 The Calvert Gazette CLUES ACROSS 1. Winter capital of Kashmir 6.

CLUES ACROSS

1.

Winter capital of Kashmir

6.

So. African Music Awards

11.

The Bay State

14.

A disorderly crowd

15.

Actress Greta

16.

Expression of surprise

18.

Storybook elephant

21.

John Jacob

,

capitalist

23.

Mulled wine

25.

Membrane around the lungs

26.

Shows how something works

28.

Canonized

29.

Layers bonded together

31.

A vessel or duct

 

34.

The fire had been

35.

Female sibling

 

36.

Israeli capital

39.

Blocked in fencing

40.

98942 WA

44.

Gasoline hydrocarbon rating

45.

Light snacks with drinks

47.

Supplementing with difficulty

48.

Am. composer & diarist Ned

50.

A waterproof raincoat

51.

Accumulate a large quantity

56.

Am. Newspaper Assoc.

57. Butterfly collector

27.

Caesar or cobb

62. and Venzetti

28.

Building lots

63. Female servants

30.

1/1000 inch

31.

Apexes

CLUES DOWN

32.

Firth of Clyde’s largest island

1. Poked at

33.

Bringing suit

2.

Equally

36.

Forsyth novel “The Day of

3.

Manuscript (abbr.)

The

4.

Periodical (slang)

37.

Perceive with the eyes

5.

Fiddler crabs

38.

Was introduced to

6.

Hero sandwich

39.

Lines of verse

7.

Volcanic mountain in Japan

41.

Household god (Roman)

8.

Of I

42.

Military mailbox

9.

Indicates position

43.

Challenge aggressively

10.

Legislative acts

46.

Posted

11.

Low sustained cry

49.

One thousandth of an ampere

12.

Human resources (abbr.)

51.

General’s assistant (abbr.)

13.

Supported by a prop

52.

Bovine sound

14.

Megabyte

53.

Associated press

17.

9/11 Memorial designer Michael

54.

Opposite of LTM

19.

The years someone has existed

55.

A very large body of water

20.

Distilled from

58.

Ma’s partner

fermented molasses

59.

Integrated circuit

21.

a.k.a.

60.

Rhode Island

22.

Estonian kroon = 100

61.

Potato state

24.

The sun

25.

Wide metal cooking vessel

Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions

Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions
61. Potato state 24. The sun 25. Wide metal cooking vessel Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions Ko
Ko r n er
Ko
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er
Out & About Classes at Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Art Center • artLAB New Hours

Out& About

Classes at Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Art Center

artLAB New Hours Staring Jan. 4, 2013

Annmarie Garden, Solomons, Md. The artLAB at Annmarie Garden will have new winter hours and will be open Friday through Monday, 2 to 5 p.m., beginning Jan. 4, 2013 through March. Should you want to visit during the week (at a different time), group visits for all ages can be organized, simply call 410- 326-4640 or email artlab@annmariegarden.org to schedule your visit.

artLAB Mom’s Club

Annmarie Garden, Solomons, Md. artLAB Mom’s Club at Annmarie Garden is held on the first and third Monday of each month. These lightly guided sessions will help your child make great art, fun toys, creative costumes, and new friends. This club is perfect for pre-school- ers, ages 3-5. Mark your calendars, Dec. 3 and 17, 10 to 12 p.m. and new hours in 2013. Jan. 7, Jan. 21, Feb. 4, Feb. 18, March 4, and March 18, 9 to 11 a.m. Cost is $7 for parent/child pair; $2 for each additional child. No registration required. Call 410-326-4640 for more information.

Homechool Tuesdays

Annmarie Garden, Solomons, Md. Annmarie Garden will host Homechool Tuesdays, 9 to 11 a.m., on Jan. 15, Feb. 19, and March 19. Add a little artLAB to your home- school curriculum as we invent, build, and dis- cover through guided ‘challenges’. Ideal for ages 7-12 years, but all ages can participate. No regis- tration required; $7 for parent/child pair; $2 for each additional child. No registration required. Call 410-326-4640 for more information.

Wednesday Wine Nights

Annmarie Garden, Solomons, Md. – 5 to 7 p.m. Annmarie Garden will host Wednesday Wine Nights, the third Wednesday night of each month, 5 to 7 p.m. (drop in at any time), on Dec. 19, Jan. 16, Feb. 20, and March 20. Bring your favorite beverage or snack and get ready to turn trash to treasure as we create home décor, fash- ion items, and jewelry. Adults only, no registra- tion required. Cost is $7 per person. For more in- formation visit annmariegarden.org or call 410- 326-4640. Plan a fun night out with your friends.

Open Studio Days

Annmarie Garden, Solomons, Md. Annmarie Garden will host Open Studio Days in the artLAB by appointment only. If you have want free reign in the artLAB to create, now is your chance. Email artlab@annmarie- garden.org or call to schedule your session today. Cost is $7 per person.

Monday, Jan. 21

School’s Art, Art’s In

Annmarie Garden, Solomons, Md. – 9 to 4 p.m. Register at Annmarie Garden today for the next School’s Art, Art Is In full-day program, for Grades K-2 or Grades 3-5. Students will learn all about the animal kingdom through art, with a specific focus on Magnificent Mammals. Call today to pre-register for this popular class at 410- 326-4640; Members $35, Non-Members $40. Register early, as spaces are limited. For more in- formation please visit www.annmariegarden.org

The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, January 10, 2013

22

Community Events

Saturday, Jan. 12

American Association of University

Women Meeting Mt. Zion United Methodist Church Hall (27108 Mt. Zion Church Road, Mechanic- sville) 12 p.m. The meeting will start at noon with a pot luck lunch followed by discussion of books and an update of American Asso- ciation of University Women activities at the state and national levels. Participants are asked to bring children’s books for the Tri-County Head Start. The Patuxent Riv- er branch includes members from Charles, St. Mary’s and Calvert counties. For more information, contact the president Barbara Fetterhoff at paxriveraauw@gmail.com.

Adult Education Orientation

Adult Education Program Annex (4105 Old Town Road, Huntingtown), 9 a.m. If you are over 16 years old, out of school and need a high school diploma, the Adult Education Program can help you. Adult Education Classes help individuals prepare for the GED Test or the External Diploma Program. To enroll in an Adult Education class, students must participate in an Orientation and Skills Assessment before being assigned to class. For more information or to register, call the Adult Education Program at 410-535-7382 or visit www.calvertnet.k12.md.us/depart- ments/other/adulted/index.htm.

Meat-down - A Vegetarian Meet-up

Leonardtown Library (23250 Hollywood Road, Leonardtown) 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Meat-Down will be hosting their inaugural meeting. Vegans, vegetarian and anybody wanting to learn more about vegetarianism are welcome to attend. The purpose of this and future meet-ups is to offer an inviting social setting for net- working with like-minded friends who care about their well-being, the well-being of animals and the environment. Discus- sion will focus on the purpose and mission of the group, building community sup-

port, vegan potlucks, sharing resources and how the group will network with other

groups for community outreach. RSVP to Natalie at nrevans1117@yahoo.com or

301-481-274.

Overeaters Anonymous Meeting

Middleham Parish Hall (10210 H.G. Trueman Road, Lusby, 10 a.m. Do you worry about the way you eat? Overeaters Anonymous may have the an- swer for you. There are no dues, fees or weigh-ins. Everyone is welcome at the weekly open meeting. The only require- ment for membership is the desire to stop eating compulsively. Contact Martha at 410-326-9546 or Joyce at 301-866-1484 for more information or visit www.oa.org.

Sunday, Jan. 13

Sundays in the Park at Greenwell

Greenwell State Park, off Sotterley Road, Hollywood, 1 to 4 p.m. Enjoy Sundays in the Park at Green- well’s Rosedale Manor on the second Sun- day of every month. Sundays in the Park is a family-friendly event where the commu- nity is welcome to come and browse the rooms of historic Rosedale Manor. Rose- dale was the home of John Philip Green- well, Jr., who donated his land to the state of Maryland, and began the Greenwell Foundation, an independent, non-profit organization offering inclusive and ac- cessible programs, services and facilities

within Greenwell State Park. Self-guided tours of the manor house are available. Sundays in the Park is also an opportunity for brides-to-be to spend some time inside the manor house and envision what their special day will look like. For more infor- mation about the Greenwell Foundation, visit www.greenwellfoundation.org.

Prince Frederick to the Bay Trail

Work Day ACLT office, Double Oak Farm (676 Double Oak Road, Prince Frederick), 11 a.m.

Tell the world how you feel. Send a message in our Valentines section to someone
Tell the world how you feel. Send a message in our Valentines section to someone

Tell the world how you feel. Send a message in our Valentines section to someone special on February 14th.

our Valentines section to someone special on February 14th. Simply fill out the form below and

Simply fill out the form below and send payment by Feb. 6th. Questions? Call 301-373-4125 or e-mail to cindijordan@countytimes.net

ONLY

$ 15.00

Mail this form to: SOMD Publishing, P.O. Box 250, Hollywood, MD 20636 OR email in this information to cindijordan@countytimes.net

Your Name:

Daytime Phone:

Person’s Name:

Message Here:

*200 Characters MAX Including Spaces*

Come out to work on the new Prince Frederick to the Bay Overlook Trail. Vol- unteers are needed to clear the trail of leaves, flatten steep or uneven areas, trim back limbs and bushes and outline the trail with pieces of deadwood. To regis-

ter, e-mail volunteer@acltweb.org or call

410-414-3400.

Monday, Jan. 14

Adult Education Orientation

Appeal Elementary School (11655 H.G.Trueman Road, Lusby, 5:30 p.m. If you are over 16 years old, out of

school and need a high school diploma, the Adult Education Program can help you. Adult Education Classes help individuals prepare for the GED Test or the External Diploma Program. To enroll in an Adult Education class, students must participate

in an Orientation and Skills Assessment

before being assigned to class. For more information or to register, call the Adult Education Program at 410-535-7382 or visit www.calvertnet.k12.md.us/depart- ments/other/adulted/index.htm.

Tuesday, Jan. 15

CSM Career Starters Open House

CSM Prince Frederick Campus, Room 119 (115 J.W. Williams Road, Prince Fredrick) – 4:30 p.m.

The College of Southern Maryland

is hosting a Career Starters program open

house to introduce its slate of non-credit training courses for people who want to kick-start a new career in business, con- struction, early childhood, healthcare, hospitality, information technology, trans- portation or veterinary medicine in 10 to 16 weeks. Career Starter programs offer train- ing and classes in short sequences for

students to gain skills quickly to enter the workforce. During the open house, pro- spective students can meet with a program coordinator and instructors from each career field, learn about financial assis- tance options and register for classes. At- tendees can enter a drawing for an instant scholarship for the Spring 2013 Semes- ter. For more information, call 443-550- 6199, Ext. 7765 or visit www.csmd.edu/ CareerStarters.

Wednesday, Jan. 16

HR Professionals Focus on Employee

Engagement Hampton Inn Waldorf (3750 Crain High- way, Waldorf) 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Human Resources Associa- tion of Southern Maryland will meet on

Marisa Sanchez, PhD, will present this month’s topic. Research shows that orga- nizations with engaged employees have

a competitive advantage and are more

likely to achieve both revenue and profit

goals. Participants will learn the benefits

of increasing engagement among employ-

ees, discuss strategies to improve engage-

ment and share best practices in employee engagement. The meeting is open to anyone with an interest in Human Resources issues. The cost is $21 for members and $26 for nonmembers, which includes lunch. Reg- istration begins at 11 a.m. Deadline for

registering is noon on Monday, Jan. 14. To register, go to: www.hrasmonline.shrm. org. Once registered, payment is required

if a cancellation is made after the deadline

date. This seminar is currently pending

approval of HRCI credit hours toward PHR, SPHR, and GPHR recertification.

23

Thursday, January 10, 2013

The Calvert Gazette

Out & About
Out & About
Out & About

Out& About

Long Standing Calendar

Monday Memories Tours at JPPM

Jefferson Patterson Park & Museum 10515 Mackall Road St. Leonard, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Each Monday, the public is invited to a free Monday Memories guided tour of Point Farm at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum. All are welcome to enjoy the memories of Calvert County, the Patterson family, JPPM or those who once worked on the land that is now JPPM. The public is welcome to share stories, or visitors may also simply enjoy the tour and listen to the memories of others. Point Farm was the country retreat of the late Mr. & Mrs. Jefferson Patterson. In 1983 Mrs. Patterson donated the property to the state in honor of her late husband, creating Jefferson Patterson Park & Museum. Join us for a guided tour of this beautiful 1933 Colonial Revival brick house and gardens designed by noted female architects Gertrude Sawyer and Rose Greely. Please call 410-586-8501 or visit www.jefpat.org for more information

Library Events

Thursday, Jan. 10

Cuddle Up and Read to Me

Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Cost- ley Way, Prince Frederick), 9:30 to 9:50 a.m. For children birth to 24 months. Regir- stration is required. For more information, call 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862.

Calvert Conversations

Calvert Library Twin Beaches Branch (3819

Harbor Road, Chesapeake Beach), 10 to 11

a.m. The library is hosting an informal dis- cussion of local history of interest to long- time Calvert residents and newcomers. For more information, call 410-257-2411.

Kids Just Want to Have Fun

Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Cost- ley Way, Prince Frederick), 2 to 3 p.m. The library will host reading, discus- sion and projects for children in kindergarten through third grade. For more information, call 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862.

Friends of the Library Gently Used

Book Sale Preview Night Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Cost- ley Way, Prince Frederick), 5 to 7 p.m. The Friends of the Library have collect- ed thousands of used books for sale. Thursday is a preview night and reception for members of Friends of the Library. For more informa- tion, call 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862.

Evening Storytime

Calvert Library Twin Beaches Branch (3819 Harbor Road, Chesapeake Beach), 6:30 to 7:15 p.m. This storytime is for the family with children of multiple ages. Children can learn about books and language through short stories, songs, crafts and more. An adult must accompany child. This week’s theme is “Trains.” For more information, call

410-257-2411.

Code Name 4-5-6

Calvert Library Southern Branch (20 Ap- peal Way, Lusby), 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Students in fourth through sixth grade are invited to this series of events which uses plenty of hands-on activities to have fun with reading. Each month the library explores a new theme and introduces a chapter book on the topic. No advanced preparation is needed and a snack will be provided. Reg- istration is required. This month’s topic is Hail to the Chief. For more information, call

410-326-5289.

Friday, Jan. 11

Friends of the Library Gently Used

Book Sale Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Cost- ley Way, Prince Frederick), 12 to 4 p.m.

Thousands of used books will be avail-

able. For more information, call 410-535-

0291 or 301-855-1862.

Saturday, Jan. 12

Friends of the Library Gently Used

Book Sale Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Cost- ley Way, Prince Frederick), 12 to 4 p.m. Thousands of used books will be avail- able. For more information, call 410-535-

0291 or 301-855-1862.

PlayTime

Calvert Library Fairview Branch (Rt. 4 and Chaneyville Road, Owings), 10:45 to 11:15

a.m. Playtime is learning and discovery time for children and parents. Attendees should bring a non-battery operated toy to share. PlayTime is open to children ages birth through 5 years old. For more information, call 410-257-2101.

Monday, Jan. 14

Monday Morning Movies and More

Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Cost-

ley Way, Prince Frederick), 10 to 11 a.m. Bring the little ones for movies and a

story. For more information, call 410-535-

0291 or 301-855-1862.

Kids Just Want to Have Fun

Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Cost- ley Way, Prince Frederick), 2 to 3 p.m. The library will host reading, discus- sion and projects for children in kindergarten through third grade. For more information, call 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862.

Book Discussion

Calvert Library Twin Beaches Branch (3819 Harbor Road, Chesapeake Beach), 7 to 8:30

p.m. Costumes optional during the party at- mosphere discussion of “The Great Gatsby.” For more infomraiton, call 410-257-2411.

Tuesday, Jan. 15

Board of Trustees Meeting

Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Cost- ley Way, Prince Frederick), 2 to 5 p.m. The Calvert Library Board of Trust- ees will hold their monthly meeting. For more information, call 410-535-0291 or

301-855-1862.

Yes, You Can Use A Computer

Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Costley Way, Prince Frederick), 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. Participants will learn the basics of formatting a resume using Microsoft Word. Registration is required. For more informa- tion, call 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862.

Downton Abbey Schemes and Skeins

Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Costley Way, Prince Frederick), 5 to 6:30

p.m. Participants are encourages to bring their knit or crochet projects and settle in for an episode of Downton Abbey on the big screen. For more information, call 410-535- 0291 or 301-855-1862.

Wednesday, Jan. 16

PlayTime

Calvert Library Southern Branch (20 Ap- peal Way, Lusby), 10:25 to 10:55 a.m. Playtime is learning and discovery time for children and parents. Attendees should bring a non-battery operated toy to share. PlayTime is open to children ages birth through 5 years old. For more information, call 410-326-5289.

Book Discussion

Calvert Library Fairview Branch (Rt. 4 and Chaneyville Road, Owings), 2 to 3:30 p.m. Come discuss “The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern. A fierce competition is underway – a duel between two young ma- gicians. Celia and Marco have been trained since childhood expressly for this competi- tion by their mercurial instructors. Unbe- knownst to them, this is a game in which only one can be left standing, and the circus is but the stage for a remarkable battle of imagination and will. For more information, call 410-257-2101.

Yes, You Can Use A Computer

Calvert Library Twin Beaches Branch (3819 Harbor Road, Chesapeake Beach), 2 to 3

p.m. Participants will learn the basics of formatting a resume using Microsoft Word. Registration is required. For more informa- tion, call 410-257-2411.

South Side Sinners - A Chicago Mystery

Calvert Library Prince Frederick (850 Costley Way, Prince Frederick), 7 to 8:30

p.m. Attendees should feel free to dress up in pinstripe suits or flapper dresses as partici- pants try to solve the question of whodunit during an evening of murder and mayhem. For more information, call 410-535-0291 or

301-855-1862.

Book Discussion

Calvert Library Southern Branch (20 Ap- peal Way, Lusby), 7 to 8:30 p.m. January’s Book Club selection is “Drop Dead Healthy” by A.J. Jacobs, who felt com- pelled to change his ways and get healthy. The task was epic. He consulted an army of experts— sleep consultants and sex clini- cians, nutritionists and dermatologists. For more information, call 410-326-5289.

Throughout the Month

Mondays, Jan. 7, 14, 21, 28

Memories Tour

Jefferson Patterson Park & Museum, 10515 Mackall Road, St. Leonard, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. The public is invited to share memories of Calvert County, the Pat- terson Family, JPPM or those who may have once worked this land. If you do not have a story to share, come enjoy the tour and hear the memories of oth- ers. In 1983 Mrs. Patterson donated Point Farm to the state in honor of her late husband, creating Jefferson Pat- terson Park & Museum. Join us for a guided tour of this beautiful 1933 Co- lonial Revival brick house and gardens designed by noted female architects Gertrude Sawyer and Rose Greely. For more information call 410- 586-8501 or go to www.jefpat.org.

Through Sunday, Jan. 13

Glitz: Art that Sparkles

Annmarie Sculpture Garden & Arts Center, 13480 Dowell Road, Dowell This exhibit goes over the top with works of art that shine, sparkle, twinkle, shimmer, flash and glitter. 410-326-4640 • www.annmariegar- den.org.

Jan.18-March 24

The Living Gallery

Annmarie Sculpture Garden & Arts Center (13480 Dowell Road, Dowell)

– Daily, Annmarie’s Main Gallery will be transformed into artist studios, provid-

ing a serene retreat and experimental space for artists to develop new work. Visitors can observe and interact with artists and are invited to participate in the creative process. For more in- formation, call 410-326-4640 or visit www.annmariegarden.org.

Through Sunday, Feb. 24

Marc Castelli: The Art of the

Waterman Annmarie Sculpture Garden & Arts Center, 13480 Dowell Road, Dowell

– Daily This exhibit features 23 paintings by renowned Chesapeake artist Marc Castelli. Castelli paints in watercolor on paper, working from photographs he takes. This allows him not only to get the proportions and details exactly right, but also to capture action and at- titude that painting from life would not permit. The paintings are on loan from the collections of Diane Simison and the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Mu- seum in St. Michael’s, Md. For more information call 410-326-4640 or go to www.annmariegarden.org.

KITCHEN

KITCHEN

KITCHEN
KITCHEN KITCHEN A BEfORE CONTEST KITCHEN B BEfORE KITCHEN A AfTER Send us a picture of
KITCHEN A BEfORE CONTEST KITCHEN B BEfORE KITCHEN A AfTER Send us a picture of
KITCHEN A BEfORE
CONTEST
KITCHEN B BEfORE
KITCHEN A AfTER
Send us a
picture of your
ugly kitchen
for a chance to
WIN ALL NEW
CABINETS! *
KITCHEN B AfTER

* Pictures must be submitted by Feb. 15th, 2013 to our Facebook page. (search for Dunkirk Hardware & Home Center) Customer must complete an entry form on Facebook. then get your friends and family to like your photo! the ugly kitchen with the greatest number of likes will win! Contest winner will be announced march 1st, 2013.

will win! Contest winner will be announced march 1st, 2013. www.schrock.com 410-257-1300 10745 Town Center Blvd

www.schrock.com

410-257-1300 10745 Town Center Blvd
410-257-1300
10745 Town Center
Blvd

LET US HELp mAKE UgLy BEAUTIfUL!