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NUMBERS

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1,000 million nid/neamha aon d tr ceathar cig s seacht ocht naoi deich a haon dag a d dhag a tr dag che trocha daichead/ceathracha caoga seasca seacht ocht ncha cad mle millin

COUNTING PEOPLE
one person two people three people four people ve people six people seven people eight people nine people ten people duine amhin beirt trir ceathrar cigear seisear seachtar ochtar naonr deichnir

Speak Irish with condence


Mire Mhic Ruair & Dnall Mac Ruair

MONTHS OF THE YEAR


January February March April May June July August September October November December Eanir Feabhra Mrta Aibren Bealtaine Meitheamh Iil Lnasa Men Fmhair Deireadh Fmhair Samhain Nollaig

SEASONS
spring summer autumn winter earrach samhradh fmhar geimhreadh

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The publisher has used its best endeavours to ensure that the URLs for external websites referred to in this book are correct and active at the time of going to press. However, the publisher and the author have no responsibility for the websites and can make no guarantee that a site will remain live or that the content will remain relevant, decent or appropriate. For UK order enquiries: please contact Bookpoint Ltd, 130 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 4SB. Telephone: +44 (0) 1235 827720. Fax: +44 (0) 1235 400454. Lines are open 09.0017.00, Monday to Saturday, with a 24-hour message answering service. Details about our titles and how to order are available at www.teachyourself.co.uk For USA order enquiries: please contact McGraw-Hill Customer Services, PO Box 545, Blacklick, OH 43004-0545, USA. Telephone: 1-800-722-4726. Fax: 1-614-755-5645. For Canada order enquiries: please contact McGraw-Hill Ryerson Ltd, 300 Water St, Whitby, Ontario L1N 9B6, Canada. Telephone: 905 430 5000. Fax: 905 430 5020. Long renowned as the authoritative source for self-guided learning with more than 50 million copies sold worldwide the Teach Yourself series includes over 500 titles in the elds of languages, crafts, hobbies, business, computing and education. British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data: a catalogue record for this title is available from the British Library. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: on le. First published in UK 2007 as Teach Yourself Irish conversation by Hodder Education, 338 Euston Road, London, NW1 3BH. First published in US 2007 as Teach Yourself Irish conversation by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. This edition published 2010. The Teach Yourself name is a registered trademark of Hodder Headline. Copyright 2007, 2010 Mire Mhic Ruair and Dnall Mac Ruair In UK: All rights reserved. Apart from any permitted use under UK copyright law, no part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information, storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or under licence from the Copyright Licensing Agency Limited. Further details of such licences (for reprographic reproduction) may be obtained from the Copyright Licensing Agency Limited, of Saffron House, 610 Kirby Street, London, EC1N 8TS. In US: All rights reserved. Except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher. Typeset by Servis Filmsetting Ltd, Stockport, Cheshire, England. Printed in Great Britain for Hodder Education, a division of Hodder Headline, an Hachette Livre UK Company, 338 Euston Road, London, NW1 3BH. Hachettes policy is to use papers that are natural, renewable and recyclable products and made from wood grown in sustainable forests. The logging and manufacturing processes are expected to conform to the environmental regulations of the country of origin. Impression number 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Year 2013 2012 2011 2010

DAYS OF THE WEEK


Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday D Luain D Mirt D Cadaoin Dardaoin D hAoine D Sathairn D Domhnaigh Monday night Tuesday night Wednesday night Thursday night Friday night Saturday night Sunday night oche Luain oche Mhirt oche Chadaoin oche Dhardaoin oche Aoine oche Shathairn oche Dhomhnaigh

DIRECTIONS
to the right to the left straight on opposite ar dheis ar cl dreach ar aghaidh os comhair in front of next door to between os coinne bal dorais le idir

TELLING THE TIME


what time is it? its one oclock its ve minutes past one its ten minutes past one its quarter past one its twenty minutes past one its twenty-ve minutes past one its half past one its twenty-ve minutes to two its twenty minutes to two its quarter to two its ten minutes to two its ve minutes to two cn t-am ? t s a haon a chlog t s cig tar is/i ndiaidh a haon t s deich tar is/i ndiaidh a haon t s ceathr tar is/i ndiaidh a haon t s che tar is/i ndiaidh a haon t s cig noimad is che/che cig tar is/i ndiaidh a haon t s leath tar is/i ndiaidh a haon t s cig nimad is che/che cig go dt/chun a d t s che go dt/chun a d t s ceathr go dt/chun a d t s deich go dt/chun a d t s cig go dt/chun a d

Essential vocabulary

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Essential vocabulary
GREETINGS AND OTHER PHRASES
Do you like ? good morning goodbye goodnight hello I like Im Colm. An maith leat ? maidin mhaith sln oche mhaith dia duit is maith liom Is mise Colm. no problem of course OK we like What is your name? why not youre welcome fadhb ar bith cinnte t go maith is maith linn Cad is ainm duit? cad chuige nl a bhuochas ort

Contents
Track listing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Only got a minute? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Only got ve minutes? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Only got ten minutes? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Conversation 1: Meeting and greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Part 1: Greeting people . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Part 2: Introducing yourself . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Conversation 2: This is my sister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Part 1: Talking about your family. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Part 2: Introducing members of your family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Conversation 3:Socializing with friends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Part 1: Having a drink with a friend. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Part 2: Saying goodbye. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Conversation 4: Eating out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Part 1: Booking a table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Part 2: Ordering a meal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Conversation 5: Leisure time activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Part 1: Pastimes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Part 2: Likes and dislikes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Conversation 6: Knowing the way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Part 1: Asking the way. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Part 2: More information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Conversation 7: Transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Part 1: The pharmacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Part 2: The clothes shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Conversation 8: Time and money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Part 1: Whats the time? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Part 2: Enquiring about local music sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Conversation 9: Small talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Part 1: Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Part 2: Yesterday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Conversation 10: Everyday living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Part 1: How did you spend your weekend? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Part 2: Holidays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
Contents

FOOD AND DRINK


beef beer bread butter cheese chicken chips egg sh fruit ham mairteoil leann/beoir arn im cis cearc/sicn sceallga ubh iasc tortha muiceoil/liamhs juice lamb meat milk potatoes red wine sausage vegetables water white wine s uaineoil feol bainne prta fon dearg ispn glasra uisce fon geal/fon bn

COLOURS
black blue green orange dubh gorm glas/uaine annbhu/oriste purple red white yellow corcra dearg bn bu

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with you (plural) 3libh

yet 3/3 go fill you 1 t you are right 3/2 t an ceart agat you are welcome (greeting) 3/2 S do bheatha you would like (emphatic form) 3/3 ba mhaith leatsa youre welcome 3/7 nl a bhuochas ort youngest 3/2 is ige your 2do your (pl.) holiday 3/6 bhur saoire yourself 1t fin

Conversation 3/1: Meeting and greeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Conversation 3/2: This is my sister . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Conversation 3/3: Socializing with friends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Conversation 3/4: Eating out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Conversation 3/5: Leisure time activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Conversation 3/6: Knowing the way. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Conversation 3/7: Making a purchase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Conversation 3/8: Time and money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Conversation 3/9: Weather forecast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Conversation 3/10: Everyday living . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Cultural information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Grammar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Listening skills: Survival phrases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 IrishEnglish glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 EnglishIrish glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Essential vocabulary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

work 9obair working 9ag obair would like: I ~ 3ba mhaith liom; would you like? (pl.) 3/3 ar mhaith libh?; I would like (emphatic form) 3 ba mhaith liomsa; I would not like 3 nor mhaith liom; would you like? 3 ar mhaith leat? wrong: is there anything else ~ with you? 6an bhfuil rud ar bith eile ort?; what is wrong with you? 7 cad at ort? yesterday 9inn

iv

EnglishIrish glossary

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there 4 ann there will not be 8n bheidh they 5iad thing 5rud thirty 7trocha this is 2seo this year 3/10 i mbliana thousand 6mle three 7tr Thursday 3/9 Dardaoin ticket 8ticad time 3/2 am time: what ~? 4cn uair? tired 3tuirseach to 5go dt to be done 3/3 a bheith danta to eat 3/3 le hithe to take (future tense form of verb) 3/6 baindh to take (the verb) 3/6 bain today 8inniu tomorrow night 4oche amrach tonight 5anocht too 7rtown 6baile; in this ~ 6 ar an bhaile seo traditional music session 8seisin ceoil Tuesday 3/9 D Mirt tummy ache 7tinneas goile Turkey 3/10 An Tuirc twelve eurosdh Euro dag twenty 8che two 8dh two people 4beirt unfortunately 8ar an drochuair university 3/1 ollscoil vegetable soup 4 anraith glasra very 7anvery good 3/1 an-mhaith walk 3sil

walking 3ag sil was: it ~ 9bh s was not: I ~ 9n raibh m water 9uisce we are 3/6 timid we can 3/9 is fidir linn we should leave 3/2 is fearr dinn imeacht we will 3/2 beimid we will buy 3/5 ceannimid we will go 3/9 rachaimid we will stay 3/10 fanaimid Wednesday 3/9 D Cadaoin weekend 10deireadh seachtaine welcome: youre ~ 4go ndana a mhaith duit well 1/7go bre; bhuel well done 3/3 danta go maith went: I ~ 10chuaigh m were you? 9an raibh t? were you there before 3/10 an raibh t riamh ann wet 3/9 iuch what? 3cad ? what did you do? 10cad a rinne t? what would you (plural)/you (singular) like? 3cad ba mhaith libh/leat? what would you like? (emphatic form) 3cad ba mhaith leatsa? what? 1cad ? where are you from? 1 c as t? where is? 6c bhfuil? white wine 3/4 fon geal will: I ~ have that 4beidh sin agam; I will take it 7 beidh s agam 7; will there be a bus going? 8 an mbeidh bus ag dul? will you (pl.) stay? 3/10 an bhfanfaidh sibh? wind 9gaoth wine 5fon with 3le with you 2leat

Track listing
CD1 Track 1: Introduction Track 26: Conversation 1, part 1 Tracks 710: Conversation 1, part 2 Tracks 1114: Conversation 2, part 1 Tracks 1518: Conversation 2, part 2 Tracks 1922: Conversation 3, part 1 Tracks 2326: Conversation 3, part 2 Tracks 2730: Conversation 4, part 1 Tracks 3134: Conversation 4, part 2 Tracks 3538: Conversation 5, part 1 Tracks 3942: Conversation 5, part 2 CD2 Tracks 14: Conversation 6, part 1 Tracks 58: Conversation 6, part 2 Tracks 912: Conversation 7, part 1 Tracks 1316: Conversation 7, part 2 Tracks 1720: Conversation 8, part 1 Tracks 2124: Conversation 8, part 2 Tracks 2528: Conversation 9, part 1 Tracks 2932: Conversation 9, part 2 Tracks 3336: Conversation 10, part 1 Tracks 3740: Conversation 10, part 2 CD3 Track 1: Introduction Tracks 24: Conversation 1 Meeting and greeting Tracks 57: Conversation 2 This is my sister Tracks 810: Conversation 3 Staying with friends Tracks 1113: Conversation 4 Eating out Tracks 1416: Conversation 5 Leisure time activities Tracks 1719: Conversation 6 Knowing the way
Track listing

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Tracks 2022: Conversation 7 Making a purchase Tracks 2325: Conversation 8 Time and money Tracks 2628: Conversation 9 Weather forecast Tracks 2931: Conversation 10 Everyday living Tracks 32: Conclusion

pills 7piolla pint 3pionta pint of beer 3pionta leanna pity 9trua; that is a great pity 9 is mr an trua sin please 3le do thoil polite greeting/acknowledgement to a man 3/2 a dhuine uasail

single ticket 8ticad singil sir 6duine uasal; oh sir 6a dhuine uasail sister 2deirr small: too ~ 7rbheag some, approximately 5igin something else 5rud igin eile sore 7nimhneach; very sore 7 an-nimhneach spent: I ~ 9chaith m splitting 9ag scoilteadh starting 8ag tosn steak 3/3 stig stomach ache 7tinneas goile street 6srid student 3/1 mac linn sugar 3sicra sun 9grian; the sun will be splitting the stones 9 beidh an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch sunny, it will be very ~ 9 an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch swim 5snmh swimming 5ag snmh table 4tbla take a rest 3/5 scth a ligean take these pills 7glac na piolla seo tea 3tae; with your tea 3 le do chuid tae teen (number) 8dag ten days 3/10 deich l ten past 3/8 deich tar is terrible 9uafsach thank you 1go raibh maith agat thanks very much 6go raibh mle maith agat thats 4t sin the 2an; the (plural) 5na the last one 3/8 an ceann deireanach the stones 3/5 na gcloch the sun would be 3/10 bhodh an ghrian the weather will break 3/9 brisdh an aimsir them 5iad

Recorded at Alchemy Studios, London Cast: Dnall Mac Ruair, Sinad N Churnin, Michelle Nic Grianna, Tommy Seoige, Sarah Sherborne

polite greeting/acknowledgement to a woman 3/4 a bhean uasal post office 6oig an phoist prefer: you ~ 5is fearr leat present 3/9 bronntanas public house 6teach leanna quarter 8ceathr rain 9fearthainn raining 9ag cur fearthainne

Credits
Front cover: Siede Preis/Photodisc/Getty Images Back cover: Jakub Semeniuk/iStockphoto.com, Royalty-Free/ Corbis, agencyby/iStockphoto.com, Andy Cook/iStockphoto. com, Christopher Ewing/iStockphoto.com, zebicho Fotolia. com, Geoffrey Holman/iStockphoto.com, Photodisc/Getty Images, James C. Pruitt/iStockphoto.com, Mohamed Saber Fotolia.com

read 5lamh reading 5ag lamh ready 3/4 ridh ready to order 3/4 ridh le hord red 3/4 dearg reserve, to 4a chur in irithe reserved 4in irithe restaurant 6bialann return ticket 8ticad llet returning 3/8 pilleadh road 6 bthar salmon 4bradn Saturday 10D Sathairn Scotland 10Albain sea 9farraige second course: for the ~ 4 don dara crsa self, own 1fin seven oclock 4a seacht a chlog share, portion 3cuid she ate 3/7 dith s shopping 10ag siopadireacht

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EnglishIrish glossary

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I 1m I dont think so 3/7 n digh liom I hope you can 3/7 t sil agam gur fidir leat I stayed 3/10 dfhan m I will go 3/5 rachaidh me I will not go 3/9 n rachaidh mise I wont be 9n bheidh m Im great (literally, Im on the pigs back) 3/1 t m ar dhroim na muice ice 3/3 oighear in 2 i in the 9sa (n) in the area 3/6 sa cheantar indigestion 3/7 tinneas bhal an ghoile inexpensive 3/6 saor Irish (language) 3/1 gaeilge is there? 6an bhfuil? it 6s job 3/1 post large 9mr last night 3/7 arir last year 10anuraidh late 3/2 mall leave 3/2 imeacht lie down 7luigh sos lift (ride in car) 3sob like: I ~ 5is maith liom; I dont like 5 n maith liom London 10Londain looking forward to it 3/10 dil go mr leis madam 7bean uasal may it do you (pl.) good, youre welcome 3/6 go ndana a mhaith daoibh may you (pl.) enjoy it 3/6 bainaig sult as me 1m meal 3/6 bile medium 3/3 measartha meet with you: to ~ 2 bualadh leat

met: I ~ 10bhuail m le milk 3 bainne morning 1maidin mother 2mthair my 2mo my friend 3/6 mo chara myself 2m fin name 1ainm; what is your name? 1 cn t-ainm at ortsa? new 10nua nice 7deas; it is nice 2 is deas night 3oche nine 8naoi no 6nl not: is ~ 6nl now 3 anois OK 3ceart go leor on 2 ar on a ticket 3/8 ar thiced on her 2uirthi on holiday 3/6 ar saoire on me 7orm on the 9ar an on the right hand side 3/6 ar thaobh na limhe deise on them 7orthu on you 7ort one 6ceann one thousand thanks 6go raibh mle maith agat out 3/7 amuigh out of, from 1as oysters 3/4 oisr past, after 8tar is pastimes 5caithimh aimsire people: there will be two ~ 4 beidh beirt ann perfume 3/7 cumhra person 2duine

Introduction
Speak Irish with condence is a three-CD audio course designed to get you speaking in Irish whether you are a complete beginner or have learned some Irish before and want to improve your condence in speaking the language. We have designed the course to give you the basic grammar and vocabulary to be able to speak Irish effectively and correctly in a number of everyday situations. CDs 1 and 2 are designed to get you talking! Each conversation is preceded by a full explanation of the vocabulary, grammar and phrases you will need. The conversations are then broken down into easily manageable chunks and you will get ample opportunity to practise your Irish by listening to and taking part in these conversations. CD 3 will help to develop your listening skills. Language learners often panic because they cannot understand everything that is being said but this CD will help you train yourself to hone in and pick-out the important information. You will nd Speak Irish with condence effective and enjoyable whether you plan to visit an Irish speaking area or you just want to be able to speak Irish with condence. dh mr ort! Good luck! Mire Mhic Ruair & Dnall Mac Ruair

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Global scale of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: learning, teaching, assessment (CEFR)
Can understand with ease virtually everything heard or read. Can summarise information from different spoken and written sources, reconstructing arguments and accounts in a coherent presentation. Can express him/herself spontaneously, very uently and precisely, differentiating ner shades of meaning even in more complex situations.

enjoyment 10sult euro 7 Euro ever 10riamh every 3/10 gach excellent 3/10 ar fheabhas excellent 8ar digh excuse 6leithscal excuse me 6gabh mo leithscal

goodbye for now 1sln go fill goodnight 3oche mhaith great 9mr great joy/delight 3/10 an-sult greeting more than one 3/3 dia daoibh half 8leath half an hour 8leathair half past 3/4 leathuair i ndiaidh half past 8leathuair tar is have: I ~ (at me) 4agam; you have (at you) 1 agat he 6s headache 7tinneas cinn: I have a headache 7t tinneas cinn orm heard: I ~ 9chuala m Hello 2Dia duit; Hello (in reply to one person) 2 Dia is Muire duit; Hello (to more than one person) 2Dia daoibh help/to help 7cuidi; can I help you (plural)? 5 an fidir liom cuidi libh?; you can help 5 is fidir leat cuidi here 8 anseo here you are 7seo duit high 9mr high wind 3/9 gaoth mhr history 3/1 stair holidays 10saoire home, homewards 3abhaile hope 9sil; I hope 9 t sil agam hour 8uair how? 1/6cad mar?; conas? how are you? 1/6cad mar at t?; conas at t? how long did you stay? 3/10 c fhad ar fhan t? how many? 2c mhad?; how many people will be there? 4 c mhad duine a bheidh ann? how much? 2c mhad? how much is that? 7 c mhad at orthu? hundred 4cad

Procient User

TY Level 6 CEFR LEVEL C2

TY Level 5 CEFR LEVEL C1

Can understand a wide range of demanding, longer texts, and recognise implicit meaning. Can express him/herself uently and spontaneously without much obvious searching for expressions. Can use language exibly and effectively for social, academic and professional purposes. Can produce clear, well-structured, detailed text on complex subjects, showing controlled use of organisational patterns, connectors and cohesive devices. Can understand the main ideas of complex text on both concrete and abstract topics, including technical discussions in his/her eld of specialisation. Can interact with a degree of uency and spontaneity that makes regular interaction with native speakers quite possible without strain for either party. Can produce clear, detailed text on a wide range of subjects and explain a viewpoint on a topical issue giving the advantages and disadvantages of various options. Can understand the main points of clear standard input on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise whilst travelling in an area where the language is spoken. Can produce simple connected text on topics which are familiar or of personal interest. Can describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briey give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans. Can understand sentences and frequently used expressions related to areas of most immediate relevance (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment). Can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters. Can describe in simple terms aspects of his/her background, immediate environment and matters in areas of immediate need. Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.

excuse me (to more than one) 3/4 gabhaig mo leithscal expensive 3/6 daor family 2teaghlach father 2athair fee 8tille ne 4go bre rst 4cad rst course: for the ~ 4 don chad chrsa ve 8cig ve people 2cigear food poisoning 3/7 nimhi bia for the 4don for the week 3/9 don tseachtain forty 3/8 daichead four people 2ceathrar France 3/10 F(hrainc (an) free 8saor in aisce from 8 from Belfast: I am ~ 1is as Bal Feirste m Galway 1Gaillimh glass of wine 5gloine fona go 6gabh; did you go? 10 an ndeachaigh t?;I didnt go 10 n dheachaigh m; to go 3 dhul going 5ag dul good, well 1go maith good morning 1maidin mhaith goodbye 1sln goodbye and bless you 3/6 sln agus beannacht

Independent User Basic User

TY Level 1 CEFR LEVEL A1

TY Level 2 CEFR LEVEL A2: (Foundation GCSE)

TY Level 3 CEFR LEVEL B1 (Higher GCSE)

TY Level 4 CEFR LEVEL B2 (A Level)

Council of Europe. www.coe.int/lang. Extract reproduced with the permission of the Council of Europe, Strasbourg

EnglishIrish glossary

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EnglishIrish glossary
NB: Numbers indicate the conversation in which the vocabulary item rst appears.
a little 3/5 giota beag about 7/8faoi; thart faoi about this one 7faoin cheann seo across 6trasna across the road 6trasna an bthair after, past 8tar is afternoon 8trthnna again 6ars all 3/7 iomln all day 3/9 i rith an lae alright 7maith go leor also 4/5fosta; freisin am: I ~ 1ta m, is mise; I am not 7 nl m/mise and 1 agus another 3eile anything else? 7rud ar bith eile? at 6ag bank 6banc; no bank 6 banc ar bith; there is no bank in town 6 nl banc ar bith ar an bhaile be, exist 1t be: to ~ 5bheith beach 9tr beautiful 9lainn because 7mar beer 5leann before 10riamh Belfast 1Bal Feirste beside 6taobh le; beside the restaurant taobh leis an bhialann 6 book 3/5 leabhar book, reserve 4cur in irithe bottle 3/4 buidal bought: I ~ 10cheannaigh m bottom 6bun; the bottom of the street 6 bun na sride brother 2dearthir bus 8 bus bus stop 3/6 stad bus but 5ach buy 7ceannaigh; to buy 7 a cheannach; did you buy? 10 ar cheannaigh t? can: you ~ 5is fidir; you can because 7is fidir mar certain, certainly 8cinnte chicken 4sicn chips 3/3 sceallga cinema 5pictirlann clock 4clog coat 7 cta coffee 3/3 caife cold 9fuar Cork 3/8 Corcaigh cup of tea 3cupn tae day 9l dessert 4milseog dont you like? 3/5 nach maith leat? done 3/3 danta door 8doras drank: I ~ 10dl m drink 3deoch Dublin 7Baile tha Cliath; to Dublin 8 go Baile tha Cliath enjoy: did you ~ it? 10 ar bhain t sult as?; I really enjoyed it 10bhain m an-sult as

Only got a minute?


According to the Irish Constitution, Irish is the national and rst official language of the Republic of Ireland and it is also an official language of the European Union. It is also an officially recognized minority language in Northern Ireland. The language is usually referred to as Gaeilge in Irish and as Irish in English. At least one in three people on the island of Ireland can understand Irish to some extent. There are three main dialects in modern Irish, which roughly coincide with the provinces of Munster, Connacht and Ulster. There is currently something of a renaissance taking place in the Irish language. Recent years have seen a signicant increase in printed media in Irish books, newspapers, magazines and in non-print media. Irish is now easily accessible through various radio stations, the television channel TG4 and on the internet. It is becoming increasingly easy to learn how to speak Irish!

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sin 4that

tar is 8after, past teach leanna 6pub teaghlach 2family thart faoi 8about ticad 8ticket ticad llet 8return ticket ticad singil 8single ticket tinneas bhal an ghoile 3/7 indigestion tinneas cinn 7headache tinneas goile 7stomach ache tosn 8staring tr 9beach trasna 6across trasna an bthair 6across the road trthnna 8afternoon tr 7three trocha 7thirty trua 9pity t 1you t fin 1yourself tuar na haimsire 3/9 the weather forecast Tuirc (an) 3/10 Turkey tuirseach 3tired uafsach 9terrible uair 8hour uirthi 2on her uisce 9water

sob 3lift; ride (in car) siopadireacht 10shopping

Only got ve minutes?

sicra 3sugar sil 3walk sln 1goodbye sln agus beannacht 3/6 goodbye and bless you sln go fill 1goodbye for now snmh 5swim srid 6street stad bus 3/6 bus stop stair 3/1 history stig 3/3 steak sil 9hope sil: t sil agam gur fidir leat 3/7 I hope you can sult 10enjoyment Ar bhain t sult as? 10 Did you enjoy it? t 1be, exist ta m 1I am t sin 4thats t sil agam 9I hope tbla 4table tae 3tea tille 8fee timid 3/6 we are taobh le 6beside taobh leis an bhialann 6beside the restaurant

Why learn Irish?


If you want to understand Irish history and culture then you need to understand its language. The Irish language is of huge signicance in Irish national identity and it is the key to the most important distinguishing characteristics of Irish culture. There is currently something of a renaissance taking place in the Irish language. Recent years have seen a signicant increase in printed media in Irish books, newspapers, magazines and in non-print media. Irish is now easily accessible through various radio stations, the television channel TG4 and on the internet.

The Irish language today


According to the Irish Constitution, Irish is the national and rst ofcial language of the Republic of Ireland and it is also an ofcial language of the European Union. It is also an ofcially recognized minority language in Northern Ireland. The language is usually referred to as Gaeilge in Irish and as Irish in English. Estimates of native speakers of Irish range from 40,000 up to 80,000 people. While Irish is the main spoken language of only 3% of the population, 41.9% of the total population (aged three years and over) regard themselves as competent Irish speakers. Of these 32.5% claim to speak Irish on a daily basis. Monolingualism of Irish is now restricted to a handful of elderly within more isolated regions as well as among those speakers of Irish under school age.

IrishEnglish glossary

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mall 3/2 late mar 7because mthair 2mother m 1me m fin 2myself measartha 3/3 medium mle 6one thousand milseog 4dessert mise 1I, me mo 2my mo chara 3/6 my friend mr 9great, large, high na 5the (plural) na gcloch 3/5 the stones nach maith leat? 3/5 dont you like? naoi 8nine n bheidh 8there will not be; n bheidh m 9 I wont be n dheachaigh m 10I didnt go n digh liom 3/7 i dont think so n maith liom 5I do not like n rachaidh mise 3/9 i will not go n raibh m 9I was not nl 6is not, no nl a bhuochas ort 3/7 youre welcome nl banc ar bith ar an bhaile 6there is no bank in town nl m 7I am not nimhi bia 3/7 food poisoning nimhneach 7sore nor mhaith liom 3I would not like nua 10new 8from obair 9work oche amrach 3tomorrow night oche mhaith 3goodnight oig an phoist 6post office oighear 3/3 ice

oisr 3/4 oysters ollscoil 3/1 university orm 7on me ort 7on you orthu 7on them pictirlann 5cinema pilleadh 3/8 returning piolla 7pills pionta 3pint pionta leanna 5a pint of beer post 3/1 job rachaidh me 3/5 I will go rachaidh m 3/9 i will go rachaimid 3/9 we will go ridh 3/4 ready ridh le hord 3/4 ready to order riamh 10ever, before riamh 3/10 (an raibh t riamh ann) 3/10 were you there before r- 7too rbheag 7too small rud 5thing rud ar bith eile? 7anything else? rud igin eile 5something else sa (n) 9in the sa cheantar 3/6 in the area saoire 10holidays saor 3/6 inexpensive saor in aisce 8free sceallga 3/3 chips scth a ligean 3/5 take a rest scoilteadh 9splitting s 6it, he see ar 7air seisin ceoil 8traditional music session seo 2this is seo duit 7here you are sicn 4chicken

10.4% of people in Northern Ireland have some knowledge of Irish. Combined, this means that at least one in three people on the island of Ireland can understand Irish to some extent.

History of the Irish language


Old Irish rst appeared in its written form as glosses and marginalia in Latin manuscripts written in the great monasteries of Ireland. By the 10th century Old Irish had evolved into Middle Irish, which was spoken throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. From the 12th century onwards Middle Irish began to evolve into modern Irish in Ireland, into Scottish Gaelic in Scotland, and into the Manx language on the Isle of Man. Modern Irish emerged from the literary language known as Early Modern Irish in Ireland and as Classical Gaelic in Scotland. The 17th century saw great political and religious upheaval in Ireland and the resulting breakdown of the native Gaelic system and culture. Despite this upheaval the Irish language remained the main spoken language of the vast majority of the population of Ireland until the 19th century. During the nineteenth century, the Great Famine (184552) wiped out a disproportionately high number of Irish language speakers, who were the poorest and most vulnerable in society. It is estimated that one million people died during the famine and that another million emigrated as a result, the majority of these were Irish speakers and this contributed greatly to the rapid decline of the language. The major movement to revive and preserve the Irish language was initiated in 1893 with the founding of The Gaelic League (Conradh na Gaeilge) which coincided with the national cultural revival of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

The Gaeltacht
The parts of Ireland where Irish is still spoken as a native language are collectively known as the Gaeltacht. It is in these areas that the
Only got a minute? got ve minutes? Only

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Irish language continues to be the usual language of communication of the general population. The Gaeltacht regions are on the west coast of County Donegal, in County Galway, in particular Connemara, the Aran Islands, Carraroe and Spiddal, and the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry. There are smaller Gaeltacht areas in County Mayo, County Waterford, County Meath and County Cork. Almost all of these Gaeltacht areas have Irish language summer colleges which are attended by thousands of learners, teenagers in particular, every year. These students live with local Irish-speaking families and attend language classes and other cultural events. One of the most important aspects of these courses is that Irish must be spoken at all times. These summer colleges have undoubtedly inspired and assisted many Irish people, whose rst language is English, to attain uency in Irish and to realize the importance and relevance of the language in a predominantly English-speaking country.

fill (go) 3/3 yet fosta 4also freisin 5also/as well fuar 9cold g(hrian) 3/5 sun gabh 6go gabh mo leithscal 6excuse me (to more than one) gach 3/10 every gaeilge 3/1 Irish (language) Gaillimh 1Galway gaoth 9wind gaoth mhr 3/9 high wind giota beag 3/5 a little glac na piolla seo 7take these pills gloine fona 5a glass of wine go Baile tha Cliath 8to Dublin go bre 1/4well/ne go dt 5to go fill 3/10 yet

iomln 3/7 all is as Bal Feirste m 1Im from Belfast is deas 2it is nice is fearr dinn imeacht 3/2 we should leave is fearr leat 5you prefer is fidir 5you can is fidir linn 3/9 we can is fidir mar 7you can because is maith liom 5I like is mise 1I am is mr an trua sin 9that is a great pity is ige 3/2 youngest l 9day le 3with, to le do chuid tae 3with your tea le do thoil 3please le hithe 3/3 to eat leabhar 3/5 book lamh 5read leann 5beer leat 2, leatsa 3you; cad ba mhaith leat? 3 what would you like? cad ba mhaith leatsa? 3what would you like? leath 8half leath tar is 8half past leathuair i ndiaidh 3/4 half past leithscal 6excuse leathuair 8half an hour libh 3with you (plural) liom: ba mhaith liom 3I would like; ba mhaith liomsa 3 I would like (emphatic) Londain 10London lu sos 3/5 lie down luigh sos 7lie down mac linn 3/1 student maidin 1morning maith 1good maith go leor 7alright

Dialects
There are three main dialects in modern Irish, which roughly coincide with the provinces of Munster, Connacht and Ulster. The Munster dialect is spoken primarily in the Gaeltacht areas of County Kerry, Ring in County Waterford and Muskerry and Cape Clear Island in County Cork. A strong Connacht dialect can be heard in Connemara and the Aran Islands. The dialect spoken in northern Mayo in Erris and Achill is fundamentally a Connacht dialect but has some similarities to Ulster Irish. The Connemara dialect is also spoken in the Gaeltacht area of Rth Cairn in County Meath. This is because the Gaeltacht here was established in the 1930s by a group of mostly Connemara Irish speakers who moved there as a result of a land reform campaign. The Ulster dialect is spoken in County Donegal, in Teelin and Glencolmcille in south Donegal, in Fintown and its surrounding area in central Donegal and in the Rosses, Gweedore, Clochaneely

go maith 1good, well go ndana a mhaith daoibh 3/6 may it do you (pl.) good, youre welcome go ndana a mhaith duit 4you are welcome go raibh maith agat 1thank you go raibh mle maith agat 6one thousand thanks, thank you very much grian 9sun i 2in iad 5they, them; cad iad 5 what are i mbliana 3/10 this year i rith an lae 3/9 all day (i)S do bheatha 3/2 you are welcome (greeting) imeacht 3/2 leave in irithereserved; tbla a chur in irithe 4to reserve a table inn 9yesterday inniu 8today

IrishEnglish glossary

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ceathr 8quarter cn t-ainm at ortsa? 1what is your name? cn uair? 4what time? chaith m 9I spent cheannaigh m 10I bought chuaigh m 10I went chuala m 9I heard cinnte 8certain, certainly clog 4clock conas at t? 6how are you? Corcaigh 3/8 Cork cta 7coat cuid 3share, portion; do chuid tae 3 your tea cuidi 7to help/help cig 8ve cigear 2ve people cumhra 3/7 perfume cupn tae 3a cup of tea cur in irithe 4to reserve, to book dfhan m 3/10 I stayed dith s 3/7 she ate daichead 3/8 forty daor 3/6 expensive D Cadaoin 3/9 Wednesday D Mirt 3/9 Tuesday D Sathairn 10on Saturday dag 8number (+ ten) danta 3/3 done danta go maith 3/3 well done Dardaoin 3/9 Thursday dearg 3/4 red dearthir 2brother deas 8nice deich l 3/10 ten days deich tar is 3/8 ten past deireadh seachtaine 10weekend deirr 2sister deoch 3drink

dh 8two dh uair 8twice dhul 3to go Dia daoibh 2Hello (used when greeting more than one) Dia duit 2Hello literally God be with you Dia is Muire duit 2God and Mary be with you (common reply to latter) do 2your dl m 10I drank don 4for the don chad chrsa 4for the rst course don dara crsa 4for the second course don tseachtain 3/9 for the week doras 8door drochuair 8crisis; ar an drochuair 8 unfortunately dil go mr leis 3/10 looking forward to it duine 2person duine uasal 6sir dul 3to go; ag dul, going igin 5some, approximately eile 3another Euro 7euro F(hrainc (an) 3/10 France fanaimid 3/10 we will stay faoi 7about farraige 9sea fearr: is fearr leat 5you prefer fearthainn 9rain; ag cur fearthainne 9 raining fidir(used only with copula in certain phrases); An fidir liom cuidi libh? 5 Can I help you?; Is fidir 5(reply) yes; Is fidir leat you can; n fidir leat you cannot fin 1self, own che 8twenty fon 5wine fon geal 3/4 white wine iuch 3/9 wet

and Downings in northwest Donegal. Ulster Irish is also spoken by many people in Northern Ireland who have acquired Irish as a second language but who use it as their main spoken language. This is due, in the most part, to attendance at the Irish language summer colleges in Donegal and the use of Ulster Irish in Irish-medium education in Northern Ireland.

Irish-medium education
The growth of Irish-medium education in recent years, particularly in Northern Ireland, has made a very signicant and positive impact on the number of Irish speakers and so has helped ensure the continuity of the language. This movement has led to an unprecedented growth in the Irish language in the north through a whole range of community initiatives, in primary, secondary and tertiary education, legislation, media and other areas.

Irish language in the media


As in Irish-medium education there has been signicant growth in the use of Irish in the media in all of its forms in recent years. This was an essential development, not only for those speakers of Irish who already exist, but also for those who are learning the language. Irish language speakers now have their own television station TG4 (1996) which has almost 800,000 people tuning in each day. TG4 has a wide range of programmes which cater for all ages and tastes. The national radio station Raidi na Gaeltachta (RnaG) is part of the RT franchise and broadcasts throughout the island of Ireland. It can also be accessed online at www.rte.ie/rnag/

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ar fheabhas 3/10 excellent ar mhaith leat? 3would you like?

bhuail m le 10I met bhuel 7well bhur saoire 3/6 your (pl.) holiday bialann 6restaurant bthar 6road bradn 4salmon bre 1ne brisdh an aimsir 3/9 the weather will break bronntanas 3/9 present bualadh leat 2to meet with you buidal 3/4 bottle bun 6bottom bun na sride 6the bottom of the street bus 8bus c bhfuil? 6where? c fhad ar fhan t? 3/10 how long did you stay? c mhad? 2how much? how many? c mhad at orthu? 7how much is that? c mhad duine a bheidh ann? 4 how many people will there be? cad ? 1what? cad at ort? 7what is wrong with you? cad ba mhaith libh/leat? 3what would you (plural)/you (singular) like? cad faoin cheann seo? 7what about this one? cad mar? 1how? cad a rinne t? 10what did you do? caife 3/3 coffee caithimh aimsire 5pastimes c as t? 1where are you from? cad 4hundred, rst ceann 6one ceann deireanach 3/8 the last one ceannimid 3/5 we will buy ceart agat 3/2 you are right ceart go leor 3OK ceathrar 2four people

10 Only got ten minutes?


Why learn Irish?
If you want to understand Irish history and culture then you need to understand its language. The Irish language is of huge signicance in Irish national identity and it is the key to the most important distinguishing characteristics of Irish culture. There is currently something of a renaissance taking place in the Irish language. Recent years have seen a signicant increase in printed media in Irish books, newspapers, magazines and in non-print media. Irish is now easily accessible through various radio stations, the television channel TG4 and on the internet. Irish is the only language north of the Alps to have an extensive surviving ancient and medieval literature. It is, therefore, studied at many major universities throughout Europe and some in North America and Australia. Ireland also has the worlds largest collection of folklore and proverbs, the vast majority of which is in the Irish language.

ar mhaith libh 3/3 would you like (pl.) ar saoire 3/6 on holiday ar thaobh na limhe deise 3/6 on the right hand side ar thiced 3/8 on a ticket arir 3/7 last night ars 6again as 1out of, from at 1are athair 2father ba mhaith leatsa 3/3 you would like (emphatic form) ba mhaith liom 3I would like baile 6town Baile tha Cliath 7Dublin bain 3/6 verb to take bainaig sult as 3/6 may you (pl.) enjoy it baindh 3/6 future tense form of verb to take bainne 3milk banc 6bank banc ar bith 6no bank Bal Feirste 1Belfast bean uasal 7madam beidhfuture tense verb to be; C mhad duine a bheidh ann? 4 How many people will be there? beidh beirt ann 4there will be two people beidh s agam 7Ill take it beidh sin agam 4I will have it bile 3/6 meal beimid 3/2 we will beirt 4two people bhain m an-sult as 10 I really enjoyed it; Ar bhain t sult as? 10 Did you enjoy it? bheith 5to be bh s 9it was bhodh an ghrian 3/10 the sun would be

The Irish language today


Irish is a Celtic language of the Indo-European language family. According to the Irish Constitution, Irish is the national and rst ofcial language of the Republic of Ireland and it is also an ofcial language of the European Union. Irish is also an ofcially recognized minority language in Northern Ireland. The language is usually referred to as Gaeilge in Irish and as Irish in English. Irish is the main spoken language of 3% of the Republics population. Areas in which Irish remains the main spoken language are referred to as Gaeltacht areas. According to the 2006 Census the number of inhabitants of the ofcially designated Gaeltacht regions of Ireland is

IrishEnglish glossary

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IrishEnglish glossary
NB: Numbers indicate the conversation in which the vocabulary item rst appears.
a 2; A Eimear Oh Eimear a bhean uasal 3/4 polite greeting/ acknowledgement to a woman a bheith danta 3/3 to be done a cheannach 7to buy a chur in irithe 4to reserve a dhuine uasail 6oh sir, polite greeting/ acknowledgement to a man a seacht a chlog 4seven oclock abhaile 3home, homewards ach 5but ag 6at ag bun na sride 6at the bottom of the street ag cur fearthainne 9raining ag dul 5going ag lamh 5reading ag obair 9working ag scoilteadh 9splitting ag siopadireacht 10shopping ag sil 3walking ag snmh 5swimming ag tosn 8starting agam 4at me agat 1at you agus 1and ainm 1name irithe 4book, reserve lainn 9beautiful Albain 10Scotland am 3/2 time amrach 4tomorrow amuigh 3/7 out an 2the an- 7very an bhfanfaidh sibh? 3/10 will you(pl) stay? an bhfuil? 6is there? an bhfuil rud ar bith eile ort? is there anything else wrong with you? an fidir liom cuidi libh? 5 can I help you (plural)? an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch 9 it will be very sunny an mbeidh bus ag dul? 8 will there be a bus going? an-mhaith 3/1 very good an ndeachaigh t? 10did you go? an-nimhneach 7very sore an raibh t? 9were you? ann 4there anocht 5tonight anois 3now anraith glasra 4vegetable soup anseo 8here an-sult 3/10 great joy/delight anuraidh 10last year ar 2on, at ar an 9on the ar an bhaile seo 6in this town ar an drochuair 8unfortunately ar bhain t sult as? 10did you enjoy it? ar bith: banc ar bith 6no bank ar cheannaigh t? 10did you buy? ar dhroim na muice 3/1 Im great (literally, Im on the pigs back) ar digh 8excellent

91,862. Estimates of native speakers of Irish range from 40,000 up to 80,000 people. Irish is a compulsory subject in schools, however, and so many people are reasonably uent second-language speakers. While Irish is the main spoken language of only 3% of the population, 41.9% of the total population (aged three years and over) regard themselves as competent Irish speakers. Of these 32.5% claim to speak Irish on a daily basis. Monolingualism of Irish is now restricted to a handful of elderly within more isolated Gaeltacht regions as well as among those speakers of Irish under school age. The 2001 Census in Northern Ireland showed that 10.4% of people had some knowledge of Irish. Combined, this means that at least one in three people on the island of Ireland can understand Irish to some extent.

History of the Irish language


The earliest identied form of Irish is known as Primitive Irish. This is primarily known through fragments inscribed in the ogham alphabet, which have been found throughout Ireland and the west coast of Great Britain. These fragments are mainly personal names inscribed on stone. Primitive Irish moved into Old Irish during the 5th century. This is the earliest form of Irish for which there are extensive written sources. Old Irish rst appeared in its written form as glosses and marginalia in Latin manuscripts written in the great monasteries of Ireland such as Clonard, Durrow, Clonmacnoise and Glendalough. By the 10th century Old Irish had evolved into Middle Irish, which was spoken throughout Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Middle Irish displays a slight inuence from Norse, which is undoubtedly due to Viking attacks and subsequent settlement in these areas. From the 12th century onwards Middle Irish began to evolve into modern Irish in Ireland, into Scottish Gaelic in Scotland, and into the Manx language on the Isle of Man. Modern Irish emerged from the literary language known as Early Modern Irish in Ireland and as Classical Gaelic in Scotland. Early Modern Irish, also known as Classical Irish, linguistically represents a transition between Middle and Modern Irish.

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Listening skills: Survival phrases


The seventeenth century saw great political and religious upheaval in Ireland and the resulting breakdown of the native Gaelic system and culture. Native Gaelic society suffered heavily as a result of the transfer of power from the Gaelic chieftains to newcomers under various British Government plantation schemes. Despite this upheaval and loss of power the Irish language remained the main spoken language of the vast majority of the population of Ireland until the nineteenth century. During the nineteenth century the Great Famine (184552) wiped out a disproportionately high number of Irish language speakers, who were the poorest and most vulnerable in society. It is estimated that one million people died during the famine and that another million emigrated as a result, the majority of these were Irish speakers and this contributed greatly to the rapid decline of the language. The use of Irish was also prohibited in the primary education system until 1871 which further contributed to its decline. Initial efforts to preserve and protect the Irish language were made by Irish Protestants such as William Neilson and Robert McAdam in Belfast at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The major movement, however, was initiated in 1893 with the founding of The Gaelic League (Conradh na Gaeilge) which coincided with the national cultural revival of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. This growing interest in the Irish language coincided with other landmark events in Irish cultural history such as the founding of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) in 1884. I dont understand. Slowly, please. Say that again, please. Do you speak Irish? I am learning Irish. I dont know. Can we ? Can we change money here? Where is ? Where are the toilets? Where is the hotel? excuse me sorry How much is all that? please Thank you very much. OK It doesnt matter. Im lost, can you help me? N thuigim. Nos moille, le do thoil. Abair sin ars, le do thoil. An bhfuil Gaeilge agat? T m ag foghlaim na Gaeilge. Nl a fhios agam. An fidir linn ? An fidir linn airgead a athr anseo? C bhfuil ? C bhfuil na leithris? C bhfuil an t-stn? gabh mo leithscal t m buartha C mhad at ar sin uilig? le do thoil Go raibh mle maith agat. t go maith Is cuma. T m caillte, an fidir leat cuidi liom?

The Gaeltacht
The parts of Ireland where Irish is still spoken as a native language are collectively known as the Gaeltacht. It is in these areas that the Irish language continues to be the usual language of communication of the general population. The Gaeltacht regions are on the west coast of County Donegal, in County Galway, in particular Connemara, the Aran Islands, Carraroe and Spiddal, and the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry. There are smaller Gaeltacht areas in County Mayo, County Waterford, County Meath and County Cork.

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me ag (at) ar (on) as (out of) chuig (to) do (to) agam orm asam chugam dom

you agat ort asat duit ft leat

him aige air as d faoi leis

her aici uirthi aisti di fithi li

us againn orainn asainn chugainn dinn finn linn

you (pl.) agaibh oraibh asaibh daoibh fibh libh

they acu orthu astu dibh fthu leo

chugat chuige chuici

chugaibh chucu

faoi fm (under/about) le (with) liom

Almost all of these Gaeltacht areas have Irish language summer colleges which are attended by thousands of learners, teenagers in particular, every year. These students live with local Irish-speaking families and attend language classes and other cultural events. One of the most important aspects of these courses is that Irish must be spoken at all times. These summer colleges have undoubtedly inspired and assisted many Irish people, whose rst language is English, to attain uency in Irish and to realize the importance and relevance of the language in a predominantly English-speaking country.

roimh (before) romham romhat roimhe roimpi romhainn romhaibh rompu

Dialects
There are three main dialects in modern Irish, which roughly coincide with the provinces of Munster, Connacht and Ulster. The Munster dialect is spoken primarily in the Gaeltacht areas of County Kerry, Ring in County Waterford and Muskerry and Cape Clear Island in County Cork. One of the most notable features of Munster Irish is that the stress generally falls on the second syllable of a word when the rst syllable contains a short vowel and the second a long: Eg. GasR (boy/child), in contrast to GASr in Connacht and Ulster. A strong Connacht dialect can be heard in Connemara and the Aran Islands. The dialect spoken in northern Mayo in Erris and Achill is fundamentally a Connacht dialect but has some similarities to Ulster Irish. The Connemara dialect is also spoken in the Gaeltacht area of Rth Cairn in County Meath. This is because this Gaeltacht was established in the 1930s by a group of mostly Connemara Irish speakers who moved there as a result of a land reform campaign. A notable feature of both Connemara and Ulster Irish is the tendency to use the we pronoun muid instead of the standard compound form which is used in Munster, eg. bhris muid is used for we broke instead of bhriseamar. The Ulster dialect is spoken in County Donegal, in Teelin and Glencolmcille in south Donegal, in Fintown and its surrounding area in central Donegal and in the Rosses, Gweedore, Clochaneely and Downings in northwest Donegal. Ulster Irish is also spoken by
Only got ten minutes?

4 WORD ORDER In English the word order is most commonly as follows: Subject Susan Verb went Other home

In Irish, however, the order is different the verb normally comes at the beginning of a simple sentence: Verb Chuaigh Went Subject Sen Sen Other abhaile homewards

5 SAYING YES AND NO IN IRISH There is no one word for yes and no in Irish. Answering yes to a question simply depends on what verb is used when asking the question. The verb is repeated in the answer without the pronoun. Yes An bhfuil t go maith? Ar l t deoch? An mbeidh Sle ann? Are you well? Did you have a drink? Will Sle be there? T Dl Beidh No Nl Nor l N bheidh

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Grammar
many people in Northern Ireland who have acquired Irish as a second language but who use it as their main spoken language. This is due, in the most part, to attendance at the Irish language summer colleges in Donegal and the use of Ulster Irish in Irish-medium education in Northern Ireland. 1 MUTATIONS Mutatable letter b c d f g m p s t Eclipsis mutation mb gc nd bhf ng bp dt Aspirate mutation bh ch dh fh gh mh ph sh th

Irish-medium education
The growth of Irish-medium education in recent years, particularly in Northern Ireland, has made a very signicant and positive impact on the number of Irish speakers and so has helped ensure the continuity of the language. This second revival began in the 1960s when six families established a Gaeltacht area in Belfast and opened the rst Irish-medium school in Northern Ireland, Bunscoil Phobal Feirste, in 1971. This movement has gone from strength to strength. According to the latest gure from Comhairle na Gaelscolaochta, the representative body for Irish-medium education in Northern Ireland, there are currently 81 schools providing Irish-medium education to over 4,000 children at pre-school, primary and post-primary level throughout Northern Ireland. Most of these children are taught in and speak the Donegal or Ulster dialect. This movement has led to an unprecedented growth in the Irish language in the north through a whole range of community initiatives, in primary, secondary and tertiary education, legislation, media and other areas.

2 MY, YOUR, THEIR, ETC. my your (singular) his her our your (plural) their mo + aspirate do + aspirate a + aspirate a r + eclipses bhur + eclipsis a + eclipsis

Irish language in the media


As in Irish-medium education there has been signicant growth in the use of Irish in the media in all of its forms in recent years. This was an essential development, not only for those speakers of Irish who already exist, but for those who are learning the language.

3 PREPOSITIONAL PRONOUNS A prepositional pronoun occurs in Irish when a pronoun, e.g. me, you, is the object of a simple preposition. Here are two examples: ar (on) + t (you) = ort (on you) ag (at) + m (me) = agam (at me)

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Grammar

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Cultural information
DIALECTS There are three major dialects in modern Irish, which roughly coincide with the provinces of Munster, Connacht and Ulster. There is an ofcial standard An Caighden Oigiil, which was composed using elements of the three main dialects. This is what is taught in most schools in Ireland. In recent times, with the growth in the Irish language media, it has become much easier for speakers of different dialects to understand one another. TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC AND THE SESSION Ireland is famous worldwide for its rich musical heritage. Traditional Irish music is most frequently encountered in the session. This is a gathering of usually amateur musicians where tunes are played together by all the musicians who know the tune. Such events normally occur at scheduled times and often take place in pubs. SPORT IN IRELAND The most popular sport in Ireland is Gaelic football. This game is uniquely Irish and is played at underage, minor and senior levels. It was formally organized by the Gaelic Athletic Association in the late nineteenth century. The main national competitions are the Senior All-Ireland Football Championship and the National Football League. Hurling is a sport of ancient Celtic origin and is also unique to Ireland. This game is played with camin (sticks) and sliotar (ball). It is arguably the worlds fastest eld team sport in terms of game play. There is a similar game for women called camogie.

Irish language speakers now have their own television station TG4 (1996) which has almost 800,000 people tuning in each day. TG4 has a wide range of programmes which cater for all ages and tastes. BBC2 Northern Ireland also produces a limited number of Irish language programmes. Irish public broadcaster RT broadcasts some Irish language and bilingual television programmes. One of the more signicant is RT Nuacht (news). RT News Now is also particularly useful as it is a 24-hour live news service available on the RT website which features national and international news. It uses a mix of Irish language, English language and Irish sign language and offers TV news bulletins and political programmes. The national radio station Raidi na Gaeltachta (RnaG) is part of the RT franchise and broadcasts throughout the island of Ireland. It can also be accessed online at www.rte.ie/

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Conversation 1: Meeting and greeting


PART 1: GREETING PEOPLE LI CD1, TR2

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian

Maidin mhaith. Maidin mhaith. Cad mar at t? T m go maith, go raibh maith agat. Agus t fin? T m go bre, go raibh maith agat. Sln. Sln go fill.

Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad

PART 2: INTRODUCING YOURSELF LI CD1, TR7

Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn

Maidin mhaith. Maidin mhaith. Is mise Tiarnn cn t-ainm at ortsa? Eimear. C as t? Is as Bal Feirste m. C as t fin? Is as Gaillimh m.

Did you go on holidays this year Tiarnn? Yes. I went to Turkey. How long did you stay? I stayed for ten days. Did you enjoy it? I really enjoyed it. The food and the weather were excellent. It was very sunny every day. Lovely! Did you go anywhere yet? Not yet but Cian and I will go to France at the weekend. How long will you stay? Well stay ve days. Were you there before? No but I am really looking forward to it. I was there last year. You will really enjoy it. I hope so!

Insight
You have probably noticed that two different ways of saying I am have been used in this conversation. T m in Part 1 and Is mise in Part 2. This is because Irish has two verbs to be: (i) The substantive verb which has the stem b and is used in phrases which describe a state of being such as t m go maith. (ii) The copula is. One major use of the copula is to call a noun another noun such as Is mise Tiarnn.

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Conversation 3/10: Everyday living

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Conversation 3/10: Everyday living


LI CD3, TR29

Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad Tiarnn Mairad

A Thiarnin, an ndeachaigh t ar saoire i mbliana? Chuaigh. Chuaigh m chuig an Tuirc. C fhad ar fhan t ann? Dfhan m deich l ann. Ar bhain t sult as? Bhain m an-sult as. Bh an bia agus an aimsir ar fheabhas. Bhodh an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch gach l. Go deas! An ndeachaigh t fin it ar bith go fill? N dheachaigh go fill ach rachaidh m fin agus Cian go dt an Fhrainc ag an deireadh seachtaine. C fhad an bhfanfaidh sibh ann? Fanfaimid cig l ann. An raibh t riamh ann? N raibh ach t m ag dil go mr leis. Bh m fin ann anuraidh. Baindh t sult mr as. T sil agam go mbaindh!

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian

Good morning. Good morning. How are you? I am well thank you. And yourself? I am well, thank you. Goodbye. Goodbye for now.

Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn

Good morning. Good morning. Im Tiarnn whats your name? Eimear. Where are you from? Im from Belfast. Where are you from yourself? Im from Galway.

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Conversation 2: This is my sister


PART 1: TALKING ABOUT YOUR FAMILY LI CD1, TR11

Eimear Assistant

Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn

A Eimear, c mhad duine at i do theaghlach? T cigear i mo theaghlach. C mhad at i do theaghlach fin? T ceathrar i mo theaghlach mo mhthair, mathair, mo dheirr agus m fin. Cn t-ainm at ar do dheirr? Brd an t-ainm at uirthi.

Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant

Will there be a bus going to Dublin tomorrow? Yes, of course. There will be one at twenty to nine in the morning. There will be another one at a quarter to one and the last one will be at a quarter past six in the evening. How much is a ticket to Cork? A single is 5 euros and a return ticket is 9 euros. How much is a return ticket to Dublin? A return ticket is 40 euros. Thank you for your help. Youre welcome.

PART 2: INTRODUCING MEMBERS OF YOUR FAMILY LI CD1, TR15

Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian

Dia duit. Dia is Muire duit. A Chiain, seo mathair Samus agus seo mo mhthair Sorcha. Dia daoibh. Seo mo dhearthir Pdraig. Dia duit a Phdraig. Agus seo mo dheirr Sle. Is deas bualadh leat a Shle.

Broadcaster

Insight
To address someone directly in Irish, the particle a is placed before the name and h is placed after the rst consonants b, c, f, g, m, p, d, t and most forms of s. Some masculine proper names, such as Cian, make the nal consonant slender by placing an i before it.

Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

Here is the weather forecast for this week. It will be a ne day tomorrow and on Tuesday. It will be cold on Wednesday and it will rain throughout the day. There will be a high wind on Thursday morning but it will be very sunny in the afternoon. Friday morning will be beautiful but the weather will break on Friday afternoon and it will be cold and wet at the weekend. Well, we will go walking tomorrow and on Tuesday then when the weather is nice. Certainly and I will go swimming tomorrow as well. We can go shopping on Wednesday because I would like to buy a few presents. You can go. I wont because I dont like shopping. OK.

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Conversation 3/9: Weather forecast

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Eimear Assistant

Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant

An mbeidh bus ag dul go Bile tha Cliath amrach? Beidh cinnte. Beidh ceann ann ar che go dt a naoi ar maidin. Beidh ceann eile ar ceathr go dt a haon agus beidh an ceann deireanach ar ceathr tar is a s trthnna. C mhad at ar thicad go Corcaigh? T cig Euro ar thicad singil agus t naoi Euro ar thicad llte. C mhad at ar thicad llte go Baile tha Cliath? T daichead Euro ar thiced llte. Go raibh maith agat as do chuidi. Nl a bhuochas ort.

Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn

Eimear, how many people are in your family? There are ve people in my family. How many are in your family? There are four people in my family my mother, my father, my sister and myself. What is your sisters name? She is called Brd.

Conversation 3/9: Weather forecast


LI CD3, TR26

Mairad Cian Mairad


Seo tuar na haimsire don tseachtain seo. Beidh l bre ann amrach agus D Mirt. Beidh s fuar D Cadaoin agus beidh s ag cur fearthainne i rith an lae. Dardaoin beidh gaoth mhr ann ar maidin ach beidh an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch trthnna. Beidh maidin lainn ann D hAoine ach brisdh an aimsir trthnna D hAoine agus beidh s fuar agus iuch ag an deireadh seachtaine. Bhuel, rachaimid ag sil amrach agus D Mirt mar sin nuair a bheidh an aimsir go deas. Cinnte agus rachaidh m ag snmh amrach fosta. Is fidir linn dul ag siopadireacht D Cadaoin mar ba mhaith liom cpla bronntanas a cheannach. Is fidir leat dul. N rachaidh mise mar n maith liom bheith ag siopadireacht. Ceart go leor.

Broadcaster

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian

Hello (to one person). Hello (reply). Cian, this is my father Samus and this is my mother Sorcha. Hello (to more than one person). This is my brother Pdraig. Hello Pdraig. And this is my sister Sle. Its nice to meet you Sle.

Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

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Conversation 3:Socializing with friends


PART 1: HAVING A DRINK WITH A FRIEND LI CD1, TR19

Waiter Cian & Mairad Waiter Cian Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter

Dia daoibh. Dia is Muire duit. Anois, cad a ba mhaith libh? Ba mhaith liomsa pionta leanna le do thoil. Agus t fin, cad a ba mhaith leatsa? Ba mhaith liom cupn tae le do thoil. Ar mhaith leat bainne agus sicra le do chuid tae? Ba mhaith liom bainne le do thoil. Ceart go leor.

Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn

Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist

PART 2: SAYING GOODBYE LI CD1, TR23

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

Ar mhaith leat deoch eile a Mhairad? Nor mhaith, go raibh maith agat. T m tuirseach. Ba mhaith liom dhul abhaile. Ceart go leor. Ar mhaith leat sob? Nor mhaith. Ba mhaith liom sil. Ceart go leor. Oche mhaith. Oche mhaith.

Hello sir, can I help you? I hope you can. What is wrong with you? There is nothing wrong with me but myself and my friend were out for dinner last night and now my friend has a stomach ache. What did she eat? She ate oysters and salmon but I also had that and I am OK. Well, I dont think that she has food poisoning then. I dont think so. Well, maybe she has indigestion. Maybe. Give her these pills. Certainly. I would like to buy her something nice as well. Well, I have a nice perfume here. Ill take that too. How much is all of that? Thirty euro please. Here sir. Thank you very much. You are welcome.

Insight
Here we have another very common use of the copula in the conditional tense and is becomes ba. The conditional question form Ar, the conditional afrmative ba and conditional negative nor all aspirate whatever follows.

Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant: Eimear Assistant

What time will there be a bus going to Cork today? There will be one at ten past three. Will there be a bus going to Galway at three oclock? Not today, but there will be one at a quarter past four. Will that bus return today? Yes. It will return at half past nine tonight.
Conversation 3/8: Time and money

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Conversation 3/7: Making a purchase


LI CD3, TR20

Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn

Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist Tiarnn Pharmacist

Dia duit a dhuine uasail, an fidir liom cuidi leat? T sil agam gur fidir. Cad at ort? Nl rud ar bith orm ach bh m fin agus mo chara amuigh don dinnar arir agus t tinneas goile ar mo chara anois. Cad a dith s? Dith s oisr agus bradn ach bh sin agam freisin agus t m fin ceart go leor. Bhuel, n digh liom go bhfuil nimhi bia uirthi mar sin. N digh liom . Bhuel, bfhidir go bhfuil tinneas bhal an ghoile uirthi. Bfhidir. Tabhair na piolla seo di. Cinnte. Ba mhaith liom rud igin deas a cheannach di freisin. Bhuel, t cumhra deas agam anseo. Beidh sin agam freisin. C mhad at ar an iomln? Trocha Euro le do thoil. Seo duit a dhuine uasail. Go raibh mle maith agat. Nl a bhuochas ort.

Waiter Cian & Mairad Waiter Cian Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter

Hello. Hello. Now, what would you like? I would like a pint of beer please. And yourself, what would you like? I would like a cup of tea please. Would you like milk and sugar with your tea? I would like milk please. OK.

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

Would you like another drink Mairad? I wouldnt, thank you. I am tired. I would like to go home. OK. Would you like a lift? I wouldnt. I would like to walk. OK. Goodnight. Goodnight.

Conversation 3/8: Time and money


LI CD3, TR23

Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant: Eimear Assistant

Cn uair a bheidh bus ag dul go Corcaigh inniu? Beidh ceann ann ar deich tar is a tr. An mbeidh bus ag dul go Gaillimh ar a tr a chlog? N bheidh inniu, ach beidh ceann ann ar ceathr tar is a ceathair. An mbeidh an bus sin ag pilleadh inniu? Beidh. Beidh s ag pilleadh ar leathuair tar is a naoi anocht.
Conversation 3:Socializing with friends

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Conversation 4: Eating out


PART 1: BOOKING A TABLE LI CD1, TR27

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter

Dia duit. Dia is Muire duit. Ba mhaith liom tbla a chur in irithe don oche amrach. Cn uair? A seacht a chlog le do thoil. Ceart go leor. C mhad duine a bheidh ann? Beidh beirt ann. T sin go bre. Go raibh maith agat. Go ndana a mhaith duit.

OK. You can lie down and relax and Ill go swimming. I would like to do that. Do you not like reading? I do. Have you got a good book? No. Well, we will buy you a good book and you can read it on the beach. Excellent!

PART 2: ORDERING A MEAL LI CD1, TR31

Waiter Mairad Samus Waiter Mairad Waiter Samus Waiter Mairad

Anois, cad a ba mhaith libh? Ba mhaith liom anraith glasra don chad chrsa. Beidh sin agam fosta. Agus don dara crsa? Beidh an sicn agam le do thoil. Agus t fin? Beidh an bradn agamsa le do thoil. Ar mhaith libh milseog? Nor mhaith, go raibh maith agat.

Tiarnn Dnall Tiarnn Dnall Tiarnn Dnall Eimear Dnall Tiarnn Dnall Tiarnn Dnall Eimear Dnall Eimear Tiarnn

Insight
There is a particular set of numerals which is used when counting people in Irish. Note the use of beirt (two people) in this conversation. You have also met ceathrar (four people) and cigear (ve people) in Conversation 2. The different sets of numerals in Irish are listed at the back of this booklet.

Hello sir. Hello. I am Tiarnn and this is my friend Eimear and we are on holidays in this area. Im Dnall and its nice to meet you (pl.). Is there a pub in this town Dnall? Yes, of course. Its at the bottom of this street. Excuse me but where is the bus stop? Its across the road on the right. And is there a good restaurant in this town? No, but you can get a nice meal in the pub. Is it expensive? No, its quite cheap. OK, thank you. You (pl.) are welcome. Goodbye and enjoy your holiday. We will of course! Goodbye. Goodbye and bless you.

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Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

Ceart go leor. Is fidir leat lu sos agus do scth a ligean agus agus rachaidh mise ag snmh. Ba mhaith liom sin a dhanamh. Nach maith leat bheith ag lamh? Is maith. An bhfuil leabhar maith agat? Nl. Bhuel, ceannimid leabhar maith duit agus is fidir leat a lamh ar an tr. Ar digh!

Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter

Conversation 3/6: Knowing the way


LI CD3, TR17

Hello. Hello. I would like to reserve a table for tomorrow night. What time? Seven oclock please. OK. How many people will there be? There will be two people. Thats ne. Thank you. You are welcome.

Tiarnn Dnall Tiarnn Dnall Tiarnn Dnall Eimear Dnall Tiarnn Dnall Tiarnn Dnall Eimear Dnall Eimear Tiarnn

Dia duit a dhuine uasail. Dia is Muire daoibh. Is mise Tiarnn agus seo mo chara Eimear agus timid ar saoire sa cheantar seo. Is mise Dnall agus is deas bualadh libh. A Dhnaill, an bhfuil teach leanna ar an bhaile seo? T, cinnte. T s ag bun na sride seo. Gabh mo leithscal ach c bhfuil an stad bus? T s trasna an bhthair ar thaobh na limhe deise. Agus an bhfuil bialann maith ar an bhaile seo? Nl, ach is fidir bile deas a fhil sa teach leanna. An bhfuil s daor? Nl, t s measartha saor. Ceart go leor, go raibh mle maith agat. Go ndana a mhaith daoibh. Sln go fill agus bainig sult as bhur saoire. Baindh cinnte! Sln. Sln agus beannacht.

Waiter Mairad Samus Waiter Mairad Waiter Samus Waiter Mairad

Now, what would you like? I would like vegetable soup for the rst course. I will have that also. And for the second course? I will have the chicken please. And yourself? I will have the salmon please. Would you like dessert? We wouldnt, thank you.

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Conversation 5: Leisure time activities


PART 1: PASTIMES LI CD1, TR35

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian

A Mhairad, ar mhaith leat dul ag snmh anois? Nor mhaith. N maith liom bheith ag snmh. Cad iad na caithimh aimsire is fearr leat? Is maith liom bheith ag lamh agus ag dul go dt an phictirlann. Cad iad na caithimh aimsire is fearr leatsa? Is maith liom bheith ag snmh agus ag dul go dt an phictirlann fosta. Ar mhaith leat dhul go dt an phictirlann anocht? Ba mhaith!

PART 2: LIKES AND DISLIKES LI CD1, TR39

Waiter Mairad Waiter Cian Waiter Cian

An fidir liom cuidi libh? Is fidir. Ba mhaith liom gloine fona le do thoil. Ar mhaith leatsa gloine fona freisin? Nor mhaith. N maith liom fon. Ar mhaith leat rud igin eile? Pionta leanna le do thoil.

Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Waiter Mairad Friend Waiter Mairad Waiter Friend Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter

Hello Madam, can I help you? Yes. I booked a table for tonight. What time? For half past eight. Thats ne. How many people are there? Two. And what is your name? N Dhnaill. OK, the table is here... Excuse me, are you (pl.) ready to order? Yes. I would like vegetable soup for the rst course. I would like oysters. And for the second course? I will have the chicken please. And you? I will have the steak well done please. Would you (pl.) like dessert? No but we would like a bottle of wine. What sort, red or white? Red wine please. Thats ne.

Insight
Here we have the copula is in the present and conditional tense. Notice that the present tense forms, unlike the conditional tense, do not aspirate the word that follows: An maith? Is maith / N maith.

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

Would you like to go to the beach today Mairad? Im not sure. Its a little cold. Its not cold! It is very sunny! Well I am cold. Well you can put on a coat. Alright. I will go to the beach but I will not swim. I dont like swimming.
Conversation 3/5: Leisure time activities

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Conversation 3/4: Eating out


LI CD3, TR11

Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter Waiter Mairad Friend Waiter Mairad Waiter Friend Waiter Mairad Waiter Mairad Waiter

Dia duit a bhean uasal, an fidir liom cuidi leat? Is fidir. Chuir m tbla in irithe don oche anocht. Cn uair? Ar leathuair i ndiaidh a hocht. T sin go bre. C mhad duine at ann? Beirt. Agus cad an t-ainm at ort? N Dhnaill. Maith go leor, t an tbla anseo... Gabhaig mo leithscal, an bhfuil sibh ridh le hord? T. Ba mhaith liom anraith glasra don chad chrsa. Ba mhaith liomsa oisr. Agus don dara crsa? Beidh an sicn agam le do thoil. Agus t fin? Beidh an stig agamsa le do thoil agus danta go maith. Ar mhaith libh milseog? Nor mhaith ach ba mhaith linn buidel fona. Cn chinal, dearg n geal? Fon dearg le do thoil. T sin go bre.

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian

Mairad, would you like to go swimming now? I wouldnt. I dont like swimming. What pastimes do you prefer? I like reading and going to the cinema. What pastimes do you prefer? I like swimming and going to the cinema as well. Would you like to go to the cinema tonight? I would!

Waiter Mairad Waiter Cian Waiter Cian

Can I help you? You can. I would like a glass of wine please. Would you also like a glass of wine? I wouldnt. I dont like wine. Would you like something else? A pint of beer please.

Conversation 3/5: Leisure time activities


LI CD3, TR14

Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

A Mhairad, ar mhaith leat dul chuig an tr inniu? Nl m cinnte. T s giota beag fuar. Nl s fuar! T an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch! Bhuel, t mise fuar. Bhuel, is fidir leat cta a chur ort. Maith go leor. Rachaidh m chuig an tr ach n bheidh m ag snmh. N maith liom bheith ag snmh.
Conversation 5: Leisure time activities

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Conversation 6: Knowing the way


PART 1: ASKING THE WAY LI CD2, TR1

Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn

Gabh mo leithscal, c bhfuil oig an phoist? T s ag bun na sride seo. Agus c bhfuil an banc? Nl banc ar bith ar an bhaile seo. Agus bialann? T bialann ann trasna an bhthair. Ceart go leor, go raibh mle maith agat. Go ndana a mhaith duit. Sln. Sln go fill.

Mairad Sle Mairad Sle Mairad Sle Mairad Sle Mairad Sle

It is nice to meet you sir. This is my mother Mire. Hello woman of the house. This is my brother Colm. Hello Colm. This is the youngest in the family, my sister Nra. Hello Nra. Would you like a cup of tea? I wouldnt thanks. There is no time. We will be late for the cinema. You are right. We should leave.

Insight
Note the words ar bith, meaning any or no in the phrase banc ar bith meaning no bank or literally bank no/any. These little words are a very useful add-on and can be used with a number of other words. Look out for them again, especially in Conversations 7 and 10!

Waiter Man Waiter Woman Waiter Woman Waiter Woman Waiter Woman Man Woman Waiter Woman Man Waiter

PART 2: MORE INFORMATION LI CD2, TR5

Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian

A dhuine uasail, conas at t? Go maith, go raibh maith agat. Is mise Tiarnn. Is mise Cian agus is deas bualadh leat ars. A Chiain, an bhfuil teach leanna ar an bhaile seo? T. T ceann maith ann taobh leis an bhialann. Go raibh maith agat. Go ndana a mhaith duit.

Hello and welcome in. Now, what would you (pl.) like? I would like a beer please. OK, and you, what would you like? I would like a glass of water and a cup of coffee please. Would you like ice in the water? No, thank you. Would you like milk and sugar with your coffee? I dont want milk but I would like sugar. Would you (pl.) like anything to eat? I would but Im not sure yet... Well, I would like steak and chips. Ill have that also. How would you (pl.) like the steak? Well done please. Medium please. Thats ne.

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Conversation 3/3: Socializing with friends

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Mairad Sle Mairad Sle Mairad Sle Mairad Sle Mairad Sle

Is deas bualadh leat a dhuine uasail. Seo mo mhathair Mire. Dia duit a bhean an t. Seo mo dhearthir Colm. Dia duit a Choilm. Seo an duine is ige sa teaghlach, mo dheirr Nra. Dia duit a Nra. Ar mhaith leat cupn tae? Nor mhaith go raibh maith agat. Nl am ann. Beimid mall don phictirlann. T an ceart agat. Is fearr dinn imeacht.

Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn

Excuse me, where is the post office? It is at the bottom of this street. And where is the bank? There is no bank in this town. And a restaurant? There is a restaurant across the road. OK, thanks very much. Youre welcome. Goodbye. Goodbye for now.

Conversation 3/3: Socializing with friends


LI CD3, TR8

Waiter Man Waiter Woman Waiter Woman Waiter Woman Waiter Woman Man Woman Waiter Woman Man Waiter

Dia daoibh agus filte isteach. Anois, cad a ba mhaith libh? Ba mhaith liom pionta leanna le do thoil. Ceart go leor, agus t fin, cad a ba mhaith leatsa? Ba mhaith liomsa gloine uisce agus cupn caife le do thoil. Ar mhaith leat oighear san uisce? Nor mhaith, go raibh maith agat. Ar mhaith leat bainne agus sicra le do chuid caife? Nor mhaith liom bainne ach ba mhaith liom sicra. Ar mhaith libh rud ar bith le hithe? Ba mhaith ach nl m cinnte go fill... Bhuel, ba mhaith liomsa sceallga agus stig. Beidh sin agamsa freisin. Cad mar a ba mhaith libh an stig a bheith danta? Danta go maith le do thoil. Go measartha le do thoil. T sin go bre.

Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian Tiarnn Cian

Sir, how are you? Well, thank you. Im Tiarnn. Im Cian and its nice to meet you again. Cian, is there a pub in this town? Yes. There is a good one beside the restaurant. Thank you. Youre welcome.

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Conversation 7: Transactions
PART 1: THE PHARMACY LI CD2, TR9

Pharmacist Maidin mhaith a dhuine uasail, an fidir liom cuidi leat? Tiarnn Is fidir mar nl m go maith. Pharmacist Cad at ort? Tiarnn T tinneas cinn orm agus t s an-nimhneach. Pharmacist An bhfuil rud ar bith eile ort? Tiarnn T tinneas goile orm freisin. Pharmacist Bhuel, glac na piolla seo agus luigh sos. Tiarnn Maith go leor. C mhad at orthu? Pharmacist Tr Euro le do thoil. Tiarnn Seo duit a bhean uasal. Pharmacist Go raibh maith agat.

Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian

Insight
Two very useful little prexes are used in this conversation anmeaning very and r- meaning too. Both of these little words aspirate the word which follows when possible. In Part 1 the word nimhneach is not aspirated following an- because you cannot change the initial consonant n. In Part 2, however, we will see that beag meaning small becomes rbheag too small. If we wanted to say very small it would be an-bheag.

Good morning. Good morning, how are you? I am well, thank you, and how are you? I am great, thanks. I am Brd, who are you? I am Brian. Where are you from Brian? I am from Belfast. Where do you live? Well I am from Galway but I live here in Dublin. Well it is nice to meet you. Im working here. Very good. What is your job? I am a teacher. What is your job? I dont have a job yet. Im a student and I am at university here. Which course? Irish and history. Do you like it? I love it. Great! I also studied Irish at university!

PART 2: THE CLOTHES SHOP LI CD2, TR13

Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear

Dia duit a bhean uasal, an fidir liom cuidi leat? Is fidir. Ba mhaith liom cta a cheannach. Anois, cad faoin cheann seo? T s deas ach t s rbheag. Bhuel, cad faoin cheann seo? T an ceann sin go bre. Is maith liom ach c mhad at air? Trocha Euro. Beidh s agam!

Sle Mairad Sle Mairad Sle

You are welcome Mairad. How are you? Good thank you Sle and you? I am great. Would you like to meet my family? I would certainly. How many people are in your family? There are ve in my family my mother, my father, my sister and brother and myself. This is my father Sen.
Conversation 3/2: This is my sister

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Conversation 3/1: Meeting and greeting


LI CD3, TR2

Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian Brd Brian

Maidin mhaith. Maidin mhaith, conas at t? T m go maith, go raibh maith agat, agus cad mar at t fin? T m ar dhroim na muice, go raibh maith agat. Is mise Brd. C thusa? Is mise Brian. C as t, a Bhriain? Is as Bal Feirste m. C bhfuil t fin i do chna? Bhuel is as Gaillimh m ach t m i mo chna anseo i mBaile tha Cliath. Bhuel is deas bualadh leat. T m fin ag obair anseo. An-mhaith. Cad an post at agat? Is minteoir m. Cad an post at agat fin? Nl post agam go fill. Is mac linn m agus t m ar an Ollscoil anseo. Cn chrsa? Gaeilge agus Stair. An maith leat ? Is bre liom . Ar digh! Rinne mise Gaeilge ar an Ollscoil fosta!

Pharmacist Good morning sir, can I help you? Tiarnn You can because I am not well. Pharmacist What is wrong with you? Tiarnn I have a headache and it is very sore. Pharmacist Is there anything else wrong with you? Tiarnn I have a stomach ache also. Pharmacist Well, take these pills and lie down. Tiarnn All right. How much is that? Pharmacist Three euros please. Tiarnn Here you are madam. Pharmacist Thank you.

Conversation 3/2: This is my sister


LI CD3, TR5

Sle Mairad Sle Mairad Sle

S do bheatha a Mhairad. Cad mar at t? Go maith, go raibh maith agat a Shle agus t fin? T m ar dhroim na muice. Ar mhaith leat bualadh le mo theaghlach? Ba mhaith cinnte. C mhad duine at i do chlann? T cigar i mo chlann mo mhthair, mathair, mo dheirr agus mo dhearthir agus m fin. Seo mathair Sen.

Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear

Hello madam, can I help you? You can. I would like to buy a coat. Now, what about this one? It is nice but its too small. Well, what about this one? That one is ne. I like it but how much is it? Thirty euros. Ill take it!
Conversation 7: Transactions

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Conversation 8: Time and money


PART 1: WHATS THE TIME? LI CD2, TR17

Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant

Gabh mo lithscal, cn uair a bheidh bus ag dul go Bal Feirste trthnna inniu? Beidh ceann ag dul ar leathuair tar is a tr. Cn uair a bheidh s i mBal Feirste? Beidh s ann thart faoi ceathr tar is a cig. An mbeidh bus ag dul Bhal Feirste go Baile tha Cliath maidin amrach? Beidh cinnte. Beidh ceann ann ar ceathr go dt a naoi agus ceann eile ar che tar is a naoi. C mhad at ar thicad Bhal Feirste go Baile tha Cliath? T dh Euro dag ar thicad singil agus t che Euro ar thicad llte. Go raibh maith agat. Go ndana a mhaith duit.

Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn

Eimear, what did you do at the weekend? I was shopping on Saturday. Did you buy anything nice? I bought a new coat. What did you do? I met Cian in the pub on Saturday and I drank a pint. Did you enjoy it? I really enjoyed it.

PART 2: ENQUIRING ABOUT LOCAL MUSIC SESSIONS LI CD2, TR21

Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

Bartender Dia duit a dhuine uasail. Tiarnn Dia is Muire duit. An mbeidh seisin ceoil anseo
anocht?

Cian, did you ever go on holidays? Yes. I went to Scotland last year. Did you enjoy it? Yes. Did you go on holidays last year? No but I went to London at the weekend. Did you enjoy it? I really enjoyed it. The shopping was great!

Bartender N bheidh, ar an drochuair, ach beidh ceann anseo san Tiarnn Bartender Tiarnn Bartender Tiarnn
oche amrach. Cn uair a bheidh s ag tosn? Ar leathuair tar is a naoi. Ar digh! An mbeidh tille ar an doras? N bheidh, beidh s saor in aisce. Go raibh mle maith agat.

Insight
The 24-hour clock is rarely used in Irish. Technical terms are r.n. = roimh nin (before noon) and i.n. = iarnin (afternoon). For am and pm one says ar maidin (in the morning) and trthnna (in the evening) or san oche (at night).

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Conversation 10: Everyday living


PART 1: HOW DID YOU SPEND YOUR WEEKEND? LI CD2, TR33

Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn

A Eimear, cad a rinne t ag an deireadh seachtaine? Bh m ag siopadireacht D Sathairn. Ar cheannaigh t rud ar bith deas? Cheannaigh m cta nua. Cad a rinne t fin? Bhuail m le Cian sa teach leanna D Sathairn agus dl m pionta. Ar bhain t sult as? Bhain m an-sult as.

Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant Eimear Assistant

PART 2: HOLIDAYS LI CD2, TR37

Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

A Chiain, an ndeachaigh t ar saoire riamh? Chuaigh. Chuaigh m go hAlbain anuraidh. Ar bhain t sult as? Bhain. An ndeachaigh t fin ar saoire anuraidh? N dheachaigh ach chuaigh m go Londain ag an deireadh seachtaine. Ar bhain t sult as? Bhain m an-sult as. Bh an siopadireacht ar digh!

Excuse me, what time will there be a bus going to Belfast this afternoon? There will be one going at half past three. What time will it be in Belfast? It will be there at about a quarter past ve. Will there be a bus going from Belfast to Dublin tomorrow morning? There will certainly. There will be one going at a quarter to nine and another one at twenty past nine. How much is a ticket from Belfast to Dublin? A single is 12 euros and a return ticket is 20 euros. Thank you. Youre welcome.

Bartender Hello sir. Tiarnn Hello. Will there be a traditional music session here
tonight?

Insight
One of the most commonly used verbs in any language is the verb to go and this is an irregular verb in Irish. It does not follow the rules which regular verbs like ceannaigh, bain and l in Part 1 do. An ndeachaigh t? (Did you go?) Chuaigh (yes) / N dheachaigh (no) There are eleven irregular verbs in Irish.

Bartender No, unfortunately, but there will be one here tomorrow Tiarnn Bartender Tiarnn Bartender Tiarnn
night. What time will it be starting? At half past nine. Excellent! Will there be an admission fee? No, it will be free. Thank you very much.

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Conversation 9: Small talk


PART 1: WEATHER LI CD2, TR25

Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear

T maidin bhre ann, a Eimear. T cinnte ach beidh s fuar trthnna. Beidh cinnte agus beidh s ag cur fearthainne. T sin uafsach agus beidh gaoth mhr ann fosta. Is mr an trua sin. Chuala m go mbeidh l lainn ann amrach. T sil agam go mbeidh. Beidh an ghrian ag scoilteadh na gcloch!

Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear Tiarnn Eimear

It is a ne morning, Eimear. It is certainly but it will be cold tonight. It will of course and it will be raining. That is terrible and there will be a high wind also. That is a great pity. I heard that it will be a beautiful day tomorrow. I hope that it will be. It will be very sunny!

PART 2: YESTERDAY LI CD2, TR29

Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

Bh l lainn ann inn. Bh s ar digh. Chaith m an l ar an tr. An raibh t ag snmh san fharraige? Bh ach bh an t-uisce fuar! An raibh t fin ar an tr inn? N raibh. Bh mise ag obair!

Mairad Cian Mairad Cian Mairad

It was a beautiful day yesterday. It was excellent. I spent the day on the beach. Were you swimming in the sea? I was but the water was cold! Were you on the beach yesterday? I was not. I was working!

Insight
Here we have the past, present and future tense forms of the substantive verb to be. Now is a good time to look at the question and the afrmative and negative forms in each of these tenses: Past An raibh? Bh / N raibh Present An bhfuil? T / nl Future An mbeidh? Beidh / n bheidh.

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Conversation 9: Small talk

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