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CLEANING PROGRAMMES AND SCHEDULES

This section once again uses an imaginary meat plant or food factory (but it can equally be adapted to accommodate the needs of a shop but in such a case perhaps the foam cleaning system would be omitted). It may appear to be quite formal but it is intended that it should demonstrate the manner and determination that is required to maintain the high standard of hygiene that is necessary to achieve a good reputation. The first part deals with the very basic aspects and is followed later by more detailed work instructions and should be kept in a style that can be read and understood by anyone who may be involved in doing the cleaning but should also be written in a manner demanded to provide the detail necessary to impress both customers and government / local government enforcement officers.

WHAT IS A CLEANING PROGRAMME?


The purpose of regular, planned cleaning is; i. ii. iii. That by regular attention to detail, the high standards required for the premises may be maintained. That the well-being of the plant, the customer and the ultimate consumer of meat based products produced in the plant is made more secure. That the maintenance of goodwill between the organisation and the customers of the organisation is secured, due to the customers awareness and confidence that products are produced in clean premises by a hygiene conscious work force adopting clean practices in order to produce a safe, wholesome, good quality product. iv. To receive and maintain the goodwill and confidence of Central and Local Government bodies (and in turn, the customers) in that the cleaning satisfies all aspects of applicable legislation (and beyond!). Cleaning must be structured and must follow a definite plan in order to satisfy the purpose of the

task. Failure to clean properly is, perhaps, even worse than not cleaning at all - at least if no cleaning is done, other workers are then aware that cleaning MUST be done before any work involving food may commence.

WHAT IS CLEAN?
"Clean", in the context of the meat plant must be considered as two separate items: 1. An ongoing practice of working tidily, with both clean equipment and clean personnel, often referred to as clean as you go and that is a definite facet of a good workman. A more inclusive good 'dry clean' whenever breaks are taken should be established as a norm. 2. At the end of the working period, shift or day, an effective removal of all visible dirt and soil, followed by a satisfactory washing process, rinsing with clean water, checking for visual cleanliness and then the application of a surface sterilant. It is rather pointless to apply a sterilant until satisfied that the dirt has gone since sterilant applied to the top of dirt merely sterilises the top of the dirt but not the soiling either in or beneath the dirt (Sterilants may well destroy some of the bacteria, but it must be remembered that even the foulest of dirt, sterilised to become free of bacteria, still remains what it was in the first instance, the foulest of dirt). materials. Cleaning referred to in 1 above is a separate and ongoing programme that must be dealt with separately for which a separate work instruction will need to be prepared to cover working practices in general. Due to the extreme variation between plants it isnt practical to give an example but, using a similar pattern to the work instructions for the final clean, an adequate work sheet can be prepared. The "end of the day" or "end of the shift" cleaning referred to in item 2 is the subject dealt with in this part and will, in itself, need to be subdivided both for the various areas that may be involved; Lairages, slaughter halls, gut rooms, offal rooms, quartering areas, various chillers and freezers, hygiene rooms, cutting rooms, production rooms, packing rooms and the associated areas (including staff facility areas). It will also need to provide
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A clean item then must be one that is not only free of

bacterial contaminants but is also free of aesthetically unpleasant and undesirable

guidance about the frequency and detail of certain aspects of cleaning in these areas. This latter part is "the schedule" and may, from time to time, be referred to in the main part of the text. While all parts of the plant must adhere to the same basic principle of cleaning, due to the nature of some particular items of equipment, the detailed requirements of some such items will probably require a separate and more specific work instruction to provide the information about the cleaning to be done. In these cases it will be necessary to examine the item in more detail before preparing a cleaning programme for the item and any unusual factors about the item need to be noted. Are there any Health & Safety attributes that need to be considered? Is there a need to isolate from electricity? Are there age restrictions on cleaners working with the type of equipment (in general, it is advisable that persons under the age of 18 should not be dismantling and cleaning equipment that has sharp blades for example) The manufacturers of the various pieces of equipment should be able to help in part but do remember that in many cases, engineers are excellent at making equipment to do a job but unfortunately they do not always take into account some aspects of the items, such as cleaning.

In view of the ongoing developments which may take place within a meat plant, some individual items may be either removed or new ones be introduced and the inclusion, or indeed the omission of particular items, from any written programme must be accepted and verbal advice and instruction on cleaning it must be accepted until a suitably revised written instruction is provided. The absence of any written instructions must, under no circumstances, be taken as a reason for omission of cleaning being done. Where necessary, any equipment that is sensitive to any particular cleaning method, and installed prior to the issue of any written cleaning instructions should be cleaned in a manner advised by verbal instructions. Of vital importance in all cleaning operations in a programme is that of ensuring that NO cleaning should be attempted in any area if to do so would in way place any meat (or other food) at any risk of contamination and this must generally be taken to mean that the room must be cleared of meat (and other foods) prior to the main cleaning taking place, excepting that the first part of the cleaning operation which does not involve the use of chemicals, detergents or
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copious amounts of water, i.e. removal of debris and loose soil by such means as by dry sweeping or by using a squeegee may be permitted provided that it is not carried out in close proximity to any open meat or food. A further exception is that of cleaning in the Packaging Storage Area and Staff Facilities (Details of which are provided for later in the text) where common sense should prevail.

GENERAL PROCEDURE (DAILY)


All workers must recognise the importance of 'clean as you go', the very essence of a good workman. Such a workman ensures that his place of work remains clean throughout the day. Dry cleaning is the Daytime cleaners will remove waste materials from the plant and attend to minor surface cleaning using appropriate materials, and keeping away from exposed food. removal of surface soils by brush or squeegee and is an accepted practice provided it is not done in the immediate area of any food intended for human consumption. Dry cleaning may be carried out throughout the working day and although the items and methods may not be specifically included in the programme, a second schedule may be attached at a later date to include those items The main areas included here in these examples cover the processes of 'wet cleaning' or to be more precise, 'detail' cleaning. All areas will be cleaned at the end of the final work period for the particular area and, on completion of that cleaning, will be checked for effectiveness of cleaning, using a standard checklist, prior to the commencement of any further work. The production manager for the area cleaned will additionally acknowledge receipt of a clean area by countersigning the cleaning check-sheet (which should then be returned to the Technical Department for checking and filing.) It must be stressed that the signatures of approval of both the person who checks at the end of the cleaning operation AND the production manager involved, prior to the start of production, will be an indication of their own standards and any evidence that the forms (and importance of cleaning) have been taken lightly may be reflected in the staff records of those involved (and may be referred to in any future staff appraisals which may affect those persons development within the organisation. The following sample cleaning programme obviously relates to a larger type meat plant and
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while it may be possible for it to be adapted to the needs of a slaughterhall, a cutting room or indeed any more general meat processing area, it is not quite as reasonable for it to be used, for example with a butchers shop (few butchers shops would be able to use a foaming system to clean walls etc. Other parts may certainly be adapted and adopted as needed). However, while it does have some limitations in that direction, it is quite easy, with a little thought, to adapt it for smaller premises, and any such extension attempted should only serve as a demonstration of the effort of the individual to deal with this very important subject.

PROGRAMME
Cleaning will be carried out as follows: 1. 2. All loose debris must be removed PRIOR to the use of any water. Since the drainage system is, essentially, designed for the purpose of removing liquids, debris and meat particles should NOT be swept on top of drain covers for collection. Floors should have been designed to fall towards the drains and therefore it is sensible that dirt and debris should be swept downwards but only to a point NEAR the drain cover for their collection and removal. 3. All holders for used towels must be removed (if indeed they are of such a type that they may be removed) and emptied and any unused paper towels must be taken from their holders and be removed to a safe place for replacement after completion of the cleaning process. All used paper towel receptacles will be removed to an appropriate disposal area. 4. All drains containing solid traps must be lifted and any filter type containers be removed for emptying. When cleaned they should be replaced and the procedure be repeated again AFTER the washing of the premises and BEFORE application of sterilants. 5. All gridded gulleys must have the grids removed in order that both the grid and the gulley may effectively be cleaned and sanitised.
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6.

All accessible walls, pipes, ledges and static fixtures (excluding any electrical, electronic devices or other items which are sensitive to such procedures) should be thoroughly wetted with water, hot water when available.

7.

A foam detergent should be applied evenly to all surfaces, commencing at the highest point and working downwards. The foam must be left in contact, in order to react with soil on the surfaces, for a minimum of 15 minutes. During this period of waiting, other items may be given some cleaning attention.

8.

Using hot water pressure lances, thoroughly wash all of the foamed surfaces, commencing at the highest point and working downwards. Any stubborn soils that have not loosened and been removed by the hot water lances must receive more detailed attention using brushes or cleaning pads, (whichever is the most appropriate for the task) with hot water and detergent solution.

NOTE: When washing floors and lower level items, great care must be taken to prevent 'splash' contamination onto other cleaned areas. Any area so contaminated by 'splash' will be required to be re-cleaned. 9. All individual items, as listed in the sections dealing with each area, must be thoroughly cleaned prior to the next stage (sterilant application). 10. A suitable and appropriate sterilant solution (such as those based for example on quaternary ammonia, amphoteric agent or sodium hypochlorite) should be applied by spray to ALL equipment, fixtures and fittings excepting those items that, by nature of manufacture or operation may be damaged by such a solution. Any items that may not be sprayed should be wiped with a sanitising wiper. The sterilant solution should be allowed to remain on the surfaces until prior to commencement of work when it may be removed by means of simple rinsing by sprays. 11. The sterilant used should be changed on at least one day in each week, e.g., if
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quaternary ammonia based sterilant is normally used then on one day each week, sodium hypochlorite sterilant will be used, or vice versa.

12.

Prior to the application of the sterilant, the premises, fixtures and fittings must receive a visual inspection and any area or item that is found to be in an unclean condition must be re-cleaned completely.

13.

All hand wash stations, equipment sterilises, nailbrushes (where used), towel holders, used towel bin holders and soap dispensers should receive detailed inspection and paper towels should be replaced after cleaning of the area is completed. Any nailbrushes showing any signs of wear should be replaced as required.

14.

At the completion of cleaning and prior to any re-commencement of work, any floor surface that may potentially be slippery due to the presence of water should have all surplus water removed by squeegee or other mechanical implement.

15.

All detergents, sterilants and soaps must be held in a secure place in order to comply with the basic requirements of good hygienic practice.

16.

All drums of detergent, sterilant and soaps should be removed at the end of cleaning and no such product should be brought into, or remain in, any food areas while any open food is present.

17.

On completion of cleaning, a measured quantity of sterilant should be emptied into each open drain in order to provide a reasonable degree of protection from build up of organisms in such locations. The amount and type of sterilant may be varied from time to time. Detergent suppliers should provide the detailed advice on any use and types of sterilants that are supplied.

18.

A full inspection, using the standard checklist should be made after the completion of cleaning by an authorised member of staff who should sign their
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approval. Any breakages, or damage to equipment, machinery, the fabric or decor of the building should be noted and reported in writing. 19. Only those detergents, sanitizers, sterilants and soaps approved by the organisation and listed in the schedule to the programme should be used or held on the site. Any such products should comply with the requirements of applicable legislation. It will be necessary to create a schedule of permitted detergents, sanitizers, sterilants and soaps used by the plant involved, probably in conjunction with the detergent/sterilant supplier. 20. All persons who use any chemical cleaning agent must take all reasonable precautions to protect themselves, and others, from any risks that may be applicable from the use of those cleaning agents. Suppliers of any cleaning agents are required to provide full Health & Safety at Work documents with their products and such documents, including necessary antidotes, should be held as an appendix to this cleaning programme and should also be made available for all workers who handle the products and must comply with all applicable Control of Substances Hazardous to Health legislation (COSHH). 21. Cleaning, as with other tasks, does require some training for the work to be done properly and formal training should be undertaken. Once again, the suppliers of detergents and similar chemicals are usually quite willing to provide assistance with this and should, on completion, provide a formal certificate as proof of the course of training undertaken by each of the workers involved. Throughout the programme, the details of items and/or areas listed to clean do not necessarily indicate the order of the cleaning since workloads of different areas may vary due to the kind of work demanded of them. Although the details may indicate that items should be sprayed with sterilant after cleaning, such spraying should be included as an integral task at the completion of cleaning in an area (excepting those items which require to be wiped with a sanitising wiper). As a general rule, foaming (when & where it may be possible to use it) should take place first,
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small and more detailed cleaning being carried out secondly and thereby permitting time for the foam to react on the surface or object being cleaned. Daytime cleaning should be such that major items of loose soil and debris are removed prior to the commencement of major cleaning tasks at the end of the work period. This can in itself reduces some of the time, and work, of the main end of shift cleaning. There is no reason for any excessive build up of soil during the working day and workers MUST practice "CLEAN AS YOU GO" and ensure that their workplace does provide an impression of good workmanship. Where the use of pressure water lances is required, all persons must be made aware of the great damage that these items can cause when used incorrectly. In addition to the physical damage that can be caused to equipment, personnel are equally at risk where any ignorance or horseplay combines with their use. Electrical fittings in a meat plant may be 'DAMP PROOF' but few are actually WATERPROOF In particular, this applies to light fittings. Unless specifically instructed that items CAN be washed with a pressure lance, the rule must be that it CANNOT.

MAIN PRODUCTION AREAS


1. 2. Ensure that all open food has been removed from the area. Dismantle, and remove to the appropriate hygiene area, all machine parts that requires cleaning separate from the machine. Cleaning can then commence on these items. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Remove all containers of used paper towels to the appropriate waste product collection point. Remove all unused paper towels from their containers and place them in a secure position to prevent them becoming wet and spoilt. Remove all waste receptacles with waste to the appropriate disposal point Remove all loose soils and collect them into suitable containers for disposal. Check and clean out all drains and drainage channels. Rinse all surfaces with water and then apply a foam detergent starting at the highest point and then working downwards.
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9. 10.

Leave the foam to act for a minimum of 15 minutes and afterwards clean using a pressure lance. While waiting for the foam to react with surface soils commence cleaning of machines and large items which cannot be moved, including conveyors, wash hand basins, sterilizers, sinks, scales, tables etc. Commence hand scrubbing on obvious stubborn soils

11. 12. 13.

When all surfaces have been effectively cleaned and rinsed, apply sterilant to all cleaned surfaces. Ensure that all surface water has been squeegeed from floor. Cleaning check sheet to be completed and signed.

SPECIFIC EQUIPMENT
An example of a programme using various pieces of equipment is shown here. The pieces of equipment used as examples may, in this instance, be imaginary but the process can be adapted to account for any type of machine, equipment or item in a food room using the same basic principles for any particular area chosen. The main point in the preparation of such a programme is to be aware of how the machine works, how it dismantles and of any specific risks that may be attached to it. ITEM AND COMMENTS
1. Hand wash facilities, Equipment sterilizers and deep sinks throughout the area Isolate electricity to any items, which use it,

CLEANING DETAILS
Remove used towel holders & waste receptacles to appropriate collection Points empty and clean any static holders. Remove unused paper towels to a secure area for replacement later. Turn off sterilizers and remove knife the supports, drain the sterilizers and using a hot water detergent solution, thoroughly wash the inside and outside of the equipment using scrub pads or brushes (as is appropriate The Sterilises and knife supports must similarly be washed. Rinse well with clean water and apply sterilant spray. Remove all cutting boards from their beds for detailed cleaning. Release the conveyor tensioners and lift the fabric and support them in order to permit easy access to clean underneath the fabric. Apply a good even covering of foam detergent. Leave the detergent to react with the soils and other upright metal for a minimum of 15 minutes. While waiting, attend to any obvious stubborn soils and rail supports by means of a hot water detergent solution and a brush. Using a hot water detergent solution and a brush, scrub all

2. Fabric type conveyors and stands Metal uprights & Cutting Boards

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cutting boards then high pressure wash all parts (including cutting boards) and apply a sterilant spray solution. 3. Metal Roller Conveyors, Steel Tables & stands Using a hot water detergent solution and brush thoroughly wash all parts and rinse with clean water. Apply a sterilant spray solution. Since the conveyor belt rotates, ensure that the full surface of the conveyor is cleaned. Dismantle and remove machine parts to the hygiene area for washing Using a hot water detergent solution and scrub pad thoroughly clean all parts. Rinse with clean water and apply a sterilant spray solution. Dismantle all moving parts and remove to the hygiene area for washing, taking care with any sharp edges. With a hot water and detergent solution thoroughly wash all parts of the body of the machine, (including the lower dice reception area) both inside and out. Rinse with clean water and apply a sterilant spray solution. Dismantle worm, knives and blades from barrel and paddles from hopper and remove to hygiene area for cleaning. Apply a foam to all external parts of the mincer (taking care not to include any electrical input areas) and thoroughly clean using brushes and pads Rinse using a hot water spray and ensure all internal and external surfaces are cleaned. Rinse with clean water and apply a sterilant spray. Dismantle mesh vanes from the top for separate cleaning. Using a hot water detergent solution, thoroughly clean all parts rinse with clean water and apply a sterilant spray.

4 Multi Blade Tenderisers (Isolate the Electricity)

5. Dicing Machine (Isolate Electricity) (Check age and training of cleaner)

6. Mincing machines (Isolate Electricity)

7. Netting loader.

Obviously, all meat plants and shops have different kinds of equipment to consider but this is shown as an example using a few different kinds of equipment. The list will need to continue itemising each piece of equipment that may be in the room. Advice may need to be sought either from the equipment manufacturer, the plant engineer or the detergent supplier on the most appropriate method of cleaning but then build it into the written programme. In a similar manner, each chiller, or separate workroom(s) needs to have a programme(s) prepared to cover possible items that are in it (them) and details of the use of the equipment. Again, below are some examples of how this can be done. The fact that they may appear to be the same doesnt matter, the programme is a logical layout of the factory and the programme should reflect this logic. If it appears that a workroom or chiller in the plant being considered do have other points that need to be considered then the lists shown here obviously need to be extended to cover those items.

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INTAKE CHILLERS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Ensure that all open food has been removed from the area. Remove all loose soils and collect them into suitable containers for disposal. Rinse all surfaces with water and then apply a foam detergent starting at the highest point and then working downwards. Leave the foam to act for a minimum of 15 minutes and then clean using a pressure lance. When all surfaces have been effectively cleaned and rinsed, apply sterilant to all cleaned surfaces. Ensure that all surface water has been squeegeed from floor. Cleaning check sheet to be completed and signed.

DESPATCH CHILLER(S) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Ensure that all open food has been removed from the area. Remove all loose soils and collect them into suitable containers for disposal. Rinse all surfaces with water and then apply a foam detergent starting at the highest point and then working downwards. Leave the foam to act for a minimum of 15 minutes and then clean using a pressure lance. If there are other fixed objects in the chiller, these should be cleaned while the foam is reacting on the walls. When all surfaces have been effectively cleaned and rinsed, apply sterilant to all cleaned surfaces. Ensure that all surface water has been squeegeed from floor. Cleaning check sheet to be completed and signed.

This type of programme would continue until all areas of the plant are covered. Remembering that if there are any rooms with any equipment in them then that equipment would require similar detailed instructions in the manner shown earlier.

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PART TWO HIGH LEVEL CLEANING


High level cleaning should be considered to be any area that it is impractical to clean, due to the height of the room, during the normal cleaning processes. It would also of course include overhead rails pipe work, ducts and girders. High level cleaning, for whichever area, will follow a similar pattern to any other area and so this instruction can be given generally in most cases. An exception where a particular room has some specific factor may require that that room should have a separate programme. Similarly, as mentioned previously, if some particular aspect of an area is found to be subject to a soiling which requires some specific attention then that specific attention must be given, even if it is not written in these sample instructions. However, in such cases, the details of any specific cleaning for an area should be reported in order that the instructions can be amended (or the reason for the specific soiling can be investigated, and perhaps eliminated). High level cleaning, as the name implies, is above other areas. This being the case it must be remembered that when high level cleaning is carried out, the area beneath that being cleaned will become soiled during the process. Any area that is subjected to high level cleaning MUST therefore be followed by a FULL clean of the area beneath it on completion of the high level cleaning. IN ALL INSTANCES OF HIGH LEVEL CLEANING, ALL PERSONS INVOLVED MUST TAKE ALL SUCH NECESSARY PRECAUTIONS AND USE ALL SUCH APPROPRIATE EQUIPMENT TO MINIMISE ANY RISK OF ACCIDENTS TO PERSONS (THEMSELVES AND OTHERS). EACH PERSON ENGAGED ON THIS WORK IS RESPONSIBLE BY LAW FOR BOTH THEIR OWN SAFETY AND FOR THE SAFETY OF OTHERS THAT THEY ARE WORKING WITH In all instances of high level cleaning, water is going to be applied to parts being cleaned. Since electricity supply is carried overhead in most industrial plants, extreme care must be taken NOT TO WET ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES unless the specific advice is that the electrical supply is
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in A WATERPROOF container. This does not happen in many instances and, if in doubt, DO NOT WET. Light fittings similarly are NOT WATERPROOF. They may be damp proofed but this only includes a prevention of certain moistures from the atmosphere penetrating. It does not include a direct supply of water being put onto them. Some people may feel confident while working at heights, on ladders etc but in ALL premises the rule must be that of, NO FOOLING, AND NO RISKS are to be taken. Before commencing on any high level cleaning, all moveable objects in the area below, which could either be damaged or be a hazard to the cleaning must be removed until the cleaning is completed. Commencing at the highest point, all loose debris will be removed prior to the application of any water. When the debris is removed, if foaming is possible, a foam detergent will be applied and will be left to react for a minimum of 15 minutes. If foaming is not possible, all surfaces should be cleaned using brushes, pads and cloths (as appropriate) with a hot water detergent solution. Foamed areas need to be washed using a hot water lance and a sterilant solution will be applied by spray once it is been cleaned. Areas to clean will include high-level walls, ceilings, girders, pipes, ducts and other fixtures and fittings in that area. Light fittings WILL NOT be cleaned unless the person cleaning has specific authority to undertake such work and in those cases, the electricity supply should be properly isolated before commencing to carry out such work. The evaporator units of chilling equipment can acquire a large build up of dust and soil along the blades of the fans. This material is quite capable of being blown around the plant almost in an aerosol type effect when the unit is working so it is necessary that it should be removed and the blades and the covers cleaned properly at regular intervals. To do this it is necessary that the plant engineer (or an approved refrigeration engineer or electrician) is asked for advice as this process will include isolating the electricity and may involve removal of the outer cover of the unit. A separate cleaning check sheet should be used to record high level cleaning. A similarly adapted checklist can also be used to record the cleaning of vehicles. As vehicles are little more
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than another room that has wheels, no specific mention is made here regarding vehicle cleaning as most people will interpret how to do that. It can be useful though to prepare a written procedure for such cleaning as a permanent document.

CLEANING SCHEDULE
It is necessary to maintain a cleaning schedule that will lay down when the various types of cleaning have to be done. The schedule will indicate the MINIMUM period between cleaning of the various areas. Any visible indication of soil is an indication that cleaning should be carried out, irrespective of the frequency shown in the schedule. Once again, a schedule is shown using our imaginary factory just to demonstrate how it could be laid out.

TIME PERIOD
Ongoing throughout the day (Dry Cleaning Only)

AREAS TO BE CLEANED.
Main Production Area Goods Reception/Despatch area (Including chillers)

Any unspecified build up of soils At any time

Any Area

End of the day or (work period)

Main Production Area Goods Inwards & Despatch Areas Staff Canteen Staff changing rooms

Weekly

Deep clean of staff facilities Deep clean of Intake Chill Deep clean of Despatch Chills
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Monthly

High level cleaning in most areas. The areas may be placed into a rota in order to give adequate time for all of the areas concerned to receive a high level clean within the allotted schedule. All Refrigerator Evaporator fans

Quarterly

Freezers

CLEANING CHECKLIST
On completion of cleaning there must be some record of the checks that are made on the cleaning that has been done so a rather formal checklist should be used. An example of a checklist is shown, again using our imaginary factory. .The checklist should be completed at the end of any period of plant cleaning which follows any work period and must be signed by a person authorised by the company to do so. The Manager responsible for any production in that workroom MUST acknowledge by signature that he has carried out a check him/herself and is satisfied that the room has been cleaned to a satisfactory standard prior to permitting any further work to be carried out in that area In the example sheets shown, several imaginary pieces of equipment have been listed to demonstrate a typical form that could be used. The actual sheet should be built up to include specific equipment in the meat plant or shop and the appropriate comments inserted.

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CLEANING CHECKLIST
Date...................... Area cleaned............................. Time..............................

Walls ................... Floors.............. Sinks & Wash basins (No. & type)....................................................................

Tables.................................... Conveyors (state which) .................................................................................. ........................................................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................................................... Other Machinery (Specify) ............................................................................................................................................ ..................................................................................................................................................................................... ........................................................................................................................................................... Mincers ..................................Dicers...............................Scales ....................................... ............................................. Flap Curtains......................... Roller Conveyors (specify) ........................................................................................... Doorways/Doors (specify)..................................................................................................... .......................................... Racks & Pallets.............................................................................................................. .................................................. Other (Specify) ............................................................................................................................................................... Damage report.............................................................................................................................................................. ............................................................................................................................................................................ Name of checker............................ Signature.......................................... Other comments, write overleaf if required. DEPARTMENT MANAGER APPROVAL OF CLEANING. Having conducted a personal check on the cleaning standards I confirm that the room and equipment have been cleaned to a satisfactory standard.

Signature...............................................................

Department Manager

Approved by............................................................ Q.A. Manager/Technical Manager DATE............................................Time..........................

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