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Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation (ACJC) 2013 PROGRAM

WELCOME TO THE ACJC

ACJC STAFF

Associate Professor Mark Baker


Welcome to the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation, Australias largest institution for tertiary Jewish studies. Each year, hundreds of students study with us on issues that impact on Jewish culture and world history. We are known for our international focus that enlivens the student experience though overseas study in Europe, Israel, South Africa and Rwanda. As members of the global Monash community, we are engaged in a dialogue of religions, cultures and civilisations that aims to address the critical challenges that confront us all. We invite you to enrol in one of our undergraduate or postgraduate courses or to participate in our public programs which encompass a diverse schedule of events incorporating distinguished Visiting Scholars. Our 2013 program reflects the diversity of activities undertaken by the ACJC at Monash University. Our flagship program in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been generously supported by donors who have enabled several new academic staff appointments and Visiting Fellowships.

Director of the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation We are pleased this year to offer lectures given by the leading academics in this field, including Ben Kiernan, Richard Bessel, Hasia Diner and Christopher Browning, whose book, Ordinary Men, reshaped our understanding of perpetrator behaviour. Other visiting scholars in Jewish history and culture include Deborah Dash Moore and Michael Steinlauf. You can read more about their profiles in this program. Our Centre is growing. As Director, Id like to thank all of our donors of distinction who are acknowledged at the back of this program. Your contribution to our Tree of Knowledge has enabled us to bring the fruits of Jewish scholarly activity to the wider Australian community. Every gift offers a transformative experience to our students for further study and research. On behalf of everyone at the ACJC, we thank you the public for supporting our Centre which is proudly located at Monash University, named for one of Australias most eminent Jewish historical figures.

Professor Andrew Markus Pratt Foundation Research Chair of Jewish Civilisation


Andrew is a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia and is a past Head of Monash Universitys School of Historical Studies. He is leading a project documenting the history of Yiddish Melbourne which examines the Jewish immigrants who came to Melbourne before and after the Holocaust. Overlapping with this research is an ARCLinkage project looking at the contemporary Jewish community in unprecedented depth. He has published extensively in the field of Australian race relations and immigration history. In an Australian first, Professor Andrew Markus is tracking changes in Australian attitudes towards immigrants and asylum seekers through a series of national surveys.

Professor Leah Garrett Loti Smorgon Chair of Contemporary Jewish Life and Culture
Leah moved to Australia in 2008 from Colorado where she was an Associate Professor of Jewish Literature at the University of Denver. She is currently researching a book on postwar Jewish American literature and culture and is the author of A Knight at the Opera: Heine, Wagner, Herzl, Peretz and the Legacy of Der Tannhauser; The Cross and Other Jewish Stories by Lamed Shapiro; Journeys beyond the Pale: Yiddish Travel Writing in the Modern World.

Dr Karen Auerbach Jacob Kronhill Lecturer in East European Jewish History


Karens research expertise is in Polish Jewish history and the history of the Holocaust. Her book, A Window on Warsaw: The Jewish Families of 16 Ujazdowskie Avenue after the Holocaust, is a microhistory of Jewish integration in postwar Poland focusing on ten families who were neighbours in an apartment building in Warsaw. Her current research focuses on Jewish booksellers and publishers of Polish literature in nineteenth-century Warsaw. She is also completing a secondary project examining the spread of information among Jews within Nazi-occupied Europe during the earliest stages of the Holocaust in 1941 and 1942. Previous to her doctoral studies, Karen published numerous articles in the New York-based Forward newspaper about Jewish life in contemporary Poland.

Mark Baker is Associate Professor of Holocaust and Genocide Studies in the School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies. He completed his D.Phil at Oxford University and was twice a Fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Before moving to Monash, he was a lecturer in Jewish history at the University of Melbourne and has taught widely in the field of Modern Jewish History, the Holocaust and Genocide, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, and Terrorism in Modern Conflict. He is the author of The Fiftieth Gate, a personal book about memory of the Holocaust which was the recipient of numerous prizes and is taught on the NSW curriculum for HSC English studies. He is currently writing a novel.

Contact us at acjc@monash.edu Visit us at artsonline.monash.edu.au/acjc 2


Front cover image: Victor Majzner

ACJC STAFF

Dr Daniella Doron Lecturer in Holocaust and Genocide Studies


Daniella received her Ph.D. in 2009 from the Departments of History and Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University, where she defended a dissertation entitled In the Best Interest of the Child: Family, Youth, and Identity in Postwar France, 19441954. Most recently she was the 20102012 Schusterman Postdoctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies at Colgate University, offering courses in modern Jewish history, Jewish history and autobiography, and Jewish migration and diaspora. Previously, she was the 20092010 Ray D. Wolfe Postdoctoral Fellow in Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto where she offered courses on postwar Jewish history and children during the Holocaust. Daniellas lectureship at Monash is supported through the philanthropy of Naomi Milgrom.

Dr David Slucki Early Career Development Fellow


David completed his PhD in History at Monash University in 2010, which explored the history of the Jewish Labor Bund after the Holocaust, and his book, The International Jewish Labor Bund after 1945: toward a global history, was released in early 2012 by Rutgers University Press. He has received fellowships, scholarships, and grants from Monash University; Jacob Waks Cultural Centre, Melbourne; Center for Jewish History, New York; Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture at Leipzig University; and the Goldreich Family Institute for Yiddish Language, Literature, and Culture at Tel Aviv University.

Dr Noah Shenker 6a Foundation Lecturer in Holocaust and Genocide Studies


In 2009 Noah received a Ph.D. in Critical Studies from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts, completing his dissertation Embodied Memory: The Formation of Archived Audiovisual Holocaust Testimony in the United States. During his doctoral studies he was the recipient of various fellowships including the Charles H. Revson Fellowship for Archival Research at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museums Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies. From 2009 to 2012 he was a postdoctoral fellow at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, where he taught courses on Holocaust representation, global cinema, and Holocaust historiography.

Hinde Ena Burstin Coordinator, Kronhill Program in Yiddish Language and Culture
Hinde has taught Yiddish language, literature and culture for over 20 years and has been an invited guest lecturer in Europe, South Africa, the United States, Canada and Australia. She is an internationally published Yiddish writer and researcher, who is currently researching her PhD on Yiddish women poets in the 1920s. In 2012, she was the sole invited Australian delegate to the Permanence of Yiddish Colloquium at UNESCO.

Paul Forgasz Lecturer in Jewish history and Jewish Education


Paul is the coordinator and lecturer of the two first year foundation courses in Jewish history offered by the ACJC: The Bible as History and Conflict & Coexistence: Jews, Christians, Muslims. He convenes the Jewish studies teacher training program with the Faculty of Education.

Dr Nathan Wolski Bori and Helen Liberman Family Lecturer in Jewish Studies
Nathan works in the field of Jewish mysticism, and is currently involved in a critical translation of the central corpus of Jewish mystical scholarship, The Zohar. He is the author of the book, Journey Into the Zohar.

Helen Midler Centre Manager


Helen joined the ACJC in August 2010 with many years of experience in administration and event management within the Jewish community and also in the broader corporate and not-for-profit sectors.

Eva and Les Erdi Lectureship in Israel Studies


This year the ACJC will be making a new appointment in Israel and Middle East studies to support our extensive teaching and research program. The ACJC mourns the passing of Les Erdi OAM on Australia Day this year. 4 Our part-time Teaching and Research staff also includes: Sue Hampel, Dr Miriam Munz, Dan Rabinovici, Dr Margi Taft. 5

Monash Wallenberg Oration


Image: M Baker

PUBLIC LECTURE PROGRAM 2013


Unless otherwise specified, all events are free and no prior registration is required.

Ending Mass Atrocities in the 21st Century


PUBLIC LECTURE: Dr Simon Adams WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 28 February 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Each year, the Monash Wallenberg Oration explores important themes in Holocaust and genocide scholarship. It is named in memory of Raoul Wallenberg, who risked his life to save Jews during the Holocaust. In the half century after the Holocaust, Never Again was never more than an empty promise. The international community failed to stop the genocide in Cambodia, dithered as crimes against humanity were committed in Bosnia, and passively watched as a million people were killed in the Rwandan genocide. Shamed by these failures, in 2005 the largest gathering of heads of state and government ever assembled, meeting at the United Nations World Summit, unanimously adopted the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). R2P is a commitment to protect all human beings from crimes against humanity, genocide, ethnic cleansing and war crimes. But what is required for R2P to have meaning, save lives and prevent mass atrocities in the twenty-first century? 6
Simon Adams is the Executive Director of the leading genocide prevention agency, The Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect in New York. Dr Adams has previously worked with NGOs, governments and community organizations in South Africa, East Timor, Northern Ireland, Rwanda, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and elsewhere. He is the author of four books and numerous academic articles with a focus on international conflict. He served as Pro Vice Chancellor (International Engagement) at Monash University and as Vice President of its South African campus between 20082010.

Speaker Series: Semester 1


Formations of Memory: Documenting Holocaust Testimony
PUBLIC LECTURE: Dr Noah Shenker WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 7 March 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University
Dr Shenker is the 6a Foundation Lecturer in Holocaust and Genocide Studies within the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation at Monash University.

A lecture series on Jewish memory, history and testimony


Images: E Santos

Rehabilitating the Child: The Buchenwald Boys in Postwar France


PUBLIC LECTURE: Dr Daniella Doron WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 11 April 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University
Dr Doron is a Lecturer in Holocaust and Genocide within the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation at Monash University, a position supported through the philanthropy of Naomi Milgrom.

This talk will provide a comparative analysis of Holocaust testimony archives, calling attention to the myriad ways that audiovisual testimonies, especially those of the Shoah, are shaped by a variety of external factors, including institutional histories and archival practices.

This talk will examine the rehabilitation efforts that surrounded a group of 500 teenage Holocaust survivors, referred to as the Buchenwald Boys, after their arrival in France in June 1945. The lecture is being held on Buchenwald Liberation day and will be followed by an event in honour of the Buchenwald Boys who came to Australia.

Yiddish in the Aftermath: Reading Archival Sources on the Holocaust


PUBLIC LECTURE: Dr Karen Auerbach WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 21 March 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University
Dr Auerbach is the Jacob Kronhill Lecturer in East European Jewish History within the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation at Monash University.

The Alliance Isralite Universelle and Jewish Emancipation


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Jay Winter WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 18 April 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University
Jay M. Winter, the Charles J. Stille Professor of History, at Yale University is a specialist on World War I and its impact on the 20th century.

Yiddish vocabulary that developed during the Holocaust reflected the experiences and preoccupations of East European Jews in conditions of persecution and genocide. This talk will use a postwar Yiddish dictionary of wartime vocabulary as a guide to testimonies and diaries, shedding light on everyday life during the Holocaust.

Now 150 years old, the Alliance has been and remains a unique secular and non-political expression of the idea of emancipation as a centrepiece of Jewish life both outside and inside Israel. This lecture by Jay Winter tells the story of this French institution and its contribution to todays human rights movement.

The Holocaust, Genocide and Human Rights


An ACJC Lecture Series presented with The Wheeler Centre

A Global History of Genocide


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Ben Kiernan WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 29 July 2013 6:15 pm The Wheeler Centre, 176 Little Lonsdale Street Melbourne

Bookings Essential via The Wheeler Centre wheelercentre.com


In this illustrated lecture, Professor Kiernan identifies powerful connections and patterns that for nearly every case of genocide gave early warning of the catastrophe to come: racism or religious prejudice, territorial expansionism, and obsessions with antiquity and agrarianism. He highlights the rich historical evidence and the importance of its telltale signs for predicting and preventing future genocides.
Image: E Santos

Ben Kiernan is the A.Whitney Griswold Professor of History, Chair of the Council on Southeast Asian Studies, and Director of the Genocide Studies Program at Yale University. His latest book is the multiple award-winning Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur (2007).

The Holocaust and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Jay Winter WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 22 April 2013 6:15 pm The Wheeler Centre, 176 Little Lonsdale Street Melbourne

Hitler and the Decisions for the Final Solution


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Christopher Browning WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 23 September 2013 6:15 pm The Wheeler Centre, 176 Little Lonsdale Street Melbourne

Bookings Essential via The Wheeler Centre wheelercentre.com The passage of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in December 1948 was the last act of the Second World War and the first act of the post-war human rights movement. This lecture examines the role of Ren Cassin, drafter of the Universal Declaration, in making human rights work a fundamental form of Holocaust commemoration.
Jay M. Winter is Charles J. Stille Professor of history at Yale University. He is the author of Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History (1995); Remembering War (2006) and Dreams of Peace and Freedom (2006). In 1997, he received an Emmy award for the best documentary series of the year as co-producer and co-writer of The Great War and the shaping of the twentieth century, an eight-hour series broadcast on PBS and the BBC, and shown subsequently in 28 countries. He is editor-in-chief of the three-volume Cambridge History of the First World War, to be published in 2014. His biography of Ren Cassin, written with Antoine Prost, published by Fayard in French in 2011, will appear in an English edition in 2013, published by Cambridge University Press. Professor Winter will be based at Monash as a guest of the Arts Faculty.

Bookings Essential via The Wheeler Centre wheelercentre.com


This lecture reviews the long-running debate among historians over Hitlers role in the decision-making process that led to the Final Solution. With particular emphasis on documents that came to light after the fall of communism and the opening of East European archives in 1989, this lecture will argue for two incremental decision-making processes, the first of which reached closure in the July 1941 and sealed the fate of Soviet Jews, and a second of which reached closure in October 1941 and sealed the fate of European Jews. Christopher Browning is the Frank Porter Graham Professor of History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. He is the author of eight books and has served as an expert witness in war crimes trials in Australia, Canada, and Great Britain. He has also served as an expert witness in two Holocaust denial cases: the second Zndel trial in Toronto in 1988 and in David Irvings libel suit against Deborah Lipstadt in London in 2000.

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Jacob Kronhill Lecture Series in Yiddish Culture


This 3 part lecture series will be delivered by Professor Michael Steinlauf, the 2013 Jacob Kronhill Visiting Scholar in Yiddish Culture at Monash University.

Bondage to the Dead? Poland and the Memory of the Holocaust


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Michael Steinlauf WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 16 May 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Michael Steinlauf teaches Jewish history and culture and directs the program in Holocaust and Genocide Studies at Gratz College in Philadelphia. He is the author of Bondage to the Dead: Poland and the Memory of the Holocaust, which examines how the experience of witnessing the Holocaust shaped Polish history and consciousness in the half century after the war. He is a contributing editor to the YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe and the editor of Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, vol. 16 (2003), the first collection of studies focusing on Jewish popular culture in Poland and its contemporary afterlife. His writings have been translated into Hebrew, Polish, German and Italian. He is currently at work on a study of the Yiddish writer and activist Y. L. Peretz.

This lecture will examine Polish-Jewish relations over the past two decades, focusing on attempts to explore the dark corners of the past as well as contemporary initiatives to renew Jewish life and culture in Poland.

Hope and Fear: Y. L Peretz and the Dialectics of Diaspora Nationalism


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Michael Steinlauf WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 13 May 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Something Lost That Seeks its Name: The Wanderings of Anskis Dybbuk
PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Michael Steinlauf WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 20 May 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Y. L. Peretz (18521915) is known as the father of modern Yiddish literature. This lecture will focus on the last ten years of his career when, amidst a burgeoning new secular Jewish culture, Peretz sought a new vision of Jewish identity.

S. Anskis work about spirit possession, The Dybbuk: Between Two Worlds, became the most popular play in the history of Yiddish theatre. This lecture will track the traces of Anskis Dybbuk both on and off the stage over the past century.

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Monash Israel Oration

Image: E Santos

Image: E Santos

Jews and Christians in Dialogue

Menachem Begins Legacy and Israels Future

PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Amy-Jill Levine WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Sunday 19 May 2013 7.30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University
Amy-Jill Levine is E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies, and Professor of Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School and College of Arts and Sciences. Her books include The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus (HarperOne), the edited collection, The Historical Jesus in Context (Princeton), and the fourteen-volume edited series, Feminist Companions to the New Testament and Early Christian Writings (Continuum).

PUBLIC LECTURE: Dr Daniel Gordis WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Tuesday 4 June 2013 7.30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University
Dr. Daniel Gordis is Senior Vice President and the Koret Distinguished Fellow at the Shalem Center in Jerusalem. The author of numerous books on Jewish thought and currents in Israel, and a recent winner of the National Jewish Book Award, Dr. Gordis was the founding dean of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies at the University of Judaism, the first rabbinical college on the West Coast of the United States. Dr. Gordis joined Shalem in 2007 to help found Israels first liberal arts college, after spending nine years as vice president of the Mandel Foundation in Israel and director of its Leadership Institute. Daniel Gordis is in Australia as a Visiting Scholar of The Shalom Institute

This lecture will be delivered in two-parts: 1. Bearing False Witness: What are the stereotypes Jews and Christians have of each other, why do they arise, and how might correct information lead to greater love of our neighbours? 2. On Different Grounds Jewish and Christian Understandings of the Land of Israel: The divides within and between Jewish and Christian communities over the Middle East are based on more than contemporary political views; they are also grounded in Scripture, worship, and history. To communicate in the present, we need to know our respective histories.

On the centennial of Menachem Begins birth in Poland, Daniel Gordis explores the life and legacy of Israels former Prime Minister based on a biography he is writing about one of Israels most enduring and surprising national figures.

The Monash Israel Oration honours the name of Sir John Monash through a public lecture on the history and culture of modern Israel. Past orators include Fania-Oz Salzberger, Itamar Rabinovitch, Anita Shapira and Amos Oz. 15

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Comparative Perspectives On Genocide: The Challenges of the Holocaust Paradigm


Professor Hasia Diner Don & Sonia Marejn Visiting Scholar in Jewish Studies
Hasia Diner is the Paul and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History at New York University and is the Director of the Goldstein Goren Center for American Jewish History. Her most recent book, We Remember with Reverence and Love: American Jews and the Myth of Silence After the Holocaust, 19451962 (2009) received both the National Jewish Book Award in the category of American Jewish Studies and also the Saul Viener Prize of the American Jewish Historical Society.

Image: A Morgan

Aftermath Conference: Public Symposium


PUBLIC SYMPOSIUM: WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Ben Kiernan, Hasia Diner, Richard Bessel and other conference speakers Sunday 4 August 2013 5:00 pm 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, Halstead Theatre K3.09, Level 3, K Building, Monash University How do scholars and archivists incorporate sources encompassing memoirs, architecture and topographies, testimonies, photographs, and moving image footage, into the writing of the Holocaust in particular and genocides more broadly? For further information, visit the Aftermath conference website: artsonline.monash.edu.au/aftermath

Professor Ben Kiernan Dr Jan Randa Visiting Scholar in Holocaust and Genocide Studies
Ben Kiernan is the A. Whitney Griswold Professor of History, Chair of the Council on Southeast Asian Studies, and Director of the Genocide Studies Program at Yale University. For more than thirty years, in Australia and the United States, Kiernan has documented the crimes of the Khmer Rouge regime and worked to bring the perpetrators to justice. At Yale in 1994 he founded the Cambodian Genocide Program. Kiernan is the author of How Pol Pot Came to Power: Colonialism, Nationalism and Communism in Cambodia, 19301975 (1985, 2004); The Pol Pot Regime: Race, Power and Genocide in Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge, 19751979 (1996, 2002, 2008); and Genocide and Resistance in Southeast Asia: Documentation, Denial, and Justice in Cambodia and East Timor (2007). He won the Critical Asian Studies Prize for his anthology Conflict and Change in Cambodia (2006). His latest book is the multiple award-winning Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination from Sparta to Darfur (2007).

The 3rd Dr Jan Randa International Conference in Holocaust and Genocide Studies together with the Institute for Public History at Monash bring together distinguished keynote scholars, academics and postgraduate students from around the world. Join our visiting keynote scholars, including Ben Kiernan, Hasia Diner, Richard Bessel, for this engaging public symposium. The symposium will address conference themes relating to sites and sources of history and memory: What can we learn from the Holocaust about other genocides? What can be learned from the Holocaust about perpetrator, bystander and victim behavior in other genocidal contexts?

Professor Richard Bessel Dr Jan Randa Visiting Scholar in Holocaust and Genocide Studies
Richard Bessel is Professor of Twentieth Century History at the University of York. He has held visiting Chairs at the University of Bielefeld, the University of Freiburg and the University of Hannover, and was the editor of the journal German History from 1993 to 2003. His most recent books include Germany 1945: From War to Peace (London and New York, 2009), (ed., with Claudia Haake), Removing Peoples: Forced Removal in the Modern World (Oxford, 2009), and Nazism and War (London and New York, 2004). He is also the author of numerous edited volumes including War, Empire and Slavery, 1770830; Life after Death: Approaches to a Cultural and Social History of Europe during the 1940s and 1950s; Life in the Third Reich and Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany: Comparisons and Contrasts. He is currently working on a general history of violence and perceptions of violence in the twentieth century.

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Speaker Series: Semester 2


This academic series is presented by two outstanding scholars of American Jewish History

Hungering for America: Jewish Foodways in the Age of Migration


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Hasia Diner WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 8 August 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Food has been not only important in Jewish culture and history. It has been central to the Jews ideas about themselves and about others, as well as their social and communal practices. Historically Jewish communities functioned around the sanctity of food and communal control. How did migration to the United States challenge and expand Jewish foodways? How did the vast diversity of America and the abundance of food impact the way they engaged with food?
Image: Jean-Pierre Jans

Professor Hasia Diner Don & Sonia Marejn Visiting Scholar in Jewish Studies Hasia Diner is the Paul and Sylvia Steinberg Professor of American Jewish History at New York University and is the Director of the Goldstein Goren Center for American Jewish History. A specialist in immigration and ethnic history, American Jewish history and the history of American women, she is the author of numerous published books, including In the Almost Promised Land: American Jews and Blacks, 19151935 (1977, reissued, 1995); Erins Daughters in America: Irish Immigrant Women in the Nineteenth Century (1984), and A Time for Gathering: The Second Migration, 18201880; Lower East Side Memories: The Jewish Place in America (2000); Hungering for America: Italian, Irish, and Jewish Foodways in the Age of Migration; Her Works Praise Her ( co-author, 2002); The Jews of the United States: 16542000 (2004). Her most recent book, We Remember with Reverence and Love: American Jews and the Myth of Silence After the Holocaust, 19451962 (2009) received both the National Jewish Book Award in the category of American Jewish Studies and also the Saul Viener Prize of the American Jewish Historical Society. 18

Professor Deborah Dash Moore Don & Sonia Marejn Visiting Scholar in Jewish Studies Deborah Dash Moore is Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professor of History at the University of Michigan and Director of the Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies. She specialises in twentieth century American Jewish History and is the author of numerous books Her first book, At Home in America: Second Generation New York Jews (1981) explores how the children of immigrants created an ethnic world that blended elements of Jewish and American culture into a vibrant urban society. To the Golden Cities: Pursuing the American Jewish Dream in Miami and L. A. (1994) follows those big city Jews who chose to move to new homes after World War II. In GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation (2004), she charts the lives of fifteen young Jewish men as they faced military service and tried to make sense of its demands. With Nurith Gertz, Moore edited volume 10 of the Posen Library of Jewish Civilization and Culture (2012) and she served as general editor for the three-volume City of Promises: A History of the Jews of New York. The latter received the Everett Best Book of the Year National Jewish Book Award.
(In partnership with the Monash History Program)

Peddlers: A New World Jewish History


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Hasia Diner WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 15 August 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Peddlers, ordinary, unsung, and usually anonymous, Jewish men made up the foot soldiers of the great Jewish migration, spanning the long era from the end of the eighteenth century into the early twentieth. Jews from Central and Eastern Europe as well as the Islamic lands left their homes for a series of new world the British Isles, Scandinavia, North, South, and Central America, the Antipodes, and southern Africa and used peddling as the strategy which got them started in these places. What were the implications of this particular occupation, one which forced them to knock on their customers doors and to speak to the customers in their own languages, for Jewish integration and transformation in these new places?

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Walkers in the City: Jewish American Photographers


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Deborah Dash Moore WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 22 August 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Explaining the Holocaust

Beginning in the 1930s, Jewish photographers established a new mode of American street photography, the origins of what would be called the New York School. Mostly working-class young people, some not yet out of high school, they produced a striking cultural efflorescence. Many were attracted by progressive politics. These neophytes rejected standard representations of New York as a vertical, inhumanly scaled Gotham. Despite their eagerness to join a burgeoning field of photography, they declined to portray city residents as ciphers defined by victimization. Instead they tried to capture the evanescent matrix of human interactions at street level. They set out to remake photography and the way New Yorkers were perceived. This lecture explores their images of the city and how they taught us to see in a new way.

This four part lectures series will be delivered by Professor Christopher Browning, the 2103 Dr Jan Randa Visiting Scholar in Holocaust & Genocide Studies.
Image: E Santos

Professor Christopher Browning is the Frank Porter Graham Professor of History at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Deborah Dash Moore WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Thursday 29 August 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Collected Memories: Holocaust History and Postwar Testimony (2003), and The Origins of the Final Solution: The Evolution of Before taking up this position in the fall of 1999, he Nazi Jewish Policy, September taught for 25 years at Pacific Lutheran University in 1939March 1942 (2004), and Tacoma, Washington. Browning received his B.A. Remembering Survival. Inside a degree from Oberlin College in 1967 and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Nazi Slave Labor Camp (2010).He is also co-editor of Every Day Lasts a Year: A Jewish Familys in 1968 and 1975 respectively.He is the author of Correspondence from Poland (2007). eight books: The Final Solution and the German Foreign Office (1978), Fateful Months: Essays on the Browning has served as an expert witness in war Emergence of the Final Solution (1985), Ordinary crimes trials in Australia, Canada, and Great Britain. Men: Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in He has also served as an expert witness in two Poland (1992), The Path to Genocide (1992), Nazi Holocaust denial cases: the second Zndel trial Policy, Jewish Workers, German Killers (2000), in Toronto in 1988 and in David Irvings libel suit against Deborah Lipstadt in London in 2000.

Whether they came from Sioux Falls, South Dakota or the Bronx, New York, over half a million Jews entered the United States armed forces during the Second World War. Uprooted from their working- and middle-class neighbourhoods, they joined every branch of the military and saw action on all fronts. This lecture charts the lives of these young Jewish men as they faced military service in World War II and tried to make sense of its demands, simultaneously wrestling with what it meant to be an American and a Jew. Military service taught Jews to fight, a lesson they learned not only for themselves as Jewish men, but also for their country and their Jewish people. The costs of this conflict, especially for those who served in Europe, was simultaneously physical, emotional, and spiritual.

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Hitler and the Decisions for the Final Solution


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Christopher Browning WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 23 September 2013 6.15 pm The Wheeler Centre, 176 Little Lonsdale Street Melbourne

Holocaust History and Testimony: The Survivor as Witness


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Christopher Browning WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 7 October 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Bookings Essential via The Wheeler Centre wheelercentre.com This lecture reviews the long-running debate among historians over Hitlers role in the decision-making process that led to the Final Solution. With particular emphasis on documents that came to light after the fall of communism and the opening of East European archives in 1989, this lecture will argue for two incremental decision-making processes, the first of which reached closure in the July 1941 and sealed the fate of Soviet Jews, and a second of which reached closure in October 1941 and sealed the fate of European Jews. This lecture examines the complexities of survivor testimony as a form of historical evidence. Through a case study of the Starachowice factory slave labor camps based almost entirely on survivor testimonies, it seeks to demonstrate how important aspects and episodes of the Holocaust that would otherwise be lost to history can be reconstructed through the careful use of such evidence.

Revisiting the Perpetrators: Why did they Kill?


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Christopher Browning WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 30 September 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

Holocaust Denial in the Courtroom: The Historian as Expert Witness


PUBLIC LECTURE: Professor Christopher Browning WHEN: TIME: LOCATION: Monday 14 October 2013 7:30 pm Caulfield Campus, H116, Monash University

This lecture looks first at how scholars in the past have tried to explain perpetrator motivation, culminating in the so-called Goldhagen controversy. It then examines both new social-psychological insights that have emerged and new empirical evidence that has been uncovered since the 1990s.

Through the autobiographical lens of Brownings personal experience as an expert witness in the second trial of Ernst Zndel in Toronto in 1988 and the trial of David Irvings libel suit against Deborah Lipstadt and Penguin in London in 2000, this lecture examines both the contrasting aspects of each trial as well as the major common challenge facing the expert witnesses, namely the need to provide convincing evidence for the historical malpractice and conscious falsification practiced by each denier.

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Image: E Santos

Judaism & Jewish History


The ACJC offers a Minor sequence in the literature, theology, philosophy, history and culture of Jews at an undergraduate and postgraduate level. As well as developing specialised knowledge of Judaism and Jewish history, the program trains students in the skills of critical inquiry and research.
Course code ATS1323 ATS1322 ATS1041 ATS1040 Unit The Bible as History (S1 CA CL) Conflict and Coexistence: Jews, Christians, Muslims (S2 CA, CL) World Religions (S1 CA CL) Religions and the Modern World (S2 CA, CL)

S1 = Semester 1 S2 = Semester 2 CA = Caulfield CL = Clayton

UNITS ON OFFER IN 2013

Israel and Middle East


The Israel and Middle East teaching program is set within a range of global perspectives incorporating Israeli history, politics, law, international relations, public affairs, economy, cultures and arts. Exchange programs incorporating Israel and the Middle East exist with the Hebrew University and Tel Aviv University.
Course code ATS2599/3599 ATS2580/3580 Unit Modern Israel: History, Politics, Society (S2 CL) The Middle East in the Modern World (S2 CA, CL) 25

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S1 = Semester 1 S2 = Semester 2 CA = Caulfield CL = Clayton

Holocaust and Genocide Studies


The Holocaust and Genocide Studies program provides undergraduate and postgraduate study sequences focused on knowledge about the Holocaust and other cases of genocide across the world. It explores the Holocaust as a turning point in human history, the causes and effects of modern genocides, and what is now being done to prevent mass atrocity.
Course code ATS2600/3600 ATS2057 ATS2632/3632 ATS2583/3583 Unit The Holocaust in An Age of Genocide (S2 CA, CL) Genocide (S1 CA, CL) Post-Conflict: Justice, Memory, Reconciliation (S2 CA, CL) History and Film: Nazi Germany and the Jewish Holocaust

The ACJC is known for its overseas courses and exchange programs which internationalise the student experience. Our courses are all intensive units held during the winter or summer semester. These units are only open to students enrolled in a degree course. Cross-accreditation from other universities in Australia is also available.

S1 = Semester 1 S2 = Semester 2 CA = Caulfield CL = Clayton

Teacher Training
The aims of this program, a joint venture of the ACJC and the network of Melbourne Jewish dayschools, are to create a cadre of well-trained Jewish studies teachers and to provide professional development opportunities for existing teachers of Jewish studies. As part of their studies in education, students can undertake a two semester course which specialises in the principles and practice of Jewish education.

Yiddish Language and Culture


The ACJC offers an undergraduate language program in Yiddish for beginners, intermediate and advanced students. Students may also wish to undertake a period of intensive language study abroad for which scholarships are available.
Course code ATS1336/1337 ATS2795/2796 ATS3814/3815 26 Unit Yiddish Language, Culture and Literature 1A (S1 CL) & 1B (S2 CL) Yiddish Language, Culture and Literature 2A (S1 CL) & 2B (S2 CL) Yiddish Language, Culture and Literature 3A (S1 CL) & 3B (S2 CL)

OVERSEAS STUDY INTENSIVES

S1 = Semester 1 S2 = Semester 2 CA = Caulfield CL = Clayton

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Image: M Baker

Final Journey: Remembering the Holocaust


ATS3284/ATS4286/APG4286 (winter semester Prato)

Seeking Justice: South Africa and Rwanda


ATS3314/ATS4314/APG4314 (winter semester Monash South Africa)

This intensive unit explores the modern history of European Jews before and after the Holocaust. Students will travel to the major centres of interwar Jewish life in France, Italy, Germany, Poland and Lithuania, and encounter the diverse heritage of Jewish life in each country. The unit will explore issues central to this period and the individuals who shaped their times. Students will visit museums, synagogues, cemeteries, destroyed ghettos and sites of mass murder such as Auschwitz-Birkenau. We will ask what remains of the past by looking at the ways in which the history of European Jews is being memorialised and renewed through efforts at reconstruction, immigration, and commemoration.
DATES: ITINERARY 2013: INSTRUCTORS: July 2013 Includes Prato, Berlin, Krakow, Lublin, Zamosc, Vilnius, Bialystok, Warsaw, Paris Dr Karen Auerbach, Dr Daniella Doron

This intensive unit will bring together students from Monash campuses in Australia and South Africa to study the contemporary histories of post-genocide and post-conflict societies. Students will spend one week in Johannesburg and a second week in Kigali exploring public debates on memory, testimony, trauma and justice. Places to be visited include the Apartheid Museum, Soweto, Constitution Hill, the Murambi genocide memorial and Rwandan survivor organisations.
DATES: ITINERARY 2013: INSTRUCTORS: July 2013 Johannesburg, Rwanda Assoc. Professor Mark Baker; Dr Simon Adams; Dr Noah Shenker

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Image: Damon Lynch

War and Peace: Models of Conflict Resolution


ATS3287/ATS4287/APG4287 (winter semester Prato)

GIFTS, ENDOWMENTS AND BEQUESTS

This course starts at the Monash Prato campus and is based in Israel. The course focuses on the Arab-Israel conflict and investigates current attempts to mediate peace between Jews and Palestinians, the impact of the conflict on the lives of people, settlements and security issues, terrorism and counter-terrorism, Jerusalem and its holy sites. In some years, the course will also travel to alternate sites of conflict, such as Northern Ireland or the former Yugoslavia.
DATES: ITINERARY 2014: INSTRUCTORS: July 2014 Prato, Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Ramallah, Bethlehem, Haifa Assoc. Professor Mark Baker

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Image: Victor Majzner

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ADVISORY BOARD

SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES

Professor Rae Frances, Dean of the Faculty of Arts The ACJC is an integral section of the Faculty of Arts which intersects with all of our academic disciplines. It is known for its excellence in research and teaching, and its strong contribution to building bridges of understanding between cultures and religions. On behalf of the Faculty and University, Id like to thank supporters of the ACJC for enabling the tremendous growth of Jewish studies at Monash.

Each year, the ACJC awards a number of scholarship to students enrolled in its courses and units. These scholarships are to support travel for overseas intensive study, archival research and language courses. The ACJC thanks our donors who have generously supported these student opportunities.

Robyne Schwartz AM, Chair of the Advisory Board The Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation is a unique institution that brings Jewish studies to the Australian and global public. Over the past decade, the generosity of donors has secured the foundations of the ACJC through the establishment in perpetuity of several professorial Chairs and lectureships. As Chairperson of the ACJC, I thank all of our supporters who have enabled this growth. The Centre continues to seek gifts, endowments and bequests for scholarships and research. Named donations are an ideal way to continue the legacy of our parents and loved ones who opened up new worlds of educational opportunity in our community. I look forward to sharing with you the fruits of this exciting program for 2013.

Leizor Pinskier Memorial Holocaust and Genocide Studies Scholarship Paul Huppert Travel Scholarship to Israel Oscar Sokolski Holocaust and Genocide Studies Scholarship Peter and Barbara Kolliner Research Travel Internship Rivka and Mordechai Lewin Memorial Yiddish Language Travel Scholarship Zelman and Diana Elton Honours Research Scholarship Mina and Leo Fink Language Intensive Travel Scholarship Dalia Pizmony Memorial Hebrew Language Intensive Travel Scholarship L & R Uechtritz Foundation Scholarships for Monash South Africa Students Dr Jan Randa Aftermath Conference Bursaries Jacob Kronhill Research Travel Internship Gershon and Rose Hasen Internship at the Global Centre for Responsibility to Protect

The ACJC is governed by Monash University regulations and an Advisory Board composed of university and external members. We value the academic independence of our Centre and its staff in accordance with our mission and the ethical practices of Monash University. Robyne Schwarz AM, Chair Professor Raelene Frances, Dean of Arts Professor David Copolov, Office of Vice-Chancellor Damien Farrell, External Relations and Development Associate Professor Mark Baker, ACJC Director Professor Alistair Thomson, Head of School of Philosophy, History and International Studies Professor Ilana Snyder, Faculty of Education Bernard Marin AM Monica Kempler Dr Helen Light AM Gary Samowitz Romy Grace 32

Each year, the ACJC awards prizes to students enrolled in its courses and units to recognise excellence in coursework and research. The ACJC is grateful to our donors for providing these opportunities to Monash students. Bernard & Helen Shulkes Honours Prize in Jewish Civilisation Bernard & Helen Shulkes Research Prize in Jewish Civilisation Bernard & Helen Shulkes Prize in Holocaust Studies Peter & Barbara Kolliner Undergraduate Prize in Jewish Civilisation Stewart Baron Prize in Israel and Middle East Studies Jacob Kronhill Prize in Yiddish Language Prize for an Overseas Study Unit (supported by Marcia Pinskier)

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RESEARCH PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS

DONORS OF DISTINCTION

Visual History Archive Shoah Foundation


Monash University is the first Australasian university to provide access to the Visual History Archive of the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education. With a collection of nearly 52,000 video testimonies of Holocaust survivors and other witnesses, in 32 languages and from 56 countries, this is the largest visual history archive in the world. The archive is being used for student study and research.

Governors

Fellows

Gen08: Australian and New Zealand Jewish Population Study


The Australian Jewish Population Study was established in 2007 through a partnership between Monash Universitys Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation and Jewish Care Victoria. The data sources for the project include the Australian Census, the Gen08 survey completed by over 6,000 respondents, focus groups, and consultation with organisational leaders. Its objective is to further understanding of the demographic characteristics of the Jewish population and of constant and changing patterns within the Jewish communities of Australia, to provide the knowledge base to inform communal planning.

Jacob Kronhill Memorial Fund Bori and Helen Liberman Family Lee Liberman and family The Pratt Foundation Victor Smorgon Charitable Fund
Patrons

Polish Testimonies Project


The Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation is working with the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw to develop a web site that will make available English translations of early Polish and Yiddish Holocaust testimonies from the institutes archival collections. Two students in ACJCs 2012 study-abroad unit on Holocaust memory helped to prepare testimonies and locate accompanying photographs during internships in Warsaw.

6a Foundation Besen Family Foundation The late Les and Eva Erdi Dinah Krongold and Family Lipkies Family Don and the late Sonia Marejn Naomi Milgrom Benjamin Slome Charitable Foundation
Benefactors

Yiddish Melbourne Project


The Yiddish Melbourne project is designed and led by Professor Andrew Markus. Much of the research and writing was undertaken by Dr Miriam Munz and Dr Margaret Taft. The project has been made possible by funding from the Australian Research Council under its Discovery Projects scheme, with additional funding in 2010 from the Pratt Foundation and the Hans Bachrach Foundation.

Roslyn Smorgon Program in Jewish Communal Service & Leadership


Named in honour of Roslyn Smorgon who left a legacy of Jewish communal service and leadership, this program is the first of its kind in Australia. The Jewish Communal Service and Leadership program deepens peoples understanding of Jewish life in Australia and the challenges and opportunities that face the community. The program prepares students for leadership positions in the Jewish community and professionally develops the skills of people already engaged in the field. 34

Debbie and Albert Dadon Mr Z Elton and Family Leo and Mina Fink Fund Gandel Philanthropy Dina and Ron Goldschlager Family Charitable Foundation Jewish Care Israel and the late Laura Kipen David, Barry and Rodney Smorgon Families Sunraysia Foundation Trawalla Foundation

Helen and Michael Abeles Nuritt Borsky, Mooky Bialylew Philip and Vivien Brass Danielle Charak, Floris Kalman Morry Fraid, the late Ruben Fried Eva and Tab Fried Gita Investments Leon Goldman Michele Huppert Peter and Barbara Kolliner Barbara and Barry Landau Family Lynette and Michael Lawrence George Lewin The late Isador and Rebecca Magid Miriam Mahemoff Andrew and Simone Markus Philip and Sylvia Munz Justice Howard Nathan Rita and Harry Perelberg Nathan Pinskier, Henry Pinskier David Ringelblum and Family Robert Sadlon Michael and Susie Small Ilana and Ray Snyder Victor Spitzer Jonathan and Margaret Taft Werdiger Family

Every effort has been made to accurately record our donors. For further information or to inform us of an error or omission please contact Lisa Flower, Manager, Donor Stewardship and Recognition on +613 9903 4649 or email donorservices@monash.edu

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Image: Victor Majzner

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