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he said, and theres a lot of play-

ers who have come to the table to


help with nancing. Its imperative
they keep the ability to buy that
building and have it as part of their
nancial package.
Councilman Brent Ricker asked
Sharp if Heartland would consider
increasing the amount it pays the
city for use of the building if an ex-
tension were granted. After some
discussion, Sharp and the council
agreed to extend the existing lease
with an option to purchase for up
to 12 months, and that Heartland
would take over payment of ap-
proximately $10,200 in property
taxes on the property for the period
of the lease.
Garbage service
As part of his regular report,
city superintendent Brent Wise
discussed the feasibility of the city
operating its own garbage service.
He listed a number of startup costs
such as purchase of a truck and
garbage receptacles and ongoing
expenses such as landll fees, fuel
and wages. The only difference
would be whether the city would
hire a full-time or part-time em-
ployee.
With a part-time employee,
Wise estimated a rst-year cost
of $233,205.25 to begin the ser-
vice. In sub
number of proposals to generate
increased road fund revenue across
the state. A 2011 DOT report listed
a number of other proposals that
had received some degree of sup-
port from the public: a one cent tax
per bushel of corn/soybeans that
would be spent on local roads in
the county from which the revenue
was generated, an increase of the
fee for new vehicle registrations
from ve to six percent, raising the
cost of a drivers license, a fee tied
to vehicle miles traveled, a sales
tax on fuel purchases and a at fee
charged on high-fuel-efciency/al-
ternatively fueled/hybrid vehicles.
Another proposal would create
segments of toll roads similar to
the Kansas Turnpike and others
found mostly in eastern states.
County bond issue
An increase in the fuel tax
would require passage through
the Iowa legislature, and accord-
ing to legislators Cecil Dolecheck
and Joni Ernst, discussion of this
issue is currently not a top priority
in this legislative session. Without
state action to generate needed
road revenue, the burden of the
cost to repair and maintain county
roads falls upon residents through
increased property taxes.
A $9 million bond issue was
brought before the voters in Ring-
gold county in November 2011,
but it was defeated with only 48
percent voting in favor of the
bond. According to Gunsolley,
the revenue generated by the bond
would have been dedicated entire-
ly to repair and maintain approxi-
mately 50 miles of the 75 miles
of the countys seal coat roads. At
the time, Gunsolley had estimated
the bond would have increased
residental propert y tax es
Mount Ayr
Volume 148, Number 52 Thursday, February 21, 2013 Mount Ayr, Iowa 50854 USPS No. 365-120 Visit us on the web at www.mountayrnews.com 75
Record News
The Mount Ayr city council re-
ceived renewal information on the
citys insurance coverage, extend-
ed a building lease with Heartland
Energy Solutions and continued
discussion about the feasibility of
a city-operated garbage service at
its regular meeting this week.
Insurance
Phil Tyler, the agent responsible
for the citys property, casualty and
workers compensation insurance
coverage, was on hand to explain
the renewal process as well as the
likelihood of increased premiums,
especially for workers compensa-
tion coverage.
Tyler walked the council
through changes in the insurance
industry and the mechanism used
to set workers compensation rates.
He explained these rates are set by
the National Council of Compen-
sation (NCC), which examines the
rate of losses and the severity of
losses each year. Based upon their
research, he said the NCC has set
an average four percent rate in-
crease effective April 1 with anoth-
er seven percent average increase
effective July 1.
Tyler agreed to prepare for the
seeking of bids for the next three
years of coverage, and a decision
to award the coverage will be made
at the April 1 council meeting.
Heartland building lease
Charlie Sharp, representing
Council talks
leases, garbage,
insurance costs
Heartland Energy Solutions, ap-
peared before the council to re-
quest a short-term extension to the
existing ve-year lease on a city-
owned building on South Cleve-
land Street. The original agreement
set February 23, 2013 as the date
by which Heartland would agree to
purchase the property and March
31 as the end date of the agreement
overall.
As part of his presentation,
Sharp provided a detailed review
of Heartlands progress in design-
ing and producing an energy-ef-
cient wind turbine system. Sharp
said his company is in the process
of arranging a nancial package,
including a letting of stock, that
will raise the capital necessary to
begin full-scale production of the
turbines. He predicted by 2016
Heartland could employ up to 170
people and turn out 200 turbines
per year. Heartland currently has
22 employees.
He told the council ownership
of the property was an important
piece of the arrangements for -
nancial support, but he asked the
council to extend the lease for nine
to 12 months to allow the nan-
cial arrangements to nalize. Kim
Greenland, president of the local
branch of Great Western Bank,
spoke in support of Sharps re-
quest. We have had a great work-
ing relationship with Heartland,
Cleareld Lions turn out for honor
Members and friends of the Cleareld Lions Club gathered Saturday
morning for a group photo that will be featured in the international orga-
nizations ofcial magazine. Cleareld was selected for the honor after
being recognized as having the largest Lions chapter in the state, despite
being in one of the smallest towns. Representatives for Lions International
were on hand and greeted by the local Lions with a free soup dinner. The
magazine featuring the Cleareld club will be distributed to 1.4 million
Lions members worldwide.
Taking a break
A ock of Canada geese settle in on a pond near Cleareld Saturday morning. The nesting area is posted to keep people away from the several hundred geese gathered there.
Farmer/author/storyteller Mi-
chael Cotter will present stories
about farming, farmers and their
community 7 p.m. Thursday,
Mar. 14 at the Princess Theater.
The presentation is sponsored by
the Mount Ayr Chamber of Com-
merce, the Princess Theater and
the Mount Ayr Lions.
Tickets are available at the door
for $10.
The Lions will serve a roast
beef and pork loin dinner from 5-7
p.m. at the First Christian Church
prior to the performance. Cost is
$8.00.
According to a press release,
Cotter is a third-generation south-
ern Minnesota farmer, dad and
storyteller. He is a combination
of pride in straight corn rows and
concern for a healthy environ-
ment. His Irish-Catholic heritage
gives him the gift of compassion
and understanding, blended with a
little blarney, and his gentle nature
invites his audiences to look deep
within themselves to nd their own
stories. He believes in farming, in
people and in the healing power of
storytelling.
Cotter is host of Remember
When on KAUS radio in Austin,
MN and founder and host of the
video production Stroies of Heal-
ing. His books include Memo-
ries: A Collection of Personal Sto-
ries, A Storyteller is a Soybean,
and Growing Up on a Minnesota
Farm. His stories are also avail-
able on the CDs Stories of the
Land, People of the Earth,
Dads Stories and Farm Memo-
ries, Minnesota Seasons and
Amazing Grace and Minnesota.
He has appeared at the Smith-
sonian Institution in Washington,
D.C., and the National Storytelling
Festival in Jonesborough, TN. He
also gave the keynote address at
the Texas Storytelling Conference
in Fort Worth.
Michael Cotter
Editors note: This is the nal
part of a three-part series focusing
on infrastructure maintenance in
Ringgold county, specically roads
and bridges. The rst part docu-
mented the need for infrastructure
improvement. The second part ex-
amined the current level of funding
for county roads. This nal install-
ment will summarize proposals for
increasing revenues as well as the
possible ramications if revenues
remain at current levels.
Iowa legislators and local gov-
ernment ofcials are well aware of
the dilemma they face in addressing
the aging road and bridge system
in the state. All agree funding for
roads and bridges has for decades
lagged far behind the amount nec-
essary to keep up with basic main-
tenance and repair, let alone allow-
ing for signicant improvement.
Each year the condition of roads
and bridges across the state contin-
ues to deteriorate, and government
ofcials responsible for efcient
and safe transportation must make
a politically difcult choice: raise
revenues or reduce services.
In response to a 2006 Iowa
Department of Transportation
(DOT) report that identied the
perfect storm in road mainte-
nance needs, the Iowa legislature
created the Transportation Moves
the Economy in the 21st Century
Fund (TIME-21) in 2008. The
legislation creating the fund also
included a number of proposals
to increase road revenues. Unfor-
tunately, most of those proposals
were never implemented, and what
little increased revenue generated
by TIME-21 has not kept up with
skyrocketing costs, thus perpetuat-
ing the perfect storm.
In a discussion of the future of
Iowa roads and bridges, it may be
useful to review some of those pro-
posals a second time.
Increased fuel tax
The increased revenue from
the TIME-21 legislation came pri-
marily from increased registration
fees and other fees on Iowa ve-
Cotter to headline ag
appreciation event
County roads solutions expensive
hicles. According to the DOT, the
state collects approximately $440
million in fuel taxes as compared
with approximately $780 million
in vehicle registrations, licenses
and other fees. The states fuel tax
provides 34 percent of Iowas bud-
get for roads and bridges, while in
many states fuel taxes account for
anywhere from 50 to 70 percent of
road funds.
Iowas fuel tax rates have not
changed since 1989 and currently
rank in the bottom third among
states nationally. Currently fuel
is taxed at 21 cents per gallon for
gasoline, 19 cents per gallon for
ethanol blends and 22.5 cents per
gallon for diesel fuel. According
to DOT estimates, had prices kept
up with ination reected in the
Consumer Price Index, fuel taxes
would be 34.8 cents per gallon for
gasoline, 33.1 cents per gallon for
ethanol blendds and 39.2 cents
per gallon for diesel. Moreover, if
prices had kept pace with Iowas
Construction Cost Index, tax on
gasoline would be 49.7 cents per
gallon, 47.2 cents per gallon on
ethanol blends and 55.9 cents per
gallon for diesel.
One recommendation to gen-
erate revenue to come out of the
TIME-21 report was an across-the-
board increase in the states fuel
tax. The report estimated increased
revenues of $21 million per year
for each cent of tax increase. From
a consumer standpoint, a Univer-
sity of Iowa report estimates the
average Iowan would pay an addi-
tional $4.75 per year for each one
cent increase.
Besides increased road revenue
overall, proponents of a fuel tax
increase cite one main side benet:
capturing more revenue from out-
of-state motorists who pay no reg-
istration fees in the state. A 2007
DOT study revealed Iowa drivers
accounted for 80 percent of road
usage and pay 87 percent of Road
Use Tax Fund (RUTF) revenue. In
comparison, out-of-state motorists
account for 20 percent of road us-
age but pay only 13 percent into
the RUTF.
Short of an across-the-board
fuel tax increase, the TIME-21
report also offered more limited
proposals such as an increased
tax on diesel fuel only and/or the
elimination of the ethanol fuel tax
reduction. Another proposal rec-
ommended adding an automatic
annual adjustment to fuel tax rates
based on ination.
Some argue the fuel tax is the
fairest way to raise money for
roads because it is a use tax - the
more you drive, the more you
pay. An increase in the state fuel
tax, however, is not popular with
a majority of Iowans. A February
13, 2013 poll conducted by the
Des Moines Register showed 63
percent of those surveyed opposed
a 10 cents per gallon fuel tax in-
crease while only 35 percent were
in favor.
Ringgold county engineer Zach
Gunsolley has estimated the coun-
ty could receive approximately
$400,000 per year to the countys
Secondary Road Fund and approx-
imately $90,000 per year to the
countys Farm-to-Market account
if a 10 cent per gallon fuel tax
were adopted. And while he would
welcome any increased revenue to
his department, Gunsolley stated
an increased fuel tax may not pro-
vide as much revenue to Ringgold
county has some might anticipate.
Because of the variables in the
tug-of-war between rural and ur-
ban, he said, I dont see that as
the shoo-in because you cant be
guaranteed that youll get what
you think youre going to get.
Other proposals
While the idea of increasing
the Iowa fuel tax captures the most
headlines and creates the most
controversy, it is only one of a
____________________________
Continued on page 7
____________________________
Continued on page 7
Grassley speaks to Mount
Ayr students during visit
U.S. Senator Charles Grassley speaks to Mount Ayr students Tuesday.
____________________________
Continued on page 6
U.S. Sen. Charles Grassley
met with students at Mount Ayr
Community high school Tuesday
afternoon and spent over an hour
answering their questions on cur-
rent issues.
Grassley open the session by
explaining he hosts between 25 to
30 student interns in his Washing-
ton DC ofce each year and invited
interested students to inquire about
becoming an intern.
Johnathan Triggs open the stu-
dent questions by asking about
what programs the government is
currently working on to provide
nancial assistance to college
students. Grassley replied that he
agrees with Pres. Obamas goal
to keep nancial aid accessible
in order to make college more af-
fordable to more students. In turn,
however, he said colleges should
do all they can to keep tuition rates
down to reach the same goal. He
reminded students that Pell grants
and guaranteed student loans are
the most commonly used federal
programs to obtain money for col-
lege.
Jake Sobotka followed up the
question by asking if Grassley felt
the increased interest in student
nancial aid was a result of Pres.
Obama stating he wanted everyone
to have access to a college educa-
tion. Grassley said he agreed that
Pres. Obamas focus on educa-
tion has heightened awareness of
problems with nancial aid, but he
added that there is currently a re-
evaluation of whether we as a na-
tion have pushed a college degree
too much. He said its unfortunate
when a student racks up four years
worth of student debt and then
cant nd a job. Colleges, he said,
should also carry some responsibil-
ity to alert students that jobs may
not be available in certain majors.
Emily Fox asked Grassley what
he would like to see Pres. Obama
do in his second term. Grassley re-
plied he would like to see him do
what he promised to do all along:
bring transparency to the execu-
tive branch. Grassley said he had
repeatedly asked for information
from the executive branch and had
received nothing. Ive been stone-
walled by this administration more
than any other, he said. Ive been
stonewalled before by Republicans
as well as Democrats but never like
I have with this administration.
Casey Paxson inquired about
the future of Social Security. Grass-
ley said social security may not be
around for Paxsons generation
unless something very dramatic is
done quickly. Those changes, he
said, cannot come overnight. Rath-
er they must be planned ve to ten
years into the future to allow those
already approaching retirement to
make necessary preparations.
Bailea Stark asked Grassley
what he felt about teachers carry-
ing guns. Grassley said those deci-
sions should be left up to each in-
dividual school district based upon
their needs. The needs of a school
in Chicago are quite different from
your school here in Mount Ayr, he
said.
Zach Lemon stated that some
2 Mount Ayr Record-News Thursday, February 21, 2013
Opinion
Ringgold Countys News
and Advertising Source
Since 1864
Published by
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Inc.
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P. O. Box 346
Mount Ayr, IA 50854
Telephone
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Reporter
Published weekly at 122 W. Madi-
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Record News
Mount Ayr
BY LISA WILSON
LOOKING BACK in the Early Files
DEBRA LARSON
AGENT
106 E. South Street, Suite B
P.O. Box 564
Mount Ayr, Iowa 50854
Ph./Fax 641-464-2668 Cell 515-979-8552
debra.larson@insurancestationinc.com
Because Stuff Happens
Personal
Commercial
Auto
Home
Health
Life
HOME HOME
HEALTHCARE HEALTHCARE
RINGGOLD COUNTY PUBLIC RINGGOLD COUNTY PUBLIC
HEALTH NURSING AGENCY HEALTH NURSING AGENCY
SERVING RESIDENTS SINCE 1972 SERVING RESIDENTS SINCE 1972
119 South Fillmore Street, Mount Ayr Ph. 641-464-0691
Please visit our website at: www.rcph.net
Disease Follow-Up helps persons who have been diagnosed
with a disease that could be spread to others become more
aware of how they acquired the illness and how to keep from
spreading the illness. Examples of recent disease in the
county include tuberculosis, pertussis (whooping cough),
Hepatitis A and B, cryptosporidium, salmonella, shigella,
West Nile virus or campylobacter.
Call 641-464-0691 for more information.
Bill Armstrong Jay Watson
www.watsonarmstrongfh.com
Mount Ayr Clearfield Diagonal
Ph. 641-464-3413
Phone Day or Night Licensed in Iowa and Missouri
call today and get the right crop insurance coverage
let arMtech and tyler insurance be your stability
Selecting the right crop insurance coverage is crucial to the success
of your operation. Tyler Insurance Services, Inc., along with ARMtech
products, is committed to the agricultural community by providing ag
risk management solutions - quickly and accurately.
From traditional MPCI to our APH-Based Crop Hail Program, we can arm
you with accurate information, prompt response and quick turnaround
of claim payments.
Thats the ARMtech Advantage!
tyler insurance services, inc.
113 S. Fillmore St., Mount Ayr, Iowa 50854
641-464-3214
li@tyleriowa.com
ARMtech Insurance Services, Inc. is an Equal
Opportunity Provider.
Farmers Appreciation Event Farmers Appreciation Event
Michael Cotter
Thursday, March 14, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10 at door
SPONSORED BY: Mount Ayr
SAVE
THE
DATE!
Farmers Appreciation Roast Beef and Pork Loin Dinner
Served by the the Lions First Christian Church
on the Mount Ayr Square 5 to 7 p.m. Cost $8
a third generation, Southern Min-
nesota farmer, dad and storyteller is
coming to The Princess Theater for a
performance full of stories about farm-
ing, farmers and their communities.

Chamber of Commerce, The Princess Theater and the Lions
www.edwardjones.com Member CIPF Randy Gregg
Financial Advisor
.
2332 State Highway 2
Mt Ayr, IA 50854
641-464-2062
STOCKS BONDS CDs
IRAs MUTUAL FUNDS
Member SIPC
www.edwardjones.com Member CIPF Randy Gregg
Financial Advisor
.
2332 State Highway 2
Mt Ayr, IA 50854
641-464-2062
STOCKS BONDS CDs
IRAs MUTUAL FUNDS
Member SIPC
Fifty Years Ago
(From the Mount Ayr Record-
News, Thursday, February 14,
1963.)
Masonic Lodges of seven coun-
ties in this area will hold a workshop
February 22 in Mount Ayr in honor
of a man who was president of the
United Sates and worshipful master
of his lodge at the same time.
W. T. Timby, a member of the
Masonic Lodge for 50 years, was
honored Friday evening by members
of Faith Lodge No. 179, A. F. & A.
M. He received a 50-year certica-
tion from the hand of Grand Master
Ralph C. Brown of Bloomeld.
Clair (Skip) Eason, principal,
has been elected to the position
of superintendent of the Diagonal
Community school for the ensuing
year. Mr. Eason will ll the vacancy
caused by the resignation of Herman
D. Freel, school superintendent since
1961, which becomes effective July
1, 1963. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Eason of Washington township
and a graduate of the Mount Ayr high
school.
Three Mount Ayr Community
high school wrestlers advanced in
district competition Tuesday night
in Corning. Larry Knight, Dean Hall
and Dick Stephens in the 154-pound,
138-pound and 127-pound classes,
respectively, will compete again
Saturday afternoon. Knight gained
two pins over wrestlers from Far-
ragut and Cambria-Corydon; Hall
pinned a Winterset wrestler, and
Dick Stephens took an overtime
decision from Leon.
Jerry Waugh, the six-foot, three-
inch Raider center, will need to score
less than half of his game average
to exceed the individual scoring
record of 482 held by Kenny Pickens
since 1955. Waugh, a senior, will be
playing his last high school game
Friday night when the Raiders host
the Lenox Tigers.
The drivers of two cars were
injured, one seriously, in a head-on
collision Thursday morning about
10:15 oclock on a gravel road 10
miles northeast of Mount Ayr. Seri-
ously injured in the accident was
Gilbert (Bill) Webb, Jr. of Mount
Ayr who suffered arm, jaw and nose
fractures and punctured lungs. The
driver of the other car, Mrs. Dale
Greene of Ellston, suffered face and
head cuts and bruises and Craig and
Curtis Greene, who were riding with
their mother, received only scratches
and bruises.
The Mighty Three, who had
previously won the rst half bowl-
ing title, became champions for the
Junior BoysLeague (fth, sixth and
seventh grades), when competition
was completed Wednesday of last
week. They nished the season with
a total of 16 wins and eight losses.
Alan Fetty captains the Mighty
Three, members of which are Mike
McNeill and Curt Stringham. Larry
Hunter served as a substitute for the
team.
The Twins Shop, Mount Ayrs
newest business venture, was
opened to the public on Monday.
Formal opening of the store, lo-
cated at 104 N. Taylor, has been
scheduled for February 22 and 23,
according to Eva Sage, owner, and
Doris Barker, manager. Well-known
lines are featured in all of the ladies
ready-to-wear merchandise avail-
able in the Twins Shop. The Twins
Shop in this city is the fourth to be
opened by its owners -- Mrs. Sage
and her twin, Evia Jeter. The other
stores are located in Afton, Osceola
and Leon.
Truman Dulany, who had op-
erated the Q Club in Mount Ayr
for several months, purchased the
business Monday from the Kenneth
Markley estate. Immediate posses-
sion was given.
Births reported at Ringgold
County Hospital this week were a
son, born Feb. 8, to Mr. and Mrs.
Gerald Cannon of Mount Ayr; a
son, born Feb. 9, to Mr. and Mrs.
William Ward of Villisca, and a son,
born Feb. 10, to Mr. and Mrs. Allyn
Young of Sheridan, MO.
Obituaries this week were
Jesse Clair Cannon, Kenneth Kyle
Markley, Samuel Wanker, Clarence
Charles Caneld, Ruth Abagille
Lester Gammon and Mrs. Corda
McPherson.
Twenty-ve Years Ago
(From the Mount Ayr Record-
News, Thursday, February 25,
1988.)
Continuing the present policies
will not bring peace between Israel
and the Palestinians in Israel and the
surrounding area. Thats the assess-
ment of the Middle East situation of
Billie Marchik from the American
Friends Service Committee in Des
Moines who shared insights into the
conict there in visits to the area
this week. She spoke to students
at the Mount Ayr Community high
school Friday and was interviewed
Saturday morning during a swing
through southwest Iowa which
also included speaking at Lenox
high school, a seminar in Creston
Saturday and speaking in United
Methodist Churches in Zion and
Orient Sunday.
Eldon and Mary Stroburg of
rural Blockton today are sharing
about their three-week tour of
the Peoples Republic of China.
Stroburg is postmaster at Blockton
and is a former representative in the
Iowa legislature. Mrs. Stroburg is
a beautician. They considered the
experience the trip of a lifetime.
They have been out of the United
States one other time, in 1981, when
they were the guests of an exchange
student, Fred Kagi of Switzerland,
who was part of their family for the
1966-67 school year. At that time
they took a tour of Europe.
Brenda Lee Murphy, ve, daugh-
ter of Bill and Monica Murphy of
Parnell, MO, is a state nalist in the
Miss Missouri American Princess
Pageant to be held February 27-28
at the Adams Mark Hotel in Kansas
City. Her grandparents are Mr. and
Mrs. Allyn Jarred of Tingley.
Mount Ayr Lions Club president
Dave Richards presented the an-
nual 4-H award trophies to Emily
McAlexander and Doug Hickman,
recognizing their outstanding work
in the county 4-H program.
Its on to state for MAC
wrestlers Jeff Scott and Scott Eng-
land, who advanced from district
competition Saturday, Feb. 20, at
Liberty Center. Raider representa-
tives Cody Shay and Joe Love placed
fourth and Ed McCreary took third
to squelch their state reservations,
but helped the MAC team to a sixth
place district nish with 40 points.
Births reported this week were
a daughter, born Feb. 19, to Robert
and Janet Rivera of Mount Ayr and
a daughter, born Feb. 21, to Randy
and Sheila Finer of Mount Ayr.
Obituaries in this issue were
Harrison Henry Link, Callista Shay
Conwell and James Mac Clay-
pool.
Ten Years Ago
(From the Mount Ayr Record-
News, Thursday, February 13,
2003.)
Jacque Baker was crowned the
2003 Ringgold county beef queen at
the annual county Cattlemens As-
sociation meeting Saturday. Baker
is the daughter of Mark and Janelle
Baker of Diagonal.
Ringgold County Sheriffs Of-
ce has nished investigating an
incident involving the Mount Ayr
Golf & Country Club and another
incident where nine cattle owned by
Doyle Richards were shot.
A new date has been set for a
visit by astronaut Peggy Whitson to
the Mount Ayr Community school
district. According to elementary
principal Rob Olsen, Whitson is
now scheduled to visit the school
on Friday, April 4.
Junior and senior members of the
Diagonal homecoming court include
DaNelle Moftt, Tory Walkup, Alex
Stephens, Trisha Moftt, Danielle
Newton, Greg Goodale, Cody Wer-
ner and Trevor Wolf.
Four awards were received by
the Mount Ayr Record-News when
the results of the Iowa Newspaper
Associations Better Newspaper
Contest were announced Friday in
Des Moines. Awards for excellence
in editorial writing, news feature
writing, coverage of agriculture
and agriculture advertising were
received at the awards banquet.
The Mount Ayr Record-News com-
petes in a class with other weekly
newspapers in Iowa who have
subscriber numbers between 1,401
and 2,649.
Mount Ayr Chamber of Com-
merce members held a ribbon cutting
ceremony Monday morning at Tires
Plus, located on Highways 2 and
169 next to Splash n Dash. Bobby
Haley, owner and manager, is now
open for business.
Nancy Elmer, daughter of Diane
Huntsman and Richard Elmer of
Mount Ayr, was installed as Worthy
Advisor of Mount Ayr Assembly
#160, International Order of Rain-
bow for Girls in Iowa and Minnesota
on Sunday, Jan. 19, 2003 at the
Mount Ayr Masonic Temple.
Brian Inloes received the award
as the highest scoring eighth grader
and the third place individual overall
in the regional MathCounts competi-
tion held in Council Bluffs recently.
The Mount Ayr Community team,
which also included Grant Larsen,
Lucas Smith and Zach Lynch, won
the trophy as the top small school
team in the contest.
Kevin Trullinger won the Pride
of Iowa conference wrestling title
at 215 pounds.
Obituaries this week were Mi-
chael Jack Ward and Karen LaVon
(Nickles) Woolheater.


Sure, theres been some snow
this winter, but enough to cut the
drought decit in the Upper Mid-
west? Nope! And, the drought has
cut into the corn supply, too, result-
ing in constrictions for the ethanol
industry, constrictions of a very se-
rious nature.
This winter, ethanol producers
are seeing last years corn crop,
devastated by widespread drought
conditions, dwindling to the point
where decisions are being made
about keeping many plants open.
The Associated Press reports that
20 of the nations 211 ethanol
plants have shuttered in the past 12
months, including January of this
year.
The AP said that leaves plants in
28 states still functioning and pro-
ducing 13 billion gallons annually,
up quite sharply from the 2.1 bil-
lion gallons produced nationwide
in 2002. The report said about 10
percent of all gasoline used domes-
tically contains ethanol or other
biofuels.

What matters in these droughty
times is this: Some 40 percent of
the corn crop is used to produce
ethanol (about 95 percent of U.S.
ethanol is made from corn) and
producers are trying to keep up
with the Renewable Fuels Standard
(RFS), which means full-tilt pro-
duction. But some experts believe
at least some of the crop can be di-
verted back into food production.
They said any immediate cut-backs
in ethanol corn use would have
little impact on consumers, that a
surplus has developed due to more
fuel-efcient cars and fewer miles
being driven because of the linger-
ing effects of the Great Recession.
The AP quoted Chris Hurt, an
economist at Purdue University,
as saying, There needs to be a tri-
fecta of good news the drought
ending, a good corn crop this sea-
son and lower corn prices before
ethanol production gets back on its
feet. Thats a pretty tall order, but
Hurt believes the industry touched
bottom in the last quarter.
The trouble is the long-term ef-
fects of drought. Farmers thought
they had a record corn crop grow-
ing in 2012, but as the drought
tightened its grip, those predictions
went out the window and supplies
got tighter while prices kept rising.
This created a tough scenario for
efcient ethanol production nation-
wide.
The fact is, even though more
acres were planted to corn in 2012
than in 2011, 13 percent less corn
was harvested, the AP reported.
Note: The 770,000 gallons per day
produced by ethanol plants in the
last full week of January were the
fewest produced since the U.S. En-
ergy Information Administration
began tracking weekly data in June
of 2010.
Of the 20 plants that ceased pro-
duction in the past year, one was in
Minnesota, six were in Nebraska,
two in Indiana, and 10 states have
seen at least one plant close. The
AP said Geoff Cooper, vice presi-
dent for research and analysis for
the Renewable Fuels Association
(RFA), noted that about 1,000
workers were employed by the
closing plants, but he didnt know
how many were laid off.
With the impact of the drought
continuing as we move toward the
2013 planting season, there is sure
to be continuing stress on the corn
supply, both for ethanols needs
and for the nations tummiesnot
to mention grain available for ex-
port.
Ill see ya!
For ethanol producers, drought is tough for business
THOUGHTS
& other things
BY ALAN SMITH
A wedding in January and a wedding in February.
In the same family. Now that has to be quite a winter.
My brother Doug, and especially his wife Judy, surely
must be coming up for air this week after their second
daughter was married in a ve-week period.
Back in January, their daughter Natalie added
Wayne Marten to the family and then this past week-
end their oldest daughter Lauren added Danny Nixon
to the clan.
We enjoyed sharing in the celebrations, but were
also kind of glad that we werent the ones getting all
the details handled in such a short period.
February will be a month of celebrating for Lauren
and Danny. There is Valentines Day, of course, but
now they will have their wedding anniversary in the
month too. Add the fact that both of them have Febru-
ary birthdays and it will be quite the month. At least
Danny wont have much of an excuse for forgetting
which month they all fall in.
The two weddings were quite different, reecting
the personalities of the couples. Natalie had envisioned
a more traditional candlelight wedding in a historic
church with attendants and a unique donut and hot
chocolate reception following in the church basement.
Lauren had a simpler ceremony with a little more elab-
orate reception, all taking place in a rustic lodge in a
city park.
Both brides were beautiful -- and both ended up
wearing their mothers wedding dress to keep a family
tradition going.
We helped Lauren celebrate her 25th birthday Fri-
day night in Independence, MO as a prelude to the busy
weekend. We were staying the weekend with Valles
mother, so on Saturday we took part in the hour and
a half adventure of going to a big city grocery store to
take Nana grocery shopping. We went back to Nanas
for lunch, where Nathan and Julie and Cara joined us.
Daughters Erin and Cara were singing son Nathans
new music for the hymn Beautiful Savior for the
service, so the Cornish clan joined us from Columbia,
MO on Saturday too.
While Valle, Erin and Cara went shopping Satur-
day afternoon, Peter and I took the grandkids to Barnes
and Noble, our favorite place to hang out and look for
books. The Cornish clan stayed with Peters mother
Saturday night while we helped Cara get her house
ready for Sunday morning activity.
The wedding was at 2 p.m. Sunday afternoon in
Overland Park, KS, so there wasnt going to be an op-
portunity for attending a regular church service that
morning. Many of the people helping with the wedding
met at Caras for a worship service at 10 a.m. and then
it was off to the wedding venue.
The lodge was open to the crew for the rst time at
noon but Lauren and Judy had the setup efforts well
organized. The people who otherwise might be helping
as attendants and the like were part of the set up crew.
The chairs were already set up in a circle with tables
around the outside. We helped with the food and deco-
ration unloading and the effort was off and running.
Crews put the table clothes on all the tables. The
tall stand-up tables had burlap ribbons that were tied
around the middle of them. They were decorated with
a slab of wood with a dowel rod in them and Carolina
snowakes, star-shaped three-dimensional creations
from chair caning that Judy had made for the occasion.
Carolina has special signicance, because Lauren and
Danny will be living in North Carolina, where he is
employed by an architectural rm.
The large round sit down tables were centered with
wreath material and hurricane lamps with candles.
There were some mixups for a second on which table-
cloths went where, but that was soon straightened out
and the major decorating handled.
Lauren had cut two ngers Friday night while get-
A string of family weddings
ting ready for the reception. She had cut the rst
one when making the velvet cake balls dipped in
chocolate that were part of her reception treats and
the second one when working on baking the coco-
nut wedding cake that was served. There were no
more injuries the rest of the way, however.
For the reception, the food table was beautifully
decorated with a printed paper runner, owers and
unique serving methods for the four kinds of cheese,
multiple kinds of crackers, pita chip, two kinds of
salsa and the tortilla chips and layered dip. The dip
came in individual squarish containers with layers
of refried beans, guacamole, sour cream, tomatoes
and cheese. The salsa was also dipped into small-
er squarish containers to be taken individually. A
chalk board had the cheese types labeled.
The punch table with its pink sherbet punch
rounded out the reception preparations.
This was all in place and the crew was fed lunch
by my sister Karen in an hour and a half of well-
organized effort.
Then the string trio began to play and the guests
were ushered to their places. In the center of the
circle Dannys dad Scott had a microphone and a
small column to hold his scriptures. After the fam-
ilies were escorted in, Danny joined his dad and
then Lauren was escorted down a ight of stairs
from the second oor of the lodge into the center as
well.
There was beautiful music from Erin and Caras
duet, accompanied on guitar by John Larsen, and
the Brotherton brothers sang a duet accompanied
by their father. After Scott nished the ceremony,
Laurens dad Doug offered a prayer of blessing for
the couple and a kiss sealed the pronouncement of
new life together for the happy couple. The couple
then greeted all those attending as they were ush-
ered out and joined the reception line.
It was a beautiful day.
I had the opportunity to catch up with friends
and especially enjoyed a visit with my aunt Win-
nie. Her generation is waning with just three of the
seven siblings remaining from the Nelson clan --
my mothers side of the family. The original Smith
clan has waned even more. It seems a bit strange to
become one of the old folks.
Eli had come to the wedding after being ill the
night before and was a pretty subdued puppy until
after the service, when he began to perk up.
Before long he and I were outdoors playing hide
and seek. He didnt let his good clothes stop him
from jumping down into a weeded area to hide be-
hind a retaining wall. We had fun at that for awhile.
Then we were joined by Esther to go on a walk on
one of the nice walking trails in the park where the
lodge is located.
We made it back in time to see Danny and Lau-
ren off. Someone outside the family mentioned that
there probably wouldnt be too many more of the
big family weddings like this to attend.
Then we counted up. Yes, there have been 17
weddings among our childrens generation and their
cousins. But there are as many as 10 more possible.
So the family wedding season still has some legs.
Its a blessing to share in each one.
Keep up to date on all the happenings in Ringgold County with the countys
news and advertising source since 1965.
Mount Ayr Record-News
Call 641-464-2440
Farmers will be able to check
soil moisture levels around the
state when Iowa State Universitys
Department of Agronomy up-
grades weather stations at several
research and demonstration farms.
With drought conditions con-
tinuing across Iowa, ISU Extension
agronomist Elwynn Taylor said the
stations offer a risk management
tool for crop producers.
New ISU weather stations to monitor soil moisture
The updated stations provide
information on the soil moisture
resource and the actual crop water
consumption, Taylor said. Farm-
ers will be able to know the yield
limits being placed on crop yield
by water stress as the season pro-
gresses.
The new stations replace ones
that have been monitoring weather
data at the farms for more than 30
years. Taylor said the original units
made up the worlds rst nonmili-
tary network of automatic report-
ing weather stations.
They were networked, as the
new ones will be, so their readings
can be monitored on the Mesonet
(http://mesonet.agron.iastate.edu/)
weather website.
Moisture sensors are placed a
foot, two feet and four feet deep in
the soil next to the station. Read-
ings are taken every 15 minutes
and sent by cellular phone text
messages to the network.
The weather stations also mea-
sure rainfall, air and soil tem-
perature, humidity, sunlight, wind
speed and direction. A solar collec-
tor powers the units.
Taylor said the rst of the new
units was placed next to the previ-
ous model at the Northwest Re-
search and Demonstration Farm
near Sutherland. Another seven
will be installed on research farms
as weather permits. He said two
farmers have paid for a station
to be placed on their farms and a
cooperative has ordered three sta-
tions.
The goal is, with cooperators,
to have one in every county, he
said.
It costs about $12,000 each for
the equipment and installation.
Campbell Scientic of Logan,
Utah produced the original units
and the new ones.
Twelve thousand dollars
sounds like a lot of money, but
these days when you consider the
cost of farm equipment thats not
out of anybodys reach, especially
when you realize the payoff on it if
you use it, he said. People have
to be trained to use it, so they know
what it means for their yield and
what it means for their soil. The
payoff will be just as great for any
piece of farm equipment.
Thursday, February 21, 2013 Mount Ayr Record-News 3
Courthouse News
Ringgold County
Courthouse
News & Notes
You have the Power!
Eat well. Move more. Keep score.
504 North Cleveland St.
Mount Ayr, IA 50854
641-464-3226
You have a Partner!
Ringgold County Hospital. Your partner in health.
www.rchmtayr.org
February is National Heart Health Month.
Are you doing all you can to keep your
most important muscle in great shape?
Nows a good time to make some changes
that can improve your health and keep you
strong and active.
Eat well. The information on how your diet
affects your hearts health is abundant and
easy to fnd. From books, the Internet, to
resources here at Ringgold County Hospital,
there is no shortage of sound advice on the
best eating plans for you. Take some time to
research your best options.
Move more. Muscles need exercise, and
your heart is no exception. You dont have
to be an Olympic athlete to get a good
workout. Your doctor can help you get
started at a level thats just right for your
age and ftness level.
Keep score. Knowing your blood pressure
and cholesterol levels is an important step
in keeping a healthy heart. When you know
your scores, you can take charge of your
own health! Sign up for our monthly email
newsletter, which is full of tips, recipes,
and more ideas to keep you healthy. Email:
mhymbaugh@rchmtayr.org
GEROLDS
We are here
for all your
plumbing,
heating
and air
conditioning
needs
all makes
and models.
Two full-time professional installers.
Full parts service department. If we dont have it, we can get it.
Equipment rental
Skid Loader Sewer Tape Pex Tools
Taps Scaffolding Other Miscellaneous
306 S. Garfield, Mount Ayr
Give us a call at: 641-464-3703
and talk to one of our friendly staff, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
After hours 641-464-3446
SIMPLE MISDEMEANOR AND
TRAFFIC CONVICTIONS
February 7-14, 2012
Michael Tucker Manuel, Des
Moines, $114.00, speeding 6-10
m.p.h. over the speed limit.
Natasha Marie Van Heeswyk,
$114.00, speeding 6-10 m.p.h.
over the speed limit.
William James Maurer, Cedar
Rapids, $114.00, speeding 6-10
m.p.h. over the speed limit.
Edgar Valentin Alcarta, Keller-
ton, $148.50, speeding 6-10 m.p.h.
over the speed limit.
Edgar Valentin Alcarta, Keller-
ton, $75.00, minor using tobacco/
rst offense.
Merle Lyndon Triggs, Mount
Ayr, $201.75, speeding 20+ m.p.h.
over the speed limit.
Richard Lee Mercer, Kellerton,
$127.50, seat belt violation.
Nathaniel Dillon Becker, Perry,
$168.00, speeding 11-15 m.p.h.
over the speed limit.
Paul David Palmer, Maryville,
MO, $114.00, speeding 6-10 m.p.h.
over the speed limit.
FROM RINGGOLD COUNTY
MAGISTRATE COURT
February 13 - A judgment was
led in magistrates court nding
Edith F. Sanders of Creston guilty
of theft in the fth degree. Sanders
was ordered to pay a ne of $100,
a surcharge of $35, a law enforce-
ment initiative surcharge of $125,
court costs of $60 and restitution
to Lynns Sinclair in the amount of
$86.18, all monies payable to the
clerk of court by June 19, 2013.
Sanders was also ordered to be n-
gerprinted by the Ringgold County
Sheriffs Ofce within seven days.
FROM RINGGOLD COUNTY
DISTRICT COURT
February 11 - Trial information
was led in district court charging
Kegan Evan Bishop of Mount Ayr
with OWI.
Bond set previously continues
and a preliminary hearing was can-
celled. Bishop was ordered to ap-
pear for arraignment at the Ringgold
county courthouse on Monday, Feb-
ruary 25, 2013.
February 11 - A judgment was
led in district court nding Edmond
Lewis Allee of Diagonal guilty of
OWI.
Allee was sentenced to two days
in jail. Allee shall receive credit for
this sentence by successfully com-
pleting the OWI weekend program
and ling a certicate of completion
with the clerk of court no later than
April 8, 2013.
Allee was also ordered to com-
plete the drinking drivers course at
his own expense and to le a cer-
ticate of completion with the clerk
of court within 60 days of this l-
ing. In addition, Allee was ordered
to satisfy all recommendations of
an evaluation for substance abuse
and to le written verication of his
enrollment in a treatment program
as recommended by the evaluation
within 60 days of this ling.
Allee was ordered to pay a ne
of $1,250, a surcharge of $437.50,
a drug abuse resistance education
surcharge of $10 and court costs of
$100, all monies payable to the clerk
of court. The court then waived $625
of the ne and the corresponding
surcharge. Appeal bond was xed at
$1,000.
February 11 - A judgment was
led in district court nding Austin
Russell Boles of Mount Ayr guilty
of OWI.
Boles was sentenced to two
days in jail which is to be served by
March 25, 2013 and given credit for
any time served pending disposition
of this case.
Boles was also ordered to com-
plete the drinking drivers course at
his own expense and to le a certi-
cate of completion with the clerk of
court within 90 days of this ling.
In addition, Boles was ordered to
satisfy all recommendations of an
evaluation for substance abuse and
to le written verication of his
enrollment in a treatment program
as recommended by the evaluation
within 60 days of this ling.
Boles was ordered to pay a ne
of $1,250, a surcharge of $437.50,
a drug abuse resistance education
surcharge of $10, jail fees of $80
and court costs of $100, all monies
payable to the clerk of court. Appeal
bond was xed at $1,000.
February 11 - A judgment was
led in district court nding Ethan
Donn Wambold of Mount Ayr guilty
of harassment in the second degree.
Wambold was sentenced to one
day in jail and ordered to pay a ne
of $315, a surcharge of $110.25, jail
fees of $35 and court costs of $100,
all monies payable to the clerk of
court.
A no contact order was put in
place for a period of one year and
Wambold was ordered to reimburse
the state of Iowa for his court-ap-
pointed attorney fees.
Appeal bond was xed at
$1,000.
An additional charge of domestic
abuse assault was dismissed.
February 13 - Trial information
was led in district court charging
Raece Tariq Nieman of Mount Ayr
with possession of a controlled sub-
stance/marijuana.
Bond set previously contin-
ues and a preliminary hearing was
cancelled. Nieman was ordered to
appear for arraignment at the Ring-
gold county courthouse on Monday,
March 11, 2013.
RINGGOLD COUNTY
SHERIFFS OFFICE
February 9 - Shelly Bogan of
1995 180th Street, Diagonal, re-
ported that someone had pulled their
mail box out of the ground and run
over it smashing it. Anyone with in-
formation on the incident is asked to
contact the Ringgold County Sher-
iffs Ofce at 641-464-3921.
February 10 - A city employee
reported to the RCSO that he found
the west door window broken and
the door unlocked when he reported
to work at the city water plant. The
window appeared to have been shot
and then a hole put in the glass to
reach in and unlock the deadbolt.
Nothing was taken or disturbed.
Anyone with information on the in-
cident is asked to contact the Ring-
gold County Sheriffs Ofce at 641-
464-3921.
RINGGOLD COUNTY
SHERIFFS LOG
(Call Origination Code: MA = Mount Ayr; KE = Keller-
ton; EL = Ellston; TI = Tingley; DI = Diagonal; DE =
Delphos; MO= Maloy; BE = Beaconseld; BO= Benton;
SC = Shannon City; BL = Blockton; RE = Redding; SV
= Sun Valley; CO = In County; OC = Out of County; OS
= Out of State)
February 7-13, 2012
Thursday, February 7
8:24 a.m., caller wanting infor-
mation regarding inmate. (CO)
9:46 a.m., caller with informa-
tion for ofcer. (CO)
11:25 a.m., sex offender check-
ing into county. (OC)
1:28 p.m., caller wanting to
speak to ofcer. (MA)
2 p.m., call for civil clerk.
(MA)
2:57 p.m., sex offender check-
ing out of county. (OC)
3:11 p.m., caller needing to
speak to an ofcer. (MA)
3:49 p.m., vehicle lockout.
(MA)
4:17 p.m., caller requesting
information regarding an inmate.
(OC)
4:25 p.m., caller needing an of-
cer. (MA)
7 p.m., caller wanting to speak
to an ofcer. (MA)
10:30 p.m., report of a gas drive
off in Union county. (OC)
10:53 p.m., 911 call, report of
an erratic driver. (KE)
Friday, February 8
12:58 a.m., 911 call, request for
an ambulance. (MA)
1:48 a.m., caller needing to
meet ofcer at county line. (CO)
8:23 a.m., call for sheriff. (OC)
8:33 a.m., call for jail. (OC)
9:22 a.m., call for jailer. (OC)
10:54 a.m., caller needing a
house checked. (CO)
11:51 a.m., 911 call, request for
an ambulance. (MA)
2:21 p.m., caller wanting jail
information. (OC)
2:36 p.m., caller reporting a
reckless driver. (MA)
2:59 p.m., caller needing to
speak with ofcer. (OC)
4:26 p.m., caller left message
for ofcer. (MA)
Saturday, February 9
8:28 a.m., caller reporting van-
dalism. (CO)
9:40 a.m., call for jail. (MA)
10:09 a.m., call for jail. (OC)
11:34 a.m., caller reporting an
electrical smell. (MA)
1 p.m., caller wanting to be
called back. (OC)
2:42 p.m., caller reporting reck-
less four-wheelers. (MA)
4:02 p.m., call for ofcer. (OC)
4:58 p.m., caller with jail infor-
mation. (OC)
11:42 p.m., bail bondsman call-
ing. (OC)
Sunday, February 10
6:53 a.m., call for dispatch.
(OC)
7:35 a.m., caller reporting a
break-in. (MA)
9:23 a.m., magistrate checking
in. (CO)
9:57 a.m., call for chief deputy.
(KE)
11:06 a.m., chief deputy check-
ing in. (MA)
5:06 p.m., caller advised it
looked like a roof was trying to
blow off. (CO)
5:22 p.m., caller checking on
how to get a driving record. (CO)
Monday, February 11
8:12 a.m., caller setting up vis-
tation with inmate. (OC)
8:27 a.m., caller setting up vis-
tation with inmate. (KE)
8:55 a.m., call for jail. (MA)
8:56 a.m., caller setting up vis-
tation with inmate. (OC)
9:17 a.m., visitor in to see clerk.
(MA)
9:31 a.m., call for jail. (OC)
9:52 a.m., call for clerk. (MA)
9:58 a.m., caller looking for
Hayes Street. (MA)
10:18 a.m., caller with 911
question. (OC)
10:29 a.m., caller with ques-
tions on permit to carry weapons.
(CO)
10:45 a.m., call for ofcer on-
duty. (OC)
11:04 a.m., call for jail. (OC)
11:14 a.m., caller setting up
visitation with inmate. (OC)
12:19 p.m., caller reporting he
was in the county. (MA)
1:09 p.m., caller reporting their
German shorthair dog missing.
(TI)
1:28 p.m., caller with questions
regarding stolen items. (MA)
1:54 p.m., caller reported nd-
ing stolen items. (CO)
2:02 p.m., caller with harass-
ment complaint. (OC)
2:16 p.m., caller reported a dog
running loose. (MA)
3:24 p.m., inmates attorney
calling. (OC)
8:34 p.m., caller calling about
disabled car. (DI)
Tuesday, February 12
7:26 a.m., 911 call, request for
an ambulance. (MA)
8:22 a.m., call about mental
health issues. (MA)
8:34 a.m., caller checking on
inmate. (OC)
9:18 a.m., caller with concerns
about childrens well-being. (MA)
10:07 a.m., caller checking to
see if the sheriffs ofce had found
their lost items.
11:02 a.m., nine phone calls
testing an alarm system.
11:29 a.m., caller checking calls
about stolen items.
11:53 a.m., call in reference to a
suspicious vehicle.
2:01 p.m., caller reporting sto-
len items.
7:39 p.m., call for ofcer.
8:13 p.m., caller reporting a
cow out.
Wednesday, February 13
3:40 a.m., motorist in need of
assistance.
9:34 a.m., call for jail.
9:45 a.m., call for jail.
9:58 a.m., caller reporting ha-
rassment.
3:07 p.m., report of a fender
bender.
6:35 p.m., domestic call.
6:44 p.m., caller reporting
vadalism.
COURTHOUSE NEWS
Ringgold County Courthouse
hours are Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.
to 4 p.m. unless noted otherwise.
Ringgold county now has a
website at www.ringgoldcounty.
us.
Assessor: Neil Morgan, 464-
3233.
Auditor: Amanda Waske,
464-3239.
Board of Supervisors: David
Inloes, chairman, Royce Dredge
and Kraig Pennington, members,
464-3244.
Supervisors meetings are open
to the public and are held in the su-
pervisors conference room located
on the second oor between the
clerk of court and auditors ofce.
On days the board is not sched-
uled to be in ofce, please direct
all inquiries to the auditors ofce.
To schedule a meeting time with
the supervisors, contact the audi-
tors ofce.
Regular board meetings are
held on Mondays with ofcial
public notice of the meeting agen-
das posted at the Ringgold county
courthouse, Mount Ayr Record-
News, Sun Valley Lake and Diago-
nal city hall the day before.
Clerk of Court (a state of-
ce): Jackie Saville, 464-3234; fax:
464-2478. Ofce hours: Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays, 8 a.m. to
noon and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. and
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8 a.m. -
noon and 1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
The clerks ofce handles ali-
mony and child support payments,
probates, civil and criminal lings,
magistrates court and records and
services of adoptions, conservator-
ships, court proceedings, divorces,
estates, grand jury, guardianships,
judgments, juvenile proceedings,
mechanics liens, mental health
admissions, petit jury, surety
company certicates, state hospi-
tal, trafc violations, trust funds,
trusteeships. Certied copies can
be made of above listed records.
Court records are also available at
www.iowacourts.gov.
County Conservation
Board: Kate Zimmerman, phone:
464-2787, email: rangerkate@io-
watelecom.net.
Please contact for information
on rules and regulations, parks,
trail ways, camping, shelter reser-
vations, environmental education
and more. Parks are open March
15 - November 15. Walk-in trafc
is allowed year round.
County Weed Commission-
er: Brenda Adams, 641-344-9629.
Development and Tourism:
Karen Bender, Coordinator, 464-
3704. If anyone has any calendar
events, please contact the develop-
ment ofce at 641-464-3704.
E-911 Service Board: Merle
Walter, 307 N. Webster St., Mount
Ayr, 464-3311.
Emergency Management
Agency: Teresa Jackson, Coordi-
nator, 109 W. Madison St., Suite
105, cell: 641-202-9671; phone:
464-3344; fax: 464-0663, email:
tjackson@iowatelecom.net. Hours:
Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m.
The tornado sirens in Mount
Ayr will be tested the rst Tuesday
of each month unless there is se-
vere weather.
Engineer: Zach Gunsolley,
P.E., 464-3232. 707 South Hender-
son Drive. Ofce hours: Monday -
Friday, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
General Relief: Teresa Jack-
son, 109 W. Madison St., Suite
105, 464-3344. Ofce hours: Tues-
day and Friday, 8 a.m. to noon or
by appointment. For emergencies
call 641-344-9767.
Recorder: Karen Schaefer,
464-3231. Passport applications
are taken daily from 8 a.m. - 11
a.m. and noon - 4 p.m. Certied
vital records can be obtained from
8 a.m. - noon and 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.
The recorders ofce serves as
a passport agent. Items needed to
apply are: certied copy of birth
certicate, drivers license or state
issued ID, two-inch square pass-
port photos and passport applica-
tion (both available at recorders
ofce) and fees. Allow four to six
weeks from date of application to
receive passport book or card from
the passport agency. Expedited
service is available for an addi-
tional fee.
Individuals with recent name
changes can get their passport
book/card updated without a fee
within one year of issue. Forms
may be obtained at the recorders
ofce. For additional information
call the recorders ofce or go to
www.travel.state.gov/passport.
Avoid a $5 penalty by renew-
ing boat registrations by April 30,
2013.
Sanitarian: Ringgold County
Public Health Agency, 464-0691.
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
Public Health Agency: 119 S.
Fillmore, 464-0691. Hours: Mon-
day - Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Sheriff: Mike Sobotka, Emer-
gency Only 911, Non-Emergency
(Available 24/7) 464-3921 or 464-
2911. New location at the Ringgold
County Law Enforcement Center,
801 West South Street. Hours are
8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Road Conditions
- dial 511 or online at www.Io-
waRoadConditions. org.
Treasurer: Debbie Cannon,
464-3230.
Property taxes can be paid on-
line at www.iowatreasurers.org
with Visa, Master Card and Dis-
cover credit cards or e-checks.
Payments made in the ofce may
be with cash, checks or with a Mas-
ter Card, Visa or Discover credit or
debit card.
All documents conveying real
estate need to have the name and
address of the person to whom
the property tax statement is to
be mailed. Please check renewal
notices and tax statements for the
correct information. If the infor-
mation is wrong, contact the trea-
surers ofce.
Motorists can now renew mo-
tor vehicle registrations online at
www.iowatreasurers.org if a re-
newal notice is received through
the United States Postal Service
that contains a personal identica-
tion number (PIN). Please be aware
that the PIN can only be used one
time. Contact the treasurers ofce
for more information.
Those with January birth dates
are reminded to register their mo-
tor vehicles by February 28, 2013.
Bring in the renewal statement re-
ceived in the mail so renewals can
be quickly processed.
Drivers License Ofce: Lo-
cated in the Treasurers Ofce.
Drivers licenses may be re-
newed any time during the period
of 30 calendar days before and
up to 60 calendar days after the
drivers birth date.
The drivers license station
hours are Monday - Friday, 8:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 3:30
p.m. Phone 464-3230 with ques-
tions.
Veterans Affairs: Gary Smith,
464-2397. Mondays and Thurs-
days, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.; Tuesdays, 8
a.m. - noon; Closed Wednesdays
and Fridays. In case of emergency
641-464-2397 or 641-202-1199.
Whether rst child, middle
child or youngest, each child re-
sponds differently, with his or her
own needs. Thats why parenting
seems to require on the job train-
ing, says Kim Brantner, a family
life program specialist with Iowa
State University Extension and
Outreach.
A new child brings new situa-
tions, Brantner said. Parents may
joke that their rst child was their
experimental child, because they
were new to parenting. When the
second child arrives, theyre more
at ease as parents, even though
there always is something new to
learn.
Brantner recommends two
research-based resources that can
help answer parents questions
about rearing their children.
Just in Time Parenting can help
the novice or experienced par-
ent, Brantner said. Over the past
25 years, Cooperative Extension
faculty in land-grant universities
across the country have developed
and evaluated this parent-friendly
series. The monthly newsletters
are delivered just in time, keyed
to the age of the child. In addition,
extension professionals from more
than 30 land-grant universities are
transforming these research-based,
age-paced newsletters into a na-
tional interactive Internet resource
on parenting.
This newsletter series actually
starts before a child is born and of-
fers monthly newsletters until age
ve, Brantner said. Sign up for the
series at www.extension.iastate.
edu/families/just-time-parenting.
We all know that the parent-
ing questions dont stop at age
ve, Brantner continued. Parent-
ing 24/7 guides parents, as well as
grandparents, of children up to age
18. Its a one-stop source of news,
information and advice on parent-
ing and family life available on-
line.
Parenting 24/7, at http://par-
enting247.org/, provides feature
articles with research-based infor-
mation, video clips of parents and
experts, breaking news and com-
mentary, newsletters and recom-
mendations for web-based parent-
ing resources.
The site includes video clips of
real parents on the challenges they
face and the strategies they use to
solve problems, as well as parent
ratings and comments on feature
articles, Brantner said.
Topics include childrearing
challenges such as tantrums, toilet
training, discipline and sleeping,
and pep talks to help you re-
member the joys of parenting and
share success stories, Brantner
said. Youll also learn strategies
for fostering a strong family life,
including coping with stress, fam-
ily traditions and rituals, and if you
have a partner, managing your re-
lationship as a couple.
Get parenting information
when needed online
Certication
needed to sell
morels in Iowa
Mushroom hunters who would
like to legally sell morel mush-
rooms in Iowa need to complete
a morel mushroom certication
workshop. Iowa State University
Extension and Outreach is offering
the workshop at several Iowa loca-
tions in March and April.
The aim of the workshop is
to help assure that misidentied
mushrooms are not sold as morels.
Those interested in attending
one of the workshops should pre-
register by emailing mgleason@
iastate.edu or calling 515-294-
0579 by Monday, March 26.
Additional questions about the
workshops can be directed to Mark
Gleason, 515-294-0579; mglea-
son@iastate.edu.
4 Mount Ayr Record-News Thursday, February 21, 2013
Social
Retirement Open House
in honor of Theola Bullock.
February 27, 2013 10 am - 2 pm
first national bank
101 w. adams st, creston, ia
Theola will continue as the Silver Circle Club Manager but will
be retiring from her role as a Personal Banker at FNB.
celebrate celebrate celebrate celebrate
Join us for a
theola may be contacted at tbullock@fnbcreston.com
Ph. 641-877-4151
Home of Roonys Coffee Espresso and More
FINAL
FINAL
CLEARANCE!
CLEARANCE!
All Remaining Winter Clothing
60% Off
For Gals 60% Off
All Long-Sleeved Life Is Good
40% Off Tees 40% Off
Thank You
I would like to thank my
family and friends for all the
cards, flowers, gifts, phone
calls and well-wishes for my
80th birthday.
Patty Sobotka
Amplify Your Life
www.WoodardHearing.com

Call for an
appointment
(800)233-4327
Dr. Kent Weaver
Ringgold County Hospital
Specialty Clinic 504 N. Cleveland
Mt. Ayr, IA 50854
Serving Iowa
for more than
65 Years!
Lordy, Lordy
look who
is turning
forty
on
February 23!
Community Calendar
NOTICE - If you would like your
organizations meeting dates to
appear in the calendar, please
contact Record-News staff at
464-2440.
Thursday, February 21
Mount Ayr Model Railroad
Club at 1210 E. Monroe Street at
6 p.m. Contact O. Martsching at
641-464-9294.
Alcoholics Anonymous meet-
ing at 8 p.m. at the Neighborhood
Center, Mount Ayr.
Friday, February 22
2013 Mardi Gras celebration
in Mount Ayr!
Card shower for Marlene
Zarrs 80th birthday. Cards and
correspondence may be sent to her
at 1206 E. Monroe Street, Mount
Ayr, IA 50854.
Hang gliding class at the La-
moni Community Center at 6:30
p.m.
Saturday, February 23
Reception for Roger and Beth
Elliotts 25th anniversary at the
Decatur county fairgrounds in
Leon. Food will be served from
6 to 8 p.m. with a DJ from 8 to
12 p.m. If unable to attend, cards
and correspondence may be sent
to them at 10976 280th Street,
Lamoni, IA 50140-9530.
Sunday, February 24
Musical gathering at the Tin-
gley Christian Church at 4 p.m.
Monday, February 25
$1 sack day every day at the
Ringgold County Neighborhood
Center.
The Second Childhood Doll
Club will meet at 12:30 p.m. at
Rumors for lunch. Meeting will be
at the Ringgold County Extension
ofce at 1:30 p.m. Program will
be by Darlene Bear.
Thin Within support group will
meet at 5 p.m. at the Lighthouse.
Ringgold County Tourism
meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Cham-
ber of Commerce building.
Sowing in Tears Support Group
will meet at 7 p.m. at the Light-
house Church, two miles west of
Mount Ayr.
Jam session at the Mount Ayr
American Legion building from
6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, February 26
Bag Day at the Ringgold
County Neighborhood Center.
Wednesday, February 27
Blockton community potluck at
12 noon to celebrate Edith Camp-
bells 90th birthday. If unable to
attend, cards and correspondence
may be sent to her at P.O. Box 248,
Blockton, IA 50836.
Bag Day at the Ringgold
County Neighborhood Center.
Sushi class at the Lamoni Com-
munity Center at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday, February 28
Deadline for Judge Lewis
scholarship applications for 2013
graduates.
Alcoholics Anonymous meet-
ing at 8 p.m. at the Neighborhood
Center, Mount Ayr.
Friday, March 1
Card shower for 91st birthday
of Velma King Lorenz. Cards and
correspondence may be sent to her
at 826 Quiet Harbor, Creston, IA
50801.
Saturday, March 2
Open Closet at the Mount Ayr
Assembly of God from 8 to 11
a.m.
Chapter CK, P.E.O. will meet
at the Heritage Park community
room for brunch at 9:30 a.m. Host-
esses are Mari McGehee, Mitzi
Hymbaugh and Ruth McDonnell.
Program will be A Reason for
Responsibilities. Election and
installation of ofcers and election
of delegate and alternate to state
convention will take place.
Chili cook-off at Leftys Club
Tavern in Mount Ayr. Judging sarts
at 6 p.m.
Monday, March 4
Thin Within support group will
meet at 5 p.m. at the Lighthouse.
Mount Ayr City Council will
meet at 6 p.m. at Mount Ayr City
Hall.
Jam session at the Mount Ayr
American Legion building from
6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Mount Ayr Order of the Eastern
Star will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Masonic Temple, Mount Ayr.
Sowing in Tears Support Group
will meet at 7 p.m. at the Light-
house Church, two miles west of
Mount Ayr.
Tuesday, March 5
Calico Quilters will meet from
9:30 a.m. to 12 noon at the Senior
Citizens Activity Center, Mount
Ayr.
Mount Ayr Chamber of Com-
merce will meet at 5:30 p.m. at
Jamies Coffee Mill & Deli for
dinner during the meeting.
Faith Lodge #179 A.F. & A.M.
meets at 8 p.m. at the Masonic
Temple, Mount Ayr.
Wednesday, March 6
$1 sack day every day at the
Ringgold County Neighborhood
Center.
The Mount Ayr Public Library
board will meet at 5:15 p.m. at the
library.
Basic desserts class at the La-
moni Community Center at 6:30
p.m.
Thursday, March 7
Ringgold County Master Gar-
deners will meet at the Iowa State
Extension ofce at 5 p.m.
Southwest Iowa Shutterbugs
will meet at the Creston Pizza
Ranch. Chatter and food begins
at 6 p.m. Regular meeting begins
at 7 p.m.
Sons of the American Legion
will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Mount
Ayr Legion hall.
Alcoholics Anonymous meet-
ing at 8 p.m. at the Neighborhood
Center, Mount Ayr.
Mary Kathryn Gepner
Library Leangs
Birthdays
Campbell to observe
90th birthday
The family of Edith Campbell
is going to celebrate her 90th birth-
day with a Blockton community
potluck on Wednesday, Feb. 27, at
12 noon. Meatloaf will be the main
dish.
No gifts, please.
If you are unable to attend,
cards and correspondence may
be sent to Edith at P.O. Box 248,
Blockton, IA 50836.
Lorenz to celebrate
91st birthday
A card shower will be held
for Velma King Lorenz for her
91st birthday on Friday, March 1,
2013.
Cards and correspondence may
be sent to her at 826 Quiet Harbor,
Creston, IA 50801.
Warren Cultural
Center to present
cabaret March 2
Singer Mary Carrick and pianist
Todd Brooks will present Songs
with a Twist of Lime, classic
cabaret with a theatrical air at the
Warren Cultural Center on Satur-
day, March 2, 7 p.m.
Tickets are on sale now at Ed &
Evas, 154 Public Square, Green-
eld, and on the centers website,
warrenculturalcenter.com. Call Ed
& Evas at 641-743-2566 for store
hours. All seats are $15.
Email the Mount Ayr Record-News
at recnews@iowatelecom.net.
Health Care queen and king
Dorothy Sobotka and Gerald Gardner were named Valentine queen
and king at Mount Ayr Health Care.
February 18 - The winner of
Best in Show at the 2013 West-
minster Dog Show was an Affen-
pinscher, Banana Joe, a small black
dog resembling an Ewok. Many of
our presidents have been associ-
ated with dogs.
President George Washing-
ton developed the American Fox
Hound. An American Fox Hound,
Pandoras Box, was the 2013 win-
ner of the hound group.
President Obamas dog, Beau,
was represented by a Portuguese
Water Dog, Mattise, who won the
working group.
Sometimes presidential dogs en-
joy as much fame as the president.
In 1987, Millie, a Springer Spaniel,
full name Mildred Kerr Bush, came
to live with Vice President George
H.W. and Barbara Bush. Their pre-
vious dog, C. Fred Bush, had died
and they wanted another dog. They
did not need a puppy because, as
the then vice president remarked,
Training puppies on your own
rugs is a challenge. Training pups
on government rugs is impossible.
Millie went to live in the White
House in 1989 where she gave birth
to a litter of puppies and wrote a
book, Millies Book, As Dictated
to Barbara Bush. The book was a
best seller with the proceeds going
to the Barbara Bush Foundation for
Family Literacy.
Two Scottish Terriers may be
the best known presidential pets.
George and Laura Bushs Scot-
tie, Barney, the star of Barneycam
showed off the Christmas decora-
tions at the White House. A typi-
cal Scottie, First Dog Barney, was
feisty and in 2008, bit Reuters cor-
respondent Jon Deckers nger.
Sadly, February 1, 2013, Barney
died of Lymphoma.
President Franklin Roosevelts
Scottie, Fala, was probably the
most famous Scottie. Fala always
accompanied the president, even
to important events like the Atlan-
tic Charter Conference with Win-
ston Churchill. He was with FDR
when he died in Warm Springs, GA
on April 12, 1945. Fala attended
the funeral and followed his mas-
ter to his nal resting place in the
rose garden at Hyde Park. He lived
for seven more years with Mrs.
Roosevelt, who remarked in her
column My Day that it was Fala,
my husbands little dog, who never
really adjusted ... Fala accepted me
after my husbands death, but I was
just someone to put up with until
the master should return. He is
buried in the rose garden near the
Roosevelts. The only presidential
pet to be immortalized in statuary,
Fala stands next to his master at the
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memo-
rial in Washington, D.C.
New books in the library: In
large print Christian ction: An-
gels Rest, Hummingbird Lake,
Heartache Falls, Lovers Leap
and Nightingale Way by Emily
March in the Eternity Springs se-
ries, donated by Judy Linn. In regu-
lar print Christian ction: Courting
Cate, The Courtships of Lancaster
County, book one by Leslie Gould
and Christmas in Apple Ridge
by Cindy Woodsmall, donated by
Karyn Graham.
In Mount Ayr every Wednesday? You can save
money by picking up your paper at the
Mount Ayr Record-News with a counter sub.
Diagonal reunion
held in Texas
February 14
The Diagonal reunion was held
Thursday, February 14 at Anns
Restaurant in San Juan, TX. Those
attending were Gayle and Linda
Sammons and Bessie Austin of
Diagonal, Alan and Kay Oshel of
Flemmington, MO, J. E. and Ber-
nadine Ecklen of Lenox, Art and
Carol Hays of Council Bluffs,
Lloyd and Kay Drake of Tingley
and Ron and Vi Abel of Boone.
Alan Oshel asked the blessing
and after eating, read a cute article
on How You Know You Are From
Iowa.
A sympathy card was signed for
the family of Wilfred Dolecheck
as they had planned to be at the re-
union. Everyone was saddened that
he passed away before the event.
It was a little smaller crowd this
year but its always a busy time and
there has been a lot of sickness this
year. Everyone had fun visiting af-
ter lunch. Alan and Kay Oshel were
the hosts this year.
It was decided to hold the re-
union next year on the second
Thursday in Feburary as has been
done for several years.
Ringgold County
Public Health
offers Heart
Month tips
Ringgold County Public Health
invites everyone to celebrate
American Heart Month in Febru-
ary.
The American Heart Associa-
tion (AHA) offers some wisdom
on how to keep ours and those we
love tickers healthy! Those who
provide day-to-day care for their
families are caregivers and play
an important role. They also owe
it to themselves to be heart healthy
so they can be there for their fami-
lies. Busy lifestyles may overlook
healthy eating and exercise, opt-
ing for convenience and processed
foods. Over time, the poor nutri-
tional value and excess salt and
sugar of these foods pose serious
risk to our heart health.
1. Learning Heart Health.
AHA urges all Americans to be
food literate so they know the
nutritional value of what theyre
serving and make informed choic-
es. This involves learning to read
and understand nutrition labels and
ingredients.
2. Teaching Heart Health.
When children become accus-
tomed to eating foods that are high
in salt and added sugars, there is
the danger that they will develop
lifetime taste preferences that lead
to poor diets and poor health, says
Barry Jacobs, and AHA consultant.
Parents in two-income families
and single parents are often hard-
pressed for time to prepare nutri-
tious meals. But there are many
resources to teach them to prepare
foods that are convenient to make
and are lower in salt and sugars.
Visit www.heart.org for more info.
3. Developing Heart Health.
Developing better eating habits
is often a step-by-step exploration
of new foods and recipes. Jacobs
suggests gradually introducing
healthier foods and drinks, making
sure your choices taste good and
are good for the whole family.
4. Modeling Heart Health.
Its up to you to model the eat-
ing habits you want to see in your
loved ones. Your kids diet may
be heavy on the potato chips and
light on the veggies, but leading by
example is the best teacher. Start
small by picking one battle. If
your kids guzzle soda, limit it to a
very small amount each week and
gradually limit altogether or keep
as a treat for a special occasion. If
theres been too much junk food,
say they can have it for one meal
on the weekend.
Extension
News & Notes
Judy Hensley
Enjoy indoor owering plants
and cut owers longer with proper
care. Learn from horticulturists
with Iowa State University Exten-
sion and Outreach about caring for
and transplanting owering indoor
plants. To have additional ques-
tions answered contact the Iowa
State University Hortline at hort-
line@iastate.edu or 515-294-3108.
I recently received some cut
owers as a gift. How do I pro-
long their life?
Several things can be done to
lengthen the vase life of cut ow-
ers. Begin with a clean vase and
remove all foliage that will be be-
low the water line. Place owers
immediately in water to prevent
air from entering the stems. If the
owers have been out of water for
more than a few minutes, cut off
the bottom portions of the stems
under water. Add a commercial
ower preservative to the water
and check the water level daily.
Change the water frequently. Place
the cut owers in a cool, brightly
lit location in the home or ofce.
Keep owers away from heat
sources and cold drafts.
I received a owering azalea
as a gift. How do I care for it?
In the home, place the azalea
in a brightly lit, cool location. An
ideal site is one near a window that
receives bright light (but no direct
sunlight) and temperatures of 60 to
65 degrees Fahrenheit.
An important aspect of caring
for an azalea is proper watering.
Water needs can be determined
with your nger. Check the potting
soil daily. When the soil surface
becomes dry to the touch, water
the plant until water begins to ow
out the bottom of the pot. The pots
of most azaleas are placed inside
decorative pot covers. When wa-
tering the azalea, carefully remove
the pot covering, water the plant in
the sink, then drop the azalea back
into the pot cover.
When placed in a favorable
location and given good care, an
azalea may bloom for three to four
weeks. Azaleas sold by orists are
not winter hardy outdoors in Iowa
and are normally discarded after
owering.
I recently purchased hya-
cinths that had been forced in a
pot. After owering, can I save
the bulbs and plant them out-
doors?
Hyacinths, tulips and most oth-
er spring-owering bulbs that have
been forced indoors are usually
discarded after owering. Most
wont bloom again when planted
outdoors. Daffodils are an excep-
tion. Daffodils are more vigorous
than hyacinths and most other
spring-owering bulbs. Forced
daffodils can be saved and suc-
cessfully planted outdoors.
The care after owering is im-
portant if attempting to save forced
bulbs. After blooming, remove the
spent owers and place the plants
in a sunny window. Water regularly
until the foliage begins to yellow.
At this point, gradually cut back
on watering until the foliage with-
ers and dies. Carefully remove the
bulbs from the potting soil, allow
them to dry for one to two weeks,
then store the bulbs in a cool, dry
location. Plant the bulbs in fall.
I purchased a miniature rose
for Valentines Day. How do I
care for it?
Miniature roses need direct sun.
In the home, place the miniature
rose in a south or west facing win-
dow. Rotate plants once or twice a
week to promote even growth.
Miniature roses also require a
consistent moisture supply. When
the soil surface becomes dry to the
touch, water the plant until water
ows out the bottom of the con-
tainer. Discard the excess water.
Fertilize the miniature rose (once
or twice a month) with a dilute fer-
tilizer solution.
Miniature roses prefer daytime
temperatures around 70 degrees
Fahrenheit and a minimum night-
time temperature of 60 degrees
Fahrenheit. Keep the plant away
from cold drafts or heat sources.
To promote new growth and
additional blooms, remove ow-
ers as they fade. Cut off the stem
just above the uppermost ve-leaf-
let leaf. Also, remove any yellow
leaves or dead growth.
In May, the miniature rose can
be placed outside. Harden or ac-
climate the plant to outdoor condi-
tions by initially placing the plant
in a shady location. Then gradu-
ally expose it to longer periods
of sunlight. After the miniature
rose has been acclimated outdoors
for several days, place the potted
plant on a sunny patio or deck. The
miniature rose can also be planted
outdoors in the garden. While min-
iature roses are small, theyre actu-
ally more cold hardy than hybrid
tea roses. Select a sunny site with
fertile, well-drained soil.
Daffodil Days
are March 11-15
Daffodil Days, a spring project
of the American Cancer Society,
will be March 11-15.
Orders can now be given to
most of the people who helped last
year. The prices have remained the
same as the last few years. They
are $10 for 10 owers, $25 for the
annual collectible bear and bunch
and also $15 for Dainty Daffo-
dils which bloom and then can be
planted in the ground.
Places or persons to contact to
order the daffodils include Cindy
Snethen of Redding, Martha Ham-
mond or Dixie Taylor of Diagonal,
Nancy Jarred of Tingley, Linda
Swanson of Kellerton, Wanda
McGahuey, Pat Weddle, Cleone
Hoseld, Dorothy Hughes and
Deanna Adams of Mount Ayr, Sta-
cy Andreason at the school, Public
Health ofce, Ringgold County
Hospital, Mount Ayr Medical Clin-
ic, Patty Dolecheck at Dr. Crains
ofce, U.S. Bank and Great West-
ern Bank.
If there are any questions,
please contact Phyllis Riggs, 44-
2655, or Helen Terry, 464-2355.
Need a gift idea?
Mount Ayr Record-News
subscriptions make a gift
that gives 52 times a year.
Mount Ayr Personals
Call 464-2440 Mondays
Allison Carr and Cathy Ward
from Iris Beauty Salon and Mary
Lee Foltz, Glen Tull and Jim Sis-
sel from Hair Tech in Creston at-
tended the Cosmetologists and
Barbers of Iowa presentation for
eight hours of quality accredited
continuing education at The Mead-
ows Event and Convention Center
on February 10, 2013. Some of the
classes were Iowa Law, Competi-
tions Triple Crown, Cut, Color
& Style, Ladies Contemporary
Day Look, Fantasy Royal Wed-
ding, and cosmetology schools
students teams competitions (there
were 50 teams). Some of the spe-
cialty classes were Iowa Cosme-
tology Educators, 2013 Design
Team; The Trifecta Collection;
nails with some nail art; esthet-
ics; Permanent Makeup; Day
to Evening Makeup, electrology
and instructors class If you want
students invested in education, you
have to invest in them, and the
awards banquet Celebrate Beauty
in Iowa, The Mane Event Finale.
On February 11 they attended
the annual delegate session.
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news and advertising source since 1965.
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WELCOMING ALL PATIENTS!
Radiation Oncology Clinics:
Tuesdays and Thursdays
Radiation Therapy offered Monday-Friday

Medical Oncology Clinics:
Tuesdays
Chemotherapy offered Monday-Friday



For more information,
please call: 641-782-3693
Bradley K. Hiatt, DO
Medical Oncology
Looking for GREAT Cancer Care? Choose
John M Martens, MD
Radiation Oncology
George H. Voynov, MD
Radiation Oncology
Philip J. Colletier, MD
Radiation Oncology
Richard L. Deming, MD
Radiation Oncology
Dev R. Puri, MD
Radiation Oncology





WELCOMING ALL PATIENTS!
Radiation Oncology Clinics:
Tuesdays and Thursdays
Radiation Therapy offered Monday-Friday

Medical Oncology Clinics:
Tuesdays
Chemotherapy offered Monday-Friday



For more information,
please call: 641-782-3693
Bradley K. Hiatt, DO
Medical Oncology
Looking for GREAT Cancer Care? Choose
John M Martens, MD
Radiation Oncology
George H. Voynov, MD
Radiation Oncology
Philip J. Colletier, MD
Radiation Oncology
Richard L. Deming, MD
Radiation Oncology
Dev R. Puri, MD
Radiation Oncology
Friday - Sunday
September 24 - 26
www.theprincessmtayr.com
On the square in Mount Ayr Ph. 641-464-2466
Theater
THIS WEEK AT THE MOVIES
Friday and Saturday Evenings, February 22 and 23, 7 p.m.
Sunday Matinee, February 24, 2 p.m.
WARM BODIES
After R (a highly unusual zombie) saves Julie from an attack, the two
form a relationship that sets in motion a sequence of events that
might transform the entire lifeless world.
Rated PG-13 Admission - $5
North Side of the Square in Mount Ayr
Ph. 641-464-2900 Connie Ph. 641-344-0586
Sundays Sundays
we are open we are open
11 a.m. - 2 p.m. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Thursday Night Thursday Night
February 21 February 21
is Mexican Night is Mexican Night
Thursday Night Thursday Night
February 28 February 28
is Chinese Night is Chinese Night
FEBRUARY FEBRUARY
Mount Ayr
Wednesdays, Wednesdays,
February 20 and 27 February 20 and 27
801 E. Van Buren Street 801 E. Van Buren Street
803 E. Van Buren Street 803 E. Van Buren Street
All above dates open for viewing. All above dates open for viewing.
2:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. 2:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M.
Ph. 641-234-0077
OPEN HOUSE DATES OPEN HOUSE DATES
112 W. Madison, Mount Ayr
641-202-1234
www.MountAyr.com
www.UnitedCountry.com
www.IowaLandAuction.com
Authorized Dealer
www.sandcreekiowa.com
Cunning Real Estate
and Land Auction
Farm Management
603 E. Jackson $79,900
Nice family home in Mount Ayr with
basement and large garage.
Kellerton
Kathryn Still and Jan
Holmes 783-2123
Maloy
Joan Jackson 785-2210
Benton
Mary Swank 785-2205
February 18 - Modern Mothers
Club will meet Wednesday, Feb.
20, at Rumors at 6:30 p.m.
Amy Ford received her lung
transplant Friday. Her address is
Amy Ford, CNICU 5 JPP, UIHC,
200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA
52242.
Monday Joan and Don String-
ham and Mike and Malinda Swank
went to Lenox to watch Mitchel
Swank and the other Mount Ayr
middle school wrestlers wrestle.
Wednesday Bobbi Bainum
treated Mary Kathryn Gepner and
Nancy Roe to lunch at Jamies
Coffee Mill and Deli.
February 14 Patty and Wallace
Sobotka went to Tabor to visit his
sister, Margaret McGinnis.
Thursday Mary Swank and Su-
san Ferber attended a valentines
party at the Greened Manor as
guests of their mother, Wilma
White.
Friday Bob and Lucy Ricker
took Rena Smith out to lunch at
Allendale, MO to celebrate their
birthday anniversaries.
Saturday Bev and Clyde Woods
of Omaha, NE and Liz Wiley were
visitors of Bob and Lucy Ricker to
celebrate Lucys 80th birthday an-
niversary. The Woods were over-
night guests and returned to their
home Sunday.
Sunday Mike and Nancy Gep-
ner, baby Sophia Camacho, Mary
Kathryn Gepner, Kay and Don
Hove and Mary Swank attended
the birthday potluck dinner at
the Mount Ayr United Methodist
Church.
Sunday dinner guests of Joan
and Don Stringham were Mike,
Malinda, Shane and Mitchel Swank
and Matt Swank and Katie. All
helped Shane Swank celebrate his
18th birthday anniversary. Mary
Swank was an afternoon caller.
Junior Swank and Richard
Swank attended a garden tractor
meeting in King City Sunday af-
ternoon.
Redding
Bobbi Bainum 767-5211
February 18 - Pat VerHuel and a
friend, Joy Ann of Altoona, visited
Sunday with Mary Carpenter.
Helen Combs called on Kim
Scharfenkamp and Dale Olney
Wednesday afternoon. Sunday
morning Lori, Jacob and Justina
Wimer visited with Helen Combs
after church.
Peggy Overholser and Lesa and
BayLee Darrah were Sunday lunch
guests at Bob and Verna Martins
in Mount Ayr. Sunday supper
guests at Peggy and Jerry Overhol-
sers to celebrate Aaron Darrahs
birthday were Bob and Verna Mar-
tin, Brenda, Sheldon, Shelby and
Shane Comer, Lesa, John, Tucker,
BayLee and Alexis Darrah, Jeff,
Brandi, Jordyn and Ellie Overhol-
ser and Paul Maudlin.
Thimble Club met Monday af-
ternoon in Mount Ayr with Cindy
Snethen as hostess.
Katie and Preston Hayse were
in Nashville, TN Wednesday
through Sunday. They went to an-
tique shows while they were there
and also visited the Antique Arche-
ology shop.
Calvin Main spent Tuesday
through Sunday with his grandpar-
ents, Ginny and Bill Quick, while
his parents and brother went skiing
in Colorado.
Rebecca, Cliff, Bryson and
Kaden Smith, Bill and Ginny
Quick, Dan and Kathy Quick and
Ashton Quick spent Sunday with
Kenny and Berta Quick to help
Kenny celebrate his birthday.
Kim Scharfenkamp and Dale
Olney visited Wednesday with
Betty and J.W. Robertson. Rodney
Saville of Maryville, MO was a
Saturday morning caller of Rob-
ertsons.
The Methodist Action Club
members attended the Ash
Wednesday service at the Mount
Ayr United Methodist Church and
then held their monthly meeting
at the Senion Citzens Center with
Cindy Snethen as hostess.
Annabel Walkup went to the
Diagonal Book Club meeting
Wednesday evening at the com-
munity hall with Laura Bentley
and Chris Davis as hostesses. An-
nabel went to NCP club Thursday
at Ann Meeks. Saturday afternoon
visitors at Annabels were Sharon
Walkup and Alaina Whittington.
Sunday Annabel took Vera Carson
from Mount Ayr Clearview Home
and Jean Haidsiak from Clearview
Home in Cleareld for an after-
noon drive. Annabel visited with
Vera Carson at Clearview during
the week.
Bobbi Bainum visited with Liz
Hunt at Worth County Convales-
cent Center in Grant City, MO and
with Lena Hunt Thursday. Bobbi
attended the VFW soup supper in
Grant City Thursday evening.
Blockton
Mary Kay Loutzenhiser
641-788-2450
February 18 - Weekend guests
of Donna Melvin and Terry Hen-
son were Brad, Rachel, Abby and
Alyssa Melvin. Donna and the
girls went to Kathleen Drakes Sat-
urday for a tea party. Joining them
were Connie and Nolan Drake.
Duane, Cindy and Daniel Wall
went to Mattie Thompsons Satur-
day to help her celebrate her third
birthday. Rebecca and Matt Straus
were there along with her other un-
cles and aunts, grandparents, etc.
Richard and Joyce Brown,
Connie and Earl Drake and Mary
Weaver were Saturday night guests
of Deb Gray.
Tiffany Green received the Ath-
letic Honor Award at Morning Side
College.
Linda Green and Lynn King
went to Sioux City. Lynn visited
her sister-in-law, Jeanette, and Lin-
da visited her sister and husband,
Lola and Larry Wentz. While there
they attended a concert that Tif-
fany Green participated in.
Greg, Taraleigh, Corbyn, Jim
and Charlotte Pearce, along with
other family, helped Jims dad cel-
ebrate his 80th birthday.
Pat Hunt has been on a trip to
Florida to visit family.
Rev. Robin Thomas had the
honor Sunday of baptizing Cyrus
Michael Herzberg, son of Eric
and Tara Herzberg. Cyrus was one
year old on Valentines Day.
Dont forget the remens
breakfast next Saturday morning
from 7 to 9 a.m.
On February 27 there will be a
90th birthday celebration for Edith
Campbell at a potluck held in the
community building. Serving will
start at 12 noon so bring a covered
dish and help this special lady cele-
brate her birthday. No gifts, please.
She can receive cards at P.O. Box
248, Blockton, IA 50836.
Remember: Winning does not
always mean coming in rstreal
victory is in arriving at the nish
line with no regrets because you
know youve gone all out.
Senior Citizen
Activity Center
February 18 - Be sure to check
your weather rock often because
there are rumblings from the
weather people on TV that a large
storm is coming later this week.
And then possibly another one
after that. Moisture is needed, but
everyone at the Center would rath-
er it be in a liquid form. Guess we
will take what the good Lord sees
t to give us.
Monday chair exercises went
very well. There were four people
participating. Wednesday there
were ve working out and they re-
ally got into it with lots of move-
ment and some laughter. They had
coffee and cookies afterward. Ev-
eryone agrees that they feel much
better after doing the exercises.
If you would like to participate
come to the Center on Monday or
Wednesday mornings at 9:30 a.m.
Both men and women are welcome
to attend.
Several were here for bingo on
Tuesday and many for pitch on
Wednesday afternoon. Thursday
afternoon is domino day and there
is also another group meeting to
play a game called Rummy Cube
at the same time. Come and join
the fun.
Last week on Monday the Red-
ding Thimble Club met at the Cen-
ter. At this writing, Antique Club
is meeting in the kitchen. They
discuss various antiques and the
uniqueness of some. Refreshments
are always served.
Sharon has been painting in
the handicapped bathroom at the
Center after the sink had to be re-
placed and some other work inside
one wall was done. Another coat of
paint and it will be ready to have
the handicap bars put on the wall
and the mirror replaced in its prop-
er position. Having the work done
on a pipe inside the wall has solved
an odor problem that used to greet
everyone quite often when they
walked into the Center. Everyone
is very happy this issue has been
resolved.
Remember if school is can-
celled due to bad weather, the Cen-
ter will be closed as well. If that
happens, stay at home, make cook-
ies and read a good book. Most of
all -- stay safe!
Mount Ayr
Meal Site
February 18 - There was no
birthday dinner in February. There
was a funeral dinner at the Legion
on the regular day so it was decid-
ed to wait and celebrate February
and March birthdays in March. On
March 8 a fried chicken dinner will
be served as well as birthday cakes
and ice cream. Mark that day on
your calendar and come on out to
enjoy.
Wednesday all at the site en-
joyed piano music by Carmene
James.
All were pleased to have Arlene
Burdette well enough to come to
the meals again.
Bernard announced that the daf-
fodil sales have begun. See Wanda
McGahuey if you are interested in
purchasing some.
Valentines Day was celebrated
Thursday. Joyce shared some facts
about Valentines Day. Did you
know that roses are not the top sell-
ing owers for Valentines Day?
Mixed owers are the top selling
bouquets, followed by red roses,
then other roses and other owers
and plants.
Americans spend $8.6 million
on sparkling wine for Valentines
Day. Leola Adams won the wom-
ens drawing, a basket of valentine
candy, shower gel and a candle.
Brownie (Randy Brown) won the
mens drawing and received a bag
of chocolate kisses and valentine
cookies.
This writer will be leaving for
Arizona on February 27 so there
will not be any news from the meal
site for a while. It will be nice to
see family down there and enjoy
some nice warm weather.
To live only for some future
goal is shallow. Its the sides of the
mountains that sustain life, not the
top. -- Robert M. Pirig
February 19 - The breakfast for
supper at the community center
was another success. The proceeds
from these meals allows them
to keep the facility available for
rental by persons in the area. The
meals are very good, as well.
Myron and Shirley Ingram
spent four days down in Saint Pe-
ters, MO visiting their daughter,
Teresa Sickels, oldest grandson,
Adam Sickels and their great-
granddaughter, Lilly Sickels, who
has just turned four years old. It
was a very fun time for all.
Sandy Campbell reported her
sister, Linda Foland, had just re-
turned from Dallas, helping her
daughter, Stacy, get moved and
situated. Stacy has accepted a po-
sition as senior attorney for Sallys
Beauty in Denton.
Judy Doolittle visited with her
mom, Loreen Reed, Wednesday
afternoon and helped her play bin-
go. Judy visited in the Gene Reed
home in Tingley Thursday after-
noon. Howard and Rose Peterson
of Beaconseld were Friday af-
ternoon callers. Saturday evening
Judy attended the churchs valen-
tine party at the Wild Bird Lodge
southeast of Mount Ayr. Visitors
Sunday evening were Wes, Amber,
Emma Grace and Jeffrey Richards
of Leon.
Jamie Holmes attended basket-
ball games in Leon Saturday. Her
son, Darrian, was a member of the
team.
Rod and Debbie Holmes attend-
ed the Assembly of God Churchs
valentine party Saturday evening.
They had a good meal and many
fun games.
Kassidy McAtee and a friend
attended church with her grandpar-
ents, Larry and Dorothy McAtee,
and had lunch in the McAtee home
afterward.
Jan Holmes and Kathryn Still
were in Mount Ayr on business
Tuesday. Wednesday Kathryn
received word of the birth of a
son, Chase Maxwell Still, born
to Calob Still and Amanda. The
little guy was born on February
13, his daddys birthday. Grandpa
Dougs birthday was on February
14. Ronche Still stopped by for a
few minutes Thursday and visited
with his mom and xed Aunt Jans
wheelchair. The sisters attended
the basketball tournament game
Thursday evening. Cassie Still of
Des Moines spent Friday night
with her grandma and Aunt Jan.
Jan and Kathryn went to the church
valentine party Saturday evening.
The sisters had lunch at Pizza Hut
Sunday after church. They were
Lamoni shoppers Monday. Becky
Giles visited with the sisters Mon-
day afternoon. Katie Still stopped
by Monday evening and visited
with Jan and Kathryn.
February 18 - Dick, Joyce and
Payton Weehler went to Iowa City
Saturday night. Sunday morning
they met Becky and Jamie Heil-
man for breakfast. In the afternoon
they attended the Iowa basketball
game.
Wyatt Jackson attended a
speech event at Graceland Univer-
sity Thursday.
Maloy Shamrocks 4-H Club
met Sunday afternoon in Benton.
Amber Davison and Paige Lynch
presented the program for the
meeting.
Kathi Braby visited with Jane
and Roland Buck Saturday.
Thursday Joan Jackson visited
with the Erin Jackson family in
Maryville, MO.
The sixth grade girls basket-
ball team coached by Jason Lynch
played in Ravenwood, MO Satur-
day. Paige Lynch, Amber Davison,
Emma Mobley and Hannah Jack-
son were all part of the team from
Mount Ayr that won the tourna-
ment. Tara and PJ Lynch, Robert,
Julie and Laura Davison, Melanie
Jackson, Joan Jackson and Greg
Mobley were there to watch the
win.
Gracie Mobley played basket-
ball in Leon Saturday. The team
that she plays on went undefeated.
Amy Mobley was there to watch
the girls.
Tim, Mel, Lauren and Luke
Burton attended the Diagonal/
Mount Ayr basketball game Thurs-
day night in Mount Ayr.
Joan Jackson attended the
Northwest Missouri State Basket-
ball game in Maryville, MO Satur-
day afternoon.
Several others from the com-
munity attended that game as well
as the varsity girls game in Leon
Tuesday night.
Curt, Kevin, Melanie, Wyatt
and Hannah Jackson were supper
guests of Wendell and Joan Jack-
son Monday night.
Sunday Joe and Linda Murphy
hosted a brunch for their family to
celebrate February birthdays. Jus-
tin, Jessica, Ayla and Kaley Mur-
phy, Kevin, Melanie, Wyatt and
Hannah Jackson and Jared, Leslie,
Rhett and Zach Murphy attended.
Hattie and Holden Dukes
stayed Saturday night with Craig
and Kathi Braby. They enjoyed a
night of movies and playing soft-
ball and baseball.
Saturday evening Tim, Mel,
Lauren and Luke Burton met her
parents in Creston. They enjoyed
the evening eating out and visit-
ing.
Planning A Wedding?
We have a full line of
wedding invitations, napkins, guest
books and accessories.
10 % discount on other items when
you purchase invitations.
Mount Ayr Record-News
122 W. Madison, Mount Ayr, Iowa
Phone 641-464-2440
6 Mount Ayr Record-News Thursday, February 21, 2013
School
H.E.L.P. Youth Pod is doing their 2nd annual granting
cycle!
H.E.L.P. is a youth pod that serves Ringgold County. Our mission
states that we are to serve the people of Ringgold County by
providing recreational activities and educational opportunities in
a safe environment. H.E.L.P. stands for:
HELPING
ENRICH THE
LIVES OF
PEOPLE
We grant money to people or organizations that we feel will
help our community.
We will be accepting applications until Friday, March 1, 2013.
Grant applications will be held in the Mount Ayr High School Ofce
and the Diagonal School Ofce. If you have any questions you can
contact Dawson Knapp at 641-234-0217. If your grant is approved,
we request your presence at the annual banquet in May.
NOTICE
Judge Lewis Scholarship
Applications
for 2013 graduates are now available in the
Mount Ayr Community High School Guidance
Office. All seniors who are planning to continue
their education should pick up an application.
The deadline is Thursday, February 28, 2013.
March 15, 2013
APPLY NOW
for SWCC Scholarships
www.swcciowa.edu/scholarships
for Fall 2013 Scholarships
Must be received at
the SWCC Education
Foundation ofce
by 5 p.m. CST.
1501 W. Townline Street
Creston, IA 50801
641.782.1455
APPLICATION DEADLINE
-Owners -
Darrin and Haley Hinds
Ph. 641-784-7829
210 S. Spruce
Lamoni, Iowa 50140
I-35
U-HAUL
Located at
I-35 Auto and Truck, LLC
in Lamoni, Iowa
We have the right-sized truck or trailer
for moving or hauling needs.
Call: 641-784-7829
COENS COENS
FURNITURE, INC. FURNITURE, INC.
121 N. Maple Creston 641-782-2121
Monday - Saturday 9-5 or by appointment
FREE
Delivery
in our
Area
Mike
Coen
Owner
Your Complete Home Furnishings Store
COENS COENS
Your
Complete Home
Furnishings Store
Uptown
Creston
Entire Stock Reduced
96
th
February
F
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___________________________
Continued fromfront page
More on Grassley visit
Iowans have complained they
cant monitor public ofcials, and
he asked Sen. Grassley what he
would do to improve transparency
in government. Grassley stated the
publics business should be public,
and increase transparency leads to
increased responsibility.
Jasper Abarr asked if Sen.
Grassley had any plans to get the
nation out of debt. Grassley replied
that he feels the country should al-
low the drastic cuts scheduled to
take place March 2 to go ahead
as planned. He said the scheduled
cuts have been the law of the land
for 18 months, and its too late now
to make reasonable long-term de-
cisions. He credited the House of
Representatives with coming up
with plans to avoid the cuts, but he
blamed the Senate and the White
House for not offering plans of
their own.
In reference to gridlock in
Washington D.C., Jake Sobotka
asked Grassley if he felt the sys-
tem of checks and balances in the
government should be changed to
allow for more legislation to pass
more quickly. Grassley replied he
was not in favor of any changes to
the Constitution in this area. He
said the Constitution was written
to protect the people from the gov-
ernment and changes of that type
could eliminate some of those pro-
tections.
Matt Poore asked Grassley if
there were any plans at the federal
level to prevent mass shootings
such as the one at Sandy Hook. As
a supporter of the Second Amend-
ment, Grassley said he was not in
favor of legislation banning cer-
tain types of guns. He reminded
students a gun ban was in place at
the time of the Columbine shoot-
ings. He added that no law could
prevent a person from stealing a
gun if they had the mind to. He
said he would rather plug holes in
existing legislation so people who
shouldnt have guns do not get
guns. He said mental health issues
also need more attention.
Quencey Vos asked Grassleys
opinion of the recent nuclear tests
in North Korea. Grassley said the
world should hold North Koreans
accountable for their promises. He
reminded the students, however,
the political leadership of the na-
tion is comprised of only one per-
cent of the people, and we should
not judge them by the actions of
their leaders.
Hannah Fletchall asked Grass-
ley if he was in favor of drug tests
for welfare recipients. Grassley
said he did not want legislation at
the federal level to institute such
tests, but he would vote for such
a measure as a private citizen.
He stressed, however, welfare is
important to help people provide
food, clothing and shelter for their
families. Drugs, he said, provided
none of those necessities.
As part of the discussion, An-
thony Kinsey stated he felt it was
unfair for kids to suffer if their par-
ents would lose welfare because
of drug use. Grassley agreed the
most important priority should be
to protect children.
Jake Sobotka asked Grassley
about the situation in Syria, spe-
cically whether Russians were
supplying the government with
helicopters. Grassley said he was
unaware the Russians had supplied
helicopters in the recent past, but
he said Russia has not been help-
ful in determining and supporting
United Nations sanctions against
the Syrian government. He said he
believed the country should have
been supporting the rebels in Syria,
but he was unsure if it were too late
for the support to do much good at
this point.
Noah Larson asked whether
Grassley supported alternative fu-
els such as solar and wind power
over fossil fuels such as coal and
oil, Grassley said he supported all
of the above. He explained to the
students he was author of the wind
energy tax credit, but he still felt
it was silly not to use all of our
resources. He stated he believed
in a four-part energy policy: 1)
make available all fossil fuels in
this country, 2) all types of alterna-
tive energy, 3) conservation and 4)
nuclear power.
Linda Sickels asked why the
Department of Homeland Security
has been buying up all the ammu-
nition in the country. Grassley said
he was unaware of any such pro-
gram. He attributed any ammuni-
tion shortage to gun owners buy-
ing large quantities out of fear for
a federal crackdown on guns and
ammunition.
Tracee Knapp asked why
Grassley hadnt voted for the most
recent Violence Against Women
legislation. While in favor of the
goal of the bill, Grassley said he
did not agree on certain provisions
in the bill that would allow cer-
tain offenders to be tried in tribal
courts.
John Larson asked Grass-
ley what he wouldve said if he
had delivered the recent State of
the Union address. First of all,
Grassley replied, it wouldve
been half as long. But he said he
felt Pres. Obama spent too much
time discussing guns and immigra-
tion and too little time discussing
jobs and the economy. He said he
wouldve stressed tax reform, debt
reduction and a moratorium on
federal regulations.
Pam Cross asked Grassley
about immigration reform. Grass-
ley said he felt real reform would
come within the next few months.
He said he favored nishing the
border fence, hiring more border
patrol, expanding the E-Verify sys-
tem so employers could check the
legal status of potential employees,
stiffening penalties for those who
hire illegal aliens and providing an
easier path to legal immigration.
Jacob Beamgard asked Grassley
how he thought Obamacare would
affect small business. Grassley
replied that those businesses with
fewer than 50 employees will not
be affected at all by the legislation.
However, those businesses with
just over 50 employees may likely
reduce their workforce to under 50
or cut more workers back to part-
time status. He also said as a gov-
ernment gets more into healthcare,
he feared private health insurance
might someday become unavail-
able.
Matt Poore asked if Grassley
would try to become more biparti-
san to get things done in Washing-
ton. Grassley pointed to his record
of bipartisanship over his long
career. Specically he recalled his
cooperation with Democratic Sen.
Baucus of Montana in running
the Senate Finance Committee
between 2001 and 2011. He said
he and Sen. Baucus would meet
one hour per week to agree on the
agenda for the coming week. Dur-
ing that 10 years, he said, only a
handful of bills made it out of his
committee without bipartisan sup-
port.
Lew Knapp brought up tensions
between Iran and Israel. Grassley
said he feared if Iran gained nucle-
ar capability they would likely try
to destroy Israel.
Johnathan Triggs asked Grass-
ley if he would support changing
the law whereby only natural born
citizens can become president.
Grassley said he did not support
any change in that direction.
Jake Sobotka returned to the
issue of bipartisanship and asked
Grassley if he felt maybe it would
take a third-party to break the grid-
lock in Washington. Grassley said
he felt the news media was distort-
ing the lack of bipartisanship. He
agreed there was some lack of co-
operation, but not as much as the
media portrays.
Cody Stackhouse asked Grass-
leys opinion on capital punish-
ment. Grassley said he favored
reinstatement of the death penalty.
Anthony Kinsey asked Grass-
leys opinion about the legalization
of the production of industrial mar-
ijuana. Grassley said he was aware
that some states had already legal-
ized production, but he didnt want
the industrial marijuana to become
a cover for something different. He
said before he would support the
legalization of medical marijuana
he would want assurance that it
needs FDA tests for effectiveness
and safety. As for the legalization
of recreational marijuana, he said
he would need proof that marijua-
na is not a gateway drug to heavier
drugs and narcotics.
Tracee Knapp said she realized
Grassley was an avid runner and
asked when was the last time he
ran. Sunday and Monday, he re-
plied, and ask Knapp how she knew
he was a runner. Apparently Knapp
had joined Grassley on a run while
at the Republican national conven-
tion last summer. Grassley said he
runs three miles four days a week
except during an Iowa winter when
he resorts to work out on an ellipti-
cal machine.
At the end of his presentation
Grassley aided the students with a
school spirit contest. They lmed
Sen. Grassley as he introduced a
cheer from the students.
Diagonal archers placed rst
in the high school division and
second in the elementary divi-
sion at the National Archery in the
Schools (NASP) sanctioned tour-
nament held in Diagonal recently.
In addition, two Maroons took
overall high-scorer honors in the
boys and girls divisions. Layne
Ruby, a sophomore, shot 288 while
Cassidy Becker, only an eighth-
grader, scored 282.
Ten schools competed in the
event: Iowa Christian Academy,
Jordan Creek elementary, Adel-
DeSoto-Minburn, Valley high
school, Stilwell junior high, Cen-
tral Decatur, Cardinal of Eldon,
Mount Ayr and Diagonal/Clear-
eld.
Elementary
The Maroon archers were
edged by the Jordan Creek Jag-
uars, 2,785-2,746 in the elementa-
ry division. The Cardinal (Eldon)
Comets placed third.
In the girls division, Diagonal
captured three of the top ve indi-
vidual places. Kayla Bentley n-
ished second, Emily Newton third
and Erin Sobotka fth.
Briar Knapp, placing fourth,
was the only boy to place in the top
ve.
Middle school
The Maroon girls captured
the top three places in the middle
school division. Cassidy Becker
captured rst with Cassie Lohm-
ann second and Allison Norris
third.
Ty Taylor placed third in the
boys division.
High school
Diagonal captured the team title
over Cardinal, 3,296-3,263.
While no Maroon girls placed
in the top ve, Diagonal captured
three of the top ve places in the
boys division. It was a dogght for
rst place between two Maroons.
Layne Ruby and Heath Evans both
shot 288, but Ruby scored 22 tens
to Evans 20 to break the tie. Levi
Jarred placed fourth with a 280.
Diagonal archers place rst
Several Mount Ayr students competed in the Pride of Iowa conference speech contest last weekend and will re-
peat their performances at the district contest Saturday. The students include (front row, L-R) Ica Hauge, Kody
Weeda and Allison Wallace; (second row) Matt Poore, Jacob Sobotka, Taylor Still, Lew Knapp, Alex Young and
Wyatt Jackson. Not pictured but competing at districts is Maggie Jennett. Shaun Kniep is the speech coach.
Speech competes at Graceland,
heads to district contest
BY SHAUN KNIEP
The Mount Ayr Speech team
travelled to Graceland University
recently for the Pride of Iowa con-
ference speech tournament hosted
by Lenox Community schools.
This tournament was a practice
session for the district tournament
Saturday, Feb. 23 in Adel. The
other coaches in the POI judge
the students and give them helpful
suggestions before they participate
in the district tournament.
Those attending included Alli-
son Wallace and Alex Young in po-
etry, Taylor Still and Jacob Sobotka
in radio broadcasting, Taylor Still
and Matt Poore in improvisation,
Wyatt Jackson and Kody Weeda in
public address, Lew Knapp in act-
ing and Ica Hauge in prose.
Matt Poore and Allison Wallace
received medals as the outstanding
performers in their categories. Al-
lison, Matt, Taylor, Lew and Ica all
received I ratings from the judges.
Jacob, Alex, Wyatt and Kody all
received II ratings from the judges
who stated they needed to make a
few changes before they took their
pieces to the district competition.
Not performing on Thursday
but going to the district speech
contest is Maggie Jennett in acting
and prose.
The Mount Ayr FFA chapter is
celebrating National FFA Week
through Friday.
The chapter chose a different
theme for each day of the week:
Monday was Boot Day (all FFA
members wear boots).
Tuesday was Carhart Day (all
FFA members wear Carhart brand
clothing).
Wednesday the chapter hosted
their annual Teacher Appreciation
Breakfast. It was also designated
Any Ag Shirt Day (all members
wear their choice of Ag shirt).
Thursday is Ofcial Dress Day
(all FFA members wear ofcial
dress). Members will also compete
in the sub-district contest at Indi-
anola after school.
Friday is New FFA T-shirt Day
(all FFA members wear this years
FFA T-shirt). State ofcers will
also be in Mount Ayr to visit, and
a pizza party for state and local of-
cers will be held at lunch time in
the Ag room.
Radio spots to air over KSIB
radio in Creston were recorded
by the following students: Johna-
than Triggs, Ashton Johnson, Matt
Poore, Tyler Triggs and Hagan
Willis.
Traditionally the FFA fresh-
men, sophomore, junior and senior
classes compete for those who par-
ticipate the most in the FFA week
activities. The winning FFA class
receives a breakfast or lunch spon-
sored by FFA.
Mount Ayr FFA
chapter celebrates
National FFA Week
State representative Cecil
Dolecheck has provided an update
on the status of the Governors
Education Reform bill.
He said the bill took a step clos-
er towards enactment this week as
it has passed out of the Education
Committee. No longer a study bill,
the bill moves on as a House Edu-
cation Committee bill. It has a few
more steps to take before it is eli-
gible for oor consideration.
The bill received several hours
of consideration in committee. The
nal bill passed by a party-line vote
of 13-10. The main components of
the bill remain intact; however,
there were several changes by
amendments to the bill.
The changes to the bill give
school districts a bit more ex-
ibility with a program that could
lead to difcult implementation in
some situations. With a phased-in
approach, school districts deciding
whether this program can help or
hurt their district can take the time
they need through a planning year,
and potentially two years of imple-
mentation by other school districts
before making the nal decision.
They have the option of submit-
ting an alternative plan to the DE
or opting out if after three years of
planning they cant make it work
for their district.
Additionally, accountability
is placed into the bill in the form
of the three-year review of the
Teacher/Leadership Program, en-
hanced teacher and administra-
tor evaluations, and the Building
Performance Program. Lastly, the
amendments add some continuity
with the education reform discus-
sion by giving new directives to
the Competency Based Education
(CBE) task force and taking steps
to implement other task force rec-
ommendations, including the ex-
tended learning pilot project.
First at Stanberry
A Mount Ayr fth-grade team won the Stanberry tournament recently.
Pictured are (front row, L-R) Zach Doster, Erik Masoner, Cole Cly-
mer, Cayden Lambert; (second row) Josh Restauro, Keelan Klom-
mhaus, Dalton Elwood, Austin Greenland, Isaac Grose, Dawson
Frost; (back) coaches Derek Lambert and Chris Elwood.
Education reform
bill advances
NEED A RESUME? We can professionally design
your resume and have a selection of ne paper
and envelopes at the Record-News.
Iowa Cattlemen
offer scholarship
High school seniors who have
been involved in cattle or beef ac-
tivities may be eligible for awards
from the Iowa Cattlemens Founda-
tion. Eligible students must gradu-
ate from high school this year, and
meet any of these criteria: received
Youth Beef Team training, com-
pleted the Masters of Beef Advo-
cacy, or served as a county Beef
Queen/Princess/Ambassador.
Candidates will compete for
$1,000 scholarships, and up to
three scholarships will be award-
ed.
An additional $500 will be
awarded to any $1,000 scholarship
winner who has completed the on-
line course for MBA (Master of
Beef Advocacy) by the time of the
personal interviews in April.
Questions about the scholarship
program can be directed to Micki
Butler, Micki@iabeef.org, or call
515-296-2266.
Thursday, February 21, 2013 Mount Ayr Record-News 7
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residential property taxes $145 per
year per $100,000 valuation, $290
per year per $100,000 commercial
valuation and approximately one
dollar per acre on an average par-
cel of farm ground.
The best bet for local jurisdic-
tions right now seems to be bond-
ing, Gunsolley said, because
you know 100 percent of that bond
goes back to the road or the school
or whatever it is you voted to bond
for.
Ramications for Ringgold
county
If additional road funds do not
become available either through
state or local means, county roads
and bridges will continue to dete-
riorate while the costs to repair or
replace them will continue to rise.
At current funding levels,
Gunsolley said, we cant sustain
all 75 miles [of seal coat roads].
We can try to keep up as best we
can, but were going to continue to
lose ground every year.
Gunsolley cited increased costs
of materials as a major obstacle
facing his department. For exam-
ple, in 1998 seal coat oil cost 68
cents per gallon; today its above
three dollars. That gures to a 341
percent increase over 14 years, or
a 24.4 percent average annual in-
crease. Revenues during the same
period have remained relatively
at.
The county recently rejected a
bid of $975,000 to complete a two-
inch mill and ll project for 6.65
miles of County Road P33 because
the project came in 20 percent over
estimates from 2012. The county is
currently seeking bids to resurface
approximate 35 miles of county
asphalt-paved roads at an estimat-
ed cost of $1.37 million. However,
even if the bids come in at or un-
der estimates, Gunsolley stressed
these projects can be considered
only preventative maintenance.
Were not xing the road were
not making the existing road bet-
ter, he said. Were preserving the
existing road from getting worse.
Fixing a road would entail
paving it with new concrete, and
ideally, all seal coat roads in the
county could be paved. However,
thats an accomplishment Gunsol-
ley said would likely never be com-
pleted because of funding issues.
He compared the asphalt pavement
resurfacing project currently out for
bids to a recently completed pav-
ing project on six miles of County
Road J20 from Ellston to the Deca-
tur county line. That paving project
cost approximately $600,000 per
mile to construct eight inches of
concrete on top of a six-inch stone
base along with tiling to drain the
base. In comparison, the resurfac-
ing project will cost approximately
$40,000 per mile for the applica-
tion of a thin maintenance overlay
of micro-surfacing, slurry seal or
single seal coat to the existing as-
phalt pavement surface.
Road rock is another commodi-
ty subject to cost ination. In scal
year 2002, rock cost $7.20 per ton.
Today its $10.70. In addition, fuel
costs to haul the rock have also in-
creased.
The county has 673 miles of
gravel roads, and $360,000 has
been budgeted to purchase gravel
for this scal year. At $10.70 per
ton, the budgeted amount will buy
approximately 34,000 tons of rock.
If all rock were spread evenly over
all county roads, each mile would
receive only 51 tons. While that
number may sound like a lot, Gun-
solley said that several decades
ago each mile in the county might
receive up to 300 tons of gravel per
year. Because of the eroded buying
power, the road department has
gone to spot rocking stretches
where road conditions could com-
promise public safety.
Bridges in the county are also
a concern. Of the total 234 bridges
in the county, 10 are closed due
to structural problems such as de-
cient deck boards, girders and
pilings. Another 111 have posted
weight limits. Gunsolley said he
was actively investigating which
bridges could successfully be con-
verted to steel pipe culverts or to
concrete box culverts. He cited
lower costs for installation and
maintenance as well as the elimi-
nation of state-mandated bridge
inspection costs as advantages for
culverts over bridges. Gunsolley
said installation of culverts could
average approximately $40,000
each as compared to several hun-
dred thousand for a bridge. He
added, however, not all bridges in
the county can be replaced with
culverts because many streams
drainage basins are too large. In
other words, repair and mainte-
nance of bridges will continue to
be a challenge for the county.
Summary
This series has attempted to
provide some background to the
subject of infrastructure mainte-
nance in the state of Iowa in gen-
eral and in Ringgold county in par-
ticular. The rst part addressed the
condition of our infrastructure, the
second part explained current state
funding, and this third part ad-
dressed possible solutions as well
as the effects on Ringgold county
of further inaction to address the
funding issue.
Three facts remain clear: 1)
The need to address the deterio-
rating conditions of the roadways
and bridges in Iowa is well docu-
mented; 2) The lack of funding
available to address those needs is
also well documented; 3) Govern-
ment ofcials both on the state and
local levels now face two difcult
choices: increase revenues or de-
crease services.
Iowa residents, including those
in Ringgold county, must be pre-
pared for the effects of both choic-
es. Ultimately, Iowans must face
two difcult choices of their own:
pay up or put up.
___________________________
Continued fromfront page
More on county roads
The Mount Ayr Community
school board reviewed reports
from various district departments
at its recent meeting.
Elementary principal report
Elementary principal Chris
Elwood reported on a number of
topics. He said Ringgold county
sheriff Mike Sobotka had toured
the districts buildings with emer-
gency personnel Sunday, Jan. 27.
Approximately 50 people from
the sheriffs ofce, EMTs, re de-
partment and state patrol toured
the resource center, elementary
and high school buildings to help
make everyone aware of the lay-
out of each building.
Elwood and secondary prin-
cipal Lynne Wallace met with
Kathy Lockard, a certied trainer
for the Olweus bullying preven-
tion program. Lockard will also
present information at the next
district study committee meeting.
The district set aside Febru-
ary 15 for an all-day professional
development session. The morn-
ing session was at the elementary
and spent on The Daily Five
and the Iowa Core. In the after-
noon the staff participated in an
intruder in the building drill
with personnel from the sheriffs
ofce. Elwood said a drill with
students will be held in the near
future but without participation
from sheriffs personnel.
Students whove met their
Raider Reader at-home reading
goals will attend a movie at the
Princess Theater February 26, 27
and 28. In addition, students who
met the criteria for the second
quarter reward day enjoyed go-
ing to Lucky Lanes last week for
bowling. The SOS group helped
fund that activity.
Elwood also presented a list of
summer custodial projects for the
board to review. Major items on
the list include $20,000 to pave the
northeast playground, $20,000 to
replace doors and windows in kin-
dergarten rooms, $3,000 to replace
locks on all classroom doors as a
safety precaution, $2,300 for new
carpet in fourth-grade classrooms.
Superintendent Drake said the
projects could all be funded with
money set aside for capital proj-
ects.
Secondary principal report
Lynne Wallace said staff in her
building will review the Iowa Core
Curriculum to determine which
standards and benchmarks are cur-
rently being taught and how teach-
ers can best monitor which stu-
dents have mastered those goals.
Math, science and language arts
teachers will also analyze the re-
cent ITBS and ITED test results to
determine which skill areas need to
be re-taught for specic students.
Wallace reported on a meet-
ing with Eric Neesan, the AEA
regional supervisor concerning a
program called Response to Inter-
vention. The RTI strategy seeks to
detect learning problems early and
customize instruction to correct
those problems before failure oc-
curs. She added Neesan had con-
ducted an RTI Building Evaluation
Survey with her staff.
U.S. Senator Charles Grassley
spoke to students in grades 7-12
February 19 from 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Wallace said Grassley plans to
speak briey to the students and
then hell open the oor to ques-
tions from the students.
Wallace reported Mount Ayr is
the recipient of a free site license
for NBC Learn K-12, a multime-
dia collection of over 14,000 vid-
eos, documents and images. The
resources are aligned with curricu-
lum as well as correlated with stan-
dards and the common core.
Major summer projects at
the secondary building include
$17,850 to replace carpet in the 80s
building and $11,152 to replace
doors to the music, art, ag and shop
rooms and the gym. Another proj-
ect for $18,000 to replace carpet in
the library, Mr. Budachs room and
Mr. Showalters room could be
included this year or postponed to
next year depending on available
funds. Again superintendent Drake
said most projects could be funded
with available money.
Board member P.J. West asked
administration to consider improv-
ing the walkways to the football
eld among the projects. Board
member Brandi Shay also request-
ed installation of railings at the
football bleachers.
Wallace followed up Elwoods
comments about the Olweus pro-
gram and their meeting with Kathy
Lockard. She also mentioned the
emergency personnel toured the
middle/high school building. Wal-
lace completed her report by listing
a large number of recent student
accomplishments in sports, com-
munity service, academics, music,
speech and FFA.
Technology report
Technology director Kim Curry
reported she, superintendent Drake
and representatives from Com-
munication Innovators and the
Extreme Networks met to discuss
problems with wireless connectiv-
ity at the high school.
She said the district is currently
trying to match its new technology
with an old and outdated wireless
system. She said the only option
to x the problem would be to up-
grade the wireless access points
throughout the building. She has
received one quote to upgrade the
system, but the board tabled any
action until additional quotes are
available.
Curry has been working with
rst-grade classrooms to teach stu-
dents how to operate and take care
of their computers. The students
have been creating books and
composing their own journals to
apply what they are learning about
proper computer usage.
Curry also presented results
from the rst semester 1:1 Laptop
Survey from students and staff.
She said overall the survey showed
improved satisfaction with district
technology with most negative
comments coming about Internet
access, an ongoing problem she
is in the process of correcting.
Custodial report
Lead custodian Clint Poore
reported bleachers on the south
side of the gym have been re-
paired and updated to a roller
system to retract and extend
them more easily. Poore has up-
dated the security alarm panel so
updating codes can be done elec-
tronically instead of manually.
He has also been in discussion
with secondary principal Lynne
Wallace to prioritize summer
project work.
Food service report
Food service director Taw-
nya Jones reported a surplus of
$3,861.16 for the month of Janu-
ary, but the service is still running
a decit for the year. Superinten-
dent Joe Drake told the board
he and Jones were continuing to
search for ways to trim food ser-
vice expenditures including not
hiring substitutes and purchas-
ing food through the food co-op.
In addition, the position opened
with the resignation of Jackie
McVey would not be lled for
the remainder of the school year.
Transportation report
Transportation director Dick
Still reported 15,639 miles were
covered by district buses in Janu-
ary for a total cost of $9,028.10.
The districts other vehicles re-
corded 7,121 miles at a cost of
$1,148.05.
School board hears departmental reports
vice. In subsequent years the cost
would drop to $128,579.17. With
a full-time employee, the rst-year
cost would be $258,475.81 and
$154,607.85 in subsequent years.
He compared those numbers to the
$152,498 the city currently pays in
a combination of landll fees and
the service contract with Waste
Management.
Wise told the council the cur-
rent garbage rate of $16.50 does
not cover the cost of the contracted
service, and he predicted a rate
hike would be necessary if the
contract with Waste Management
were renewed. Wise added that his
numbers reected only residential
service, and the addition of com-
mercial accounts could add several
thousand dollars in revenue.
The city has until March 31 to
make a decision to renew the exist-
ing contract with Waste Manage-
ment, put a new contract out for
bids or perhaps begin the service
on their own.
Superintendents report
Besides his presentation on the
garbage service, Wise shared a list
of other issues with the council:
He asked the citys approval
to purchase a three-quarter ton
pickup with a atbed to replace
two pickups in the citys eet. One
pickup has been totaled, and Wise
said he would use the proceeds
from the insurance settlement and
a trade-in of a second pickup to
help nance the purchase. Council
approved spending up to $15,000
for the replacement pickup.
Wise said he and Amanda
Cannon had met with representa-
tives from ACCO to discuss a leak
issue at the swimming pool. At its
last meeting, the council had ap-
proved spending approximately
More on city council, discuss leak issue at city pool
___________________________
Continued fromfront page $4,700 to install a lining in the
surge tank, but Wise said ACCO
felt the repair might not be neces-
sary. ACCO will inspect the tank to
make sure it doesnt leak. The oth-
er pool issue concerned an eight-
inch pipe that Cannon said she
thought should have been replaced
under the repair contract. ACCO
had given Cannon an estimate of
almost $2,500 to make the repair.
After the recent discussion, ACCO
agreed to repair the pipe and sur-
rounding concrete for $1,458.50.
The council approved Wises
request to purchase excavation
equipment. At the top of the list
were new shoring supports that
would ensure worker safety. Wise
estimated a cost of $7,000 for a
system that would meet the citys
needs. Other items on the list in-
cluded a cordless impact wrench,
portable power saw and other mis-
cellaneous tools.
Wise presented a quote for
5.5 cents per gallon from Justin
Kounen to haul sludge from the
waste treatment plant for land ap-
plication this spring and fall. As
accumulation of sludge in the plant
continues to be a problem, Wise
said eventually the city should
consider a new pump or take steps
to water down the sludge so it can
be more efciently removed.
Wise informed the council of
a break-in at the water plant. While
nothing was damaged or taken, he
said, the incident was reported to
the Sheriffs Department and is
currently under investigation.
Wise provided a number of
updates:
- two water main leaks have
been repaired.
- the DNR water inspection
went well.
- he had met with a represen-
tative of the Iowa Association
of Municipal Utilities to discuss
safety topics. He felt a long list of
modications to city safety proce-
dures would be needed.
- all valves at the Bennett lift
station have been installed, but
one compressor at the station has
quit. The station is now operating
on only one compressor. Wise said
rather than purchasing a new com-
pressor at this time, he would see
if the other compressor could be
rebuilt.
- he had informed a property
owner that re damage to a house
would need to be cleaned up before
the city would approve rehabilita-
tion funds for a different house.
Other council business
The council approved a raise
for utility clerk Amanda Cannon.
Mayor Don Solliday told the coun-
cil the request was his and had not
been requested by Cannon. Solli-
day said he felt Cannon had been
carrying a lot of responsibility be-
yond her job description and was
doing a great job. The approval
raised Cannons wage from $14.35
per hour to $15.25 per hour.
The city accepted settlement
from Hy-Vee and Smith Oil for
rst violations of the tobacco or-
dinance. The amount in each case
was $300.
The council approved the
second reading of the ordinance
raising city council compensation
from $25 to $50 per each meeting
attended. The compensation would
be paid twice a year.
The council set a public hear-
ing on the proposed scal year
2014 city budget for 6 p.m. March
4.
The council approved allowing
the Mount Ayr Community school
district to use the city sewer cam-
era to investigate problems with a
sewer drain at the high school. A
city employee will be in charge of
operating the camera.
A number of local cattle pro-
ducers have been recognized na-
tionally by the American Angus
Association as having registered
cows and bulls included in the
associations 2013 Pathnder Re-
port.
Those recognized for their reg-
istered Angus cows include Hoover
Angus Farm of Ellston with 47,
Jim and Ann Werner of Diagonal
with 22, Landi K McFarland of
Ellston with 10, Katelyn Holmes
of Benton with four, Will and Bon-
nie Larson of Diagonal with three,
Russell Holmes of Benton with
two and Woodland Angus LLC of
Mount Ayr with one.
In addition to their cows,
Hoover Angus Farm and Landi
McFarland are recognized in the
Pathnder report with seven and
four registered Angus bulls respec-
tively. Bulls that have sired a mini-
mum of ve or more Pathnder
cows are recognized as Pathnder
Sires.
Only 1,992 of the more than
25,000 American Angus Associa-
tion members are represented in
this years report, according to
Bill Bowman, chief operating of-
cer and director of performance
programs of the association with
headquarters in Saint Joseph, MO.
The Pathnder program iden-
ties superior Angus cows based
upon recorded performance traits
economically important to efcient
beef production. These traits in-
clude early and regular calving and
heavy weaning weights, Bowman
says. Over two million eligible
dams with more than 6.8 million
weaning records were examined
to determine Pathnder status. All
registered Angus cows that meet
the strict Pathnder standards are
listed, along with their owners, in
the Pathnder report that is pub-
lished annually by the Associa-
tion.
The 2013 Pathnder report lists
8,680 individual cows and 234
Pathnder sires. It is published on-
line at www.angus.org, and printed
copies are available from the as-
sociation. The largest number of
Pathnder cows from a single herd
this year is 96. Started in 1978,
the Pathnder Program continues
to recognize outstanding breeders
participating in the Angus Herd
Improvement Records (AHIR)
Program.
Local cattle
producers
recognized
USDA-NRCS to
reissue 1099 forms
The 2012 IRS 1099 forms is-
sued to farmers who received -
nancial assistance from USDAs
Natural Resources Conservation
Service (NRCS) are incorrect and
are scheduled to be reissued by
USDAs Ofce of the Chief Finan-
cial Ofcer in March.
Sponsored By:
2013 2013
Crop Insurance Outlook Crop Insurance Outlook
You are invited as our guest to attend a two-hour event
which will give special emphasis on the Federal Crop Insurance
program changes.
Dont miss this opportunity to start your Crop Insurance
strategy for 2013. Meet new company representatives and
have your questions answered.
Monday, February 25, 2013 Monday, February 25, 2013
1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. (Refreshments provided)
Diagonal Community Center
Please RSVP by Saturday, February 23, 2013, to:
Jim George Jim George
Ph. 641-344-1107 Ph. 641-344-1107
Vince Taylor Vince Taylor
Ph. 641-344-5820 Ph. 641-344-5820
Diagonal, Iowa
8 Mount Ayr Record-News Thursday, February 21, 2013
Sports
HWY. 2 EAST MT. AYR, IA
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or www.glendenningmtr.com
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LET YOUR KIDS
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Beatrice, Quit at age 37
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There are a lot of reasons to quit smoking.
Dont stop trying until you nd yours. Beatrice did it.
You can too. For free help, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.
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New York
There are a lot of reasons to quit smoking.
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You can too. For free help, call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.
www.smokefree.gov
Freed returns to state
Mount Ayr 132-pounder Erik Freed competed at last weeks state wrestling tournament. In rst-round action (above), Freed lost a 7-5 decision
to Zach Bruns of North Fayette. In the second round, Freed dropped a 9-5 decision to Derik Bailey of Maple Valley-Anthon-Oto to end his state
run.
Mount Ayr downs Diagonal
in rst-round district play
The Diagonal Maroons were
outscored 17-0 in the second quar-
ter and saw their comeback fall
short in a 59-45 loss to Mount Ayr
in rst-round district tournament
action Thursday, Feb. 14 in Mount
Ayr.
After trailing 17-11 at the end
of the rst quarter, Diagonal was
shut-out in the second period and
trailed 34-11 at the half.
The Maroons had a tough time
inside during the rst half of the
game as the Raiders utilized their
strength in the lane and controlled
the boards, scoring on several easy
put-backs. The second quarter saw
the Maroons get several good looks
at the basket, but they couldnt get
a shot to drop. The Raiders also
changed to an aggressive match-
up-zone that seemed to cause the
Maroons problems.
Diagonal came out of the half-
time locker room on re, and
spurred by their fan support, out-
scored the Raiders 18-15 in the
third period and 16-10 in the fourth
period. They eventually narrowed
the Raider lead to nine points with
2:57 remaining in the game, but
the Raiders hit crucial free throws
down the stretch to secure the out-
come.
We got a very emotional win
tonight against a gritty Diagonal
team,stated coach Bret Ruggles.
Ruggles was also very compli-
mentary of the Diagonal squad and
acknowledged the tough position
of the teams that share classrooms
and other sports meeting as rivals
on the court. Diagonal nished
their season with a lot of class and
tons of great emotion, he said.
Jake Still led the Raiders by
racking up a double-double with 18
points and 15 rebounds. Johnathan
Triggs and Jake Sobotka added 13
points each. Triggs also grabbed
eight rebounds. Braydee Poore had
10 points and eight assists.
Heath Evans double-double
led the Maroons as he collected
15 points and 11 rebounds to close
out his career. Ryan Parrott fol-
lowed with 12 points and four re-
bounds as the only other Maroon
to hit double gures. Also closing
out his career was Shad Haidsiak
as he added eight points and four
rebounds. Other scoring included
Jacob Taylor with four points, one
assist, one steal, and one block;
Blake Butler with three points,
three rebounds, four assists and a
steal; and Levi Jarred with three
points.
The Maroons connected on
37.5 percent of their eld goals, 33
percent from three point range, and
62 percent of their free throws.
Coach Warren was pleased with
how his team refused to give up.
We outplayed the Raiders in the
second half when it would have
been easy to just nish out the
game, he said. I was proud of the
way they battled back. I was also
impressed with all our fans who
came to the game. It was a sea of
Maroon.
Diagonal nishes the season
with an 11-11 record. They will
lose Heath Evans and Shad Haid-
siak to graduation but will return
three starters and several reserves
who saw a lot of valuable playing
time.
The Raiders advanced to the
second-round district game against
Lamoni Tuesday night at Lamoni.
(Details of the game were unavail-
able at press time.) Lamoni ad-
vanced to the second round with
an 81-36 victory over East Union.
Concluding his remarks, coach
Ruggles said, We look forward to
continuing district play with our
team completely healthy.
1 2 3 4 TP
MA 17 17 15 10 59
Diagonal 11 0 18 16 45
2pt 3pt FT TP R S B A
Doman 1-4 0-0 0-0 2 2 4 0 2
Jones 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 1 1 0
Quick 0-0 0-0 3-4 3 0 0 0 0
Poore 3-6 0-0 4-4 10 4 3 0 8
Still 7-15 1-4 3-6 18 15 1 1 5
Triggs 6-7 0-0 1-3 13 8 0 0 0
Sobotka 5-7 0-0 3-5 13 3 0 1 0
Johnathan Triggs (44) muscles a lay-up over Ryan Parrott (51) and Jacob
Taylor (13) for two of his 13 points in the rst-round district contest.
MAC bowlers close season in substate action
The Mount Ayr bowlers com-
peted in the rst round of post-
season action last week, but both
the Raiders and Raiderettes did
not qualify to move on to the next
round.
Raiderettes
Mount Ayr nished last in the
seven-team eld. Their chances
were handicapped as only four
girls were eligible to bowl in the
meet.
1 2 T
Holly Karr 127 96 223
Samantha Crawford 98 97 195
Adrian Richards 124 118 242
Naomi Richards 96 134 230
In the second round the Raider-
ettes struggled to break 100 in any
of the ve games.
1 2 3 4 5 T
MA 84 77 123 81 89 454
Team standings were as fol-
lows:
Creston 2,118
Lenox 1,939
Lamoni 1,920
Clarke 1,881
Central Decatur 1,846
Mormon Trail 1,528
Mount Ayr 1,344
Raiders
Mount Ayr elded a full-team
of six bowlers and placed fth in
their seven-team eld.
Ty Pollock paced the Raiders
with his two-game total of 287 in
the rst round.
1 2 T
Quinton Chumbley 111 155 266
Trevor Shelly 134 111 245
Blake Roberts 115 87 202
Ty Pollock 142 145 287
Nathan Roberts 104 100 204
Jasper Abarr 141 139 280
In the second round, the Raid-
ers showed improved consistency
but couldnt catch the leaders.
1 2 3 4 5 T
MA 110 141 122 126 138 637
Team standings were as fol-
lows:
Creston 2,445
Clarke 2,376
Central Decatur 2,038
Lenox 2,034
Mount Ayr 1,919
Lamoni 1,811
Mormon Trail 1,658
Raiderette season totals
The Raiderettes nished their
season with a record of 2-10. Their
average match score was 1,358,
with an individual high-game av-
erage of 100 and a Baker game av-
erage of 92.
Adrian Richards and Samantha
Crawford each bowled 22 games.
Holly Karr bowled 20, Naomi
Richards 18, Cheyenne Percield
16 and McKayla OMalia two.
Individually, Adrian Richards
paced the Raiderettes with 2,289
total pins, followed by Samantha
Crawford at 2,269. Other pin totals
included Holly Karr - 1,958, Nao-
mi Richards - 1,924, Cheyenne
Percield - 1,450 and McKayla
OMalia - 138.
Naomi Richards had the high
game average of 106, followed
closely by Adrian Richards at 104
and Samantha Crawford at 103.
Other averages included Holly
Karr - 97, Cheyenne Percield - 90
and McKayla OMalia - 69.
Individual high games included
Naomi Richards - 150, Crawford -
147, Percield - 139, Karr - 137,
Adrian Richards - 134 and OMalia
- 86.
Series average and high se-
ries included Naomi Richards
- 213/250, Adrian Richards -
208/247, Crawford - 206/265, Karr
- 195/246, Percield - 181/249 and
OMalia 138/138.
Raider season totals
The Mount Ayr boys nished
with a match record of 5-9. Their
average match score was 1,931
with an individual game average
of 132 and Baker game average of
122.
A quartet of Raiders bowled in
all 24 games - Jasper Abarr, Quin-
tin Chumbley, Blake Roberts and
Nathan Roberts. Trevor Shelley
competed in 22 games while Kev-
en Ralston had 16 and Matt Poore
two.
Individually, senior Jasper
Abarr totaled 3,506 pins with Na-
than Roberts recording 3,274 and
Quintin Chumbley 3,307. Blake
Roberts had 3,099, Trevor Shelley
2,629, Keven Ralston 1,252 and
Matt Poore 178.
High game averages and
high games belonged to Abarr
- 146/194, Nathan Roberts
136/205, Chumbley 133/190,
Blake Roberts 129/175, Shelley
119/196, Poore 89/101 and Ral-
ston 78/110.
Series average and high series
totals included Abarr 292/363,
Nathan Roberts 272/333, Chum-
bley 267/347, Blake Roberts
258/320, Shelley 239/303, Poore
178/178 and Ralston 156/175.
Senior Jasper Abarr
The Mount Ayr Sparks will
present their annual expo at 7 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 22.
The Sparks will perform
their state-winning pom routine,
Home, their state kick routine,
Fire, their homecoming dance,
Getting Over You, their football
novelty routine, Senior Spot-
light, their 2013 light show, and
the 2013 coed routine.
This year Ashton Quick and
April Shields participated in the
drill team solo competition and
they will showcase their dances as
well.
Guest performances this year
include the Graceland University
drill team, the Martensdale-St.
Marys drill team, the Creston Salt
and Peppers drill team, and a few
routines from Leslies Dance Em-
poriums competition team.
Little Sparks, featuring danc-
ers from pre-school through eighth
grade, will perform to Disney-
themed songs.
Sparks members include April
Shields, Maggie Jennett, Madi
Hoseld, Logan Wimer, Caitlin
Giles, Kylie Wilson, Allison Wal-
lace, Hannah Glendenning, and
Ashton Quick.
Sparks expo Friday
Hunting Signs
Check our our collection
of no hunting, leased
hunting and hunting
by permission only signs.
Send your message to
hunters at your
property boundaries.
Mount Ayr
Record-News
122 W. Madison, Mount Ayr, Iowa
Thursday, February 21, 2013 Mount Ayr Record-News 9
Sports
700 E. South Street Mount Ayr Ph. 515-782-0629
Monday, February 25, 7 p.m.
Sign up today and receive the rest of February
FREE.
We offer a variety of cardio, strength and free
weight equipment to ensure that you get the
best possible workout.
Early sign-up is available by contacting Doug
at the number above. Gym will not open until
Monday, February 25.
Come make your best deal with our
friendly & knowledgeable sales staff!

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NeW 2012 CHeVROlet!
1,000 and counting...
Mount Ayr senior Braydee Poore receives congratulations and a com-
momorative basketball from head coach Brett Ruggles to recognize
Poores accomplishment of breaking the 1,000-point mark in his career.
Poore becomes only the second Raider to in school history to score over
1,000 points. Drew Larsen accomplished the feat in 1993 and went on
to score 1,111 career points. Poore had the opportunity to add to his
total Tuesday night as the Raiders faced Lamoni in a second-round
district game.
Diagonals Ryan Parrott and Mount Ayrs Jake Sobotka battle for rebound
as Heath Evans (45) boxes out Braydee Poore. Parrott scored 12 points and
grabbed three rebounds in the game, while Sobotka scored 13 points with
three boards. Evans paced the Maroons with 15 points and 11 rebounds.
Bluegrass League
Week February 12, 2013
Team Standings
Hutton Construction 25-7
Sassy Strikers 18-14
Raggamufns 18-14
Rolling Stones 13-19
Giggling Girlies 13-19
Lucky Ladies 9-23
High games (150 and over): Deb
Ayres 153, 192; Roberta Owens 168,
176; Brenda Woody 168, 163; Seli-
na OConnor 167; Barbara Hutton
165; Renda Smith 162; Deanna So-
botka 152, 157; Margie Bishop 157;
Amanda Miller 152; Lorrie Haver
152; Dianna Sickels 151.
High series (450 and over): Deb
Ayres 492, Roberta Owens 480,
Brenda Woody 468, Deanna Sobotka
456.
Thursday Mens League
Week of February 14, 2013
Team Standings
Lucky Lanes 19.5-12.5
DAE 19-13
Hy-Vee 17.5-14.5
IWIWALB 17-13
Leftys 12-20
Suds & Gutters 11-21
High games (200 and over): Jim
Brand 265; Eric Ehlen 243, 250;
Rick Fox 244; Mike Hall 241; Scott
Myer 234; Chad Bals 202, 232; Eric
Dolecheck 222; Jodie Maben 204,
216, 228; Clay Nelson 204, 225; Wi-
ley Main 224; Ron Brand 222; Jer-
emy Shelley 213; Wes Mathany 212;
Brian Sheil 210; Ron Sickels 210;
Travis Hartman 202.
High series (600 and over): Eric
Ehlen 692; Jodie Maben 648; Jim
Brand 617; Eric Dolecheck 608;
Rick Fox 606; Chad Bals 604.
Keep up to date on all the happenings in Ringgold County with the countys
news and advertising source since 1965.
Mount Ayr Record-News Call 641-464-2440
The Ringgold County Pheasants
Forever committee is preparing for
its 24th annual banquet. The event
will take place at the American Le-
gion Building on March 15 begin-
ning at 6 p.m.
With the exception of member-
ship dues, all proceeds raised at
these banquets are spent locally to
promote upland wildlife habitat.
Specically, the chapter has spent
over $73,000 in Ringgold county.
Over $42,000 helped purchase the
Kellerton Grassland Bird Con-
servation Area, Fogle Recreation
Area and the Don and Connie Huff
Wildlife Area. Over $27,000 has
been used to improve habitat on
private lands. The rest has been
used for other conservation pro-
grams such as hunter safety.
The Ringgold County Pheas-
ants Forever chapter has played a
vital role in conservation in Ring-
gold county, stated Chad Paup,
Iowa DNR wildlife biologist.
Another aspect of being a
Pheasants Forever member is that
you help inuence wildlife habitat
and conservation across the state
and nation, said John Lindquist,
Pheasants Forever Shooting Sports
National Coordinator. These
are things that local conservation
groups cant accomplish. Pheas-
ants Forever was instrumental in
getting a dove season in Iowa
Pheasants Forever has a chapter
in almost every county of the state.
Last year alone Pheasants Forever
spent $3.4 million dollars on proj-
ects across Iowa. Besides paying
for your Pheasants Forever maga-
zine, the membership dues support
the national Pheasants Forever of-
ce. This ofce currently has an
employee who is working in Des
Moines on sustainable funding for
Iowas natural resources. Presently
they are working to hire biologists
funded through the recently-passed
Farm Bill to work with landowners
across Iowa to promote wildlife
habitat. They also have an employ-
ee in Washington D.C. working
towards keeping wildlife habitat
programs in the Farm Bill.
Banquet prizes and auction
items include guns, a Matthews
bow, ice shing equipment, chain-
saws, handmade quilts, limited
edition prints, a cooler full of meat
and the best smelling barrel youll
ever nd. There will be new
games including something for the
kids. There will be something for
everyone, commented chapter
president Andy Kellner. Come
enjoy the evening and help support
Ringgold county wildlife proj-
ects.
Early Bird registration is due
by March 1. To purchase tickets
for this years banquet, please call
Andy Kellner (712-621-4227),
John Newton (464-3942), or Dan-
iel Stull (464-5139).
Pheasants Forever auction, banquet
planned for March 14 in Mount Ayr
SWCC names Mundy shooting coach
Southwestern Community Col-
lege (SWCC) has announced Char-
lie Mundy of Osceola will be the
head coach for the Spartans new
sports shooting program. Mundy
will start recruiting for the team
immediately so the team is in place
at the start of the 2013-14 school
year.
Mundy is no stranger to South-
western. He has been the high
school carpentry instructor at Os-
ceola since November 2006 and
will continue to teach as well.
Mundy has a great love for the out-
doors, including shing, hunting
and shooting. He learned to shoot a
bow and cast a line at a very young
age and has shared his appreciation
for the outdoors with his children,
grandchildren and now Southwest-
erns sports shooting team.
I feel the outdoors is a place
for youth to be mentored, Mundy
explained. I know my children
would have had a more difcult
time during their youth if it were
not for the outdoors.
In addition, Mundy has coached
high school varsity athletes at Ur-
bandale high school in ice hockey
for two years and at Clarke High
School in football for ve years.
He has participated in skeet shoot-
ing at the Iowa Games and has
completed hunter safety and gun
safety through the state of Iowa.
The great part about SWCC
having a shooting team is we get
to compete with big colleges like
Iowa State, UNI and Iowa to name
a few, Mundy explained. Its a
great opportunity for SWCC to
gain recognition and let people
know we are here. The instructors
and staff at SWCC are as good
or better than you will nd any-
where.
10 Mount Ayr Record-News Thursday, February 21, 2013
News Country Columns

Form A674 Iowa Department of Management 10-13-11
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING -- PROPOSED BUDGET EXTENSION DISTRICT COUNTY NAME:
Fiscal Year 2014 (July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014) Ringgold County Ag Extension
The Extension Council of the above-named Extension District will conduct a public hearing on the proposed fiscal year
budget as follows:
Meeting Date: Time: Meeting Location:
3-6-2013 5:30 pm 101 N. Polk, Mt. Ayr
At the public hearing any resident or taxpayer may present objections to, or arguments in favor of, any part of the proposed
budget. This notice represents a summary of the supporting detail of receipts and expenditures on file with the Extension
Council Secretary. Copies of the Supplemental Budget Detail (Schedule 674-A) will be furnished upon request.
Extension District Telephone Number: Extension Council Contact Name:
641-464-3333
PROPOSED BUDGET SUMMARY
A B C D E F
Expenditures Estimated
Estimated Amount
FUND Ending Fund Estimated To Be Raised
(Use Whole Dollars) FYE 6-30-2012 FYE 6-30-2013 FYE 6-30-2014 Balance FY2014 By
Actual Re-Estimated Budget FY2014 Beg. Balance Taxation
1. County Agricultural
Extension Education 207,530 218,950 131,488 52,480 70,479 81,839
2. Unemployment
Compensation 0 0 0 0 0 0
3. Tort Liability 0 0 0 0 0 0
4. TOTAL 207,530 218,950 131,488 52,480 70,479 81,839
Proposed taxation rate per $1,000 valuation: $ 0.3
Form 644 SS/RIZ/LD Iowa Department of Management
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING -- PROPOSED BUDGET DISTRICT NAME:
Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Sun Valley Sanitary District
The Board of Trustees of the above-named District will conduct a public hearing on the proposed fiscal year
Meeting Date: Meeting Time: Meeting Location:
3-06-2013 2:00 pm Sun Valley Community Center
At the public hearing any resident or taxpayer may present objections to, or arguments in favor of, any part of the proposed
budget. This notice represents a summary of the supporting detail of receipts and expenditures on file with the Clerk/
Clerk/Secretary Telephone Number: District Clerk/Secretary Name:
641-772-4270 Judy Christensen
PROPOSED BUDGET SUMMARY
A B C D E F
Expenditures Estimated Estimated
Estimated July 1, 2013 Amount
FUND Ending Fund Beg. Balance (C + D - E)
(Use Whole Dollars) FYE 6-30-2012 FYE 6-30-2013 FYE 6-30-2014 Balance and All Other To Be Raised
Actual Re-estimated Proposed June 30, 2014 Receipts By Taxation
1. General 235,500 248,000 248,500 887,489 1,103,482 32,507
2. Debt Service 69,680 68,788 67,537 3,543 3,577 67,503
3. TOTAL 305,180 316,788 316,037 891,032 1,107,059 100,010
Proposed taxation rate per $1,000 valuation: $ 1.49237
March 1-3
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BY MIKE AVITT
The station agent in the photo
is probably Joe Forsythe. I got
this picture from James Rueber
of Boone, who is a former depot
agent for the Chicago Great West-
ern and Chicago and Northwestern
railroads. Mr. Rueber and I have
been trading photos and newspa-
per clippings for several years so
I emailed him my last article. I got
some very interesting information
in return.
The origin of Knowltons name
has always been uncertain. Some
say the name comes from a rail-
road president while others believe
Knowlton was the name of the rst
railroad engineer to bring a train
to the new town. James Rueber
says a Mr. W. H. Knowlton was
the civil engineer in charge of
building the CStP&KC (later the
CGW) road from Des Moines to
Saint Joseph, MO. Prior to work-
ing for the CStP&KC, Mr. Knowl-
ton was civil engineer for the city
of Dubuque, roadmaster for the
Dubuque and Dakota Railroad and
assistant engineer in Minneapolis,
MN, building stone arch bridges.
Thanks, Jim.
I found a timetable in an August
1893 issue of The Weekly News
showing Diagonal as a scheduled
stop on the CGW (the Chicago, St.
Paul and Kansas City became the
Chicago Great Western in 1892).
Diagonals CGW depot wasnt
built until the winter of 1895-96 so
a shed was used as a station until
the depot was built.
In the fall of 1894, Diagonals
other railroad, the Humeston and
Shenandoah, was busy digging
a well and erecting a water tank.
Aaron Lamb would have been the
station agent at this time. He would
move on to New Market in June
of 1895 and be replaced by a Mr.
Snapshots of History
Chicago Great Western depot at Knowlton about 1908.
Shaw, formerly of the Gravity de-
pot.
Knowltons depot was prob-
ably built in 1888 as the CStP&KC
began regular service in August
of that year. Early station agents
were I. D. Jordan, A. B. Ashby, C.
D. Henderson, C. M. Cheney and
George Dukes. Night operators
included Clara Wing, Miss Gates,
George Abarr and Vall Edward.
This depot was probably a 24-hour
station from the beginning.
Knowlton had a water tank and
coal chutes for re-fueling steam
engines. The foreman for this crew
was a Mr. Bonebrake in 1894 and
Dominique Cardaman in 1899.
Haskell Avitt, a very distant rela-
tive of mine, was a section hand in
1899. He is buried in the Cleareld
cemetery.
The Humeston and Shenandoah
was placed under receivership in
July 1895 and was eventually deed-
ed to the Chicago, Burlington, and
Quincy. This line was abandoned
December 31, 1945. The Chicago
Great Western was purchased by
the Chicago and Northwestern in
1968 and this line was abandoned
in 1984.
The week of February 17-23 is
Food Check-Out Week, which is
locally supported by the Ringgold
County Farm Bureau. During this
time the local Farm Bureau will
make a donation to the Ringgold
County Neighborhood Center to
assist their food bank. The Food
Check-Out Week reminds us that
farmers feed the world and the
American Farmer does this task
more efciently and cost-effec-
tively than any other producer.
Since the Check-Out Week pro-
gram was initiated in the 1990s,
Farm Bureau members have do-
nated more than $3 million in food
and monetary contributions to lo-
cal food banks as well as to Ronald
McDonald House Charities. The
third week in February was se-
A hazard mitigation planning
committee is holding two open
house public meetings at the Ring-
gold County Courthouse Assembly
Room Tuesday, Feb. 26 and Thurs-
day, Feb. 28, 2012, from 4-8:30
p.m..
These meetings will be open
to all Ringgold county residents.
Each open house will be the same
and residents can choose when
they would like to attend.
The main topic of these open
houses will be to prioritize hazard
mitigation projects for the commu-
nities of Ringgold county. Your in-
sight and experiences as residents
Hazard mitigation team
needs more members
of the area will be helpful in the
development of a quality hazard
mitigation plan.
The Southern Iowa Council of
Governments (SICOG) will lead
the hazard mitigation project se-
lection and take notes on impor-
tant projects identied by planning
team members.
Your attendance as a member of
the public is not a commitment to
attend future meetings.
If you have any questions, please
contact Andrew Collings, Region-
al Planner at SICOG at collings@
sicog.com or 641.782.8491.
Farm Bureau food
check-out week here
lected for Food Check-Out Week
as a way to celebrate the American
farmer and American food leading
up to National Nutrition Month in
March.
Check-Out Week encourages
consumers to have a plan, shop
smart and eat balanced, nutritious
meals. Free one-page nutrition fact
sheets are available at the local
Farm Bureau ofce. They include
the following:
1. Tips for Better Nutrition on a
Tight Budget
2. Understanding Food Labels
3. Understanding What My-
Plate Means
4. How Much Should I Eat?
Please stop by the Ringgold
County Farm Bureau ofce for this
free information.
A local 4-H member has been
selected to auction their Iowa State
Fair exhibit at the fourth annual
Iowa 4-H Gala on March 2 at the
Downtown Des Moines Marriott.
Haylea England is a member
of the Junior Farmers 4-H club in
Ringgold county. England was
one of 15 Iowa State Fair exhibits
selected to be auctioned at the an-
nual fund raising event hosted by
the Iowa 4-H Foundation. Eng-
land has donated a Farmall photo
to be auctioned at the event.
Half the proceeds of the 4-Hers
items are designated to the 4-Hers
club of choice. England has cho-
sen to designate the funds to the
Junior Farmers 4-H club.
This is the second year a Ring-
gold county 4-H member has been
selected to auction one of their
photographs at the Iowa 4-H Gala.
Last year Tessa Shields Harley
Davidson motorcycle photo was
auctioned off with half the pro-
ceeds given to the Maloy Sham-
rocks 4-H club, of which Tessa is
England project to be
auctioned at 4-H Gala
a member.
Hayleas exhibit will be featured
in the auction portion of the Iowa
4-H Gala in Des Moines. Prior to
the event, bidding will open on-
line via the Iowa 4-H Foundation
website. Online bidding provides
persons who are unable to attend
the event an opportunity to bid
on items. Bidding will begin on
February 8, 2013, at www.iowa4h-
foundation.org/gala.
The Iowa 4-H Gala is a pre-
miere fund raising event for the
Iowa 4-H Foundation, which pro-
vides scholarships and recognition
opportunities for Iowa 4-H mem-
bers. Attendees will experience a
night of live entertainment provid-
ed by Dueling Pianos of Ankeny, a
variety of food stations, silent and
live auctions, all while mingling
with 4-H supporters and friends
from across the state.
Registration for the event is
still open and available at www.
iowa4hfoundation.org/gala.

February 18 - February has sure
been ying by fast for everone at
Health Care as they are anxiously
waiting for spring to arrive one of
these days!
First of all, those at Health Care
want to extend sympathy to the
family and friends of a dear resi-
dent, Calvin Gregg, who passed
away Friday. He will be greatly
missed by all of them.
Monday started a fun week of
activities with dog days trivia
along with talking about different
Presidents dogs. Noodle hockey
was played with the red team win-
ing. This team consisted of Nova
Giles, Lorraine King, Virginia Al-
bers, Don Bear, Nieda Cunning-
ham and Ruth Angus.
Valentines stories were read
from Reminisce magazine Tuesday
along with many residents shar-
ing valentine memories and how
they met their spouses. There was
a dominoes game going on in the
afternoon with the help of Phyllis
Sickels and Skip Bo was also an-
other fun card game enjoyed. Seth
Denny led the afternoon Bible
study.
Wednesday the shop cart was
up and going for resident shop-
pers. Scott Marcum led the church
service and music was played by
Ellen Powell. Bingo was played
in the afternoon with guests Con-
nie Worthington, Harold Crawford
and Corwin Karr. Dorothy Hughes
called the numbers while Phyllis
Riggs passed the prizes. Winners
included June Steinman, Marvin
Morse, Corwin Karr, Earl Brand,
Ruth Angus, Connie Worthington,
Harold Crawford, Donna Benegas,
Dorothy Sobotka, Catherine Craw-
ford, Elaine McCampbell and An-
nabelle Jones. Blackout winners
were Virginia Albers and Donna
Benegas.
Thursday was a very busy day
starting with nail care by Phyllis
Riggs and Dorothy Hughes. A spe-
cial valentines party was enjoyed
in the afternoon with several fun
Mount Ayr Health
Care Center
Activities Staff
activities. Residents started with
a mailing valentine relay followed
by a heart guessing game and re-
ceiving valentine cards given ei-
ther by other residents and staff
or friends and family. Deanna had
them guessing famous couples
and listening to valentine poems.
Heart-shaped cookies and red
punch were served for refresh-
ments and the grand nale was
the crowning of the valentine king
and queen from a drawing selected
by the other residents. This years
king and queen were Gerald Gard-
ner and Dorothy Sobotka. Con-
gratulations to both!
The Mount Ayr Record-News
was read Friday morning along
with trivia and the daily exercises.
A new game was played in the
afternoon called Name 10 as
residents had to name 10 different
things associated with a particular
question asked. Several answers
were brought out with a lot of
laughter to go along with it.
Saturday brought word games
followed by exercises. Its amaz-
ing how you can actually make
anywhere from 40 to some 60
words out of the letters of simple,
small phrases and words.
Mary K. Overholtzer taught
the Sunday school lesson Sunday
morning. Residents celebrated any
February resident birthdays in the
afternoon with the help of Dorothy
Hughes and the Ringgold Rockets
4-H Club that day. They served
cookies and played bingo with the
residents. All sang Happy Birth-
day to Darlene Minnick who was
actually the only February birth-
day. Birthday bingo winners were
Elaine McCampbell, Kathryn Ad-
ams, Betty Ruby, Trevor Anderson,
Annabelle Jones, Ada Stanley, Earl
Brand, Olivia from the Ringgold
Rockets and Irene Hogue. Black-
out winner was Trevor Anderson.
Evalee White enjoyed going
out over the weekend with her
daughter, Dee Euritt. Together they
attended the breakfast for supper at
the Kellerton community center.
Shirley Brown enjoyed having her
sister, Irene Merical, join her for
lunch Sunday as Elaine McCamp-
bell enjoyed having her daughter,
Patti Jones, as a lunch guest. Neil
Stanley was over this week to eat
lunch with his mother, Ada. Max-
ine Werner enjoyed going to the
Tingley meal site with her daugh-
ter, Nancy, and grandson, Race,
Friday.
February 18 - Greetings from
Clearview. Wow did we have a
busy week, it just ew by again!
Monday the day started with ex-
ercise and reading some valentine
true stories, then residents shared
their own valentine memories.
Bible study was held with Scott
Marcum in the afternoon and the
kitchen whipped up some cookies
for a treat afterward.
Tuesday residents had a discus-
sion about what Fat Tuesday meant
and what they would give up for
lent. All decided it would be very
hard to give up TV and sweets.
This all lead to the Mardi Gras
party held in the afternoon. There
were lots of treats and residents
played their favorite game, bingo.
Winners were Helen Lyddon, Lila
Barker and Darlene Gilbert won
three times again. Luck is on Dar-
lenes side!
Wednesday residents exercised
and read from My Cup Runneth
Over. Everyone enjoys the beau-
tiful poems from this book. Tim
Maxa was in to lead church ser-
vices. It was such a nice day that
Jeani took a few residents out for
a car ride. They also got a nice
treat with the Diagonal school kids
coming and putting on a little skit.
They surprised residents with Val-
entines when they were done. All
agreed they would love to see the
Clearview Home
Cleareld
Jeani Swartwood
kids come again. They put a lot of
time and effort on their skit and it
was appreciated.
Thursday was Country School
with Betty and she had some val-
entine stories and she some yum-
my cookies for residents. The val-
entine party was a huge success.
Jim Boltinghouse was in to auction
off prizes and residents had a fun
game of Lets Make a Deal with
their purchases.
Friday everyone enjoyed
Caseys donuts and coffee for a
nice coffee break. It was nice to
just sit and visit with everyone.
Cleareld school kids came to read
to residents in the afternoon. The
residents always look forward to
seeing the kids.
Saturday residents played bin-
go. It was a packed house, the din-
ing room was full and Jeani didnt
have a single bingo card left. The
winners today were Darlene Gil-
bert, Jade Cole, Jean Haidsiak, Lo-
rane Leonard, Evelyn Stevenson,
Arnold Leonard and Gladys Ker-
schner.
Food for thought: Do not wor-
ry about avoiding temptation. As
you grow older it will avoid you.
Dry conditions
drive state park
visitations
After a number of wet summers,
the dry conditions of 2012 seem to
have helped increase visitation at
Iowas state parks
In 2012, trafc at Iowa state
parks increased by 12 percent from
the previous year. Iowas 87 parks
attracted 15.6 million visitors.
Typically, they bring in closer to
14 million visitors.
For more information on Iowas
parks, visit IowaEnvironmentalFo-
cus.org.
Thursday, February 21, 2013 Mount Ayr Record-News 11
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Come and see the
automotive doctor at:
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Ph. 641-464-2814
Let Mike get you back
on the road.We also cure:
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Aluminum Fence
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County Columns Public Notices
Mount Ayr Community
School Board
Proceedings
___________________________
Continued on page 12
February 11, 2013
The board of directors of the
Mount Ayr Community school dis-
trict met in regular session Monday,
February 11, 2013.
There were present Chris Eaton,
Duane Schafer, Rod Shields, P. J.
West and Brandi Shay.
Also present were Joe Drake,
superintendent; Lynne Wallace,
7-12 principal; Chris Elwood, PK-6
principal; Janette Campbell, board
secretary/business manager; Darrell
Dodge, Record-News; Kim Curry,
and Jess Frost.
Call to Order: The meeting was
called to order at 6 p.m. by president
Shields.
Previous Minutes: Director West
made a motion to dispense with the
reading of the January 14 regular
minutes and approve them as print-
ed. Seconded by director Shay. Mo-
tion carried 5-0.
Communications: Supt. Drake
noted that there will be a round table
negotiations meeting with the MAEA
on February 20 at 5 p.m.
Administration Reports: The ac-
tivity fund, buildings and grounds,
lunch, transportation and technol-
ogy reports were reviewed. Under
buildings and grounds, Supt. Drake
reported that they are still waiting to
hear back from the bonding company
regarding the status of the commons
oor. There is some concern regard-
ing the parking on the west side of
the secondary building during ac-
tivities. The access to the sidewalk
(entrance) is being used for parking
which could cause a problem in case
of an emergency vehicle needing to
use it. Administration will be look-
ing into a way to prevent parking in
this area. Tentative summer work
projects for both the elementary and
secondary buildings were reviewed.
Under lunch reports Supt. Drake
reported that head cook, Tawnya
Jones, has started purchasing food
through the food co-op and they are
no longer getting substitutes in the
lunchroom in order to reduce costs.
Under the transportation report,
Supt. Drake noted that the district
has been selected through an EPA
Clean Diesel selection process to
receive two new busses. Mount Ayr
Community school district was the
only school selected in the state of
Iowa to receive this. There were over
1,000 applications nationwide. They
now have 30 days to submit purchase
orders for the busses. When the new
busses arrive, old busses must be
scrapped in order to receive pay-
ment of $30,000 per bus to receive
the payment from the EPA. The time
line to purchase the busses will pose
a slight budget issue. Supt. Drake
will present a recommendation for
the nancial position the district will
take to complete the purchase at the
March board meeting. Kim Curry,
technology director, was present to
review her report which consisted of:
1) Wireless upgrade; 2) Elementary
technology integration, and 3) One-
to-one laptop survey results for the
rst semester. Chris Elwood gave his
principal report: 1) AEA principals
meeting; 2) Tour of buildings for
emergency personnel; 3) Bullying
prevention program; 4) February 15
professional development; 5) Sum-
mer custodial work; 6) Raider Read-
er movie; 7) Music/band program,
and 8) Fifthsixth grade reward day.
Lynne Wallace reviewed her princi-
pal report: 1) Professional develop-
ment; 2) Response to intervention;
3) Olweus Bullying Prevention Pro-
gram; 4) Regional principal meet-
ing; 5) Senator Grassley to visit; 6)
Emergency personnel visit to school;
7) NBC Learn, and 8) Great accom-
plishments from the students.
New Business:
A. Consideration of spending
reduction plan: Supt. Drake shared
ve different scenarios showing
how the allowable growth would
affect the districts overall spend-
ing. They know the settlement with
the teachers association will be ap-
proximately $156,976 and the non-
certied raises will be approximately
$30,000. Depending on the percent-
age of allowable growth they get,
Supt. Drake has a plan for each sce-
nario. Director Schafer made a mo-
tion to direct the superintendent to
reduce spending according to allow-
able growth in order to maintain the
districts unspent spending authority
at its current level. Motion was sec-
onded by director Eaton. Motion car-
ried 5-0, unanimously.
B. Early retirement request: Di-
rector Schafer made a motion to ap-
prove the early retirement request re-
ceived from Pam Cross. Motion was
seconded by director Shay. Motion
carried 5-0, unanimously.
C. Early Retirement Policy Clas-
sied Employee Early Retirement
413.6: Supt. Drake presented a pol-
icy for the classied employees for
early retirement. Applicants must be
55 years of age and should have com-
pleted a total of 15 years of service.
Applications must be submitted by
February 28, 2013 to be considered.
Director Eaton made a motion to
approve the early retirement policy
with a second from director West.
Motion carried 5-0, unanimously.
D. Approval of school calendar
for 2013-2014: Supt. Drake pre-
sented a school calendar for 2013-
2014. The calendar shows a start
date of August 20, 2013 and an end
date of May 23, 2014 for students.
Snow make-up days would be in
the following order: May 27, May
28, May 29, May 30, March 21 and
March 20. Christmas break - Dec. 23
Jan. 3 and spring break Mar. 17-
21. Director West made a motion to
approve the 2013-14 school calendar
with a second from director Eaton.
Motion carried 5-0, unanimously.
E. Approval of district study
committee members: Supt. Drake
submitted a list of members of the
district study committee for approv-
al. Director Shay made a motion to
approve the list as submitted with a
second from director West. Motion
carried 5-0, unanimously.
F. $6,615,000 General Obliga-
tion School Refunding Bonds Se-
ries 2013: Board member Shay
introduced the following resolu-
tion: RESOLUTION APPOINTING
BANKERS TRUST COMPANY OF
DES MOINES, IOWA TO SERVE
AS PAYING AGENT, BOND REG-
ISTRAR AND TRANSFER AGENT,
APPROVING THE PAYING AGENT,
BOND REGISTRAR AND TRANS-
FER AGENT AGREEMENT AND
AUTHORIZING THE EXECUTION
OF SAME and moved its adoption.
Board member Eaton seconded the
motion to adopt. The roll was called
and the vote was AYES: (5) Shields,
Eaton, Schafer, West and Shay.
NAYS: (0).
Board member West moved that
the form of Tax Exemption Certi-
cate be placed on le and approved.
Board member Shay seconded the
motion. The roll was called and the
vote was AYES: (5) Shields, Eaton,
Schafer, West and Shay. NAYS: (0).
President Shields declared the mo-
tion adopted.
Board member Schafer moved
that the form of Continuing Dis-
closure Certicate be placed on le
and approved. Board member Eaton
seconded the motion. The roll was
called and the vote was AYES: (5)
Shields, Eaton, Schafer, West and
Shay. NAYS: (0). President Shields
declared the motion adopted.
Board member Eaton introduced
the following resolution entitled
RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING
THE ISSUANCE OF GENERAL
OBLIGATION SCHOOL RE-
FUNDING BONDS, SERIES 2013
IN THE AMOUNT OF $6,615,000
AND LEVYING A TAX FOR THE
PAYMENT THEREOF and moved
its adoption. Board member Schafer
seconded the motion to adopt.
The roll was called and the vote
was AYES: (5) Shields, Eaton,
Schafer, West and Shay. NAYS: (0).
President Shields declared the reso-
lution adopted.
G. Approval of wireless upgrade:
Director West made a motion to table
action until another bid could be re-
ceived. Seconded by director Shay.
Motion carried 5-0, unanimously.
H. Request for use of high school
gym and commons by junior class
Wishard Chapel
Carol McCreary 464-3178
Hickory
Grove
Rose James 464-2630
February 19 - Sunday afternoon
Gene Motsinger visited with Daryl
and Brad Holden at their home.
That evening Billie Adli and Mol-
lie were at Genes home to share
their home-baked treats.
Charlie and Vickie Jeanes met
Joe and Nora Feummeler, Tony
and Kerri Feummeler and Troy and
Abby Hawk in Saint Joseph, MO
for supper at Bandanas Barbecue.
Sunday Charlie and Vickie had an
enjoyable lunch with Bill and Pat
Hunt at Blockton. Dorothy Saville
and Tracy Hunt were also guests.
Everyone looked with envy at
Pats pictures of her recent trip to
Florida. She reported wonderful
weather and a smooth ight.
Stacey Shields had a great trip
to Arizona and mostly good weath-
er until the nal few days. She and
Rod went to Ravenwood, MO
Saturday to watch granddaughter
Hayley Whittington play basket-
ball. Her team took rst place in
the tournament.
February 19 - Pastor Bill Arm-
strong returned to the pulpit at
Wishard Chapel, after being on
vacation, with an excellent sermon
on the seven wonders of Christ.
Wishard Chapel will be spon-
soring a basketball and game night
Friday, March 1, at the Kellerton
community building. There will be
fun for all ages. Basketball, board
games and food are being planned.
Bring a friend to join in the fun.
Three Wishard Chapel families
have returned from vacations in
warmer climates this week -- Doyle
and Connie Richards from a Car-
ribean cruise, Russell and Jackie
Stewart from Florida and Bill and
Sandy Armstrong from Mexico.
Wishard Chapel is sending con-
dolences to family and friends in
the Wishard Chapel Church -- the
families of Virgil Main, Calvin
Gregg, Michelle Schrodt and Carl
Crees. May all families feel the
peace of God and comfort in these
difcult times.
COLOR COPIES are available at the Mount Ayr
Record-News. We can repair and duplicate your
color or black and white photos too.
Activities Staff
Clearview Home
February 18 - Happy Presidents
Day! By the time you read this col-
umn, the snow may be ying and
some of you may be stuck at home
or work. Coming up this week is
country school today (Thursday) at
9:30 a.m.
Monday Pattie continued to
read to the residents from the book,
Dewey. She plans on starting a
new book next week. Pattie took
a small group to the center area to
read some special readings from
the Good Old Days magazine.
Kathi and Sommer opened the
general store in the afternoon.
Lets party! It was the last day
to feast before lent begins. It was
the annual Mardi Gras party for
coffee club Tuesday. Fat Tues-
day was enjoyed by several eat-
ing a traditional crab cake, King
cake and beignets. Some residents
challenged each other in a cookie
stacking contest. Joe Routh went
up against Anita Hayworth. Joe
won. Shorty Umbarger went head-
to-head with Robyn Bickel. Shorty
won due to Robyns stack falling
over. Roxie Trullinger and Ione
Veatch went against each other.
The winner was Roxie. Joan Hill
and Irene Spencer stacked cookies
next to each other. It was close but
Irene came out on top. Finally, but
not least, Liz Schafer challenged
Berniece Hoffman. Berniece won
with a more even-looking stack of
cookies. Pictures of the event can
be seen on Clearviews Facebook
page. Search for Clearview Home
- Mount Ayr. All this was enjoyed
with some jazz music in the back-
ground.
Lisa played the piano in the spe-
cial care unit for a sing-along. She
also played in the south lobby be-
fore lunch. Lisa and Pattie played
bingo in the afternoon. Winners
were Anna Linkey, Joan Hill, Ed-
die Overholser, Vera Daughton and
Henry Peterson.
Wednesday Sommer, Pattie and
Kathi were busy with hand care.
Scott Marcum was in for church
and Carmene James was on the
piano.
Be my Valentine? Thursday was
a special day as staff and residents
were enjoying owers being deliv-
ered all day long. Many residents
and staff were dressed in pink and
red. In the morning Kathi had sev-
eral out to play the valentine al-
phabet game. Anita Hayworth was
the rst to go out. In the afternoon
everyone enjoyed an affair with
chocolate. The dining room was
decorated for love with red hearts
and love songs from the World
War II era.
Liz, Sommer and Amber served
a buffet of chocolate. Many tried
everything including homemade
chocolate mousse (milk and dark
chocolate), cream puffs, chocolate
eclairs, chocolate lava cupcakes,
white chocolate bread pudding
and fresh raspberry sauce, M&Ms,
chocolate candies and a love po-
tion. Mike Maddy was in to lead
Bible study to complete the days
activities.
There was no school Friday
so Liz scheduled her daughters
to come in to play the Wii with
residents. They enjoyed team-
ing up with residents and playing
The Price Is Right. Abbey Scha-
fer, Ione Veatch and Iris Osborn
won the most money during the
game. Emmalee Schafer and Anna
Linkey came in second while Liz
Schafer and Vera Daughton were
last. It was a lot of fun. Once they
were done with that game, the girls
played some sports games. Other
residents like Larry Hull, Rose
Hunt, Ione Veatch and Iris Osborn
watched them get a bit more com-
petitive. Lisa played the piano in
the special care unit. In the after-
noon Pattie came in to help with
bingo. Other volunteers were Bes-
sie Parker, Kelly Kern, Nina Fricke
and Bonnie Summa. Winners were
Lois Anne Sobotka, Doyle Mur-
phy, Gerata Scott, Norma Smith,
Rose Hunt and Joan Hill.
Saturday Kathi was in to play
high rollers. Winning was Ione Ve-
atch.
Sunday Elaine Willis was
in to lead Sunday school. She
also played the piano for church
hymns. United Baptist-Presbyteri-
an Church elders were in for com-
munion in the afternoon.
Visitors last week were Tom-
mie and Larry Hull, Vickie Mer-
icle and Roselee Hull with Larry
Hull; George Hunt with Rose
Hunt; Brenda Comer with Eddie
Overholser, Kathleen Freed and
Vera Cason; Kay Sickels with Vera
Daughton; Sharon Weaver with
Virginia Weaver; Janis Taylor with
Anna Linkey; Dee Jones with Milo
Jones; Bill Breckenridge with Min-
nie Breckenridge;
Shirley and Bob Erickson with
Don Strange; Betty Jean Schnack-
enburg with Virginia Weaver, Anna
Linkey and Mildred Beymer; Susan
White and Shirley Idle with Don
Strange; Trenneth Johnson with
Winifred Johnson; Joyce England
with Lois Ann Sobotka and Larry
Hull; Dave and Lisa Richards with
Marilyn Richards; Bill, Joni and
Colby Taylor with Anna Linkey;
Lyla Miller and Sue Richards with
Ray Miller; Carol Lee Bentley
with Anna Linkey; Sue Richards
with Twilla Lininger, Cleola Geist
and Lois Anne Sobotka;
Lesa Darrah and Aaron with
Berniece Hoffman; Jim and Jean
Hanks with Lawrence Hanks;
Richard ODell and Pat Straight
with Hazelee Saxton; Louise Frost
with Joan Hill, and Helen Terry
and Quita and David Koehler with
Twilla Lininger.
Laminating services are provided by the Mount
Ayr Record-News. We can preserve items up to
11by 17while you wait. Call 464-2440.
12 Mount Ayr Record-News Thursday, February 21, 2013
PRIZE
One of three
prizes to the top
hands of the
2013
Mardi Gras
Celebration
Poker Poker
Run, Walk Run, Walk
or Drive or Drive
Friday,
February 22
Prizes

Gift
Certificates

Mount Ayr
Money

Hot
Deals
To Play
1. Find your entry form
insert in this Mount Ayr
Record-News, pick one up
at the Mount Ayr Record-
News or participating busi-
nesses.
2. Take it to five of the par-
ticipating businesses and
receive a playing card at
each. (One entry per per-
son. Entrants must play
their own card in person).
3. Take your completed
entry form to the Mount Ayr
Record-News by 5:15 p.m.
on Friday, February 22,
2013.
4. May the best three
hands win! (A drawing will
be held in the event of a
tie.)
Take your entry form
to five of these
participating
businesses for
cardsbut visit
them all for the
fun and savings:
Aunt Jennies Attic
CGI Foods
Country Blossoms
Cunning Insurance Co Inc
Farmers Cooperative
First Federal Savings
Bank
Great Western Bank
Hy-Vee
Lynns Sinclair
McDonnell Appliance
Mount Ayr Record-News
NAPA Auto Parts
Smith Oil
Sweet Escapes
U.S. Bank
Vetter Equipment
Come celebrate spring at the
2013 Mardi Gras
CELEBRATION
Friday February 22
at CGI Foods!
The Mardi Gras
King and his
crazy Jesters
at CGI offer you the:
Freshest, highest quality
meat and produce departments
Very competitive prices
Superior service
Pick up your Poker Walk, Run
or Drive cards
and entry forms here!
Traditions of excellence continuing on into the future.
108 W. Madison, Mount Ayr Ph. 641-464-3120
Friday, February 22
Pick
a lucky
card
for the
Poker
Run
Let the loan officers at First Federal
Savings Bank make your purchase
dreams a reality.
Your community bank
with experienced loan officers.
The loan officers at First Federal Savings Bank of Creston can help.
We have loan officers who specialize in: We have loan officers who specialize in:
Ag Lending Car Loans Home Loans Ag Lending Car Loans Home Loans
Home Improvement Loans Personal Loans Home Improvement Loans Personal Loans
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Additional convenient locations: Creston Lenox Corning
www.ffsbank.com
Have you been thinking about a purchase?
Have you been thinking about a vacation?
Not for sure where to find the funds?
Stop by Friday, February 22
for the 2013 Mardi Gras
Celebration, to participate in the
Poker Run, Walk or Drive and to check out our services.
Mount Ayradise, Iowa,
USA
Come pick a card for your
Poker Run hand and
have some fun with us at our
Lynns Sinclair
Welcomes
to our
neighborhood.
Dogs-For-A_Buck
$
1 Hot Dogs
Friday, Feburay 22
11 a.m. - Noon
Gatorade
Energy
Chews
2/
$
2
22
FREE
Awesome
Aces
tickets
to first 7
customers
SNOWMAN
CONTEST
Call 641-464-2740 to enter
2013 Mardi Gras
CELEBRATION
Friday, February 22
MONDAY - SATURDAY
March 4 - 9
2013 MARDI GRAS
CELEBRATION
Friday, February 22
and watch for our annual
OPEN HOUSE
STOP BY
VETTER EQUIPMENT
during the
403 E. South Street, Mount Ayr
Ph. 641-464-3821
HOURS: Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Mount Ayr Retail Store www.farmerscoopco.com
Stop in during the
2013 Mardi Gras
CELEBRATION
on Friday,
February 22
The time has come to
order your baby chicks
from Farmers Coop.
Choose from many
varieties of: Broilers
Layers Ducklings
Visit Farmers Coop to see the new spring items that are arriving daily!
Aunt Jennies Attic
JOIN US FOR THE
2013 Mardi Gras Celebration
Friday, February 22
Mug Rugs
4 for price of 3
Check out our website and blog: Check out our website and blog:
www.auntjenniesattic.com www.auntjenniesattic.com
www.auntjenniesattic.blogspot.com
Like us on facebook
REGULAR HOURS: REGULAR HOURS:
CLOSED ON MONDAY CLOSED ON MONDAY
Tuesday - Friday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Tuesday - Friday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.;
CLOSED ON SATURDAY CLOSED ON SATURDAY
Pop A Balloon for a 10% to
25% discount on your purchase
on Friday, February 22.
Your discount percentage
is inside the balloon.
Marilyn Saville Marilyn Saville
114 W. Madison, Mount Ayr Ph. 641-464-2149 114 W. Madison, Mount Ayr Ph. 641-464-2149
P.O. Box 346 122 W. Madison Mount Ayr, Iowa 50854
Ph. 641-464-2440 Fax 641-464-2229
Website: mountayrnews.com Email: recnews@iowatelecom.net
Mardi Gras Celebration Special
On Friday February 22 get a
Public Notices
Mount Ayr Community
School Board
Proceedings
_________________________________
Continued frompage 11
___________________________
Continued on page 13
parents for after-prom: Director
West made a motion to approve the
request for use of the high school
gym and commons and the use of
a school vehicle to accompany the
busses to Omaha, NE by junior class
parents for after-prom. Motion was
seconded by director Schafer. Mo-
tion carried 5-0, unanimously.
I. Personnel: Supt. Drake rec-
ommended the approval of resigna-
tion from Joe Catanzareti as middle
school boys basketball coach to be
effective the 2013-2014 school year.
Director Eaton made a motion to ap-
prove the recommendation pending
suitable replacement with a second
from director Schafer. Motion car-
ried 5-0, unanimously. Supt. Drake
recommended the approval of res-
ignation from Mark Budach as as-
sistant girls high school basketball
coach to be effective the 2013-2014
school year. Director Shay made a
motion to approve the recommenda-
tion pending suitable replacement
with a second from director Eaton.
Motion carried 5-0, unanimously.
Supt. Drake made a motion to ap-
prove the resignation received from
Jacque McVey, lunchroom cook, to
be effective February 6, 2013. Direc-
tor Eaton made a motion to approve
the recommendation with a second
from director Schafer. Motion car-
ried 5-0, unanimously.
Consideration of: On motion by
director West and seconded by direc-
tor Shay, it was resolved: That all
bills presented be allowed. Motion
carried 5-0, unanimously.
Director Eaton made a motion to
accept the secretary/treasurer nan-
cial report as submitted. Seconded
by director West. Motion carried 5-0,
unanimously.
Superintendents report: Supt.
Drake took a few minutes to review
the preliminary 2013-2014 certied
budget. Based upon the aid and levy
and property tax evaluations, the dis-
trict will be able to keep the levy rate
very close to what it was for 2012-
2013. Supt. Drake will make his
recommendation at the March board
meeting, pending allowable growth
rates dictated by the state. The bud-
get hearing date, time and location
will be set at the March board meet-
ing.
Supt. Drake reported that health
insurance rates for 2013-2014 will
take a -2 percent decrease.
Adjournment: With there being
no further business, director Eaton
made a motion to adjourn. Seconded
by director Shay. Motion carried 5-0,
unanimously.
GENERALFUND
Access Systems, superintendent
ofce copier, $336.11.
Ahlers and Cooney, P.C., legal
services, $451.50.
Alaska Staff Development Net-
work, special education staff training
Webin, $225.00.
Alliant Energy, gas/electricity,
$23,793.35.
Apple, elementary special educa-
tion equipment, $1,497.00.
Auditor of State, auditor state l-
ing fee, $625.00.
B. M. Sales, district paper,
$1,620.00.
Cardmember Service, UPS/spe-
cial education supplies, $106.77.
Central Plains Electric, mainte-
nance repair, $7.50.
CGI Foods, special education
Level III supplies, $118.41.
Cummins Central Power LLC,
bus barn parts, $193.90.
De Lage Landen, copiers lease,
$1,186.65.
Department of Education, bus in-
spection, $392.00
Diagonal Community School,
second/third quarter open enroll-
ment/ rst semester special educa-
tion, $57,079.36.
Divine Waste, landll waste re-
moval, $585.00.
Dollar General Corporation/
Charge Sales, media/preschool spe-
cial education supplies, $25.97.
Econo Lodge Inn & Suites, TAG
decathlon lodging, $199.97.
Farmers Cooperative Company,
maintenance supplies, $3.59.
Federal Express, FedEx ground
services, $191.14.
Glendenning Motor Co., bus barn
parts, $57.40.
Grainger, maintenance repair
parts, $8.15.
Green Hills AEA, Level III CPI
training, $45.00.
Howard Clothing & Sporting,
protective equipment, $8.13.
Hy-Vee, Inc., TAP/FACS/special
education Level II supplies/elemen-
tary water, $214.09.
Iowa Association of School
Boards, board of education meeting
registration, $85.00.
Iowa State University, agri-
cultural education endorsement,
$1,982.00.
Need a gift idea?
Mount Ayr Record-News
subscriptions make a gift
that gives 52 times a year.
CLASSIFIEDS WORK FOR YOU
with the Mount Ayr Record-News Classieds
Iowa Talented & Gifted Associa-
tion, TAG conference registration,
$290.00.
Iowa Testing Programs, grade K
Iowa assessments, $1,290.32.
John Deere nancial, bus barn
parts, $196.83.
Jodie Geist, maintenance class-
room blinds, $4.25.
Johnston Community School
District, rst semester special educa-
tion tuition, $5,400.13.
JW Pepper & Son, Inc., 7-12 vo-
cal supplies, $109.81.
Marks Plumbing Parts, mainte-
nance repair parts, $294.71.
Maryville Typewriter Exchange,
superintendent ofce supplies/el-
ementary ofce binders, $241.68.
Meyer Laboratory, Inc., mainte-
nance supplies, $2,356.70.
MFA Oil Company, gas/diesel,
$8,744.82.
Midwest Ofce Technology,
copier maintenance/SFL copier
maintenance, $790.19.
Monoprice, Inc., media equip-
ment, $90.50.
Morningside College, student tu-
ition, $1,140.00.
Mount Ayr Farm & Home, main-
tenance supplies, $56.46.
Mount Ayr Record-News, board
proceedings, $184.88.
Namify, high school principal
supplies, $128.14.
NAPA Auto Parts, mainte-
nance/vocational mechanics resale,
$265.15.
Premier A& B Services, bus barn
parts, $315.78.
Red Oak Welding Supplies, Inc.,
industrial arts supplies, $63.15.
Riser Incorporated, bleacher re-
pair - motors, $5,300.00.
Sams Club/GECRB, ECSC
equipment, $1,536.25.
School Health Supply Co., nurse
supplies, $10.91.
Scott Giles, industrial technology
equipment, $32.98.
Suzie Catanzareti, agricultural
educational textbooks, $43.43.
Southwest Builders, industrial
arts technology/maintenance sup-
plies, $628.90.
Thomas Bus Sales of Iowa, Inc.,
bus barn parts, $1,713.42.
Timberline Billing Service LLC,
MediCaid administrative fees,
$946.65.
City of Mount Ayr, water/sewer,
$2,990.00.
Wileys Pest Control, pest con-
trol, $200.00.
Zep Manufacturing Company,
bus barn supplies, $542.34.
US Bank, health savings match,
$1,318.32.
US Bank, health savings match,
$1,318.32.
Fund total - $129,583.01
GIFTS & MEMORIALS
Department of Administrative
Services, TSAannual administration
fee, $250.00.
Fund total - $250.00
MANAGEMENT FUND
Mercer, retirees health match,
$1,165.63.
Thursday, February 21, 2013 Mount Ayr Record-News 13
CUNNING INSURANCE CO INC
Call today for crop insurance!
Ph. 641-464-8017 111 S. Fillmore, Mount Ayr
insurance@mountayr.com
Ted Dan Renda
Farmers and
Land Owners
2013 Multi-Peril 2013 Multi-Peril
CROP CROP
INSURANCE INSURANCE
Sign-up deadline
is Thursday,
March 15, 2013
Stop in
during the
2013
Mardi Gras
Celebration
Friday, Febuary 22
www.greatwesternbank.com
100 E. South Street
Ph. 641-464-3888
On Friday, February 22, join us
for the fun of the
2013 Mardi Gras
Celebration
Stop by
for a lucky card
for the
Poker Run
and check out
the wide variety
of banking services
we provide.
PRIZE
One of three
prizes to the top
hands of the
2013
Mardi Gras
Celebration
Poker Poker
Run, Walk Run, Walk
or Drive or Drive
Friday,
February 22
Prizes

Gift
Certificates

Mount Ayr
Money

Hot
Deals
To Play
1. Find your entry form
insert in this Mount Ayr
Record-News, pick one up
at the Mount Ayr Record-
News or participating busi-
nesses.
2. Take it to five of the par-
ticipating businesses and
receive a playing card at
each. (One entry per per-
son. Entrants must play
their own card in person).
3. Take your completed
entry form to the Mount Ayr
Record-News by 5:15 p.m.
on Friday, February 22,
2013.
4. May the best three
hands win! (A drawing will
be held in the event of a
tie.)
Take your entry form
to five of these
participating
businesses for
cardsbut visit
them all for the
fun and savings:
Aunt Jennies Attic
CGI Foods
Country Blossoms
Cunning Insurance Co Inc
Farmers Cooperative
First Federal Savings
Bank
Great Western Bank
Hy-Vee
Lynns Sinclair
McDonnell Appliance
Mount Ayr Record-News
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Smith Oil
Sweet Escapes
U.S. Bank
Vetter Equipment
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Public Notices
Mount Ayr Community
School Board
Proceedings
_________________________________
Continued frompage 12
___________________________
Continued on page 16
Kellerton
City Council
Proceedings
February 12, 2013
The Kellerton City Council met
in regular session at 5:30 p.m. at city
hall on February 12, 2013, to con-
duct business and other matters to
come before the council; pursuant to
the laws of Iowa and the rules of the
council.
Mayor Nail was in the chair and
the following councilors were pres-
ent: Rodney Holmes, Janet Holmes,
Kathy Johnston, Paul Fifer and Mat
West. Also in the chambers were
Patrick Greenwood, city attorney;
Ed Minnick; Kathy Still, and Randy
Fox.
Motion by R. Holmes/West to ap-
prove the agenda. Ayes: R. Holmes,
J. Holmes, Paul Fifer, Mat West. Ab-
stained: Kathy Johnston.
R. Holmes moved for the city
council of Kellerton, Iowa to pro-
ceed into closed session pursuant
to Iowa Code Section 21.5(1) (c) to
discuss strategy with council in mat-
ters that are presently in litigation or
where litigation is imminent where
its disclosure would be likely to
prejudice disadvantage the position
of the governmental body in that liti-
gation, Second by Jan Holmes. Roll
call: Ayes - R. Holmes, J. Holmes,
Mat West, Paul Fifer. Abstained -
K. Johnston. The council proceeded
into closed session at 5:41 p.m.
At 6:30 p.m. the council returned
to regular meeting. R. Holmes moved
to pursue settlement negotiations
in current litigation in the Ringgold
County District Court entitled K.
Johnston vs. City of Kellerton as dis-
cussed in closed session with legal
counsel, second by J. Holmes. Roll
call: Ayes - R. Holmes, J. Holmes,
Mat West, Paul Fifer. Abstained- K.
Johnston.
Motion by West/R Holmes to ap-
prove the consent agenda (minutes,
bills, nancial). Roll call vote unani-
mous.
Water/Sewer: The clerk reported
the IADNR sent their report of an
audit and inspection. Everything was
good.
Fund total - $1,165.63
ACTIVITY FUND
Brad Honnold, wrestling quad of-
cial, $145.00.
Brian Seidle, varsity basketball
ofcial vs. Bedford, $85.00.
David Greene, junior varsity
girls basketball ofcial vs. Bedford/
Southeast Warren, $100.00.
Dennis Blum, varsity basketball
ofcial vs. Bedford, $85.00.
Greg Davis, varsity basketball of-
cial vs. Southeast Warren, $85.00.
James Smith, middle school girls
basketball ofcial vs. I-35/junior
varsity boys basketball ofcial vs.
Bedford/junior varsity girls basket-
ball ofcial vs. Southeast Warren,
$160.00.
Jim Maine, varsity basketball of-
cial vs. Bedford, $85.00.
Deer & Company, service train-
ing, $179.80.
John Ford, middle school wres-
tling ofcial, $100.00.
Kevin Trullinger, middle school
wrestling ofcial, $100.00.
Larry Jacobus, varsity basket-
ball ofcial, vs. Southeast Warren,
$85.00.
Scott Havel, wrestling quad of-
cial, $160.00.
Tim Smith, varsity basketball of-
cial vs. Southeast Warren, $85.00.
Tracey Barnes, middle school
girls basketball ofcial vs. I-35,
$60.00.
David Greene, junior varsity
girls basketball ofcial vs. Chariton,
$50.00.
James Smith, junior varsity bas-
ketball ofcial vs. Chariton, $50.00.
Lyle Fedders, varsity basketball
ofcial vs. Chariton, $95.00.
Randy Blum, varsity basketball
ofcial vs. Chariton, $95.00.
Tracey Barnes, junior varsity
girls basketball ofcial vs. Chariton,
$50.00.
Scott Blum, varsity basketball of-
cial vs. Chariton, $95.00.
Taylen Abarr, scholarship,
$200.00.
Jim Bruck, RSD ofcial 1/11/13,
$170.00.
4 Seasons Fund Raising, fruit/
cheese, $17,577.54.
Great Western Bank, supplies,
$431.54.
Iowa High School Baseball
Coaches Association, dues/fees,
$105.00.
Great Western Bank, photos,
$61.96.
Iowa Association FFA, member-
ship fee, $797.00.
Tailgater Toby, beef brisket,
$309.15.
Atlantic Bottling Co., supplies,
$1,011.06.
Barb Gerber, FCCLAsupplies re-
imbursement, $6.87.
Boathouse Sports, shorts/tops,
$506.00.
Bobs Custom Trophies, trophy,
$790.00.
Brad Elliott, track clinic/motel,
$221.08.
Claire Andresen, scholarship,
$200.00.
Community Grocers, Inc., sup-
plies, $1,469.39.
Country Blossoms, balloons,
$78.00.
Dannco, Inc., shirts/stadium
seats/jackets/pants, $1,851.75.
David Greene, junior varsity bas-
ketball ofcial vs. Wayne/junior var-
sity tournament, $155.00.
Delwyn Showalter, scoreboard
cables reimbursement, $133.00.
Dollar General, supplies, $3.75.
Farner Bocken Co., supplies,
$274.45.
Farm & Home, supplies, $53.97.
Gopher Performance, ball cart w/
casters, $378.98.
Graphic Edge, shirts/crewnecks/
jackets, $3,641.83.
James Smith, junior varsity bas-
ketball vs. Wayne/junior varsity
tournament ofcial, $195.00.
Josh Smith, junior varsity bas-
ketball tournament ofcial 1/5,
$140.00.
Kalian Smith, state drill team
parking reimbursement, $24.50.
Karl Kerns, message board re-
pair, $100.00.
Katelyn Warin, scholarship,
$200.00.
KBACoach, basketball rack,
$299.00.
Kris Quick, drill team supplies
reimbursement, $1,049.76.
Mount Ayr Community School,
salaries reimbursement, $2,711.74.
Michael Smith, junior varsity
basketball tournament ofcial 1/5,
$140.00.
Neff Company, banner, $268.89.
Record-News, Raider bag adver-
tisements, $77.00.
Tracey Barnes, junior varsity
basketball tournament/middle school
girls basketball ofcial, $140.00.
Bill Grell, duals ofcial,
$180.00.
Brand Honnold, duals ofcial,
$170.00.
Brian Gray, duals ofcial,
$145.00.
David Greene, middle school
girls basketball ofcial vs. East
Union/junior varsity girls basketball
ofcial vs. Clarke/Central Decatur,
$160.00.
James Smith, junior varsity boys
basketball ofcial vs. Clarke/girls
basketball ofcial vs. Central Deca-
tur, $100.00.
Jim Christensen, duals ofcial,
$175.00.
Jim McCombs, duals ofcial,
$160.00.
Lyle Fedders, varsity basketball
ofcial vs. Central Decatur, $85.00.
Paul Honnold, duals ofcial,
$170.00.
Randy Blum, varsity basketball
ofcial vs. Central Decatur, $85.00
Rick Dawson, duals ofcial,
$150.00.
Streets: The council discussed the
tube at W. 1st Avenue and N. Lincoln
Street and the tube in the alley south
of W. Main Street. J. Holmes report-
ed S. Ringgold Street has some seri-
ous problems that need looked at.
Refuse: The clerk is to contact
Waste Management about the city
Scott Havel, duals ofcial,
$180.00.
Steve Dick, varsity basketball of-
cial vs. Clarke, $85.00.
Tim Bruck, duals ofcial,
$170.00.
Tim Baier, duals ofcial,
$145.00.
Tracey Barnes, junior varsity
girls basketball ofcial vs. Clarke,
$50.00.
Wade Anderson, varsity basket-
ball ofcial vs. Clarke, $85.00.
Ben Applegate, varsity basketball
ofcial vs. Clarke, $85.00.
Scott Blum, varsity basketball vs.
Central Decatur, $85.00.
Fund total = $40,613.81
14 Mount Ayr Record-News Thursday, February 21, 2013
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Thank You
for the cards, floral tributes and memorials from friends
and a caring community. Thanks to Bill and Sandy Armstrong
for making things easier, Rev. Terry Roberts for the sermon and
the American Legion Auxiliary for the lunch after the service.
The care and support from everyone was much appreciated
by the Jack Hartman family.
Beulah, Linda and Nancy
Lenox Monument
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Call for an appointment
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Thank You
to the many friends and neighbors who remembered
our family with food, flowers and other acts of kindness at
the time of our mothers death.
Special thanks go to Clearview Home for the wonderful
care given during her stay, to Watson-Armstrong Funeral
Home, to Reverend Ed Shields and Reverend Barton
Shields and to the American Legion for the lunch.
Mary Lou Goetz
Gary and De Ann Shields
Jerry and Norma Shields
What a treat to blow out 88 birthday candles.
Cardsabundant. Hallmark surely is out of
business now. There are no friends like my
Ringgold County friends.
Thanks for the memories.
Bud Breckenridge
Church Obituaries
Obituaries
Church Notes
Mount Ayr Larger Parish
United Methodist Churches
Pastor Skip Rushing
Redding
9:00 a.m., Worship.
10:00 a.m., Sunday School.
Middle Fork
9:00 a.m., Sunday School, all
ages.
10:00 a.m., Worship.
Mount Ayr
10:00 a.m., Sunday School.
10:30 - 11:00 a.m., Refreshments
and Fellowship.
11:00 a.m., Worship.

St. Josephs Catholic Church
100 N. Polk, Mount Ayr
Fr. Glen Wilwerding, Pastor
Sunday mass, 8:00 a.m.
St. Patricks Catholic Church
Grand River
Fr. Glen Wilwerding, Pastor
Saturdays, mass at 5:30 p.m.

United Church of Diagonal
Pastor Ed Shields
9:30 a.m., Church.
10:30 a.m., Sunday school.

Tingley First Christian Church
Al Rusk, Pastor
10:00 a.m., Church school. Mar-
garet Hull, Superintendent.
11:00 a.m., Worship.
Sunday, February 24:
4:00 p.m., Musical gathering.

First Lutheran Church
Mount Ayr - LCMS
Vacancy Pastor: Rev. Jonathan
Watt
Sunday, February 24:
8:00 a.m., Worship.
Free Methodist Church
Charles Weiman, Pastor
10:00 a.m., Sunday school.
11:00 a.m., Worship service.
7:00 p.m., Evening worship.
Wednesday, Family Night Prayer
meeting; F.M.Y., C.L.C., 7 p.m.
Kellerton Assembly of God
Church
Pastor Barton Shields
9:30 a.m., Sunday School.
10:30 a.m., Worship service.
6:00 p.m., Sunday evening wor-
ship.
Wednesday, 7:00 p.m., Adult Bible
study.
Blockton Christian Church
Scott Marcum, Pastor
9:30 a.m., Bible School.
10:45 a.m., Worship.
Second and fourth Sundays of each
month, Youth Groups.
First Wednesday of each month,
Church Night.
Tent Chapel
Church of Christ
Richard Reinhardt, Minister
(3 miles south of Blockton, Iowa)
Bible study, 10:00 a.m.
Morning worship, 11:00 a.m.
Watch In Search of the Lords
Way - 7 a.m., Sunday on Ch. 17;
KDSM Dish 259, 6:30 a.m. or Direct
TV 364, 6:30 a.m.
Sundays, 6:30 p.m., evening ser-
vices.
Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m., Bible
study.
Regular Baptist Church
Mount Ayr
464-3293 (Church)
Pastor Seth Denney
9:45 a.m., Sunday School.
11:00 a.m., Morning worship
service. Nursery available.
6:30 p.m., Evening service.
Wednesday, 6:30-8 p.m., AWANA;
7 p.m., Midweek Bible study and
prayer. 7 p.m., Youth service.
Hickory Grove
Advent Christian Church
Sherry Wiley, supply pastor
The church has closed for the
winter and will reopen in the spring
on Palm Sunday, March 24, 2013.

Mount Ayr Assembly of God
Pastor Doug Rohrer
(515-783-7712)
See our facebook page
8:15 - 8:45 a.m., Prayer
9:00 a.m., Sunday school for all
ages.
10:00 a.m., Fellowship.
10:30 a.m., Worship service. Nursery
available. Childrens church.
5:00 p.m. Men of Valor
Saturday, March 2: 8 - 11 a.m., Open
Closet.
Thursdays: Revolution Youth - 6 to 8
p.m.
Wednesdays: Kids Club - 5-7 p.m.

Kellerton
United Methodist Church
Rev. Robin Thomas, Pastor
9:30 a.m., Sunday School
10:30 a.m., Worship.
Beaconseld
United Methodist Church
Rev. Robin Thomas, Pastor
Sunday, 9:00 a.m., Morning Wor-
ship.
No Sunday School.
Bank of Christ Outreach and Hope
Center
2nd & Ringgold, Kellerton
10:00 a.m., Sunday school for
children and adults.
11:00 a.m., Church service with
Kathy Johnston speaking.
United Baptist-Presbyterian
Church
2343 State Highway 169
Mount Ayr
Michael Maddy, Pastor
(641-464-2127)
www.ubpchurch.com
Sunday, February 24:
9:00 a.m., Sunday school.
10:00 a.m., Church service.
Greeter, Dean Blades; Call to worship,
Deb Larson: Musician, Nancy Sackett;
Childrens sermon, Fay Howie; Mes-
sage, Mike Maddy.
Monday, February 25:
5:00 p.m., Stretch exercises-UBP
Church.
Tuesday, February 26:
7:00 a.m., Mens breakfast at UBP
Church.
7:00 p.m., TEK Church Service
Group.
Wednesday, February 27:
5:00 p.m., Stretch exercises.
5:30 p.m., Choir practice at UBP
Church. Director Judy Cunning.
6:30 p.m., Bible study at Mount
Ayr Health Care.

Faith United Parish
Pastor Bruce Giese
Platte Center
8:30 a.m., Worship.
10:00 a.m., Sunday School.

First Christian Church
Pastor Chris Conklin
Sunday, February 17:
7:00 a.m., Mens breakfast.
9:00 a.m., Sunday school.
10:00 a.m., Church.
Wednesday, February 20: 9 a.m.,
WIC.
Wednesdays: L.A.M.B.S. at 3:30
p.m.; Choir at 5:30 p.m.
Thursday Prayer group at 9:30
a.m.


Wishard Chapel Community
Church
Pastor Bill Armstrong
9:30 a.m., Sunday school.
10:30 a.m., Worship.
Women of Wishard (WOW): Every
rst Wednesday at 7 p.m.

Ellston
United Methodist Church
Rev. Robin Thomas, Pastor
9:00 a.m., Church services.
10:00 a.m., Sunday school and
Bible study.
United Methodist Women: Every
second Monday at 1:30 p.m.
United Methodist Men: First/third
Saturdays at 7:30 a.m.
Youth Group: First/third Wednes-
days, 6:30 p.m.
Second Sunday - potluck; fourth
Sunday - fellowship time.
Website: ellstonumc.org
Tingley
United Methodist Church
Rev. Robin Thomas, Pastor
9:30 a.m., Sunday school.
10:30 a.m., Worship.
United Methodist Women: Every
Third Wednesday.
Youth Group: Second and Fourth
Sundays, 5 p.m., at Ellston.
Area Bible Fellowship Church
204 North Van Buren, Cleareld
Pastor Ron Christian
10:00 a.m., Worship service.
11:15 a.m., Sunday school.
Wednesday: 6:30 p.m., AWANA.
Website: www.areabiblefellow-
ship.org
The Lighthouse
Non-Denominational Fellowship
Doug Greene, Pastor
Darin Dolecheck, Youth Pastor
(west 2 miles on Hwy. 2)
9:45 a.m., Sunday School.
10:30 a.m., Worship.
6:30 p.m., Evening Worship.
Mondays, 5 p.m., Thin Within
Support Group; 7 p.m., Sowing in
Tears Support Group.
Wednesdays, 6 - 8 p.m., Crew
Kids Club; 8 - 9 p.m., SOC Youth
Meeting.
Saturday Night Service, 7 p.m.,
Bible Study and Prayer led by Darla
Dolecheck.
Sermons available online at: light-
houseonline.org.
Trinity Christian Church
Terry Roberts, Minister
446-8654
(Hwy. 2 West, Decatur)
8:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m., Sunday
morning worship services.
9:30 a.m., Sunday School, all
ages.
Wednesday: 7 p.m., Youth/Small
group Bible study. Nursery avail-
able.
The Community of Christ
Tony and Sandy Crandell, Co-
pastors,
Sunday, February 24:
11:00 a.m., Worship service with
Sandy Crandell speaking.

Mount Ayr Restoration Branch
Sherman Phipps, Presiding Elder
Alan Smith, Assistant
Sunday, February 24:
Welcomers: Alan Smith family.
9:45 a.m., Family Worship, Ed
Anderson family.
10:00 a.m., Classes.
11:00 a.m., Worship. Ron Smith,
presiding; Rob Rolfe, speaking; Pat
Bolingbroke, pianist; Jim Barber,
special music.
Custodians: Alan Smiths.
6:00 p.m., Family fellowship at
Steve Smith home.
Wednesday, February 27:
7:00 p.m., Prayer service at
Norman Nelson home. Alan Smith,
presiding.
OFFICE SUPPLIES? Copier paper, resume paper,
colored paper, computer forms and more are
available at the Mount Ayr Record-News,
112 W. Madison Street, Mount Ayr.
Gathering to be
held at Tingley
Christian Church
A musical gathering will be held
at the Tingley Christian Church on
Sunday, Feb. 24, at 4 p.m. Every-
one is invited.
Groups or individuals are wel-
come to sing or play. There will be
hymn requests for congregational
singing.
The contact number is 515-402-
2788.
Need A Stamp?
We oer notary stamps,
pre-inked stamps, rubber
stamps, rell ink, ink
pads and more!
Reasonable prices.
Mount Ayr
Record-News
122 W. Madison, Mount Ayr, Iowa
Carl Crees
CARL EUGENE CREES
Carl Eugene Crees, son of Mi-
chael Samuel and Ruth Lavern (El-
lars) Crees, was born on the family
farm in Decatur County, Iowa on
May 10, 1939. He grew up in the
Grand River area and graduated
from Beaconseld high school in
1957. He was working at Adams
Ranch in Odebolt, Iowa when he
met his future bride. On June 10,
1961 he married Carol Birchard at
the Methodist church in Hornick,
Iowa. They lived in Davenport,
Iowa where they were blessed with
two children, Craig and Cathy.
In 1974 they moved to southern
Iowa when Carl went into the auto
parts business with his brother-in-
law, Ralph Jones. Carl became an
active member of many organiza-
tions, including the Leon Develop-
ment Corporation and the Chamber
of Commerce. He was given the
Citizen of the Year award in 1989.
Carl retired when he sold the Jones
& Crees Auto Supply business in
2001. He and his wife, Carol, en-
joyed traveling and spending time
with their children and grandchil-
dren, including taking them on
their vacations. He was extremely
proud of his children and grand-
children and bragged about them
to anyone who would listen. He
also enjoyed playing golf and other
activities at the Leon Country Club
and going to Central Decatur ball
games. He was always learning
new things and did a lot of research
on the Internet. He often went to
coffee with his friends to nd out
the news and he enjoyed driving
cars for Big Doug.
Carl passed away in the Deca-
tur County Hospital on February
16, 2013 at the age of 73. Preced-
ing him in death were his parents;
infant brother, Clarence; brother,
Willis; sister, Patricia, and broth-
ers-in-law, Ralph Jones and Duane
Poore.
Those left to cherish his memo-
ry are his wife, Carol, of 51 years;
children, Craig and Dinah Crees of
Hinton, Iowa and Cathy and James
Cornell of Leon, Iowa; grand-
children, Devin, Janie and Emily
Cornell of Leon, Iowa and Nolan
and Logan Crees of Hinton, Iowa;
sisters, Barbara Jones of Leon,
Iowa and Willa Poore of Mount
Ayr, Iowa; brothers, Kenneth and
Bonnye Crees of Pinetop, Arizona
and LeRoy and Velma Crees of
Brownstown, Indiana; sisters-in-
law, Peggy Crees of Dysart, Iowa,
Lucile and Ron Lapin of Madi-
son, Wisconsin and Ruth Lloyd of
Omaha, Nebraska; brother-in-law,
David and Jane Birchard of Rose-
burg, Oregon, and a host of nieces,
nephews, cousins and friends.
Funeral services were held at the
Slade-ODonnell Funeral Home
in Leon with Rev. Rick Hawkins
ofciating Tuesday, February 19,
2013. Burial was in the Oak Hill
Cemetery near Grand River, Iowa.
Michelle Schrodt
MICHELLE SCHRODT
Michelle Schrodt, 48, of Lori-
mor died Thursday, February 14,
2013.
Michelle Robin Schrodt was
born June 17, 1964 in Escondido,
California, the daughter of David
and Donna (Walters) Schrodt. She
graduated from Chattooga high
school of Summerville, Georgia in
1981.
Michelle worked at Iowa Select
Farms near Lorimor for 10 years
as a farm manager, where she had
many friends and was well respect-
ed. All her life she loved animals.
She raised dogs and loved her
horses.
Michelle is survived by her
parents, David and Donna Schrodt
of Urbandale, Iowa; a brother, An-
drew (Sara) Schrodt of West Des
Moines, Iowa, and three nieces
and a nephew, Rebecca, Gracen,
Samuel and Chloe.
She was preceded in death by
her grandparents, Chris and Wanda
Walters who lived in Beaconseld,
Iowa and John and Pauline Duke
from the Creston, Iowa area.
Funeral services were held
Tuesday, February 19, at Ochiltree
Funeral Service & Aftercare in
Winterset with burial immediately
following in the Ellston Ceme-
tery in Ellston, Iowa in Ringgold
county. Memorials are to the Ani-
mal Rescue League of Iowa (5452
NE 22nd Street, Des Moines, IA
50313). Online condolences may
be made to the family at www.
ochiltree.com.
Calvin Gregg
CALVIN LEE GREGG
Calvin Lee Gregg was born Oc-
tober 6, 1928 to Alvin and Jenny
Gregg in Hateld, Missouri.
On August 25, 1945 Calvin was
united in marriage to Fern Louise
Hanks at Troy, Kansas. To this
union were born nine children. He
farmed for 33 years and moved
off the farm to town in 1979. He
pastored for 14 years, 13 of those
years at Kellerton Assembly of
God and one year at Mount Ayr
Assembly of God.
Calvin was preceded in death
by his wife, Fern; his parents, Al-
vin and Jenny Gregg; his son, Lar-
ry; two grandsons, Robbie Gregg
and J.R. Gregg; granddaughter,
Marilee Gregg; one great-grand-
daughter, Jolynn Kimball, and sis-
ter, LaVonne.
His loving family who survive
him and cherish his memory in-
clude his children, Marvin Gregg
and wife Pat of Oakland, Iowa,
Connie Bittner and husband Jay
of Griswold, Iowa, Bob Gregg and
wife Regina of Omaha, Nebraska,
Jerry Gregg and wife Barb of Red-
ding, Iowa, Ronnie Gregg and wife
Joyce of Mount Ayr, Iowa, Danny
Gregg of Mount Ayr, Iowa, Kathy
Kirkpatrick and husband Mike
of Elkhorn, Nebraska and Roger
Gregg and wife Carla of Tingley,
Iowa; 31 grandchildren; 65 great-
grandchildren; four great-great-
grandchildren; a brother, Doyal
Gregg of Columbia, Missouri, and
other relatives and friends.
Calvin lived his life for Christ
and without a doubt Calvin has
experienced what the Apostle Paul
wrote in 2 Timothy 4:7; I have
fought the good ght, I have n-
ished the race, I have kept the
faith.
A memorial fund has been es-
tablished to Kellerton Assembly
of God. Arrangements were by
Watson-Armstrong Funeral Home
in Mount Ayr.
Services were held at the As-
sembly of God Church in Kel-
lerton on Tuesday, February 19,
2013, with Pastor Bart Shields
ofciating. Musicians were Alice
and Eddie Sweeten.
Casket bearers included James
Gregg, Joey Bittner, Steven Be-
berniss, Joey Gregg, Mark Gregg
and Wesley Gregg.
Honorary pallbearers were
Ricky Kimball, Damion Bogan,
T. Nolan, Donni Donahue, Dustin
Jackson, Kevin Kimball, Pat Sheil
and Kent Bolte.
Calvin was laid at rest in the
Maple Row Cemetery in Keller-
ton.
Mount Ayr envelopes spread the word about
some of the features of Mount Ayr with every
letter mailed. Available exclusively at the
Mount Ayr Record-News, 464-2440.
_________________________________
Obituaries ontinued on page 16
Community Health Centers of Southern Iowa Community Health Centers of Southern Iowa
is pleased to welcome is pleased to welcome
Eugene Yoder, ARNP
to the CHCSI team!
Mr. Yoder will be providing same-day,
acute medical services in our LEON
facility located at 302 NE 14th Street.
For questions or to schedule a
same-day appointment, please call
641-446-2383. Walk-ins are welcome!
CHCSI accepts most major insurances,
including Medicaid! We also offer a sliding fee program
that allows us to provide services at a discounted rate
for those who qualify!
Check us out online at www.chcsi.org
Thursday, February 21, 2013 Mount Ayr Record-News 15
LET YOUR WORDS DO THE TALKING IN THE MOUNT AYR RECORD-NEWS
CLASSIFIED ADS
How to Write A Good Classied Ad
1. Makeclassiedads work for you. Start your adwith themerchandiseyou areselling. This
makes it easier for the reader to locate your items for sale.
2. Always include the price of the item. 72 percent of classied readers do not respond to
ads that do not include a price.
3. Putyourself in thereadersshoes. Ask whatyou wouldliketo know aboutthemerchandise
for sale. Include information such as brand names and colors.
We accept:
Need Your Classied to Reach Even Further?
Ask us about the Iowa Newspaper Classied Network. Run your ad in over 230 Iowa newspaper
publications reaching more than 2.5 million readers for $300 for 25 words and $9 for each
additional word. Or choose one or more regions of the state for $110 for 25 words and $4 for
each additional word. The Southwest Iowa region classied ad is printed in 65 publications in
southwest Iowa reaching over 722,000 readers. Call us today at 641-464-2440 for details.
NOTICE TO CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISERS
Please check your ad for accuracy the
rst time it appears in the paper so that
any necessary changes can be made.
The newspaper will not be responsible
for mistakes beyond the rst week of
publication. We reserve the right to edit,
reject or cancel any ad.
DIVINE WASTE, INC.
Your local residential and commercial waste services provider.
Ph. 641-464-2143
RECYCLING MADE EASY TIP:
Keep saving money on your electric bill by
continuing to block spaces under your doors.
DRIVERS WANTED
American Concrete (an Oldcastle Company)
Requirements include:
CDL License Pre-Employment Drug Screen
DOT Physical and Physical Capacity Evaluation
Oldcastle provides competitive wages, full benefts package including year
round health & retirement options, longevity bonus, and no over-the-road-travel.
Women and Minorities encouraged to apply. Oldcastle Materials is an EEO/AA
American Concrete has openings for Ready-Mix Drivers in
surrounding area. Wages up to $15.55
Apply online at: http://jobs.oldcastle.com
Earnwhile youlearn
Extensive training
programfor
inexperienceddrivers.
CHARLES E. MANUEL
CHIROPRACTOR
DR. BRYAN NOWLIN
303 S. Linden
Lamoni, Iowa
OFFICE HOURS
Monday - Thursday
8:15 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Friday
8:15 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Call 641-784-6677
Leon Recycling & Auto Parts
Ph. 641-446-7557
Buying all ferrous and nonferrous metals. From cars
to machinery, we can pick up anything. If you can
deliver, we now have new truck scales on site where
we will give you top dollar for your scrap iron. We are
also your one-stop shop for nationwide new and
used auto parts.
205 North Boundary Street, Grant City, MO 64456
Ph. 660-254-3592
Located in the heart of Chinatown
Tammy Ueligger, Owner
Call me for your Special Order Ag Parts!
Novozymes is recruiting
Maintenance Tech/Craftsman
for its enzyme facility in Blair, NE.
Novozymes Blair offers a competitive starting wage plus shift differential pay, excellent
benets package (most benets begin on your rst day of employment), superb work
environment and promotional opportunities.
Submit your application and resume online to www.novozymes.com/careers.
Only online applications will be accepted.
We are seeking (2) experienced Maintenance Tech/Craftsman (one rotating day
shift, one rotating night shift). We want individuals with one or more disciplines at a
journeyman level: mechanical, instrument, electrical and/or utilities with emphasis
on maintenance, repair, installation and modication of plant equipment facilities
and systems. Positions will perform troubleshooting, repairs and maintenance in a
state-of-the-art enzyme facility and participate in root cause analysis.
SCRAP PRICES ARE UP!
Cars ...................................................................$180.00 per ton
Shred .................................................................$170.00 per ton
Farm Equipment ...............................................$170.00 per ton
#1 Steel ..............................................................$180.00 per ton
#2 Steel ..............................................................$170.00 per ton
#1 Cast Iron .......................................................$190.00 per ton
#2 Cast Iron .......................................................$170.00 per ton
Unprepared Steel ..............................................$160.00 per ton
Woven and Barbed Wire ..................................$120.00 per ton
This is a partial listing. Call for more prices.
We also buy catalytic converters.
We will not accept whole appliances, steel cable, glass, plastic, wood or cardboard.
Prices subject to change without notice.
P&L RECYCLING
2261 Church Street Weldon, Iowa
Ph. 641-342-6459
Open Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. - 4 :30 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. - Noon
www.pandlrecycling.com
Buyers are looking.
Is your property
being shown?
PREFERRED PROPERTIES
OF IOWA, INC.
Real Estate and Farm Management
Dan Zech - Broker
Tom Miller - Agent/Owner
Lenox, Iowa
Ph. 641-333-2705
David Brown-Ph. 641-333-2567
Daryl Kline-Ph. 641-782-2403
Curtis Kinker-Ph. 641-333-2820
Rules for acceptance and participation in the clinics are the same for everyone
without regard to race, color, national origin, sex, age, handicap, creed, religion or
political affiliation.
CONSULTANT SCHEDULE CONSULTANT SCHEDULE
504 N. Cleveland Street, Mount Ayr
www.rchmtayr.org
General Surgery Laparoscopic Surgery
Orthopedic Surgery ENT Surgery
Ophthalmology Surgery
Do your hips and knees ache by the end of the day? Is it progressively getting
worse or keeping you from the fun you used to have? Get ahead of the pain before
it gets ahead of you. See your family doctor today or call 641-464-4409 to schedule
a consult with our orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Homedan, to learn about your options.
Dont lose one more day to aches and pains.
Outpatient Clinic Department - Phone 641-464-4409
CARDIOLOGY CLINIC
Department of Ringgold County Hospital
Eric Martin, M.D.
Wednesday, February 27
Jean Schmitt, A.R.N.P.
Wednesday, February 27
AUDIOLOGY CLINIC
Kent Weaver, Au.D.
Thursday, February 28
For an appointment, please call
1-800-233-4327
ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC
Shehada Homedan, M.D.
Tuesday, February 26
NEPHROLOGY CLINIC
Hermien Creger, A.R.N.P.
Wednesday, February 27
SURGERY CLINIC
Dane Johnson, D.O.
Thurs., Feb. 21; Mon., Feb. 25
Thurs., Feb. 28
200 West South Street Mount Ayr, Iowa 50854
Ph. 641-464-2080 Fax 641-464-2081
sciowarealty@iowatelecom.net
www.sciowarealty.com
Wanda Hosfield
Broker-Owner
Cell: 641-344-4802
SALES ASSOCIATES: Ron Landphair-Cell 641-234-0056 ;
Sherri L. Adams-Cell 641-442-5289 ; Darin Dolecheck-Cell 641-234-0220;
Norma Sickels-Cell 641-344-5407; Cass Hosfield-Cell 641-344-8583
T.J. Towing and Automotive
1410 N. Main Street, Osceola, Iowa 50213
Ph. 641-342-4495
Bad Credit?
No Credit?
Re-establish your credit!
APPLY ONLINE AT
www.tjtowingandauto.com
POSITIONS OPEN
Certified Nurse Assistant - Evening/Late Night
Laundry and Light Housekeeping - Day Shift
We are looking for people who are compassionate and enjoy
the elderly to come to work for Clearview Homes.
If you want job satisfaction by working with a caring team,
come in and visit with us about our starting rate and pay scale.
Offering an excellent benefit package including: Paid sick leave,
401k, health and life insurance, paid holidays and vacation.
CLEARVIEW HOMES
Mount Ayr Ph. 641-464-2240
Ahome away fromhome providing quality care for our residents for over 51 years.
Mount Ayr Health Care Center
Hwy. 2 East, Mount Ayr Ph. 641-464-3204
Mount Ayr Health Care Center
Help Wanted
Full-time RN/LPN and part-time cook
positions available. Apply in person. New
wage and benefit package including
employer contributions for retirement, IRA
and health insurance, employer paid life
insurance, holiday pay, vacation and more.
Equal opportunity employer.
IN
CRESTON
Ph. 641-782-7617
MOWING BIDS
Ringgold County Fairgrounds
We are now accepting bids to mow and trim the Ringgold
County Fairgrounds (including the new campground).
Submit bids in writing by Friday, March 8, 2013, to:
Ringgold County Fair
P.O. Box 335, Mount Ayr, Iowa 50854
Questions? Contact Keith Miller 641-464-0746 (after 6 p.m.)
or Amanda Waske at 641-344-2559.
Community Health Centers of Southern Iowa
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
POSITION: LISW (Licensed Independent Social Worker) to
provide behavioral health services in our Leon office.
EXPERIENCE: Clinical experience and a willingness to work with
children and adolescents are preferred.
EDUCATION: Qualified applicants must hold a current LISW
license and be trained in the delivery of evidence-based best practices.
Community Health Centers of Southern Iowa offers a great
benefits package and competitive wages. Resumes will be accepted
until the position has been filled.
Apply in person or send your resume to:
Community Health Centers of Southern Iowa
ATTN: Cody Cooper Resource Coordinator
302 NE 14th Street, Leon, Iowa 50144
ccooper@chcsi.org EOE
BUSINESS SERVICES
McNEILLS TREE SERVICE, Afton.
Tree trimming, topping and removal.
David, 641-344-9052. 49-4t
______________________________
ADKISSON SAWMILL. Portable
sawmill service. Your place or mine.
Serving the area since 1989. Call
Gerald Adkisson, 712-537-2433. 3-tf
______________________________
SHAHA CONSTRUCTION, Mount
Ayr. Dozer work. Call Kurt at 641-
340-0428. 52-tfn
______________________________
PRINTING -- Business cards,
envelopes, letterheads, statements,
business forms, circulars. Competitive
prices. MOUNT AYR RECORD-NEWS,
641-464-2440. 12-tfp
______________________________
FARM ITEMS
FOR SALE: Porta Huts, A Frames,
other hog equipment. Call 641-234-
0072. 50-3tp
_____________________________
FOR SALE: Seed oats, 98 percent
germination. Doyle Richards, 641-
340-0395. 52-1t
_____________________________
FOR SALE: 40 big bales of alfalfa
hay. Lyle Main, 641-464-3542.
52-1tp
_____________________________
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 22 X 60 double wide
trailer house. Call 641-234-0072.
50-3tp
_____________________________
FOR SALE: Wood pellet heating stove
- like new. Call 641-234-0072.
50-3tp
_____________________________
HELP WANTED
DRIVERS: Make $63,000.00 year
or more. $2,500.00 Driver Referral
Bonus and $1,200.00 Orientation
Completion Bonus! CDL-A OTR
experience required. Call Now:
1-888-635-1678. 50-4tp
______________________________
Driver- Qualify for any portion of
$.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01
Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG.
Two raises in rst year. 3 months
recent experience. 800-414-9569
www.driveknight.com (INCN)
______________________________
TanTara Transportation is now hiring
OTR Company Flatbed Drivers and
Owner Operators. Competitive Pay
and Home Time. Call Dave 800-650-
0292 or apply online at www.tantara.
us (INCN)
______________________________
You got the drive, We have the Di-
rection OTR Drivers APU Equipped
Pre-Pass EZ-pass passenger policy.
Newer equipment. 100% NO touch.
1-800-528-7825 (INCN)
______________________________
Drivers: Inexperienced? Get on the
Road to a Successful Career with
CDL Training. Regional Training
Locations. Train and WORK for
Central Refrigerated (877) 369-7895
www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com
(INCN)
______________________________
GO SHOPPING. GET PAID! Join
Today and Become A Secret Shop-
per In Your Area. To learn more visit
http://joinstn.com/ (INCN)
______________________________
MISCELLANEOUS

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
meetings every Thursday at 8 p.m.
at the Neighborhood Center, Mount
Ayr. 47-tfp
______________________________
NEED COPIES? Copies up to 11 x 17
inches are available in black ink on
white or colored paper. Reduction and
enlargement also available. MOUNT
AYR RECORD-NEWS. 12-tfp
_____________________________
AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train
for hands on Aviation Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid if
qualied- Job placement assistance.
CALL Aviation Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-783-0458. (INCN)
_____________________________
This classied spot for sale. Adver-
tise your product or recruit an appli-
cant in over 250 Iowa newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or
800-227-7636 www.cnaads.com
(INCN)
_____________________________
DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/
month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed
Internet starting at $14.95/month
(where available.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
Now! 1-888-605-3101 (INCN)
______________________________
WANTED
WANTED: Someone to tear down 30
X 80 building. All native lumber and
lots of steel. Call 641-234-0072.
50-3tp
_____________________________
WANTED American Muscle Cars!
American Dream Machines, special-
izing in buying rare and classic mus-
cle cars in Iowa wants to pay you the
maximum for your car! Quality cars
only, 1975 and older. Call 515-245-
9100 or email photos dougk@adm-
cars.com (INCN)
_____________________________
February 18 - Valentines Day
was observed at the meal site on
Friday, February 15. One of the
days highlights was revealing
and crowning the Valentine King
and Queen for 2013. Voting for
this couple had been on-going all
week at the site. Chosen to be this
years king and queen were Mary
Jane and Don Narigon. They were
crowned by last years king and
queen, Lloyd and Muriel Johnson
while everyone sang Love Me
Tender. The crowns were designed
and made by Karon Naomi. Due to
health reasons, Karon said she was
retiring from making crowns.
In addition to the crowning, the
Friday Singers entertained. Mem-
bers were Dorothy Clough, Iona
Triggs, Marge Werner, Mary Jane
Narigon, Peggy Skarda, Peggy
Wagonknecht, Dave Patch and Bill
and Norma Webb, along with di-
rector Bonnie Manders and accom-
panist Kay Henderson.
Marge Werner shared a poem
she wrote for Valentines Day.
Joyce England got a lot of chuck-
les as she read Petey, the Snake,
which was a tongue twister. A
drawing was used to award candy
boxes donated by Karon Naomi
and Sharon Case. Winners were
Bonnie Manders, Maxine Werner,
Anne James, Kate James and J.R.
Miller. Everyone enjoyed a treat
cup with their meal thanks to Peg-
gy Skarda. Joyce England shared
some valentine cookies and Sharon
Case shared candy.
Happy birthday wishes were ex-
tended to Cleone Hoseld who ob-
served a birthday on February 16.
Not only was Carmene James
at the meal site Friday, she had two
young guests, her granddaughters
Kate and Anne James. They didnt
have school Friday.
Friday wasnt the only fun day
... so were Monday and Tuesday.
Virginia Walden and Peggy Skar-
da brought more delightful music
Monday. Dave Patch was present
and added his lovely voice to sev-
eral of their numbers. Char Ford
had a funny story to tell to add a
touch of humor to the day. Karon
Naomi shared another lovely pic-
ture she had just nished painting.
Connie Huff was back at the site
after a long absence. Hopefully she
will be back again soon.
Tuesday found a good number
of band members on hand to enter-
tain. They were Iona Triggs, Bon-
nie Manders, Evelyn Sickels, Do-
ris Overholser, Dorothy Clough,
Junior Brown, Mary Jane Narigon,
Darlene Morgan, Dave Patch, Bill
and Norma Webb and Dick and
Virginia Walden, along with ac-
companist Carmene James.
Margaret Hull was able to be at
the site again Tuesday.
Happy birthday wishes were
sent to Bud Breckenridge as he ob-
served his birthday February 10.
All were sorry to hear that Cal-
vin Gregg had passed away Friday.
Sympathy is extended to Danny
Gregg and other family members.
The choir from Mount Ayr
Community high school will be
bringing a program to the meal site
Tuesday, Feb. 26. The program be-
gins at 11 a.m.
Ringgold County Public Health
will have someone available to take
blood pressures at the meal site Fri-
day, February 22. Do something for
yourself and take advantage of this
free service.
Tingley
Address Stamps?
We oer notary stamps, rubber
stamps, ink pads, pre-inked
stamps, rell ink and more.
Art and logos not a problem.
Mount Ayr Record-News
122 W. Madison, Mount Ayr, Iowa
CLASSIFIEDS WORK FOR YOU
with the Mount Ayr Record-News Classieds
BUY - SELL - TRADE- TELL
in the Mount Ayr Record-News Classieds!
16 Mount Ayr Record-News Thursday, February 21, 2013
Clarinda Livestock
Auction, LLC
SPECIAL CATTLE SALES
All Class Cattle Sale Thursday, February 21
All Class Cattle Sale Thursday, March 7
Starting promptly at 11 a.m. on weigh cows and bulls;
noon on feeder cattle.
All native cattle guaranteed fresh from the farm.
CLARINDA LIVESTOCK AUCTION, LLC
1208 E. Garfield Clarinda, Iowa
Owner: Dan Wood Ph. 712-542-8863
www.clarindalivestock.com


Private Treaty Sale
Sale to be held at
Werner Feed Efficiency
Testing Center
1954 180
th
St.
Diagonal, IA 50845
Bulls available for viewing at 9 am
Bidding starts at 11:00 am
Lunch to follow


Craig Hays: 660.373.1897
Becky Hays: 641.234.0183
Contact us for a bull flyer today!
HaysLandandCattle.com

February 23, 2013

Simmental & SimAngus
25 Yrlg & 7 18-Mo-Old Bulls
On the ASA Performance Advocate list every year!
Call to view bulls prior to sale

Performance tested including feed efficiency
and ultrasound data
Licensed and Insured
Commercial and Residential
641-782-7852
211 S. Elm St.
Creston
Specializing
in
BATHROOM
REMODELS
Free Estimates
Duct Cleaning
High Efficiency Furnaces
and Air Conditioning Units
Geothermal Installation and Maintenance
Radiant Floor Heating Installation and
Maintenance
Complete Plumbing Installation and Service
OWNERS: Randy and Sandy Gibson
Office 641-784-3323
Cell 641-442-5501
FAX 641-784-4298
Lamoni, Iowa
SALES EVERY THURSDAY:
Next Sales February 21 and 28
Sales start at 9:30 a.m.
CLIP and SAVE
MADISON COUNTY AUCTION
Winterset, Iowa
Regular Livestock Sale
Every Tuesday Featuring:
Sheep Goats Hogs Cattle
ALL SALES START AT 12:30 P.M.
Tom and DeAnn Christensen
Barn 515-462-2838
Toms Cell 515-729-2711 Home 515-462-1468
Barn: Ph. 712-779-3636
Visit: www.massenalivestock.com for more information
Allen Venteicher
Owner/Operator
Ph. 712-779-0168/779-2082
Mark Venteicher
Owner/Auctioneer
Ph. 712-779-0169
MASSENA LIVESTOCK SALES
Ph. 712-779-3636
No Sale Wednesday, February 20 due to Steele Land and
Livestock Complete Disperison Sale Friday, February 22
Regular Sale Wednesday, February 27
Performance Angus Genetics Bull and Commercial Heifer Sale
Saturday, March 2 1 p.m. to be held at Massena Livestock Sales
Sale Every Wednesday at 1 p.m. In your area weekly
Call for an on-the-farm appraisal
JOIN A WINNING TEAM
Caseys is looking for friendly, energetic,
dependable, honest individuals to fill several
PART-TIME
CASHIER
FOOD SERVICE
POSITIONS
Needed for evening shifts, some day shifts, including
weekends and some holidays.
Offering a competitive starting wage, paid training,
group limited-pay medical, dental and life insurance
benefits. Also enjoy 1/2 price meals and free fountain
drinks while on duty.
Apply at: Caseys General Store
300 W. South Street
Mount Ayr, Iowa 50854
www.caseys.com EOE


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Obituaries Public Notices
Obituaries
PAUL E. DOSER
Paul E. Doser of Thayer Hill
Road, husband of Marlene P.,
passed away on February 10 2013
at Sunset Nursing and Rehabili-
tation Center in Boonville, New
York.
He was born in River Falls,
Wisconsin on May 31, 1930, a
son of Emery and Ethel Bigley
Doser. Paul grew up in Kellerton,
Iowa, where he graduated from
high school and then attended
Iowa State college at Ames, Iowa,
which is now Iowa State Univer-
sity. In 1950 Mr. Doser ended his
studies at Iowa State to serve his
country by enlisting in the U.S.
Air Force, serving in England, dur-
ing the Korean Conict, until his
honorable discharge in December
1954. Paul married Mary Peek in
November 1956. The couple re-
sided in Marcy, eventually moving
to Whitesboro where Mary Doser
later passed away.
For 30 years Mr. Doser was
employed as a furnace operator
at Special Metals Corporation of
Utica in the manufacture of a va-
riety of metals for the aircraft and
aerospace industry.
On July 18, 1992 Paul was unit-
ed in marriage with Marlene Post at
Greystone Manor in Martinsburg.
The couple settled at their home on
Thayer Hill near Boonville. Paul
and Marlene attended Forest Pres-
byterian Church in Lyons Falls.
Mr. Doser enjoyed doing auto
mechanical work and furniture
reupholstering. He was a skilled
woodworker who enjoyed making
furniture and pocket doors for fam-
ily and friends.
Paul greatly enjoyed music and
traveling with Marlene and had
traveled extensively throughout
the United States. He especially en-
joyed going on an Alaskan cruise.
He is survived by his ever-lov-
ing wife, Marlene; daughter, Eileen
(John) Gallagher of Rome, New
York; son, Brian (Kym Donnellan)
Doser of Wenham, Massachusetts;
daughter, Tammy (Dale) Austin
of Freeville, New York; daughter,
Jolene (Mark) Higby of Consta-
bleville, New York; son, Kevin
Vienneau of Aberdeen, Maryland;
son, Daniel (Jeanne) Vienneau of
Pennelville, New York, and son,
Johnathan (Mary Ann) Vienneau
of Boonville, New York; grand-
children, Joseph Sarcone and Ma-
rissa (Tim McCarren) Sarcone,
Timothy, Noah, Jack and Hannah
Donnellan-Doser, Martin Gatlin,
Erienne (Mike) Austin El Sharif,
Gregory (Sarah) Austin, Heather,
Mark (Kim) and Leanne Higby
and Rachael, Danielle, Michael,
Ben and Zavier Vienneau; great-
grandchildren, Haley Gallagher,
Steven, Andrew and Aubrey Plows
and Lilly and Mark Higby; brother,
Raymond (Dola) Doser and sister,
Esther (Gene) McAlexander, both
from Iowa, and several nieces and
nephews.
Paul was predeceased by a son,
Timothy Patrick Doser.
Funeral services were held
Thursday, February 14, at the
Boonville First Presbyterian
Church with Rev. Naomi Kelly and
Rev. Barrett Lee co-ofciating. In-
terment in the spring will be in the
Boonville Cemetery in Boonville.
Memorial donations may be made
to the Residents Activities Fund
at Sunset Nursing & Rehabilita-
tion Center, 232 Academy Street,
Boonville, NY 13309.
For an online message of sym-
pathy or to share a memory of Paul,
please go to www.trainorfuneralho
me.com.
Ringgold County
Supervisors
Proceedings
Public
Notices
February 11, 2013
The Ringgold County Board of
Supervisors met in regular session
Monday, February 11, 2013. The
meeting was called to order at 9 a.m.
with the following members present:
David Inloes, Royce Dredge and Kraig
Pennington.
A motion was made by Royce
Dredge and seconded by Kraig Pen-
nington to approve the agenda. AYES:
Unanimous. NAYS: None.
A motion was made by Kraig
Pennington and seconded by Royce
Dredge to approve the previous
minutes. AYES: Unanimous. NAYS:
None.
The payroll checks will be issued
February 13, 2013.
Dan Cunning and Ted Smith with
Cunning Insurance met with the board
to review the countys surety bond.
Currently there is $50,000 coverage
for the treasurer and Extension of-
ce. Dan and Ted have a quote with
Travelers Insurance increasing the
treasurers coverage to $300,000
and the Extension ofce coverage to
$250,000. The board agreed to this
quote.
Karen Bender and Lynn Adams
with the Southwest Iowa Coalition
(SWICO) met with the board to discuss
their purpose and how they can assist
Ringgold county. SWICO is made up
of 16 counties in southwest Iowa. They
are the countys voice with legislators.
A few of the issues they address are
transportation, housing, economic de-
velopment, agriculture and education,
just to name a few. They also requested
$550 for FY2014 funding. This is not
an increase from years past.
Sgt. Rod Riner with the Iowa
DOT, along with county sheriff Mike
Sobotka and engineer Zach Gunsolley,
met with the board to discuss DOT
vehicle enforcement. The group dis-
cussed options to prevent people from
crossing bridges with posted weight
limit restrictions. It was determined
that, aside from posting an ofcer at
each bridge, there is really nothing
that can strictly be done. However,
this is a serious safety issue and will
be addressed through advertising
and signage paid for by a grant Zach
Gunsolley received from the Transpor-
tation Safety Improvement Program.
The board rejected the $90,000 P33
culvert lining project. Zach Gunsolley
will look into xing one culvert box
on P33 per the boards request. If this
one culvert is not repaired in a timely
manner, there could be a weight limit
restriction enforced on P33.
RESOLUTION RC1346
WHEREAS, the Ringgold County
Board of Supervisors hereby approves
to increase the treasurers surety bond
from $50,000 to $300,000 and the
Extension ofce surety bond from
$50,000 to $250,000.
THEREFORE, a motion was made
by Kraig Pennington and seconded by
Royce Dredge stating such.
The vote on the resolution: AYES:
Unanimous. NAYS: None.
ATTEST: Amanda Waske, auditor.
Passed and approved February 11,
2013.
RESOLUTION RC1347
WHEREAS, the Ringgold County
Board of Supervisors hereby approves
to sign the Transportation Safety Im-
provement Program Grant received
for secondary roads.
THEREFORE, a motion was made
by Royce Dredge and seconded by
Kraig Pennington stating such.
The vote on the resolution: AYES:
Unanimous. NAYS: None.
ATTEST: Amanda Waske, auditor.
Passed and approved February 11,
2013.
There was no further business. A
motion was made by Kraig Pennington
and seconded by Royce Dredge to
adjourn the meeting at 4:43 p.m.
DAVID INLOES
Chairman
ATTEST: AMANDAWASKE
Ringgold County Auditor

February 12, 2013


The Ringgold County Board of
Supervisors met in regular session
Tuesday, February 12, 2013. The
meeting was called to order at 9 a.m.
with the following members pres-
ent: David Inloes, Royce Dredge and
Kraig Pennington.
A motion was made by Royce
Dredge and seconded by Kraig
Pennington to approve the agenda.
AYES: Unanimous. NAYS: None.
A motion was made by Kraig
Pennington and seconded by Royce
Dredge to approve the previous min-
utes. AYES: Unanimous. NAYS:
None.
The board was in budget work-
shop all day reviewing budget re-
quests for FY 2014. The board will
receive the insurance rates for FY
2014 on February 20 at an insurance
meeting in Ankeny. Once these g-
ures are received the budget can be
completed for the public hearing.
IN THE IOWADISTRICT
COURT
FOR RINGGOLD COUNTY
NOTICE OF PROOF OF WILL
WITHOUT ADMINISTRATION
Probate No. ESPR208716
IN THE MATTER OF THE ES-
TATE OF ROBERT WAYNE RICH-
ARDS, Deceased.
To all persons interested in the
estate of Robert Wayne Richards,
Deceased, who died on or about the
20
th
day of December, 2012:
You are hereby notied that on the
6
th
day of February, 2013, the last will
and testament of Robert Wayne Rich-
ards, deceased, bearing date of the 25
th
day of January, 1984, was admitted to
probate in the above-named court and
there will be no present administration
of the estate.
Any action to set aside said will
must be brought in the district court
of the county within the later to occur
of four months from the date of the
second publication of this notice or
one month from the date of mailing
of this notice to the surviving spouse,
all heirs of the decedent and devisees
under the will whose identities are
reasonably ascertainable, or thereafter
be forever barred.
Dated this 18
th
day of February,
2013.
DEBRADIANE MURPHY
Proponent
James L. Pedersen, P.C.
Attorney for Estate
201 E. Monroe Street
Mount Ayr, IA50854
Date of second publication 28
th
day
of February, 2013.
52-2t
RFP Notication February 5,
2013
Southwest 8 Senior Services, Inc.
is currently soliciting proposals to
provide services to individuals age
60 and older and their family care-
givers. The Request for Proposals
(RFP) being issued on February 5,
2013 is for those agencies who wish
to contract with Southwest 8 for any
of the home and community based
services listed in the proposal. This
RFP does not apply to those agen-
cies that wish to have a purchase of
service agreement with the agency
in FY2014. The notication on those
agreements will be issued in April.
Proposals are due back in the
Southwest 8 ofce by 5 p.m. on
Monday, March 4, 2013.
You may download a copy of the
RFP on our website, www.south-
west8.org, stop by the ofce at 300
W. Broadway, Suite 240 in Council
Bluffs or phone 712-328-2540 ext.
1042 to request a copy be mailed to
you.
51-2t
The anticipated public hearing date
will be March 11.
Ron Abbott met with the board
on behalf of the Ringgold County
Tourism Board requesting $2,500 to
promote tourism in Ringgold county.
In the past, the county has not con-
tributed to this organization. Ron
mentioned the group played a sig-
nicant role in promoting the Sheep
Dog Trials event held two years ago
outside of Redding.
There was no further business. A
motion was made by Royce Dredge
and seconded by Kraig Pennington
to adjourn the meeting at 4:30 p.m.
DAVID INLOES
Chairman
ATTEST: AMANDAWASKE
Ringgold County Auditor
Kellerton
City Council
Proceedings
_________________________________
Continued frompage 13
contract.
SIPR/Museum: Kathy Still was
present to report on the nancial and
events at the Community Center.
West / R. Holmes motioned for the
museum board to be present at the
March 12, 2013 meeting for a full
report.
First Responders / KVFD: The
clerk is to notify the First Respond-
ers and Fire Department to attend
the March 12, 2013 meeting for a
report.
R. Holmes/Fifer motioned to
publish the 2014 City Budget in the
Mount Ayr Record-News on Febru-
ary 28, 2013 and to hold a Public
Hearing March 12, 2013. Roll call
vote, unanimous.
Randy Fox was present to see
what was being done about the dog
running at large. Mayor Nail stated
two notices have been sent the own-
er.
West/R. Holmes motioned to ad-
journ at 7:55 p.m.
KRISTINANAIL
Mayor
ATTEST: JUDY DOOLITTLE
City Clerk
Alliant, electric, $590.14.
Windstream, phone, internet, fax,
$145.28.
IMFOA, dues, $40.00.
Judy Doolittle, supplies and mile-
age, $51.99.
Paul Fifer, ags, $39.40.
Record-News, publishing,
$37.20.
Post Ofce, stamps, $88.90.
Innity Printing, ink cartridge,
$105.16,
Patrick Greenwood, Attorney, le-
gal fees, $72.00.
Smith Oil, 41.35 gal. diesel,
$140.57.
Ringgold County Treasurer, 1/2
sales tax, $949.03.
NAPA, tran. u. 2 qt., $7.98.
Waste Management, garbage
contract, $2,004.12.
Mangold SIRWA, 517000 G,
$2,068.00.
Hack Company, chlorine,
$76.10.
Payroll, $1,479.34.
FICA, $473.28.
IPERS, $298.75.
General Fund $34,459.55; TFMfund $421.75; Tort
Fund $8,854.66; Local Option Sale Tax $10,351.31;
County Roads Fund $5,575.49: Street Fund $11,257.59;
Refuse $-226.10; Mtr. Dpt. fund $8,892.32; Water fund
$25,552.04; Sewer fund; $18,684.68; Sewer CDs
$62,862.52; Water CDs $28,901.56.

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