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Saffys Angel

TEACHERS RESOURCE
Andrew Liddle

H O D D E R

L I T E R AT U R E

Acknowledgement The author and publishers would like to thank the following for permission to publish copyright material: p.21, The Upanishads translated by Valerie Roebuck (rst published by Penguin Books India 2000). Translation copyright Valerie Roebuck, 2004. First published on web 2005 www.hodderliterature.co.uk Copyright text 2005 Andrew Liddle Copyright extracts from Saffys Angel 2001 Hilary McKay Hodder Literature Teachers Resources can be downloaded and printed out as required. This material may be freely copied for institutional use. However, this material is copyright and under no circumstances can copies be offered for sale. Published by Hodder Murray, a division of Hodder Headline, 338 Euston Road, London, NW1 3BH. Visit our website at www.hoddereducation.co.uk

Saffys Angel

CONTENTS
H i l a r y M c K a y s I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e I n t r o d u c t i o n I n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e Te a c h e r s R e s o u r c e Guided Sessions Outcomes Short-term Plans Lesson 1: Colour Associations
Teachers Prompt Page Colour Codes Colourful Names 5 6 7 v vi vii viii 1

L e s s o n 2 : C h a r a c t e r, S e t t i n g a n d M o o d
Teachers Prompt Page The Banana House Drawing the Banana House 8 9 10

Lesson 3: Formal Language


Teachers Prompt Page Will Shakespeares Will The Last Will and Testament of Indigos Fears Production Planner Whos Doing What? 11 12 13 14 15 16

Lesson 4: Dialogue and Character


Teachers Prompt Page Dont Use Said Lets Chat 17 18 19

Lesson 5: Numinous Qualities


Teachers Prompt Page Rebirth R.E. Spellings The Stone Angel The Documentary: Saffy the Stowaway Girl Character Chart: Mrs Warbeck 20 21 22 23 24 25

Lesson 6: Personal Choices


Teachers Prompt Page Make Sense of It Personal Choices and Discussion Tennis 26 27 28

Saffys Angel

Lesson 7: Point and Counterpoint


Teachers Prompt Page Decisions! Decisions! No I Wont! Yes You Will! Stepping Stones to Stowing Away Its Hot in This Chair Investigators Notebook 29 30 31 32 33 34

Lesson 8: Mnemonics and Motivation


Teachers Prompt Page Learning Made Fun Saffys Motives 35 36 37

L e s s o n 9 : S a f f y s H o m e
Teachers Prompt Page The House Where Saffy was Born Saffys Tears Saffys Letter: Writing Frame The Journey Home What Am I Doing? 38 39 40 41 42 43

Lesson 10: The Moment of Recognition


Teachers Prompt Page Knowing Yourself Saffy Sees Herself 44 45 46

Lesson 11: A New Perspective


Teachers Prompt Page Antonias Viewpoint Saffy the Stowaway Girl: Running Order Jerry Springers Questions Seating Plan for Forum Summary of Individual Scenes 47 48 49 50 51 52

Lesson 12: The Stone Angel


Teachers Prompt Page Self-assessment: Saffy the Stowaway Girl 53 54

Saffys Angel: Hilary McKay v

Hilary McKays Introduction to the Introduction


I think Introductions are in the wrong place. They should come at the end of books, not the beginning. Who reads introductions rst? Not me. I read them (IF I read them), when I have either 1) nished a book, or 2) read as much of a book as I can endure. In either case, what I really want is not an Introduction but an Explanation. I want the author to explain to me why they wrote this (unendurable or otherwise) book. So here goes:

Introduction
Explanation for Saffys Angel
I wrote this book for fun. It was a personal thing. I lled it with things I enjoy very much. I put in hamsters because I am fond of hamsters, and Italy because I like Italy. I named half the characters after paint colours because I like the names that artists call their paints. (Paint colours are two-word stories if you prefer your history in small doses read an artists colour chart.) Most of all I put in people. Bright, irreverent kids. Boyfriends who refuse to fall in love. Kind, dopey mothers. The sort of people whose company I enjoy. I did not mean Saffys Angel to be taken seriously. I did not mean it in any way to be educational. Therefore it is very strange to me that here is Saffy, taken seriously, in an educational edition. What can it mean? I think I know. I have been seen through. Comprehended. Apprehended. I have been rumbled and my secret is out. It is no use protesting any longer that I meant it only in fun. Someone, somewhere, has realised that a joke is not less serious for being a joke. That is my explanation for Saffys Angel. I wrote a book full of people and places and ideas and hopes that matter to me. It really was a personal thing. Hilary McKay

Saffys Angel: Introduction vi

Introduction to Saffys Angel Teachers Resource


This is an excellent choice of novel for a Year 7 class for a variety of reasons. The characterisation of Saffy, the central consciousness, is particularly strong and sensitive, and most of the others in the book adults as well as children are sympathetic and threedimensional. The chief setting, that of the Banana House, is both vividly realised and powerfully atmospheric. It is the perfect ambience for the Casson family, all members of which are strong-minded and quirkily artistic. Saffys memories of her original home in Italy are evoked wistfully until her powerfully emotional and climactic revisitation of Siena. The plot is sinewy and intriguing. The theme of seeking, of questing, of striving after something spiritual and to be intuited rather than understood, runs throughout the novel. Saffys Angel is, then, a real page-turner, which provides numerous opportunities for Reading, Speaking, Listening and Writing activities. The teacher will nd especially useful the fact that each of the twelve lessons deals with a separate chapter, there being, coincidentally, twelve chapters in the novel. This gives a strong focus to each lesson, and obviously lends itself to completion, both of task and of chapter. Saffys motives provide also a focus for the pupils reading logs, and the series of lessons build to, and culminate in, a general discussion, Jerry Springer-style, of the central character seen from a variety of perspectives. The lesson plans are intended as a guide for teachers and may be easily and readily adapted according to the needs of the class, the teacher or the occasion. The resource sheets offer suggestions for a variety of stimulating and thought-provoking text-based activities.

Saffys Angel: Guided Sessions vii

Guided Sessions
There are ve proposed lessons where guided work (called Guided seminars) takes place: Lessons 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11. In these lessons it is suggested that the teacher works with one group for approximately 20 minutes, guiding them as they work on a specic task. The tasks and the groups can, of course, be adapted according to the various levels of ability in the class, but in this unit the ve guided sessions are directed at ve distinct groups of pupils of similar abilities: two lower, two middle, and one upper.
Lesson 3 Teacher guides a middle ability group. Teacher guides the upper ability group. Teacher guides a lower ability group. Teacher guides a different middle group. Teacher guides a different lower ability group. The teacher works with this group to guide their discussion.

Lesson 5

The teacher works with this group to extend their understanding of characters and how to use the role of investigator. The teacher works with this group to probe their understanding of the sequence. The teacher guides this group in their close reading of the text.

Lesson 7

Lesson 9

Lesson 11

This group is guided through the nal stages of their tasks for the Jerry Springer discussion.

It is important to view this only as a suggestion; classes vary too much for there to be only one way of planning guided sessions. It would be possible to use the planned activities for small groups of mixed ability, letting the pupils choose together which task they wish to pursue. Some classes may have fewer or more upper or lower groups, and work and Guided seminars would need to be adapted accordingly. In these lessons the Resource Sheets are structured to assist the groups not guided by the teacher, giving them a specic task and leading them through the stages. A Guided seminar plan also provides the teacher with a framework for working with the chosen group.

Saffys Angel: Outcomes viii

Outcomes
The rationale behind this resource is that pupils should read, and have read to them, a text which provides enjoyment and inspiration while also encouraging them to challenge their own thinking. The activities described here are therefore designed to promote enjoyment and fun as well as depth of thought, so that pupils respond to the reading in a variety of ways: teasing out their own conclusions about character and feeling from clues in the text; transferring their knowledge and understanding to create other forms of writing; and beginning to look beyond the story at the writers craft.

Speaking and Listening


Read aloud dramatised readings, pairs, small groups and silently. Listen to readings by teacher or other pupils. Discuss ideas and responses in small and large groups. Take part in role play and hot-seating. Take part in a class presentation.

Reading
Begin to analyse what happens in the reading process. Gather and use textual evidence to understand character. Use various media to do research. Look for patterns and links within the text. Understand how themes underpin the novel.

Writing
Record responses to their reading and related research, in various forms. Make notes on characters, setting, plot. Write in role as a character. Write news bulletins using the events and characters. Write up investigations and analysis of the text in the form of a reading log.

Key themes
The novels themes provide many opportunities for reective thought and discussion: Adoption and family life. Making personal choices. Questing after your own personal Holy Grail. Growing up: coping with feelings of being different.

Short-term planning for Saffys Angel by Hilary McKay


Whole school priorities:

Year 7

Term ____

Week ____

Teacher ___________

Aims and rationale: To provide an innovative, creative and structured approach to the reading of Hilary McKays Saffys Angel, by linking the reading process to a parallel writing task, while incorporating guided work, alternative routes for different kinds of learners, and opportunities for pupils to work collaboratively and independently in ICT, research and debate.

Objectives: Word 14 dene and deploy words with precision Sentence 11 vary sentence structure to lend pace, variety and emphasis Reading 12 comment on how writers convey setting, character and mood S & L promote, justify or defend a point of view

The project is designed to dovetail neatly with Citizenship and R.E. at KS3. Introduction Development (including guided work) Teacher introduces genre and literary conventions; pupils in independent groups assess rst impressions. Teacher introduces concept of reading log and models a mindmapping exercise. Pupils begin rst log entry. Teacher discusses the division of labour required for an on-going project, a documentary. Teacher works with a middle ability group to guide their discussion and allocate character roles. Plenary Homework/Extension/ Research Pupils complete the reading of Chapter One and do exercise on colourful names. Pupils read aloud from their rst entries and discuss their responses. Pupils read from their own wills and discuss the impact of Grandads will. Pupils read to the end of Chapter Two.

Lesson

Word and Sentence objectives integrated approaches Pupils respond to books cover and blurb, and teacher reads out opening page. Pupils complete the chart of the Banana House and peer read Chapter Two. Pupils make a list of their most treasured possessions in formal language. Teacher reads out from Shakespeares will and models writing the same. Pupils write their own wills.

1 Colour Associations

Pupils reect on associations of colour and do exercise on colour codes.

Pupils discuss their rst impressions.

2 Character, Setting and Mood

Pupils reect on setting, character and mood of the Banana House, using appropriate terminology.

3 Formal Language (Guided)

Pupils reect on the extracts from Grandads will, the formal language.

Pupils complete reading of Chapter Three and update reading logs.

Saffys Angel: Short-term Plans 1

Hodder Murray 2005. www.hodderliterature.co.uk

Short-term planning for Saffys Angel by Hilary McKay


Whole school priorities:

Year 7

Term ____

Week ____

Teacher ___________

Aims and rationale: To provide an innovative, creative and structured approach to the reading of Hilary McKays Saffys Angel, by linking the reading process to a parallel writing task, while incorporating guided work, alternative routes for different kinds of learners and opportunities for pupils to work collaboratively and independently in ICT, research and debate.

Objectives: Word 14 dene and deploy words with precision Sentence 11 vary sentence structure to lend pace, variety and emphasis Reading 12 comment on how writers convey setting, character and mood S & L promote, justify or defend a point of view

The project is designed to dovetail neatly with Citizenship and R.E. at KS3. Introduction Development (including guided work) Teacher initiates discussion of limitations on the wheelchairbound Sarah. Pupils do an empathetic exercise creating further dialogue. Pupils share their insights into Saffys motivation and complete chart for the on-going documentary. Teacher works with the upper ability group to extend their understanding of characters and how to use the role of investigator in this process. Class spontaneously debates the nose-stud question and in pairs complete exercise on Personal Choices. Teacher elicits feedback on Personal Choices, emphasising importance of informed, balanced choices. Pupils complete Discussion Tennis exercise; complete reading of Chapter Six. Plenary Homework/Extension/ Research Pupils read the remainder of Chapter Four.

Lesson

Word and Sentence objectives integrated approaches Pupils do dialogue exercise, listing alternatives to the word said.

4 Dialogue and Character

Teacher reads from Chapter Four, pp.4648, and draws attention to the use of dialogue to create and develop character.

Class read out from their dialogue Sarahs last speech; and discuss how society could better help the physically challenged. Pupils share progress on character charts.

5 Numinous Qualities (Guided)

Teacher reads out rst two pages of Chapter Five and prompts discussion of reincarnation.

Pupils do spelling exercise on words of a religious nature.

Teacher reads from The Upanishads to further the discussion. Pupils attempt to dene an angel and consider the stone-angels importance to Saffy.

Pupils nish reading Chapter Five, and begin character chart on Mrs Warbeck.

Saffys Angel: Short-term Plans 2

6 Personal Choices

Teacher reads from Chapter Six, pp.8488, concerning the acquisition of nose-studs.

Pupils do exercise on sensory descriptions and feelings.

Hodder Murray 2005. www.hodderliterature.co.uk

Short-term planning for Saffys Angel by Hilary McKay


Whole school priorities:

Year 7

Term ____

Week ____

Teacher ___________

Aims and rationale: To provide an innovative, creative and structured approach to the reading of Hilary McKays Saffys Angel, by linking the reading process to a parallel writing task, while incorporating guided work, alternative routes for different kinds of learners and opportunities for pupils to work collaboratively and independently in ICT, research and debate.

Objectives: Word 14 dene and deploy words with precision Sentence 11 vary sentence structure to lend pace, variety and emphasis Reading 12 comment on how writers convey setting, character and mood S & L promote, justify or defend a point of view

The project is designed to dovetail neatly with Citizenship and R.E. at KS3. Introduction Development (including guided work) Pupils in pairs read remainder of chapter and differentiate by completing a sequencing exercise or participating in hot-seating. Teacher works with lower ability group to probe their understanding of the sequence. Pupils in groups re-read pp.114115, focusing, for an exercise on Saffys motives, on the last ten lines of the chapter. Pupils extract details of the house and transfer them to reading log; completing a labelled drawing of the house. Pupils complete the exercise on Saffys motives. Class discussion of familys attitudes and Saffys reasons. Pupils read out extracts from their letters and discuss why Saffy burst into tears. Teacher works with three pairs of middle ability pupils to guide their close reading of the text. Integrate information from Saffys Motives into reading logs for use in documentary. No homework. Plenary Homework/Extension/ Research Pupils update reading logs and write up notes from Investigators Notebook. Hot-seating exercise and completion of Investigators Notebook.

Lesson

Word and Sentence objectives integrated approaches Pupils complete exercise examining arguments for and against stowing away.

7 Point and Counterpoint (Guided)

Teacher reads Chapter Seven, pp.9294 and contrasts attitudes of Sarah and Saffy, examining the verbal exchanges.

8 Mnemonics and Motivation

Teacher reads Chapter Eight and prompts discussion of Caddys learning techniques and mnemonic devices.

Saffys Angel: Short-term Plans 3

9 Saffys Home (Guided)

Teacher reads Chapter Nine, pp.127131, concerning Saffys former home and her emotional reaction to returning to it.

Teacher intiates discussion of emotions and models the opening of Saffys explanatory letter, which pupils complete using writing-frame.

Hodder Murray 2005. www.hodderliterature.co.uk

Short-term planning for Saffys Angel by Hilary McKay


Whole school priorities:

Year 7

Term ____

Week ____

Teacher ___________

Aims and rationale: To provide an innovative, creative and structured approach to the reading of Hilary McKays Saffys Angel, by linking the reading process to a parallel writing task, while incorporating guided work, alternative routes for different kinds of learners and opportunities for pupils to work collaboratively and independently in ICT, research and debate.

Objectives: Word 14 dene and deploy words with precision Sentence 11 vary sentence structure to lend pace, variety and emphasis Reading 12 comment on how writers convey setting, character and mood S & L promote, justify or defend a point of view

The project is designed to dovetail neatly with Citizenship and R.E. at KS3. Introduction Development (including guided work) Teacher prompts discussion of the implications of Saffys selfrecognition. Pupils complete an exercise on the subject and complete reading logs. Each group works on preparing the documentary, organising that which is to be scripted or improvised. Teacher works with lower ability group to support their nal drafts and preparations. Teacher skip-reads nal chapter and prompts discussion of the conclusion and possible changes of viewpoint. Pupils responsible for documentarys nal section write notes about the angel. Others make nal preparations. Seated according to agreed plan, pupils perform in role. In the nal open forum, the teacher takes the role of Jerry Springer. Pupils complete selfassessment tasks and read nal chapter in greater detail. Plenary Homework/Extension/ Research Pupils update their reading logs and complete reading for Chapter Ten. Pupils discuss the new insight and its place in the documentary.

Lesson

Word and Sentence objectives integrated approaches Pupils self-analyse, using the Knowing Yourself resource.

10 The Moment of Recognition Using the resource Antonias Viewpoint, pupils, in pairs, script an interview with the old lady.

Teacher reads from Chapter Ten, and prompts discussion of epiphanic moments.

11 A New Perspective (Guided)

Teacher reads out extracts from Chapter Eleven, focusing on pp.147151, the meeting with Antonia.

Some groups improvise excerpts from their scenes, using reading logs and led resources.

Pupils nalise material for the documentary.

Saffys Angel: Short-term Plans 4

12 The Stone Angel

Hodder Murray 2005. www.hodderliterature.co.uk