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Perimeter & Area

Open the Geometers Sketchpad file: Perimeter and Area. Use the last tab as a reference.

Tab 1: Rectangle- Calculating Perimeter & Area


1. Measure all four segments (highlight the segment, then go to MEASURE then LENGTH). 2. Go MEASURE then CALCULATE. Calculate the perimeter of the rectangle using the calculator tool and the measurements from step #1. Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms).

3. Go MEASURE then CALCULATE. Calculate the area of the rectangle using the calculator tool and the measurements from step #1. Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms).

4. Select points A,B,C and D in that order. Go to CONSTRUCT, then QUADRILATERAL INTERIOR (CRTL P). Go to MEASURE, then PERIMETER. This perimeter should match the answer in step #2. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in step #2. Move point A to change the size of the rectangle and make sure your calculations are the same. 5. Select the interior region for quadrilateral ABCD. Go to MEASURE, then AREA. This area should match the answer in step #3. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in step #3. Move point A to change the size of the rectangle and make sure your calculations are the same. Tab 2: Parallelogram 1- Formula Comparison 1. Measure the appropriate sides and segments and calculate the area of the purple and turquoise regions using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms).

2. Click on the purple region, go to MEASURE and then AREA. Do the same thing for the turquoise region. What do you notice about their areas? Make sure your measurements are the same as #1 or revise your work. 3. Why are the areas the equal? Press the HINT button for a visual cue.

4. Even though these areas are equal in this case, why would finding the area of a parallelogram be more difficult than finding the area of a rectangle?

5. Move point E to separate the two figures again. Measure the appropriate sides and calculate the perimeter of the two figures. The areas are equal, are the perimeters equal too? Why does this answer make sense?

Tab 3: Parallelogram 2- Calculating Perimeter & Area 1. Select point M and LJ , go to CONSTRUCT then PERPENDICULAR LINE. Press the button to show Select

LJ .

LJ

and the newly constructed perpendicular

line. Go to CONSTRUCT and then INTERSECTION (CRTL I). Label the point with the letter O (Go to the A text tool and click the point when the hand shows up. Double click the label to change it). 2. Select points M and O. Go to CONSTRUCT and then SEGMENT. 3. Select

LJ

and

MO(the lines, not the segments!!!), then go to DISPLAY and then HIDE

LINES. 4. What is MOcalled (general name in terms of the parallelogram)? ________________________________________ 5. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the perimeter using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms). 6. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the area using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms). 7. Select points M, K, J, and L in that order. Go to CONSTRUCT, then QUADRILATERAL INTERIOR (CRTL P). With that region highlighted, go to MEASURE, then PERIMETER. This perimeter should match the answer in step #5. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in step #5. Move point J to change the size of the parallelogram and make sure your calculations are the same. 8. Select the parallelograms interior fill, then go to MEASURE, then AREA. . This area should match the answer in step #6. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in step #6. Move point J to change the size of the parallelogram and make sure your calculations are the same. 9. Now, what if you didnt have Geometers Sketchpad and couldnt construct and measure the height, what is another way you could determine the height for this particular parallelogram? Click the HINT for a clue. Find the area using this method and the calculator and explain your steps below.

10. Move point J around and make sure all three calculations of area (#6, #8 and #9 are equal. Tab 4: Right Triangle- Common Mistake & Calculating Perimeter & Area 1. This is a right triangle, therefore, DBis the height. Why cant you say that the area is CB(base) times DB (height)? Click the HINT button for the visual cue. Explain below:

2. Use the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE) to take the value from #1 on the page and manipulate it using the appropriate operation to make it the correct area. Write the steps and explain why this calculation makes sense. Use the hint for help.

3. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the perimeter using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms).

4. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the area using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms).

5. Select points C, B, and D. Go to CONSTRUCT, then TRIANGLE INTERIOR (CRTL P). With the interior highlighted, go to MEASURE, then PERIMETER. This perimeter should match the answer in step #3. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in step #3. Move point C to change the size of the triangle and make sure your calculations are the same. 6. Select the triangles interior fill, then go to MEASURE, then AREA. This area should match the answers in steps #4 and #2. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations. Move point C to change the size of the triangle and make sure your calculations are the same. Tab 5: Scalene Triangle- Calculating Perimeter & Area 1. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the perimeter using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms).

2. Why is finding the area of this triangle more difficult than the triangle in tab 4? 3. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the area using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). You will also need to CONSTRUCT a particular segment that you need in order to find the area of a triangle. You can use Tab 3s first few instructions to help if you are stuck. Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms). Also, explain what you needed to find for the construction part as you describe your area steps.

4. Select points A, E and F. Go to CONSTRUCT, then TRIANGLE INTERIOR (CRTL P). With the interior highlighted, go to MEASURE, then PERIMETER. This perimeter should match the answer in step #1. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in step #1. Move point F to change the size of the triangle and make sure your calculations are the same.

5. Select the triangles interior fill, then go to MEASURE, then AREA. This area should match the answers in steps #3. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in #3. Move point F to change the size of the triangle and make sure your calculations are the same. Tab 6: Rhombus- Calculating Perimeter & Area 1. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the perimeter using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms).

2. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the area using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). You will also need to CONSTRUCT a particular segment that you need in order to find the area of a rhombus. (HINT: The buttons for the lines are to help for the construction, only one should be used depending on what side you choose for the base). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms). Also, explain what you needed to find for the construction part as you explain your area steps.

3. Is there an easier way to find the area of a rhombus? YES! Select points B and D, go to CONSTRUCT, then SEGMENT (CRTL L). Select point A and C, go to CONSTRUCT, then SEGMENT (CTRL L). What are these segments called? _____________________________. Measure DBand AC. Then, use the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Multiply times the two segment lengths to find the area. Write the general form and steps below: 4. Select points A, B, C and D in that order. Go to CONSTRUCT, then QUADRILATERAL INTERIOR (CRTL P). Then go to MEASURE, then PERIMETER. This perimeter should match the answer in step #1. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in step #1. Move point A to change the size of the rhombus and make sure your calculations are the same. 5. Select the quadrilaterals interior fill, then go to MEASURE, then AREA. This area should match the answers in steps #2 and #3. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in #2 and #3. Move point A to change the size of the rhombus and make sure your calculations are the same. 6. If you did not have the sketchpad ability to find the interior of the quadrilateral, what method do you think would be the best to use to find area: #1 steps (base times height) or #3 ( times the diagonal lengths)? Please explain and elaborate below:

Tab 7: Trapezoid 1- Common mistake in calculating a trapezoids area.

1. Explain why the two area calculations on the screen are unequal. Use the Hint button for a visual cue.

Tab 8: Trapezoid 2- How can we derive the area formula of a trapezoid? 1. The green and yellow quadrilaterals are both trapezoids. Move the points around and watch the area measurements. What do you notice? 2. Note that AD and HE (base 2) are congruent as well as CB and FG (base 1). Click the Merge button and observe the shape. What happens to the two shapes and what is the final outcome? 3. Using the terms (base 1, base 2 and height) how could you determine the area of the figure CDGH?

4. Use the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE) and the measurements on the page to determine the area using base 1, base 2, and the height. Show your steps below:

5. Now, how could you determine the area of either the yellow or green area separately using the value from #4? Write the steps and general formula for one of the separate regions below.

6. What do you notice about the formula from step #5 and the formula for finding the area of a trapezoid? State your conclusion and explain why this relationship makes sense.

Tab 9: Trapezoid 3- Calculating Perimeter & Area 1. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the perimeter using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms).

2. Measure the appropriate sides/segments to calculate the area using the calculator tool (MEASURE, then CALCULATE). You will also need to CONSTRUCT a particular segment that you need in order to find the area of a trapezoid. Write your steps below (specifically in terms of segments, etc. and also in general formula terms). Also, explain what you needed to find for the construction part as you explain your area steps.

3. Select the trapezoids interior fill (purple). Then go to MEASURE, then PERIMETER. This perimeter should match the answer in step #1. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in step #1. Move any point to change the size of the trapezoid and make sure your calculations are the same. 4. Select the trapezoids interior fill (purple), then go to MEASURE, then AREA. This area should match the answers in steps #2. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in #2. Move any point to change the size of the trapezoid and make sure your calculations are the same. Tab 10: Circle- Calculating Area 1. The circumference of A is straightened out to the right of the circle. Select the segment, go to MEASURE, then LENGTH. You cannot measure the radius in this diagram. However, if you know the circumference, explain below how you could calculate the radius. 2. Use the calculator (MEASURE, then CALCULATE) to actually find the radius (in the calculator, use the exact value of pi in the VALUES tab). 3. Now use the calculator tool and the radius value from #2 to determine the area of the circle. Explain your steps below.

4. Select the circles interior fill (yellow), then go to MEASURE, then AREA. This area should match the answers in steps #3. If it does not, you need to revise your calculations in #2 or #3. Move point B to change the size of the circle and make sure your calculations are the same. Summary: Write as many formulas and/or steps that you can think of for finding the area of the following polygons. Rectangle: Parallelogram: Right Triangle: Scalene Triangle: Rhombus: Trapezoid: Circle:

Whats the relationship between the area of a parallelogram and the area of all the polygons?