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2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 Board of Certified Safety Professionals, Champaign, Illinois, USA All rights reserved.

A BCSP Publication

All or any part of this document may be freely copied and distributed with the following restrictions: Excerpts, in any form or medium, must include a formal statement acknowledging that the Board of Certified Safety Professionals is the owner of the copyrighted material excerpted from this document. Copies and redistributions of this whole document, in any form or medium, must include the entire copyright notice and the restrictions shown on this page. The CSP logo is a registered mark with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. CSP, Certified Safety Professional, ASP, and Associate Safety Professional are registered certification marks and service marks issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to the Board of Certified Safety Professionals.

Comprehensive Practice Examination Guide Sixth Edition April 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................................................... 1 OVERVIEW OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION .......................................................................... 4 COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION BLUEPRINT......................................................................................... 5 PREPARING FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION ..................................................................... 12 Knowing Your Strengths and Weaknesses .................................................................................................. 12 Having and Examination Preparation Plan .................................................................................................. 12 Developing a Test-taking Strategy .............................................................................................................. 12 Using Your Authorized Calculators (including BCSPs Calculator Rules) ................................................ 13 Obtaining Information on the Body of Knowledge ..................................................................................... 13 BCSP-published Self-assessment Examination ........................................................................................... 14 Other Review and Study Sources ................................................................................................................ 14 Examination Integrity .................................................................................................................................. 14 SELF-EVALUATION WORKSHEET FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION ............................. 15 REGISTERING FOR AND TAKING THE COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION ....................................... 16 General Description ..................................................................................................................................... 16 Locating a Pearson VUE Test Center .......................................................................................................... 16 Purchasing an Examination Authorization (including rules for candidates who need special accommodations and rules for candidates who need to use assistive devices) .................. 16 Receiving Your Examination Authorization Letter ..................................................................................... 16 Scheduling an Examination Appointment ................................................................................................... 17 Taking the Examination (including test center identification and security requirements) .......................... 17 Late Arrivals and Missed Appointments ..................................................................................................... 19 Canceling and Rescheduling Appointments ................................................................................................ 19 Examination Authorization Extensions (For Candidates Testing in the U.S. and Canada Only) ................ 19 Retesting ...................................................................................................................................................... 20 Other Testing Arrangements........................................................................................................................ 20 Taking the Comprehensive Practice Examination for Recertification Credit .............................................. 20

SUMMARY OF COMPUTER-DELIVERED EXAMINATION RULES (U.S. AND CANADA ONLY) .......................... 21 SUMMARY OF COMPUTER-DELIVERED EXAMINATION RULES (OUTSIDE THE U.S. AND CANADA) ........... 22 ELIGIBILITY TIME LIMIT RULES..................................................................................................................................... 23 COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION SAMPLE ITEMS ................................................................................ 24

ANSWERS TO COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION SAMPLE ITEMS .............................................. 28 SOLUTIONS TO COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION SAMPLE ITEMS ........................................... 29

Note:

The latest edition of the Comprehensive Practice Examination Guide may be downloaded from the BCSP web site at www.bcsp.org/csp.

INTRODUCTION Using This Publication


This publication, the Comprehensive Practice Examination Guide, provides detailed information about the Comprehensive Practice examination leading to the A Certified Safety Professional (CSP) credential. companion publication to this document, the CSP Application Guide, provides information on the qualifications for earning the CSP credential and the application process. You may download this publication as well as the CSP Application Guide from the Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP) website at www.bcsp.org/csp, or you may contact the BCSP office to obtain free hard copies. Note there is a first examination leading to the CSP credential, the Safety Fundamentals examination. If you need information on the Safety Fundamentals examination, be sure to obtain a copy of the Safety Fundamentals Examination Guide. An overview of the Comprehensive Practice examination is presented in this publication along with its respective examination blueprint. Sample items typical of the Comprehensive Practice examination are presented in subsequent sections with solutions and explanations. A section of this publication explains how to prepare for the Comprehensive Practice examination. There is a section describing computer-delivered examinations and the procedures used at the computer test centers. The BCSP Examination Reference is also shown, and it is the same as the online version you will use at the test center. The CSP Process Complete and submit application materials. BCSP will review your application materials to determine whether you have met the academic and experience requirements and are eligible for the Comprehensive Practice examination. If you are eligible, BCSP will inform you of the length of your eligibility period and the expiration date of your eligibility. Register to take the Comprehensive Practice examination leading to the interim Associate Safety Professional (ASP) designation. Anytime during your eligibility period, you may register with BCSP to take the Comprehensive Practice examination. After you register and pay for a Comprehensive Practice examination authorization, BCSP will (1) notify the examination delivery service provider that you are an authorized Comprehensive Practice examination candidate and (2) inform you how long you have to make an appointment and to complete the Comprehensive Practice examination. You will not need to complete any additional applications for Meet Recertification requirements. Those holding the CSP credential must remain up-to-date with changes in professional practice by compiling 25 Recertification points every five years. continuing to the CSP as long as your do not allow your eligibility to expire. Make an appointment to take your examination at a test center near you, and sit for your examination at the scheduled time. BCSP's examination delivery service provider has hundreds of test centers located around the world that are open every business day (many also have weekend and holiday hours). Your examination will be delivered to you on a computer at the test center. You will receive your unofficial result as soon as you log off the test center's computer system. In most cases, BCSP will send you your official result within three weeks after you take your examination. If you fail the examination, you may register and pay for another Comprehensive Practice examination authorization as soon as you receive your official examination result from BCSP. However, if you fail the examination, you should try to enhance your knowledge of the subject material before you retake the examination in order to increase the likelihood of passing it. Complete all requirements for the CSP credential. After completing all of the requirements, BCSP will award you use of the CSP credential. Pay an annual renewal fee. The CSP credential is awarded on an annual basis. Those holding this credential must pay an annual fee in order to retain the use of this credential.

The CSP Credential The CSP credential is awarded to ASPs who subsequently pass the Comprehensive Practice examination and meet the requirements to achieve and retain the credential. Certified Safety Professionals are: Respected by other safety professionals. Honored by the safety profession. Preferred or required by many employers of safety professionals. Required in many government and private contracts. Paid on the average about $24,000 more per year1 than safety professionals without certification. Likely to fill more responsible management and executive positions than those without the CSP credential.

Definitions A safety professional is one who applies the expertise gained from a study of safety science, principles, practices, and other subjects and from professional safety experience to create or develop procedures, processes, standards, specifications, and systems to achieve optimal control or reduction of the hazards and exposures that may harm people, property, or the environment. Professional safety experience, as interpreted by BCSP, must be the primary function of a position and account for at least 50% of the position's responsibility. Professional safety experience involves analysis, synthesis, investigation, evaluation, research, planning, design, administration, and consultation to the satisfaction of peers, employers, and clients in the prevention of harm to people, property, and the environment. Professional safety experience differs from nonprofessional safety experience in the degree of responsible charge and the ability to defend analytical approaches and recommendations for engineering or administrative controls. A Certified Safety Professional, or CSP, is a safety professional who has met and continues to meet all requirements established by BCSP and is authorized by BCSP to use the Certified Safety Professional title and the CSP credential. An Associate Safety Professional, or ASP, is a temporary designation awarded by BCSP. This designation describes an individual who has met the academic requirements for the CSP credential and has passed the Comprehensive Practice examination, the first of two examinations leading to the CSP credential. A Graduate Safety Practitioner, or GSP, is a temporary designation awarded by BCSP. This designation describes an individual who has graduated from an independently accredited academic program meeting BCSPs standards.

The CSP credential: Is held by about 75% of the leaders in the safety profession. Is cited in federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and standards. Is recognized by U.S. and foreign safety and health organizations. Adds $150 million annually to the salary base of the safety profession.

Recipients of the CSP credential receive: The authority to use the Certified Safety Professional title and the CSP credential. A wall certificate showing their achievement. An annual wallet card showing their title and qualifications. A personalized BCSP certification announcement. The BCSP Newsletter. The BCSP Annual Report. Representation for promoting and protecting the CSP credential.

1 Source: Title of Latest Salary Survey, American Industrial Hygiene Association, 2004.

About BCSP BCSP was organized in 1969 as a peer certification board. Its purpose is to certify practitioners in the safety profession. The specific functions of the Board are to: Evaluate the academic and professional experience qualifications of safety professionals. Administer examinations. Issue certifications to those professionals who meet the Board's criteria and successfully pass required examinations.

Accreditation The Certified Safety Professional credential meets or exceeds the highest national accreditation and personnel certification standards for certification bodies.

National Accreditation National Commission for Certifying Agencies2

In 1968, the American Society of Safety Engineers studied the issue of certification for safety professionals and recommended the formation of a professional certification program. This recommendation led to establishing BCSP in July 1969. The BCSP governing Board consists of 17 directors who represent the breadth and depth of safety, health, and environmental practice, as well as the public. Some of the directors are nominated to a pool by professional membership organizations affiliated with BCSP. The professional membership organizations currently affiliated with BCSP are the following. American Industrial Hygiene Association American Society of Safety Engineers Institute of Industrial Engineers National Fire Protection Association National Safety Council Society of Fire Protection Engineers System Safety Society

BCSP has issued the CSP credential to over 20,000 people, and over 12,000 currently maintain their CSP certification.

2 National Commission for Certifying Agencies, 2025 M Street NW, Suite 800, Washington DC 20036; Phone: 202-367-1165; Web: www.credentialingexcellence.org.

OVERVIEW OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION General Description of BCSP Examinations


There are two examinations leading to the CSP credential: Safety Fundamentals and Comprehensive Practice. Some candidates receive a waiver of the Safety Fundamentals examination if they were rigorously examined through another allied certification or licensing process approved by BCSP or if they graduated from a qualified academic program and if BCSP awarded them temporary use of the Graduate Safety Practitioner (GSP) designation. All candidates for the CSP credential must pass the Comprehensive Practice examination. The Comprehensive Practice examination contains 200 multiple-choice items with four possible answers. Only one answer is correct. Each item is independent and does not rely on the correct answer to any other item. Data necessary to answer items are included in the item or in a scenario shared by several items. Your score is based on the number of scored items you correctly answer. How BCSP Examinations Are Developed Periodically, BCSP validates the content of its examinations to help ensure that the examinations reflect what is important, relevant, and critical in professional safety practice. The process for validating professional certification examinations against current practices produces examination blueprints. Examination Content Development and Revision BCSP updates examinations continuously. Most items come from safety professionals in practice. Before items are accepted into item banks, they go through rigorous technical, psychometric, and grammatical editing. In addition, practicing safety professionals with expertise in the subject area of the item review edited items on several criteria, including importance in and relevance to professional safety. Also, 1015% of the items on BCSP examinations are experimental, and do not contribute to a candidate's pass/fail decision. BCSP analyzes the performance of these experimental items before deciding to include them in the official item bank. Items that successfully complete this quality process are placed in the item bank for potential use in examinations. Throughout item development, examination development, examination revision, and examination administration, BCSP consults with experienced testing specialists (psychometricians) to ensure that BCSP examinations and the entire testing and certification process conform to acceptable practices and accreditation standards. How BCSP Establishes the Minimum Passing Score BCSP uses a criterion-referenced procedure (the Angoffmodified technique) to establish minimum passing scores for examinations. This procedure ensures that your score is independent of scores for other candidates sitting for the examination and involves having a panel of experts rate each examination item with respect to the candidate who would just meet the minimum requirements to sit for the examination and should know the correct answer. The minimum passing score is calculated from results across all raters and across all examination items. The ratings reflect such things as the difficulty of items and the degree to which items are common for all areas of professional practice. As examinations are modified on a regular basis, the minimum passing score is adjusted for the difficulty of items on the examination. Item performance is also evaluated regularly to ensure that BCSP examinations maintain the highest testing standards.

Comprehensive Practice Examination Blueprint BCSP examination blueprints are based on surveys of what safety professionals do in practice. The Comprehensive Practice examination is required for candidates to demonstrate knowledge of professional safety practice at the Certified Safety Professional (CSP) level. The table beginning below and continuing on the next several pages describes the subject matter covered by the Comprehensive Practice examination. The top three levels, called domains, represent the major functions performed by safety professionals at the CSP level. Each domain is divided among several tasks. Within each task are lists of knowledge areas and skills necessary for carrying out the task in that domain. The knowledge areas for the Comprehensive Practice examination build upon the knowledge that candidates have already demonstrated by virtue of having passed the Safety Fundamentals examination, or by virtue of having earned one or more allied credentials or university degrees recognized by BCSP. Each domain heading in this table is accompanied by a percentage label. This percentage represents the proportion of the actual Comprehensive Practice examination devoted to that domain.

Comprehensive Practice Examination Domain 1 Collecting Safety, Health, Environmental, and Security Risk Information 28.6%
Task 1 Identify and characterize hazards, threats, and vulnerabilities using equipment and field observation methods in order to evaluate safety, health, environmental, and security risk.
Knowledge Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. Types, sources, and characteristics of hazards, threats, and vulnerabilities Job safety analysis and task analysis methods Hazard analysis methods Qualitative, quantitative, deductive, and inductive risk assessment methods Incident investigation techniques Methods and techniques for evaluating facilities, products, systems, processes, and equipment Methods and techniques for measurement, sampling, and analysis Sources of information on hazards, threats, and vulnerabilities (e.g., subject matter experts, relevant best practices, published literature) Competencies of other professionals with whom the safety professional interacts Information security and confidentiality requirements Internet resources Skills 1. Identifying hazards associated with equipment, manufacturing systems, and production processes 2. Recognizing external and internal threats to facilities, systems, processes, equipment, and employees 3. Conducting job safety analyses and task analyses 4. Performing hazard analyses 5. Leading incident investigations 6. Interviewing witnesses to incidents 7. Interpreting plans, specifications, technical drawings, and process flow diagrams 8. Using monitoring and sampling equipment 9. Communicating with subject matter experts 10. Consulting with equipment manufacturers and commodity suppliers 11. Finding sources of information on hazards, threats, and vulnerabilities 12. Interviewing people 13. Using the Internet to find information

Task 2 Design and use data management systems for collecting and validating risk information in order to evaluate safety, health, environmental, and security risk.
Knowledge Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Mathematics and statistics Qualitative, quantitative, deductive, and inductive risk assessment methods Chain of custody procedures Electronic data logging and monitoring equipment Data management software Electronic data transfer methods and data storage options Information security and confidentiality requirements Skills 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Calculating statistics from data sources Determining statistical significance Comparing statistics to benchmarks Preserving evidence from incident investigations Calibrating and using data logging and monitoring equipment Using data management software Creating data collection forms Maintaining data integrity

Task 3 Collect and validate information on organizational risk factors by studying culture, management style, business climate, financial conditions, and the availability of internal and external resources in order to evaluate safety, health, environmental, and security risk.
Knowledge Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Mathematics and statistics Qualitative, quantitative, deductive, and inductive risk assessment methods Incident investigation techniques Sources of information on hazards, threats, and vulnerabilities (e.g., subject matter experts, relevant best practices, published literature) Organizational and behavioral sciences Group dynamics Management sciences Management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability Budgeting, finance, and economic analysis techniques Business planning Competencies of other professionals with whom the safety professional interacts Internet resources Skills 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Calculating statistics from data sources Determining statistical significance Comparing statistics to benchmarks Leading incident investigations Interviewing witnesses to incidents Developing surveys to capture data related to organizational culture Communicating with subject matter experts Interviewing people Using the Internet to find information

Task 4 Research applicable laws, regulations, consensus standards, best practices, and published literature using internal and external resources to develop benchmarks for assessing an organizations safety, health, environmental, and security performance and to support the evaluation of safety, health, environmental, and security risk.
Knowledge Areas 1. Benchmarks and performance standards 2. Mathematics and statistics 3. Sources of information on hazards, threats, and vulnerabilities (e.g., subject matter experts, relevant best practices, published literature) 4. Sources of information related to local laws, regulations, and consensus codes and standards 5. Product certification and listing agencies 6. Qualitative, quantitative, deductive, and inductive risk assessment methods 7. Competencies of other professionals with whom the safety professional interacts 8. Internet resources Skills 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Calculating statistics from data sources Determining statistical significance Using statistics to define benchmarks and performance standards Comparing statistics to benchmarks Interpreting local laws, regulations, and consensus codes and standards Communicating with subject matter experts Consulting with equipment manufacturers and commodity suppliers Obtaining information on product certification and listing requirements Using the Internet to find information

Comprehensive Practice Examination Domain 2 Assessing Safety, Health, Environmental, and Security Risk 36.6%
Task 1 Evaluate the risk of injury, illness, environmental harm, and property damage to which the public or an organization is exposed associated with the organizations facilities, products, systems, processes, equipment, and employees by applying quantitative and qualitative threat, vulnerability, and risk assessment techniques.
Knowledge Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. Qualitative, quantitative, deductive, and inductive risk assessment methods Root cause analysis methods Mathematics and statistics Basic sciences: anatomy, biology, chemistry, physics, physiology Applied sciences: fluid flow, mechanics, electricity Organizational and behavioral sciences Agriculture safety (including food supply safety) Biological safety Business continuity and contingency planning Chemical process safety Community emergency planning Construction safety Dispersion modeling Emergency/crisis/disaster management Emergency/crisis/disaster response planning Environmental protection and pollution prevention Epidemiology Equipment safety Ergonomics and human factors Facility safety Facility security and access control Facility siting and layout Fire prevention, protection, and suppression Hazardous materials management Hazardous waste management Healthcare safety (including patient safety) Industrial hygiene Infectious diseases Insurance/risk transfer principles Maritime safety Mining safety Multi-employer worksite issues Mutual aid agreements Physical and chemical characteristics of hazardous materials Pressure relief systems Product safety Public safety and security Radiation safety System safety Toxicology Transportation safety and security Ventilation systems Workplace violence Sources of information on risk (e.g., subject matter experts, relevant best practices, published literature) 45. Information security and confidentiality requirements Skills 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. Leading comprehensive risk assessments Leading threat and vulnerability assessments Facilitating chemical process hazard analyses Conducting root cause analyses Estimating organizational risk Estimating public risk Estimating the risk of human error Using statistics to estimate risk Interpreting plans, specifications, technical drawings, and process flow diagrams Evaluating facility fire risk Evaluating life safety features in facilities Calculating maximum occupancy and egress capacity Calculating required containment volumes and hazardous materials storage requirements Determining how released hazardous materials migrate through the air, surface water, soil, and water table Determining occupational exposures (e.g., hazardous chemicals, radiation, noise, biological agents, heat) Evaluating emergency/crisis/disaster management and response plans Using chemical process safety information Using dispersion modeling software Communicating with subject matter experts Consulting with equipment manufacturers and commodity suppliers Interviewing people

Task 2 Audit safety, health, environmental, and security management systems using appropriate auditing techniques to compare an organizations management systems against established standards for identifying the organizations strengths and weaknesses.
Knowledge Areas 1. Safety, health, and environmental management and audit systems (e.g., ANSI/AIHA Z10, ISO 14000 series, OHSAS 18000 series, ISO 19011, U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration Voluntary Protection Programs) 2. Management system auditing techniques 3. Benchmarks and performance standards 4. Methods and techniques for evaluating facilities, products, systems, processes, and equipment 5. Methods and techniques for measurement, sampling, and analysis 6. Qualitative, quantitative, deductive, and inductive risk assessment methods 7. Root cause analysis methods 8. Mathematics and statistics 9. Basic sciences: anatomy, biology, chemistry, physics, physiology 10. Applied sciences: fluid flow, mechanics, electricity 11. Organizational and behavioral sciences 12. Management sciences 13. Management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability 14. Budgeting, finance, and economic analysis techniques 15. Business continuity and contingency planning 16. Business planning 17. Business software 18. Change management 19. Emergency/crisis/disaster management 20. Emergency/crisis/disaster response planning 21. Group dynamics 22. Hazardous materials management 23. Hazardous waste management 24. Job safety analysis and task analysis methods 25. Multi-employer worksite issues 26. Report presentation strategies 27. Competencies of other professionals with whom the safety professional interacts 28. Sources of information on hazards, threats, and vulnerabilities (e.g., subject matter experts, relevant best practices, published literature) 29. Information security and confidentiality requirements 30. Internet resources Skills 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Leading management system audits Comparing management systems with benchmarks Comparing documented procedures and tasks with actual operations Evaluating safety, health, environmental, and security plans, programs, and policies Evaluating risk assessments Evaluating the results of root cause analyses Recognizing external and internal threats to facilities, systems, processes, equipment, and employees Interpreting plans, specifications, technical drawings, and process flow diagrams Recognizing management system changes Using monitoring and sampling equipment Determining statistical significance Comparing statistics to benchmarks Performing facility and equipment inspections Evaluating business continuity and contingency plans Communicating with subject matter experts Consulting with equipment manufacturers and commodity suppliers Using business software to present reports Interviewing people Using the Internet to find information

Task 3 Analyze trends in leading and lagging performance indicators related to safety, health, environmental, and security management systems using historical information and statistical methods to identify an organizations strengths and weaknesses.
Knowledge Areas 1. Types of leading and lagging safety, health, environmental, and security performance indicators 2. Benchmarks and performance standards 3. Safety, health, and environmental management and audit systems (e.g., ANSI/AIHA Z10, ISO 14000 series, OHSAS 18000 series, ISO 19011, U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration Voluntary Protection Programs) 4. Management system auditing techniques 5. Mathematics and statistics 6. Organizational and behavioral sciences 7. Management sciences 8. Management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability 9. Budgeting, finance, and economic analysis techniques 10. Business planning 11. Business software 12. Change management 13. Competencies of other professionals with whom the safety professional interacts 14. Training assessment instruments (e.g., written tests, skill assessments) Skills 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. Using statistics to show trends in performance indicators Calculating statistics from data sources Using statistics to define benchmarks and performance standards Communicating with subject matter experts Comparing statistics to benchmarks Determining statistical significance Evaluating management system audits Evaluating risk assessments Evaluating safety, health, environmental, and security plans, programs, and policies Evaluating the results of root cause analyses Interpreting organizational culture surveys and perception surveys Measuring training program effectiveness Recognizing management system changes Using business software to present reports Interviewing people Obtaining meaningful feedback

Comprehensive Practice Examination Domain 3 Managing Safety, Health, Environmental, and Security Risk 34.8%
Task 1 Design effective risk management methods using the results of risk assessments to eliminate or reduce safety, health, environmental, and security risks.
Knowledge Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. Engineering controls Principles of managing risk throughout the design process Administrative controls Personal protective equipment Qualitative, quantitative, deductive, and inductive risk assessment methods Root cause analysis methods Risk-based decision-making tools Mathematics and statistics Applied sciences: fluid flow, mechanics, electricity Basic sciences: anatomy, biology, chemistry, physics, physiology Organizational and behavioral sciences Management sciences Management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability Budgeting, finance, and economic analysis techniques Business planning Business software Adult learning Cultural norms and population stereotypes Training methods Training assessment instruments (e.g., written tests, skill assessments) Agriculture safety (including food supply safety) Biological safety Business continuity and contingency planning Change management Chemical process safety Community emergency planning Construction safety Education and training methods Emergency/crisis/disaster management Emergency/crisis/disaster response planning Employee assistance programs Employee/stakeholder incentive programs Environmental protection and pollution prevention Epidemiology Equipment safety Ergonomics and human factors Facility safety Facility security and access control Facility siting and layout Fire prevention, protection, and suppression Hazardous materials management Hazardous waste management Healthcare safety (including patient safety) Incident command methods Industrial hygiene Infectious diseases Insurance/risk transfer principles Labels, signs, and warnings (including international symbols) Maritime safety Mining safety Multi-employer worksite issues Mutual aid agreements Physical and chemical characteristics of hazardous materials Skills 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Recommending effective engineering controls Developing effective administrative controls Developing procedures that incorporate risk management controls Developing safety, health, environmental, and security plans, programs, and policies Designing effective labels, signs, and warnings Performing training needs assessments Developing training programs Developing training assessment instruments Applying risk-based decision-making tools for prioritizing risk management options Interpreting plans, specifications, technical drawings, and process flow diagrams Creating emergency/crisis/disaster management and response plans Performing financial analyses of risk management options Evaluating the costs and benefits of risk management options Organizing chemical process safety information Performing gap analyses Determining hazardous materials storage requirements Recommending facility life safety features Recommending methods to reduce the risk of occupational exposures (e.g., hazardous chemicals, radiation, noise, biological agents, heat) Reducing the risk of error-likely situations Selecting appropriate personal protective equipment Using sampling and measurement devices Using statistics to understand risk Using the results of risk assessments to support risk management options Using the results of root cause analyses to support risk management options

25. Communicating with subject matter experts 26. Consulting with equipment manufacturers and commodity suppliers 27. Interviewing people

Task 1 (CONTINUED) Design effective risk management methods using the results of risk assessments to eliminate or reduce safety, health, environmental, and security risks.
Knowledge Areas (CONTINUED) 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. Pressure relief systems Product safety Public safety and security Radiation safety System safety Toxicology Transportation safety and security Ventilation systems Workplace violence Competencies of other professionals with whom the safety professional interacts 64. Sources of information on risk management options (e.g., subject matter experts, relevant best practices, published literature)

Task 2 Educate and influence decision makers to adopt effective risk management methods by illustrating the business-related benefits associated with implementing them to eliminate or reduce safety, health, environmental, and security risks.
Knowledge Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Risk-based decision-making tools Budgeting, finance, and economic analysis techniques Business planning Business software Education and training methods Interpersonal communications Mathematics and statistics Organizational and behavioral sciences Management sciences Management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability Organizational protocols Presentation media and technologies Presentation strategies Project management concepts Target audience background Skills 1. Applying risk-based decision-making tools for prioritizing risk management options 2. Creating plans for implementing risk management options 3. Describing the costs and benefits of risk management options 4. Describing the effects of implementing safety, health, and environmental plans, programs, and policies 5. Describing trends to support risk management options 6. Explaining risk management options to decision makers 7. Making presentations to decision makers 8. Presenting financial analyses of risk management options 9. Recognizing changes needed in management systems 10. Using statistics to explain the effects of risk management options 11. Using the results of risk assessments to support risk management options 12. Using the results of root cause analyses to support risk management options

Task 3 Lead projects to implement the risk management methods adopted by decision makers using internal and external resources to eliminate or reduce safety, health, environmental, and security risks.
Knowledge Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Project management concepts Management sciences Management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability Methods of achieving project stakeholder acceptance of project goals Financial management principles Schedule management principles Risk-based decision-making tools Organizational and behavioral sciences Business software Project management software Change management Group dynamics Interpersonal communications Methods of facilitating teamwork Organizational protocols Presentation media and technologies Presentation strategies Principles of supervising people Competencies of other professionals with whom the safety professional interacts Skills 1. Implementing project management plans 2. Applying management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability 3. Using project management software 4. Developing systems to track project implementation 5. Leading people 6. Leading teams 7. Making presentations to stakeholders 8. Motivating project stakeholders 9. Resolving conflicts 10. Supervising people 11. Communicating with subject matter experts 12. Consulting with equipment manufacturers and commodity suppliers 13. Interviewing people

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Task 4 Promote a positive organizational culture that is conscious of its safety, health, environmental, and security responsibilities by communicating these responsibilities to all stakeholders and by training all stakeholders as part of the organizations overall risk management program.
Knowledge Areas 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. Management sciences Management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability Methods of achieving project stakeholder acceptance of project goals Organizational and behavioral sciences Organizational protocols Cultural norms and population stereotypes Group dynamics Interpersonal communications Labels, signs, and warnings (including international symbols) Multi-employer worksite issues Organized labor/management relations Presentation media and technologies Presentation strategies Protocols for public announcements Public communication techniques Risk communication techniques Stakeholder participation committees Target audience background Adult learning Education and training methods Behavior modification techniques Training methods Training assessment instruments (e.g., written tests, skill assessments) Business communication software Competencies of other professionals with whom the safety professional interacts 26. Standards development processes 27. Information security and confidentiality requirements Skills 1. Explaining risk concepts to stakeholders and the public 2. Explaining risk management options to stakeholders and the public 3. Applying management principles of authority, responsibility, and accountability 4. Encouraging participation in risk management processes 5. Influencing stakeholder behavior 6. Developing and using lesson plans 7. Conducting training 8. Administering training assessment instruments 9. Providing an effective learning environment 10. Delivering motivational presentations 11. Creating motivational literature 12. Facilitating stakeholder participation committees 13. Giving public announcements 14. Interacting with journalists and the media 15. Making presentations to stakeholders and the public 16. Negotiating with political entities 17. Resolving conflicts 18. Soliciting stakeholder feedback 19. Working with organized labor unions and management 20. Motivating stakeholders 21. Leading people 22. Leading teams 23. Exchanging information over the Internet 24. Communicating with subject matter experts 25. Interviewing people 26. Providing input in standards development activities

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PREPARING FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION


You may use various approaches to prepare for the Comprehensive Practice examination: Perform individual study. Participate in informal study groups. Attend formal review courses. Complete practice examinations. opportunities to increase your score within that subject. If you are likely to get few items correct for another subject, you have a better opportunity to gain points by studying that subject. Convert your subject strengths and weaknesses into a study plan that is likely to increase your overall examination score. You will want to refresh your knowledge in all subjects. It is also a good idea to study subjects that offer the greatest opportunity to increase your overall score. Make a chart of subjects. List for yourself how you will prepare for each subject. You may want to identify study hours for each, create a study schedule, or even chart out how you plan to prepare for each subject (reading, practicing working calculations, attending a study group or refresher course). Note that knowledge and understanding are essential in passing the examinations. Relying only on simulated examination items is not the best way to increase knowledge and understanding. Use simulated items to provide insight into the areas in which you should engage in additional study. Developing a Test-taking Strategy Knowing how to take examinations will help improve your score. The Comprehensive Practice examination uses multiple-choice items. Each item has one correct answer and three incorrect answers. Remember, the goal is to get as many items correct as possible. There is no penalty on the Comprehensive Practice examination for selecting an incorrect answer. However, only correct answers count toward reaching the passing score. Understand item construction. A four-choice, objectively scored examination item contains an item stem and four possible answers. The premise, or lead-in statement or question, is called the stem. One of the choices is correct, and three are not. Guess intelligently. If you do not know the answer to an item or are not sure about it, you should guess intelligently. Look for choices that you know are incorrect or do not appear as plausible as others. Choose your answer from among the remaining choices. This increases your chance of selecting a correct answer. Read the items carefully. Read each item carefully. Consider the item from the viewpoint of an examination
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Some keys to success include: Knowing your strengths and weaknesses. Having an examination preparation plan. Developing a test-taking strategy. Understanding how to use your calculator.

Knowing Your Strengths and Weaknesses A self-evaluation will help you determine how well you know various subjects included on the Comprehensive Practice examination. Simply rate yourself on each major and minor subject area included on the examination. Focus especially on the specific knowledge areas. The safety discipline requires knowledge in many different subjects. A rating form to help you evaluate your knowledge appears at the end of this section. It is essential for you to compare your knowledge against that contained in the examination blueprint. Having an Examination Preparation Plan You can use your ratings to help establish a study plan. The examination blueprint shows how the items on an examination are distributed across domains and topics. While the exact number of items devoted to each responsibility may vary on the actual examination, one can estimate about how many items may be devoted to each particular subject by assuming a uniform distribution within a domain. The total number of scored items that you get correct on the examination determines whether you pass. The goal is to get enough scored items correct to pass the examination. Scoring well in one subject area can compensate for a weaker score in another subject area. However, there may not be enough items in your strong areas to achieve a passing score. You will have to get items correct in your moderate and weak areas to pass. Use this information to form a preparation strategy. If you know a subject well and are likely to get most items for that subject correct on the examination, you have few additional

item writer. Look for the item focus. Each item evaluates some subject or kernel of knowledge. Try to identify what knowledge the item is trying to test. Avoid reading things into an item. The item can only test on the information actually included. Recognize that the stems for some items may include information that is not needed for correctly answering them. Consider the context. Often an item is framed around a particular industry or situation. Even if you do not work in that industry or have not experienced a particular situation, the item may be testing knowledge that you have. Avoid dismissing an item because of the context or the industry in which it is framed. Use examination time wisely. When taking your examination, complete those items first that you know or can answer quickly. Then go back to items that were difficult for you or required considerable time to read, analyze, or compute. This approach allows you to build your score as quickly as possible. You may want to go back over skipped or marked items several times. Complete skipped items. After you have gone through the examination once or if you are running out of time, look for items that you have not answered. Select an answer for any skipped or incomplete item. By chance alone, you can get one of every four correct. There is no penalty for selecting an incorrect answer. Go back to troublesome items. It is a good idea to mark items that you are not sure about or items that are difficult for you. After you have worked through the entire examination, go back to marked items. Reread the items and study the choices again. You may recall some knowledge or information that you had not considered earlier and be able to answer the item correctly. You may also be able to eliminate a choice that is not correct and increase your chance of guessing the correct answer. Using Your Authorized Calculators Some items on the Comprehensive Practice examination require computations to obtain the correct answer. You may bring as many as two of your own calculators, but your calculators must comply with the BCSP calculator rules (see Box, next column). Make sure you know how to use your calculators since you could waste valuable time trying to understand how to use it once the examination clock starts. You could also make computational errors if you have not practiced using your calculator. It is a good idea to practice working solutions to computational problems to be able to recall the correct calculator procedures.
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Solutions to computational items usually are rounded to two or three significant figures. You should select the answer closest to the computed value. You may bring one or two calculators to the examination as long as they comply with the BCSP calculator rules in the box below. You may not bring in calculator operational instructions or other written materials to assist you with using your authorized calculators. Your calculator(s) will be thoroughly inspected before you will be allowed to bring them into the secure testing room. NOTE: You also may use the online scientific calculator available on your computer testing workstation.
BCSP Calculator Rules
The following are the only makes and models of calculators permitted. Any version of these makes and models may be used. For example, a Hewlett-Packard hp 30s is permitted, as is a Texas Instruments TI-30Xa. Casio models FX-115, FX-250, FX-260, FX-300 Hewlett-Packard models hp 9, hp 10, hp 12, hp 30 Texas Instruments models TI-30, TI-34, TI-35, TI-36

Obtaining Information on the Body of Knowledge Draw on your experience and on professional and study references in your own library, a company, or a public library. BCSP maintains an online comprehensive list of published references that provide reasonable coverage on the subject matter associated with BCSP examination blueprints and safety, health, and environmental practice. Examination items are not necessarily taken directly from these sources, and you may have access to previous or later editions of these or other references that also present acceptable coverage on the subject matter. However, BCSP believes that the references online list represent the breadth and depth of coverage of safety, health, and environmental practice. BCSP maintains an online list of published references. This list provides acceptable coverage of the subject matter associated with professional safety practice at the CSP level. www.bcsp.org/safetypracticelibrary

BCSP-published Self-Assessment Examination Examination Integrity BCSP publishes a self-assessment examination for the Comprehensive Practice examination. Many candidates find it helpful in examination preparation. The selfassessment examination can help diagnose how well you know the body of knowledge as well as to help refresh your test-taking skills. To order a self-assessment examination, please download the order form from the BCSP website at www.bcsp.org or by calling BCSP. The self-assessment examination is based on the blueprint described in this document and is half the length of a full examination. The self-assessment examination booklet includes a scoring sheet and a chart of correct answers. It also includes solutions to computational items and explanations for correct answers, along with detailed references. Other Review and Study Sources A number of professional membership organizations, trade organizations, colleges and universities, and private companies offer study courses, software, and materials to assist candidates with preparing for BCSP examinations. Because candidates for BCSP examinations often ask where to locate review courses and materials, BCSP maintains an online list strictly as a courtesy. Beyond the written materials BCSP publishes (and which are available to anyone), BCSP has no involvement whatsoever in the development, content, or distribution of any courses or materials associated with preparing for BCSP examinations. BCSP neither endorses the providers shown on the online list nor evaluates the providers or the providers materials for consistency with BCSP examination blueprints or with any aspect of any BCSP examination. Candidates must contact the sources directly about materials, course schedules, fees, or matters related to satisfaction with their products or services. BCSP maintains the following online list of third-party review and examination preparation service providers. This list is maintained strictly as a courtesy and is neither intended to be exhaustive nor is it updated regularly. A key to a successful and respected credentialing program is examination security. Without it, a peer-operated credentialing program has little value. BCSP relies on the ethical behavior of candidates and certificants to maintain the security of BCSP examinations. BCSP publishes brochures and technical documents derived strictly from the examination blueprints. These brochures and technical documents are available to anyone. BCSP neither publishes nor releases any other information or material related to the Comprehensive Practice examination. In addition, BCSP does not provide access to any examination or other examination-related materials to anyone except authorized candidates for the Comprehensive Practice examination. When those who hold the CSP credential or those who are pursuing the CSP credential reveal information about the content of BCSP examinations (other than that which is described in documents published by BCSP), they violate the agreement all candidates accept when they apply for certification and when they take an examination. Applicants, examination candidates, or certificants who reveal confidential information about the content of BCSP examinations through any means also violate the BCSP Bylaws and the BCSP Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. BCSP has taken action and will continue to take action against individuals who violate this trust. Penalties include permanently barring individuals from pursuing the CSP credential and revoking the certifications and interim designations of those who have status with BCSP, in addition to other legal remedies. In addition, BCSP will pursue legal actions against organizations, individuals not seeking certification, and individuals who fraudulently claim or misrepresent their intent to seek certification, who reveal information about the content of BCSP examinations (other than information that is described in documents published by BCSP).

www.bcsp.org/sources

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SELF-EVALUATION WORKSHEET FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION


Rate your level of knowledge on each domain and task included on the Comprehensive Practice examination by marking each area as H = High, M = Medium, or L = Low. Use the ratings to help establish a preparation plan for taking the examination. Refer to the examination blueprint on pages 5 through 11.

DOMAIN/Task
DOMAIN 1. COLLECTING SAFETY, HEALTH, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND SECURITY RISK INFORMATION Task 1. Identify and characterize hazards, threats, and vulnerabilities using equipment and field observation methods in order to evaluate safety, health, environmental, and security risk. Task 2. Design and use data management systems for collecting and validating risk information in order to evaluate safety, health, environmental, and security risk. Task 3. Collect and validate information on organizational risk factors by studying culture, management style, business climate, financial conditions, and the availability of internal and external resources in order to evaluate safety, health, environmental, and security risk. Task 4. Research applicable laws, regulations, consensus standards, best practices, and published literature using internal and external resources to develop benchmarks for assessing an organizations safety, health, environmental, and security performance and to support the evaluation of safety, health, environmental, and security risk. DOMAIN 2. ASSESSING SAFETY, HEALTH, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND SECURITY RISK Task 1. Evaluate the risk of injury, illness, environmental harm, and property damage to which the public or an organization is exposed associated with the organizations facilities, products, systems, processes, equipment, and employees by applying quantitative and qualitative threat, vulnerability, and risk assessment techniques. Task 2. Audit safety, health, environmental, and security management systems using appropriate auditing techniques to compare an organizations management systems against established standards for identifying the organizations strengths and weaknesses. Task 3. Analyze trends in leading and lagging performance indicators related to safety, health, environmental, and security management systems using historical information and statistical methods to identify an organizations strengths and weaknesses. DOMAIN 3. MANAGING SAFETY, HEALTH, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND SECURITY RISK Task 1. Design effective risk management methods using the results of risk assessments to eliminate or reduce safety, health, environmental, and security risks. Task 2. Educate and influence decision makers to adopt effective risk management methods by illustrating the business-related benefits associated with implementing them to eliminate or reduce safety, health, environmental, and security risks. Task 3. Lead projects to implement the risk management methods adopted by decision makers using internal and external resources to eliminate or reduce safety, health, environmental, and security risks. Task 4. Promote a positive organizational culture that is conscious of its safety, health, environmental, and security responsibilities by communicating these responsibilities to all stakeholders and by training all stakeholders as part of the organizations overall risk management program.

Self Rating

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REGISTERING FOR AND TAKING THE COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE EXAMINATION


General Description BCSP uses computer delivered examinations at test centers operated by Pearson VUE. You do not need computer skills. Once BCSP makes you eligible for the Comprehensive Practice examination, and you are ready to take the examination, you need to take the following actions. Locate a Pearson VUE test center Purchase an Examination Authorization Receive your Examination Authorization Letter Schedule an examination appointment Take the examination not available through a Pearson VUE test center, BCSP will make other arrangements to ensure that your needs are met. If, at the time you purchase your examination authorization, you fail to inform BCSP of your need for one or more special accommodations, you will not receive them when you arrive for your examination. Your special accommodations will not be granted until BCSP receives and reviews your official medical documentation and approves your request. Once BCSP approves your request for special accommodations, BCSP will notify you and provide you with additional instructions describing how you will need to schedule your examination appointment. Note: Be prepared to send BCSP your medical documentation as soon as you purchase your examination authorization. Your 120-day examination authorization clock starts on the day you purchase your examination authorization even if you are requesting one or more special accommodations. Examinations for Candidates Using Assistive Devices. If you use (or expect to use) external assistive devices or equipment such as crutches, a wheelchair, a cane, an optical prosthetic, a portable oxygen system, or one or more hearing aids, you must inform BCSP of your need to use these external assistive devices in the secure testing room at the time you purchase an examination authorization. BCSP will inform Pearson VUE of your need to use one or more external assistive devices so the Pearson VUE test center staff can be prepared to perform appropriate security inspections on these assistive devices when you arrive. If you fail to inform BCSP of your need to use one or more external assistive devices, you will not be permitted to use your assistive devices in the secure testing room. If you do not permit reasonable inspection, you will forfeit your examination authorization fee. Receiving Your Examination Authorization Letter After you pay for an examination authorization, BCSP will mail or email you an Examination Authorization Letter. In it are detailed instructions for scheduling an examination appointment at a Pearson VUE test center. Have this letter available when you create your online Web account to schedule your appointment online, or when you make your appointment with Pearson VUE by phone.

After you take an examination, BCSP will mail your official examination result and related materials to you. Locating a Pearson VUE Test Center To ensure that a Pearson VUE test center is suitably convenient to you, visit the Pearson VUE website at www.pearsonvue.com/BCSP. Click on the "Locate a test center" link. If you do not have Internet access, contact BCSP for assistance in locating a nearby test center. Purchasing an Examination Authorization After BCSP sends you a notice indicating that you are eligible to sit for the Comprehensive Practice examination, you may register with BCSP to take the examination at any time within your eligibility time limit rules. Follow the instructions on your eligibility letter for registering and purchasing your examination authorization. Pay special attention to your eligibility expiration date. Examinations for Candidates Requiring Special Accommodations. If you require special examination facilities or arrangements because of one or more documented disabilities (consistent with the Americans with Disabilities Act), you must inform BCSP of these needs at the time you purchase an examination authorization. You will be asked to provide official medical documentation describing the nature of your disabilities, the precise special accommodation(s) recommended for you, and the name, address, phone number, and qualifications of the licensed healthcare professional validating your request. Pearson VUE can accommodate almost all requests for special accommodations. However, if special accommodations are
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Scheduling an Examination Appointment After you receive your Examination Authorization Letter, you must schedule an examination appointment directly with Pearson VUE. A brochure sent with your Examination Authorization Letter will have additional details for scheduling and rescheduling (if necessary) your examination appointment. BCSP examinations are available at Pearson VUE test centers around the world. Visit the Pearson VUE website www.pearsonvue.com/BCSP to locate a test center near you and to schedule your appointment. All test centers are open during normal (customary) weekday business hours, and some have weekend and holiday hours. Make your appointment as soon as possible after you receive your Examination Authorization Letter since available appointment times at Pearson VUE test centers are reserved early. BCSP strongly recommends making your appointment eight or more weeks in advance. If you wait too long and find that you are unable to make an appointment to take your examination within your examination authorization period, you will forfeit your examination authorization fee, and you will have to purchase a new examination authorization to sit for the examination, if you are still eligible. When you make your appointment, Pearson VUE will send you a confirmation letter by email or mail containing your examination appointment details along with driving instructions and other information. After scheduling your appointment, BCSP suggests that you confirm your appointment location, date, and time online at www.pearsonvue.com/BCSP. Taking the Examination Arrival and Preliminary Procedures. Plan to arrive at the Pearson VUE test center at least 30 minutes before your appointment starting time to help ensure your sign-in procedure goes smoothly and to account for traffic delays. The Pearson VUE test center staff will tell you where to secure your coat, hat, and other personal belongings, and show you the location of the restrooms. If you arrive 15 minutes or more after your appointment starting time, you will be refused admission, and you will forfeit your examination authorization fee. Presenting Your Identification. The test center staff will ask you to present acceptable identification and ask you to sign your name in a logbook. Depending on where you are scheduled to take your examination, the test center staff
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also may take your picture and obtain electronic fingerprint data to confirm your identity. You must bring a valid, unexpired government-issued identification document bearing both your picture and signature. Your name on this identification document must exactly match the name you used when you applied for certification with BCSP. If you are not a citizen of the country in which you are testing, the only acceptable identification document is your valid, unexpired passport. Examples of acceptable identification for testing within the country of your citizenship include your valid, unexpired passport or your valid, unexpired, non-temporary North American state or provincial drivers license/identification card, military identification card, national identification card, European Identity card, or permanent resident card. If the identification document you present is expired, invalid, or does not have both your picture and signature, you will be refused admission, and you will forfeit your examination authorization fee. There are additional identification requirements for foreign nationals testing in the People's Republic of China and Hong Kong, and for citizens of countries against which the U.S. is enforcing economic and trade sanctions. If you are in one of these situations, or if you have questions related to the presentation of acceptable identification, contact BCSP before scheduling your examination appointment. Final Sign-in Procedures. The test center staff will then provide you with materials for working out calculations by hand. If you intend to take one or two calculators with you into the secure testing room, the test center staff will inspect each calculator and verify that each calculator complies with the published BCSP calculator rules in effect when you sit for the examination. Examination Security. After the sign-in procedure is completed, the test center staff will escort you into the secure testing room and seat you at your computer testing workstation. Other than the materials provided by the test center staff for working out calculations and your authorized calculators, you cannot take any notes, books, papers, purses, hats, coats, jackets, pagers, mobile telephones, or other materials or electronic devices into the secure testing room. In addition, no food, drinks, snacks, or tobacco products are permitted in the secure testing room at any time. All such items must be stored outside the secure testing room. You may access only your stored food, drinks, snacks, medicine, or tobacco products (when permitted by local law) during self-scheduled breaks you

take outside the secure testing room. You may not access your other personal belongings at all until you complete your examination. During breaks, you are not permitted to have contact with anyone other than the test center staff. Therefore, for the duration of the examination (i.e., while your examination clock is running, including during selfscheduled breaks), you shall not: Consult verbally, electronically, or in writing with any person other than with test center staff; Consult any written or electronic reference other than your authorized calculator(s) and the materials for working out calculations provided by the test center staff; Leave your computer testing workstation, except to take a self-scheduled break within the building (or part of the building) controlled by Pearson VUE; or Leave the building (or part of the building) controlled by Pearson VUE.

complete this tutorial. The time you spend on this tutorial does not count toward your actual testing time. Examination Duration. Once you finish the online tutorial, your examination clock will actually begin. You will have five and one-half (5 ) hours to complete the Comprehensive Practice examination. At the end of your examination, you will be asked to complete a postexamination survey. Your time remaining will appear on the computer screen. If you leave your computer testing workstation for any reason during the examination, your clock will continue to run. Examination Format. One item will appear one the screen at a time. You may answer the item, flag the item for later review, or skip the item completely. Even if you flag an item because you intend to review the item later, BCSP recommends that you select an answer anyway in case you run out of time and are unable to return to review the flagged item. After you have seen all of the examination items, you will be presented with a review screen that presents a list of all items. This list will also show whether you skipped any items or flagged any for review. You then may review items you have flagged or skipped. Once you return to the item, you may change your answer selection, if desired, and return to the review screen. The 10-page BCSP Examination Reference will be available for you on every item by clicking the button on your computer screen labeled "Exam Reference." You may download a copy of the BCSP Examination Reference at www.bcsp.org/csp. Examination Environment. You may find that the examination room is too cool or too warm or that the computer testing workstation is not ergonomically designed for you. In addition, you may be distracted during an examination by noises such as mouse clicks and typing by other examinees in the room. BCSP does everything possible to help make your examination experience a positive one, and many of these distractions affect people differently. Therefore, you may want to plan for them. For example, you should consider wearing clothing that will allow you to remain comfortable in either a cool or warm environment, and consider having earplugs to block as much environmental noise as possible. You should contact the test center staff if the environmental conditions in the secure testing room are unreasonable.

Because of the length of the examination, and because it is likely that there will be no food or drink available in the test center, BCSP strongly recommends that you bring your own food, drink, or snacks and secure them for use during your self-scheduled breaks. Also, remember to bring any medicine you require. Several security procedures are in place at Pearson VUE test centers. Pearson VUE formally documents all irregularities, and BCSP evaluates these irregularities to determine appropriate action. Depending on the irregularity, BCSP may invalidate your examination and take additional disciplinary actions in accordance with BCSP's Bylaws if you access prohibited materials, have contact with anyone except test center staff, leave the test center while your examination clock is running, engage in unethical, disruptive, or unprofessional conduct, or violate any other BCSP or Pearson VUE security procedures. Examination Tutorial. When you are ready to begin your examination, you will log on as instructed by the test center staff. There will be several introductory screens, including a screen where you will have to accept BCSP's Security and Confidentiality Agreement prior to actually viewing any examination content. Once you accept BCSP's Security and Confidentiality Agreement, you will be able to complete a brief tutorial to become familiar with the features of the examination delivery software and the online BCSP Examination Reference before beginning the examination. BCSP strongly recommends that you

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Completing the Examination and Getting Your Unofficial Result. Once you have completed your examination, you will be asked to complete a brief post-examination survey. Please complete this survey to help BCSP understand your certification and testing experience and help us address any problems you encountered. After submitting your survey responses, you will be shown your unofficial result on the screen. After you view your unofficial result, you should log off, leave your computer testing workstation, and find a member of the test center staff to check out. During the check out procedure, you will have to return any materials given to you by the test center staff. The test center staff will then give you a printed copy of your unofficial examination result. In most cases, BCSP will mail your official result and score report to you within three weeks. Late Arrivals and Missed Appointments If you fail to keep your scheduled examination appointment, if you arrive more than 15 minutes beyond the starting time of your scheduled appointment, or if you fail to present acceptable identification to the test center staff when you arrive for your scheduled appointment, you will be refused admission, and you will forfeit your examination authorization fee. To sit for the examination after having been refused admission, you must pay a new examination authorization fee, if you are still eligible. Cancelling and Rescheduling Examination Appointments If you need to cancel and reschedule an examination appointment, there must be one or more full business days remaining before the date of your scheduled appointment. Appointments cannot be canceled and rescheduled if there is less than one full business day before the date of your scheduled examination appointment. To reschedule an examination appointment, a Pearson VUE test center must have an appointment time available within the remaining time in your examination authorization period. If you have to cancel and reschedule your examination appointment toward the end of your 120-day examination authorization period, you should consider purchasing a one-time, 60-day examination authorization extension from BCSP. Examination Authorization Extensions After registering and paying for an examination authorization, you will have 120 days to take the examination. If you need to extend the 120-day
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examination authorization period, BCSP allows you to purchase a one-time, 60-day extension for a nonrefundable fee. If you are eligible for this one-time examination authorization extension, BCSP must receive and acknowledge your payment for the extension at least two full business days before the date your current 120-day examination authorization period expires. If you scheduled an appointment, you are still responsible for canceling that appointment and rescheduling it even if you purchased an examination authorization extension. If you fail to cancel and reschedule your current appointment, you will forfeit both your examination authorization fee and the extension fees you paid. BCSP cannot make, cancel, or reschedule your examination appointment regardless of where you are taking your examination.

Retesting If you fail your examination, you may register and pay to retake the examination after you receive your official result and score report from BCSP. There is no limit to the number of times you can register for and retake the examination, as long as you remain eligible. You do not have to reapply for the CSP credential after failing an examination unless your overall eligibility has expired. Eligibility time limit rules are described in the CSP Application Guide and summarized on page 23 of this publication. Other Testing Arrangements If there is no Pearson VUE test center near you and if you are not planning to travel to a city with a Pearson VUE test center, BCSP can make special arrangements to deliver a BCSP examination by special administration (including for U.S. military personnel in DANTES facilities). Taking a BCSP examination by special administration is considerably more expensive than taking a computerdelivered BCSP examination at a Pearson VUE test center. If you believe that you will need a special examination administration, please contact BCSP five or more months prior to your desired examination date so we can research providing a special administration for you. Once we understand your special administration situation, BCSP will contact you to explain the special administration rules and procedures for your case and provide you with the specific examination authorization fee and the exact examination date and location.

Taking the Comprehensive Practice Examination for Recertification Credit A CSP in good standing may take and pass the Comprehensive Practice examination during the last year of a their Recertification cycle to fulfill all recertification requirements for that cycle. To take advantage of this recertification option, contact BCSP to pay for a Comprehensive Practice examination authorization. If you pass the examination, your record will be automatically updated to reflect your compliance with all Recertification requirements for that cycle. NOTE: CSPs must pass the Comprehensive Practice examination during the last year of a Recertification cycle to receive credit for that cycle. Thus, if a CSPs Recertification cycle ends on December 31, 2011, the CSP must purchase and pass the Comprehensive Practice examination in 2011 for it to count for the recertification cycle that ends on December 31, 2011.

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SUMMARY OF COMPUTER-DELIVERED EXAMINATION RULES (Testing Within the United States and Canada)
When making plans to take a BCSP examination in the United States, its territories, or Canada, consider the following rules for computer-delivered examinations. Current examination fees available at www.bcsp.org. All fees are subject to change. Once you register and pay for an examination authorization, you have 120 days from your registration date to schedule an appointment with Pearson VUE and take the BCSP examination. If you need additional time beyond 120 days, you may purchase a one-time, 60-day extension of your examination authorization. Therefore, a maximum of 180 days is available for you to take your examination after you register and pay for your examination authorization. No additional extensions to your examination authorization are permitted beyond the one-time, 60-day extension. To schedule a new appointment or to cancel/reschedule an existing examination appointment, BCSP strongly recommends that you visit www.pearsonvue.com/BCSP and register online. You may also call the Pearson VUE North American registration center at 1-866-717-3653 (8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m. weekdays U.S. Eastern Time, closed on U.S. holidays). You cannot schedule a new appointment or cancel/reschedule an existing appointment directly with a local Pearson VUE test center or directly with BCSP. When you make or change your appointment with Pearson VUE, have your Examination Authorization Letter available. After scheduling or rescheduling your examination appointment, confirm your appointment location, date, and time online at www.pearsonvue.com/BCSP. There must be one or more full business days remaining prior to the date of your existing examination appointment for you to cancel/reschedule the appointment. Even if you properly cancel an existing examination appointment, to reschedule it, there must be a test center with an available appointment during the time remaining in your examination authorization period. If you have already made an examination appointment within the original 120-day examination authorization period, but you decide to purchase the one-time, 60-day extension to your examination authorization, you remain responsible for canceling and rescheduling your existing appointment. You forfeit your examination authorization fee when you: Fail to take the examination during the 120-day examination authorization period and you did not purchase a onetime, 60-day examination authorization extension during the 120-day period; or Fail to take the examination during the 60-day extension of the 120-day examination authorization period even if you purchased the one-time, 60-day extension; or Fail to show up for any scheduled examination appointment (even if you purchased an extension); or Are more than 15 minutes late for any scheduled examination appointment; or Fail to present acceptable identification to the Pearson VUE staff; or Fail to follow BCSP's or Pearson VUE's security and administrative procedures at the test center.

If you forfeit your examination authorization fee, you must register and pay for a new 120-day examination authorization to take the examination, if you are still eligible.

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SUMMARY OF COMPUTER-DELIVERED EXAMINATION RULES (Testing Outside the United States and Canada)
When making plans to take a BCSP examination outside the United States or Canada, consider the following rules for computer-delivered examinations. All current examination fees available at www.bcsp.org. All fees are subject to change. Once you register and pay for an examination authorization, you have 120 days from your registration date to schedule an appointment with Pearson VUE and take the BCSP examination. If you need additional time beyond 120 days, you may purchase a one-time, 60-day extension of your examination authorization. Therefore, a maximum of 180 days is available for you to take your examination after you register and pay for your examination authorization. No additional extensions to your examination authorization are permitted beyond the one-time, 60-day extension. To schedule a new appointment or to cancel/reschedule an existing examination appointment, BCSP strongly recommends that you visit www.pearsonvue.com/BCSP and register online. You may also call the appropriate Pearson VUE regional registration center at one of the phone numbers shown below. You cannot schedule a new appointment or cancel/reschedule an existing appointment directly with a local Pearson VUE test center or directly with BCSP. When you make or change your appointment with Pearson VUE, have your Examination Authorization Letter available. After scheduling or rescheduling your examination appointment, confirm your appointment location, date, and time online at www.pearsonvue.com/BCSP. Regional Registration Centers Outside the United States and Canada Mexico, Central America, South America, Caribbean (Except U.S. Territories) 1-952-681-3872; 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m. weekdays U.S. Eastern Time (closed on U.S. holidays) Asia, Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands (Except U.S. Territories) 60-3-83191085; 8:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m. weekdays Australian Eastern Time (closed on Malaysian holidays) Europe, Middle East, Africa 44-161-855-7455; 8:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m. weekdays Central European Time (closed on UK holidays) There must be one or more full business days remaining prior to the date of your existing examination appointment for you to cancel/reschedule the appointment. Even if you properly cancel an existing examination appointment, to reschedule it, there must be a test center with an available appointment during the time remaining in your examination authorization period. If you have already made an examination appointment within the original 120-day examination authorization period, but you decide to purchase the one-time, 60-day extension to your examination authorization, you remain responsible for canceling and rescheduling your existing appointment. You forfeit your examination authorization fee when you: Fail to take the examination during the 120-day examination authorization period and you did not purchase a onetime, 60-day examination authorization extension during the 120-day period; or Fail to take the examination during the 60-day extension of the 120-day examination authorization period even if you purchased the one-time, 60-day extension; or Fail to show up for any scheduled examination appointment (even if you purchased an extension); or Are more than 15 minutes late for any scheduled examination appointment; or Fail to present acceptable identification to the Pearson VUE staff; or Fail to follow BCSP's or Pearson VUE's security and administrative procedures at the test center.

If you forfeit your examination authorization, you must register and pay for a new 120-day examination authorization to take the examination, if you are still eligible.

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ELIGIBILITY TIME LIMIT RULES


Three-year Rules Three-year time limits apply to several steps in the CSP candidate process. ASP Candidates If you are eligible for the Safety Fundamentals examination, you must sit for the examination at least once every three years. The three years are computed from the date you become eligible or from the date you last took the examination and failed to achieve a passing score. If you are eligible for the Safety Fundamentals examination and cannot sit for the examination before the expiration of your three-year time limit, you may pay a fee and obtain a one-year extension to your time limit. If necessary, you may purchase a second and final one-year extension at the end of the first extension for an additional fee. You may purchase a Safety Fundamentals examination only during your period of eligibility. CSP Candidates If you are eligible for the Comprehensive Practice examination, you must pass the examination and earn your CSP credential within three years of becoming eligible. The Comprehensive Practice examination eligibility date occurs when you reach 96 points through education and professional safety experience and have either passed or received a waiver of the Safety Fundamentals examination. If you are eligible for the Comprehensive Practice examination and cannot achieve the CSP credential before your threeyear time limit expires, you may pay a fee and obtain a one-year extension to your time limit. If necessary, you may purchase a second and final one-year extension at the end of the first extension for an additional fee. You may purchase a Comprehensive Practice examination only during your period of eligibility. Application and In-process Time Limits ASP Candidates All ASP candidates who need additional experience to achieve eligibility to sit for the Safety Fundamentals examination must submit experience update information within 60 days after receiving an update request from BCSP. Your application may be terminated if you fail to submit an experience update form within the time limit. CSP Candidates All CSP candidates who need additional experience to achieve eligibility to sit for the Comprehensive Practice examination must submit experience update information within 60 days after receiving an update request from BCSP. Your application may be terminated if you fail to submit an experience update form within the time limit. Candidates must show progress toward fulfilling the safety experience eligibility requirement by the end of the second year after the original projected eligibility.

Failure to meet these time limits will result in a terminated application. Upon termination, your records will be destroyed and you will have to reapply and restart the application process.

Examination Authorization Time Limits Once you purchase an examination authorization, you have 120 days from the purchase date to make an appointment and sit for the examination. If you do not sit for the examination within 120 days (or purchase a 60-day extension), your examination authorization will expire, and you must purchase another examination authorization to sit for the examination. Once you purchase an examination authorization, make your appointment as soon as possible (eight or more weeks in advance) since test center availability is very limited. If you have already scheduled an appointment, you must cancel it BEFORE you purchase a 60-day extension.

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Board of Certified Safety Professionals


Advancing the Safety, Health, and Environmental Professional Since 1969

National Commission for Certifying Agencies

National Accreditation

American Industrial Hygiene Association American Society of Safety Engineers Institute of Industrial Engineers National Fire Protection Association National Safety Council Society of Fire Protection Engineers System Safety Society

Membership Organizations