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Question 1 of 27

Score: 12

(of possible

12

points)

Match the gestalt principle with the example of its application Match 1 Helps us perceive rope on the beach as a single strand .

2 Allows us to see the number "2" in a group of dots where the dots that make up the number "2" are gr . yellow.

3 The olympic symbol is perceived as 5 circles instead of 9 smaller pieces. .

4 Looking at a rock formation, we think the rock formation looks like a man sleeping. When we look at . time it is difficult not to see a sleeping man.

Answer Key: 1 - C, 2 - D, 3 - A, 4 - B

Question 2 of 27

Score: 6

(of possible

12

points)

Match the brain area Match 1 plays important role in language expression. . Choice A.
S e l e c t A . B . C

W e r n i c k e ' s

. D .

A r e a B. B r o c a ' s A r e a C. t e m p o r a l l o b e o c c i p i t a l l o

2 plays important role in understanding . language.

3 important for processing auditory stimuli .

S e l e c t A . B . C . D . S e l e c t A . B . C . D .

4 primary receiving area for vision .

D.
S e l e c t A . B . C . D

b e

Answer Key: 1 - B, 2 - A, 3 - C, 4 - D

Part 2 of 5 T/F Question 3 of 27

Score: 16 Score: 2

(of possible

18

points)

(of possible

points)

Ebbinghaus, who studied memory by memorizing lists of nonsense syllables, measured memory as the reduction in the number of trials necessary to relearn a list of nonsense syllables, relative to the number of trials necessary to first learn the list. True False Answer Key: True

Question 4 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

Research on change blindness has shown that only small changes in a scene go unnoticed, people are able easily able to detect large changes in a scene. True False Answer Key: False

Question 5 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

Early filter theories of attention were rejected because they had difficulty accounting for the finding that we can detect whether or not someone was speaking in the unattended ear. True False Answer Key: False

Question 6 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

All processes related to object recognition occur in the occipital lobe of the brain. True False Answer Key: False

Question 7 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

The Stroop effect is likely to be more pronounced in adults than in Kindergarteners. True False Answer Key: True

Question 8 of 27

Score: 0

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points)

In the flanker compatability task, the flankers are an example of a taskirrelevant stimulus. True False Answer Key: True

Question 9 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

Controlled processing does not necessarily use greater attentional capacity than automatic processing. True

False Answer Key: False

Question 10 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

According to the feature-analysis theory of object recognition, the letters B and P are easier to distinguish from each other because they sound similar. True False Answer Key: False

Question 11 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

People are able to discriminate between faces of people of their own race more readily than between faces of people of a different race. True False Answer Key: True

Part 3 of 5 Multiple Choice Question 12 of 27 Score: 4

Score: 36 4

(of possible

40

points)

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points)

Cognitive psychologists most frequently use the experimental method, which is favored because A it uses descriptive statistics to evaluate the data, rather than inferential . statistics B it is the only way to establish cause-and-effect relationships . C it allows the manipulation of both independent and dependent variables . D it allows researchers to observe behavior in naturalistic settings . Answer Key: B

Question 13 of 27

Score: 4

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points)

Although the average person has difficulty recognizing upside-down faces, a person who cannot recognize normal faces suffers from A agnosia . B alexia . C prosopagno . sia D deep . dyslexia Answer Key: C

Question 14 of 27

Score: 4

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points)

The _______ approach contributed to the rise of cognitive psychology by using a computer as a metaphor for people's memory processes. A Information . Processing B Physiological . C Introspection . D Behavioral . Answer Key: A

Question 15 of 27

Score: 4

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points)

When driving, failing to observe a child running out in front of you would be an example of ________. A . B . C . D . blind sight inattentional blindness lapse of attention proactive interference

Answer Key: B

Question 16 of 27

Score: 4

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points)

Hubel and Wiesel discovered that some kinds of cells in the visual cortex respond especially vigorously to a line presented in a particular orientation. This research could have important implications for which of the following topics

A Predicting which letters of the alphabet are most likely to be confused with each . B Developing models using the parallel distributed processing approach . C Conducting research using the fMRI technique. . D Determining which portion of the brain can be stimulated to help individuals who . impaired Answer Key: A

Question 17 of 27

Score: 4

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points)

The emotional stroop task demonstrates that

A interference occurs only in people with phobias, not other psychological disorders . B people with an excessive fear of an object show larger interference effects for w . fear.

C people with phobic disorders are better able to suppress their automatic processe . D interference occurs only in color naming tasks. . Answer Key: B

Question 18 of 27

Score: 4

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points)

Influences from top-down processing are especially strong when A we perceive faces. . B we perceive objects that are incomplete or ambiguous. . C we perceive features of a stimulus, such as the "r" in "bears", that are clearly . presented. D we identify the intersections of objects during object recognition. . Answer Key: B

Question 19 of 27

Score: 4

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points)

Why is the Stroop Effect Related to Selective Attention?

A People are required to pay attention to the stimulus's color while ignoring its nam . B People are required to pay attention to the stimulus's shape while ignoring its . meaning

C People are required to pay attention to the stimulus's name while ignoring its colo . D Attention is divided between top-down and bottom-up processing . Answer Key: A

Question 20 of 27

Score: 0

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points)

To measure attention to auditorily-presented information, researchers often use a _______________________ paradigm to measure people's ability to divide their attention, whereas _______________________ tasks are used to measure people's selective attention. A multi-task; depth listenting . B Cherry's task; reptitive . listening C dichotic listenting; dual task . D dual task; dichotic listening . Answer Key: D

Question 21 of 27

Score: 4

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points)

Which of the following drivers is most likely to be involved in an accident?

A Sally, who is talking to the passenger in her car. . B Mike and Jennifer are equally likely to get in an accident. . C Jennifer, who is holding her cell phone in her hand and talking while . driving. D Mike, who is talking on his cell phone using a hands-free device. . E They are all equally likely to get in an accident. . Answer Key: B

Part 4 of 5 Fill in Blank Question 22 of 27 Score: 2

Score: 8 2

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points)

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points)

We use multiple areas in the brain to process faces. This is an example of distributed processing. Answer Key: distributed processing

Question 23 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

In the precueing procedure, experimenters present a cue, like an arrown, to indicate where the test stimulus is supposed to appear. Answer Key: precueing

Question 24 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

We can measure saccadic eye movements by using a device called an eye tracker. Answer Key: eye tracker

Feedback eye tracker

Question 25 of 27

Score: 2

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points)

Mallory is leaving for college. As she is driving off in her car, although her family projects a smaller and smaller size on her retina she does not perceive them to be shrinking. This phenomena is called size constancy. Answer Key: size constancy

Part 5 of 5 Short Answer Question 26 of 27

Score: 0

(partial - of possible

10

points)

Score: Ungraded

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points)

Compare and contrast the behavioral and physiological approaches to the

study of the mind. Explain how memory consolidation could be studied differently using each approach.

Answer only a practice.

Question 27 of 27

Score: Ungraded

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points)

Explain how action potentials change in response to stimulus intensity. Use examples from two sensory modalities to illustrate this process.

Answer only a practice. _______________________________________________________________

Question 1 of 25

Score: 8

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points)

Please pick the phrase that best matches the description

Match 1 Most recently proposed element of working memory. Without it have difficulty explain . chunking.

2 Allows us to rotate images in our mind .

3 Is associated with the pre-frontal cortex.

4 Has an average capacity of 1.5-2.0 seconds. .

Answer Key: 1 - B, 2 - A, 3 - C, 4 - D

Question 2 of 25

Score: 6

(of possible

points)

Please match the learning strategy to the correct cognitive phenomena that is likely motivating the actor's behavior.

Match 1 Marcus did most of his exam studying at the local McDonald's, so he made sure to take h . well.

2 Janice was very angry when studying for her exam, so she asked her boyfriend to get in . also be very angry during the exam .

3 Erika knew that her exam would have short answer questions, so she made up her own . herself using those questions.

Answer Key: 1 - C, 2 - A, 3 - B

Part 2 of 5 Fill in Blank Question 3 of 25 Score: 0

Score: 6 2

(of possible

18

points)

(of possible

points)

Variables like age and amnesia have been shown to decrease implicit and explicit memory. This means that implicit and explicit memory involve different mechanisms. Answer Key: dissociate

Question 4 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

connectivity models and

semantic networking models are both

represented by using nodes and links, but in the first kind of model nodes represent neurons and in the second kind of model nodes represent concepts. Answer Key: PDP, Semantic Network

Question 5 of 25

Score: 4

(of possible

points)

Levels of processing theory focuses on the processes we use during

encoding whereas implicit vs. explicit memory theory focuses on the

processes during

retrieval.

Answer Key: encoding, retrieval

Question 6 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

The significance of the word-length effect for Baddeley's theory of working memory is that it illustrates the role of word-superiority in determining memory span. One implication of this is that the memory spans for people who speak numbers rapidly have increased memory spans Answer Key: phonological loop, larger

Question 7 of 25

Score: 2

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points)

A brother and sister were both involved in a motor vehicle accident when they were children. When talking about the event later, there were a number of conflicting details between the two recollections. Knowing that the brother had many accidents during childhood, while the sister had only one, it is likely that he recalling details from his accident schema rather than from the actual event. Answer Key: schema

Question 8 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

In recalling stories such as War of the Ghosts, participants in Bartlett's studies often made errors, like recalling that someone foamed at the mouth (when the actual detail was that something black came out of the mouth). Errors like this, where recall is altered by the incorporation of additional knowledge already in memory, illustrate that memory is malleable. Answer Key: reconstructive

Part 3 of 5 T/F Question 9 of 25

Score: 8 Score: 2

(of possible

10

points)

(of possible

points)

Speeding up the rate of presentation of a list of unrelated words will eliminate the recency effect, but not the primacy effect, that typically occurs in free recall. True False Answer Key: False

Question 10 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

Keppel and Underwood (1962) found that the first couple of trials of the Brown-Peterson task showed little forgetting, contrary to later trials that demonstrated the typical pattern of decline. This result suggests that the inability to rehearse causes the information in short-term memory to decay over time. True False Answer Key: False

Question 11 of 25

Score: 2

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points)

In the Brown-Peterson task the purpose of an intervening task before recall, such as counting backwards by 3s, is to prevent rehearsal. True False Answer Key: True

Question 12 of 25

Score: 2

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points)

Recovered memories are a type of implicit memory.

True False Answer Key: False

Question 13 of 25

Score: 2

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points)

Being told to visualize or imagine an event can lead to a false memory because of a source monitoring error. True False Answer Key: True

Part 4 of 5 Multiple Choice Question 14 of 25 Score: 4

Score: 24 4

(of possible

36

points)

(of possible

points)

In Slamecka and Graf's (1978) experiment, people either generated responses or read word pairs that were synonyms or rhymes. The results of this experiment showed that A . B . C .

generation was beneficial for memory, but only if accompanied by deep processin synonyms were better recognized than rhymes, but only for word pairs that were read. deep processing was not always better for memory than shallow processing.

D generation was beneficial for memory. . Answer Key: D

Question 15 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

A researcher decides to do an experiment and presents the following sentence, Three turtles rested on a floating log, and a fish swam beneath it. Later in the experiment, subjects were given a list of sentences and asked to whether they had seen that exact sentence. Participants are likely to... A correctly reject a sentence that produced a reasonable inference. . B falsely recognize a sentence that produced a reasonable inference. . C correctly reject a sentence that produced an ureasonable . inference. D falsely recognize a sentence that produced an ureasonable . inference. Answer Key: B

Question 16 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

The semantic network model would explain the typicality effect in terms of A typical members are semantically related while atypical members are not.

. B typical members having stronger connection strengths because of their frequency . use. C typical members spreading activation that arrives at an intersection. . D typical members having a greater family resemblance to the category. . Answer Key: B

Question 17 of 25

Score: 4

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points)

When amnesic patients are shown a list of words followed by a wordstem completion test, they perform just as well as normal participants in completing word stems with words seen on the earlier list, although their ability to recall words from the earlier list is severely impaired. This result indicates that A amnesics have impaired memory on implicit tests. . B amnesics have a problem in conscious or effortful retrieval. . C normal people have difficulty with word-stem completion . tests. D amnesics cannot transfer information from STM to LTM. . Answer Key: B

Question 18 of 25

Score: 4

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points)

Claparede, a Swiss neurologist who described an experience with an amnesic patient. Claparede hid a pin in his hand when he shook hands with the patient one morning. The next day, the patient had no memory of having seen him before but refused to shake his hand because "sometimes people in coats have pins in heir hands". This is an example of a patient who A Has an implicit memory of the event but not an explicit . memory. B Has both an explicit and implicit memory of the event. . C Has an explicit memory of the event but not an explicit . memory. D Has neither an explicit nor implicit memory of the event. . Answer Key: A

Question 19 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

According to the discussion of levels of categorization in the textbook, basic-level categories seem to have special status. This means that

A basic-level names are used more often to identify objects. . B the basic level is the most general label that can be supplied. . C basic-level names are prototypes, whereas superordinate- and subordinate-level n . not. D the basic level is more likely than other levels to show family resemblance. . Answer Key: A

Question 20 of 25

Score: 4

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points)

According to the research on flashbulb memories, A flashbulb memories . inaccuracies. B flashbulb memories . C flashbulb memories . D flashbulb memories . Answer Key: A seem more accurate, but these memories can contain remain consistent over time.

are more accurate for unexpected events than expected even

are more accurate for unpleasant events than pleasant event

Question 21 of 25

Score: 4

(of possible

points)

Which model has the most difficulty explaining why a 32 year-old unmarried man is a better example of a bachelor than is an elderly Catholic priest A Feature Comparison . Model B Prototype Model . C Semantic Network . Model D Exemplar Model . Answer Key: A

Question 22 of 25

Score: 4

(of possible

points)

Jacoby's experiment on familiarity showed which of the following? A Famous names are easier to remember than non famous . names. B Nonfamous names can be miscategorized as famous after a . delay. C Famous names can be miscategorized as nonfamous after a . delay. D Nonfamous names are easier to remember than famous names . Answer Key: B

Part 5 of 5 Short Answer Question 23 of 25 Score: 0

Score: 0 8

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22

points)

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points)

Define priming. Name and define the two types of priming described in your book and give a real world example of each (ie. DO NOT use the example from the book.) How are these two types of priming the same and how are they different? Answer

No text entered.

Question 24 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

You have two tests on Friday. What is the best way space your study session (ie how long between study sessions) and why does it work? Should you quiz yourself as part of your studying and why? Should you alternate topics or study one topic and then the other and why? Answer

No text entered.

Question 25 of 25

Score: 0

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points)

What is source misattribution and how dies it contribute to errors in eyewitness testimony?

Answer

No text entered. _______________________________________________________________