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WILKES-BARRE Tikva

Chlamovitch Jeral was just a


little girl when friends of her
parents pushed her through a
small opening in the barbed
wire fence in the ghetto of Kov-
no, Lithuania, in 1944.
Waiting on the other side of
the fence were Adomas and
Brone Gecevicius, Catholics
who would take Jeral into their
home and raise her with their
other two children.
Jerals natural parents Yo-
sef and Asya Chlamovitch
would never see their only child
again. They would be killed by
the Nazis soon after two of
more than 6 million Jews mur-
dered under Adolf Hitlers re-
gime during World War II.
Jeral, now 71, told her story
to more than 400 Wyoming
Valley West Middle School stu-
dents Tuesday at the Jewish
Community Center.
I got out and I survived, she
said. I was lucky very lucky.
Lucky in the sense she lived
to grow up, marry, have chil-
dren and grandchildren and
friends and to work. But she
doesnt remember her parents;
she doesnt remember that aw-
ful time when she was hidden in
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timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE, PA WEdnESdAy, MARch 13, 2013 50
THE TIMES LEADER
6 09815 10011
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World: 5A
Obitiuaries: 6A
Editorials: 7A
INSIDE
Still hot
Miami wins
19th straight.
SPORTS, 1B
Weather: 10A
B SPORTS: 1B
B BUSINESS:8B
Stocks: 8BH
C TASTE: 1C
Crossword/
Horoscope:7C
Television: 6C
Movies: 6C
Birthdays: 4C
E CLASSIFIED: 1E
Comics: 8D
Enjoy this
fish tale
Tasty talapia on the menu TASTE, 1C
Did you find a
job at the job
fair?
BUSINESS, 8B
Conclaves first day ends
without a chosen pontiff
Black smoke signals no new pope
Five years ago an Arizona
prosecutor issued a dire warn-
ing:
Jessie Con-Ui was a danger-
ous man, Maricopa County As-
sistant District Attorney Ryan
Green said, who would likely for-
ever remain a danger to society.
Green had no way to know
then, but it appears he was right.
Con-Ui, anxious to earn full
membership in New Mexican
Maa gang, had devised a plan
to lure a fellow gang member
and friend, Carlos Garcia, to a
Phoenix laundromat on Aug.
25, 2002. There, two associates
ambushed and killed Garcia in
a hail of bullets, according to a
pre-sentence report Green pre-
pared after Con-Uis guilty 2008
plea to rst-degree murder.
Now Con-Ui, 36, has allegedly
killed again.
F e d e r a l
authorities
have named
Con-Ui as
the suspect
in the bru-
tal beating
and stab-
bing death
of guard Eric Williams of Nanti-
coke at the Federal Correctional
Institution at Canaan on Feb. 25,
according to court records. No
charges have been led yet, but
two attorneys were appointed
Monday to represent him in the
potential death penalty case.
Con-Ui was at Canaan serving
an 11-year prison sentence for
a separate, 2003 guilty plea for
his role in a wide-scale drug ring
run by the New Mexican Maa.
He also had extensive involve-
ment with Arizona state court.
Records from the Maricopa
County court system paint Con-
Ui as a serial offender willing
Prediction
of violence
for inmate
Con-Ui
Jessie con-Ui, accused in area
guards death, murdered a
friend to advance in gang.
By TERRIE MORGAN-BESECKER
tmorgan@timesleader.com
UNIVERSITY PARK
Penn State on Monday re-
leased the condential pa-
perwork authorizing Louis
Freehs law rm to undertake
the investigation that ended
up accusing former leaders of
concealing abuse allegations
against Jerry Sandusky.
The investigation that
yielded the Freeh report has
cost Penn State slightly more
than $8.1 million, accord-
ing to gures the university
updated Monday. The total
amount Penn State has paid
in responding to the Sandusky
scandal stands at more than
$41 million, when including
the rst of ve $12 million
payments toward the NCAA
ne and millions in legal bills,
public relations rms and oth-
er consultants.
For months, Penn State
alumni have clamored for the
university to release the con-
tract with Freehs rm, Freeh
Sporkin & Sullivan. University
spokesman David La Torre
said the document, which the
university called an engage-
ment letter, was released
Monday because of the numer-
ous requests ofcials have re-
ceived.
The letter, dated Dec. 2,
2011, outlines the scope of
Freehs investigation, rates
and other provisions. The
agreement was between Freeh
Sporkin & Sullivan and Penn
States special investigative
task force headed by trustee
Freehs PSU report cost
just over $8.1 million
University has paid out more
than $41 million as result of
Sandusky abuse scandal.
By MIKE DAWSON
McClatchy Tribune
VATICAN CITY The rst
day of a secretive Vatican con-
clave ended Tuesday with black
smoke billowing out of the Sis-
tine Chapel chimney, signaling
that cardinals had yet to decide
on a new pope.
Smoke emerged shortly af-
ter 7:40 p.m. in Italy before the
large crowd assembled in St. Pe-
ters Square to watch the specta-
cle. Giant screens were installed
to allow them to have a better
view of the small chimney high
above them.
The smoke is produced by the
burning of the cardinals ballots,
with chemicals added to alter its
color. Whereas black means an
inconclusive vote, white smoke
is used when a new leader for
AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes-Barre Mayor Tom Leighton gives injured veteran David Morgan a city coin after asking him to be one of the two St. Pat-
ricks Day Parade Grand Marshals.
AP PHOTO
Canadian Cardinal Marc Ouellet, right, takes an oath of secrecy
Tuesday inside the Sistine Chapel at the Vatican. See POPE, Page 10A
By ALVISE ARMELLINI
and NICK RIGILLO
McClatchy Tribune
David Morgan, who was badly hurt in a crash while on duty in
Kuwait, is honored along with Joe Clark
PLAINS TWP. Wilkes-Barre
Mayor Tom Leighton promised David
Morgan that he would enjoy a beer be-
fore the end of St. Patricks Day.
While serving in the U.S. Navy Mili-
tary Police in Kuwait in 2009, Morgan,
38, suffered a traumatic brain injury.
On Tuesday, Leighton and his staff
surprised Morgan with an invitation
to serve as one of two Wilkes-Barre St.
Patricks Day Parade grand marshals.
Morgan, now a resident of the Vet-
erans Administration Community Liv-
ing Center, Plains Township, was on
active duty in Kuwait when he and his
partner, Brian Patton, were in a vehi-
cle accident that took Pattons life and
left Morgan severely disabled.
Last year, some time after St. Pat-
ricks Day, Leighton said he was visit-
ing the VA Hospital when he met Mor-
gan, a Wilkes-Barre native.
Leighton learned that Morgan looks
forward to the Irish holiday every
year. Last year, Morgan was unable to
attend and Leighton said he got the
idea to appoint him as grand marshal
for this Saturdays parade.
Morgan, though conned to a
wheelchair, communicates with hand
signals and subtle expressions that his
mother and father, Peggy and Charles,
have grown keen to during the last
three and a half years.
In the living center Tuesday, sur-
rounded by ashing cameras, Peggy
and Charles doted over their son who
smiled wide-eyed as Leighton present-
ed himwith the ceremonial shillelagh,
an Irish club or stick, and expressed
his appreciation for his sacrice.
Holocaust survivors tale inspires
AIMEE DILGER/TIMES LEADER PHOTO
Tikva Jeral shares her story as a childhood survivor of the
Holocaust with Wyoming Valley West students on Tuesday.
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Area woman tells students about how she was saved
See SURVIVOR, Page 10A
See INMATE, Page 10A
Injured vet 1 of 2 W-B parade marshals
By JON OCONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
See PARADE, Page 10A
I F yO U
G O
The parade
BEGINS 2
P.M. Satur-
day
STARTS
AT S. Main
and South
Streets
CONTIN-
UES ON
to N. Main
and Union
Streets
See PENN STATE, Page 8A
RICE TWP. Police say the
former acting treasurer of the
Rice Township Volunteer Fire
Department wrote thousands of
dollars worth of checks to him-
self for department purchases
that he never made and kept
the money.
Police began an investiga-
tion after township Supervi-
sor Chairman Miller Stella
complained to them about a
possible theft from the depart-
ment checking account, noting
that multiple checks were
written out to Donald Bly for
re department equipment,
but there was no record of the
equipment.
Stella told police that Bly,
who had been the acting de-
partment treasurer, refused to
turn over the checking account
books to the department.
Police said they learned from
Citizens Bank that eight checks
totaling $4,395.43 had been
written out to Bly between
June and December.
When questioned by police
on Jan. 9, Bly said he had writ-
ten out the checks to himself
and cashed them to make pur-
chases for the re department,
but that he had no receipts,
that some of the purchases
were never made and that he
still had that money, which he
said he was going to put back
into the department checking
account, according to court
papers.
Bly did not bring the account
records to the interview with
him, nor did he return with
them as he told police he
would, police said.
New department treasurer
Paul Eyerman told police on
Jan. 16 that he met with Bly
and that Bly turned over the
departments checking and
nancial books, but no cur-
rent accounting record was
included.
Bly, 31, of Nuangola, was
charged on Thursday with theft
by deception/false impression.
NANTICOKE A Freeland
man faces a slew of charges
after he allegedly took his chil-
dren for a ride in their mothers
car without her permission
after he had been drinking, ac-
cording to court papers.
Police said they were notied
by Melissa Stanton on Mon-
day that her former boyfriend
and the father of her children,
Daniel Scholl, was watching
the children for about an hour
while she was attending a class
at Luzerne County Community
College and, upon returning
home, found Scholl, her chil-
dren and the car missing and
an empty bottle of liquor.
She called Scholl on his
cellphone and he sounded
intoxicated and told her he was
in Dallas, she told police.
The investigating ofcer
called Scholl, and Scholl al-
legedly admitted to taking the
vehicle without permission but
denied drinking. He became
uncooperative when asked for
his exact location so the ofcer
could pick up the children and
held the phone up to the car
stereo speaker, according to
court papers.
The ofcer ended the call
and started tracking Scholl by
his cellphone location, but, in
the meantime, received a call
from Stanton informing him
that Scholl had returned to
her home. When the ofcer
arrived, Scholl kicked open the
screen door and approached
him aggressively. Scholl
resisted being handcuffed
but eventually was taken to
a hospital for a blood-alcohol
content test, court records
state.
Scholl was charged with ag-
gravated assault, unauthorized
use of an auto, resisting arrest,
simple assault, endangering the
welfare of children, driving un-
der the inuence and recklessly
endangering another person.
He was arraigned before Dis-
trict Judge Donald Whittaker.
At Mondays meeting, fre-
quent critic Sam Troy queried
Wilkes-Barre Area School board
members about efforts to save
money, and ultimately stormed
out unsatised, telling them
You people should be ashamed
of yourselves, all of you.
But before he left, the board
offered Troy and anyone else
a chance to provide input
and suggestions as a budget for
2013-14 is fashioned: The Bud-
get and Finance Committee will
hold a public meeting tonight at
5 at the administration building,
730 S. Main St.
The district has started its
annual budget process with
multimillion-dollar shortfalls
for years, and this year is likely
to be no exception.
But board members have
voiced a growing reluctance
to raise taxes, so much so that
lasts springs preliminary bud-
get, usually rubber stamped
under the assumption it would
change before nal approval,
was initially rejected primarily
because of a tax increase.
The board has already agreed
to stay at or below a state-set
limit of a 2.4 percent tax in-
crease. The limit, known as
the Act 1 index, is set annually
for each district. To exceed it,
a district must either get voter
approval through a referendum
or seek special exemptions from
the state.
Even as the board announced
the public budget meeting, it
was grappling with unexpected
costs.
Along with approving a
$215,304 contract for repairs
to the Plains/Solomon arti-
cial track that they feel should
be under warranty, the board
approved a $259,986 contract
with Yannuzzi Inc. in Hazleton
to x a long-festering prob-
lem with air conditioning and
moisture in the auditorium
at GAR High School. In both
cases, members asked where
the money would come from.
Business Manager Leonard
Przywara said there should be
enough in a capital funds bud-
get to cover those costs.
The board approved a con-
tract with the Luzerne Inter-
mediate Unit for special educa-
tion services at an estimated
cost of $844,573, and approved
several technology contracts:
telecommunication services to
Ironton Global Service Electric
Telephone at a cost of $10,536
per month, wireless network
services to Integra Business
center at $314,077, Internet
upgrades to Penn TeleData at
a total of $29,200 a month, and
networking equipment pur-
chases worth $4,228 to ePlus
Technology Inc.
Much of the tech spending is
expected to be covered by the
federal e-Rate program, created
specically to offset costs of
technology upgrades in schools
and libraries.
The board also made the fol-
lowing hires Monday: Catherine
Hoskins and Brenda Maurer as
para professionals for 32.5 hours
per week; Gloria Watson as lock-
er room aid, Dominique Carter
as bus aid; James Butterwick as
elementary art teacher
Wendy Girmen as special edu-
cation teacher, and three basket-
ball coaches at Meyers Junior/
Senior High School
Dale Rapson as assistant var-
sity boys coach, James McGavin
as junior high boys head coach,
and Shawn Walker as junior
high boys assistant coach.
Elmy cast the lone no vote,
against Brenda Maurer, who
was given a position Elmy has
publicly said he wanted his wife
to have.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER WEDnESDAy, MARch 13, 2013
timesleader.com
DETAILS
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 3-8-8
BIG 4 - 9-8-3-0
QUINTO - 3-9-6-9-7
TREASURE HUNT
03-08-11-14-25
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 5-8-0
BIG 4 - 6-6-5-3
QUINTO - 3-4-3-4-8
CASH 5
09-12-13-17-37
MEGA MILLIONS
09-12-19-20-30
MEGA BALL - 39
No player matched all ve
numbers in Tuesdays Cash
5 jackpot drawing. Wednes-
days jackpot will be worth
$325,000.
Lottery ofcials reported 61
players matched four num-
bers, winning $278 each;
2,887 players matched three
numbers, winning $9.50
each; and 34,643 players
matched two numbers, win-
ning $1 each.
OBITUARIES
Amato, Antonette
Bright, David
Casaldi, Theresa
Chesney, Gilbert
Dale, Robert
Featherstone, Mary
Girton, Rodney
Hovey, Mary Jean
Johnson, Ruth
Morenko, Irene
Ogren, Jean
Ruda, Bertha
Savickas, Billie
Sekulski, Albina
Shumbris, Gary
Spadafora, Phyllis
Stroh, Glenn
Todd, Christopher
Warnagiris,
Barbara Ann
Wojcekiewicz,
Genevieve
Zingaretti, Christine
Pages 6A, 7A
WHO TO CONTACT
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BUILDING
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Issue No. 2013-072
Luzerne County Council
members voted Tuesday to come
up with work force standards
they want negotiated into future
union contracts.
County Manager Robert Law-
ton suggested council set targets
for health-care contributions,
the number of days off and other
benets because six of the coun-
tys 10 union agreements expire
Dec. 31.
New contracts must be negoti-
ated with unionized assistant dis-
trict attorneys/public defenders,
prison workers, the rank-and-le
residual unit and children-and-
youth, aging and mental-health
employees.
Lawton said the administra-
tion will use councils standards
as a guide, though he cautioned
it may take several rounds of con-
tracts to implement all changes.
Several council members have
expressed interest in Council-
man Stephen A. Urbans propos-
al to start converting the work
force to 20-percent health-care
contributions. Non-union work-
ers have been paying 10 percent
for nine years, and union em-
ployees pay at monthly contri-
butions or 10 percent.
Council agreed its strategic
initiatives committee will devel-
op proposed standards for coun-
cils approval.
County Ethics Commission
Chairwoman Margaret Hogan
also discussed concerns about
the county ethics code during
Tuesdays meeting.
Commission and council rep-
resentatives have been working
on proposed code changes.
Hogan asked council to con-
sider a legal analysis of the code
because attorneys, including
some who work for the county,
have raised objections about
code wording and procedures.
Local attorney Kim Borland,
for example, has questioned
the legality of the commission
serving as both prosecutor and
judge. Borland represents a cli-
ent accused of soliciting private
funeral home business while
serving as a deputy coroner.
An ethics code and commis-
sion are required by home rule.
Council members agreed to fur-
ther discuss the code at a future
meeting and did not vote on the
commissions request for a legal
review.
Councilwoman Elaine Mad-
don Curry said there are real
holes in the ethics complaint
procedure that must be ad-
dressed.
Several citizens expressed
disappointment in the commis-
sion and urged council to initiate
changes.
Lawton told council he will
soon present a plan to sell coun-
ty-owned property, including
the former Valley Crest Nursing
Home in Plains Township and
a downtown Hazleton building
that had been purchased by a
prior administration for a south-
ern county annex that never ma-
terialized.
The home rule charter re-
quires council approval on the
sale of property.
Councilman Edward Bromins-
ki reviewed a stack of complaints
during the meeting, including a
concern that the insurance com-
pany selected to provide a bond
for Lawton did not meet rating
standards specied in a docu-
ment seeking a county insurance
broker.
Brominski also said he re-
ceived a complaint that the judi-
cial services and records division
failed to respond to an outside
request for information.
County Council to develop work force standards
Standards will deal with
health care, days off and
other benets.
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Wilkes-Barre Area seeks
budget input from public
Shortfall likely to be issue and
board has agreed to limit any
tax hike.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
Plymouth council president steps down
PLYMOUTH Mayor Dor-
othy Petrosky broke the tie at
Tuesday nights meeting to ac-
cept Councilman Frank Cough-
lins resignation as council
president.
Coughlin resigned the post
for personal reasons but did
not elaborate and will retain
his seat on council. His re-
placement wasnt chosen and
the meeting was chaired by
Councilman Ron Kobusky, who
serves as vice president.
Councilmembers Bill Dixon,
Clif Madrak and Tom McTague
voted against Coughlin step-
ping down, and Al Petcavage,
Kobusky and Coughlin voted
in favor.
In other business, council:
Responded to complaints
that Borough Solicitor Mike
Kostelansky doesnt attend
councils regular monthly meet-
ings.
Coughlin said its been the
practice as long as he has been
on council for Kostelansky to
attend only if needed. Kobusky
added Kostelansky is paid a
$2,000 yearly retainer to be
available to council on a 24/7
schedule.
He is paid on an hourly basis
for any legal work needed. The
amount was not available at the
meeting.
Said it will not add two
new sergeants positions in the
boroughs police department
at this time. Kobusky said
Kostelansky advised against
opening up the contract be-
tween the borough and police
unless it is an emergency and
that it was better to wait until
the current contract expired.
The positions would be pro-
motions and not additional of-
cers.
Dupont audit reveals starting decit
DUPONT Michael Fiorelli,
the CPA contracted by the bor-
ough for auditing services, pre-
sented the 2012 audit results
to the council and residents in
attendance at Tuesdays regular
council meeting.
The audit revealed that while
the borough was able to pay its
bills in 2012, it did so utilizing
bank loans as well as the munici-
pal sewer and refuse funds. This
has resulted in Dupont starting
out 2013 with a $132,000 decit
in its general fund.
Council Chairman Stanley
Knick Jr. acknowledged the
amount and said he believed the
total decit would be closer to
$70,000 by the end of the cur-
rent year.
Councilman Bernie Zielinski
said he thought the gure could
be further reduced by raising
fees on services and goods pro-
vided by the borough, such as
garbage bags.
Fiorelli said the debt is largely
due to the recent spate of equip-
ment and infrastructure im-
provements that the borough
has undertaken.
He said the boroughs nan-
cial status is better now than
it was several years ago, and is
poised to improve due to the
capital and infrastructure im-
provements.
In other matters, the council
voted unanimously to amend an
ordinance regarding trash col-
lection. Dupont residents are
now permitted to place their
trash bags out for collection a
maximum of only 24 hours be-
fore the scheduled collection
day.
Although he was unable to
provide an exact amount, Knick
estimated that a ne for repeat
offenses might be roughly $15
or $20.
The move is in response to
repeated complaints from resi-
dents that bags left out for long
periods of time are occasion-
ally being torn open by animals,
leading to litter and foul odors.
By SCOTT GOMB
Times Leader Correspondent
Ashley buys new dump truck
ASHLEY Borough Coun-
cil voted unanimously Tuesday
to buy a 2013 dump truck from
E.M. Kutz Co. for $32,171.
The funds for this purchase
were previously allocated in the
current budget.
In other business:
*Council adopted an ordi-
nance that outlines a property
owners responsibility for all va-
cant and bank-owned properties
in the borough.
*Several residents expressed
concern regarding alleged slow
or absent police response times
to several chronic issues in the
borough including illegal park-
ing and speeding.
Council President Joe Gor-
ham told residents he would
look into the allegations but
that recent documented police
logs show a marked increase in
the number and alacrity of the
departments responses.
Gorham praised the depart-
ment for the quality of their ser-
vice.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
OuR OPINION: Have your say
on budget, Page 9A
By B GARRET ROGAN
Times Leader Correspondent
PoliCe Blotter
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDnESDAy, MARch 13, 2013
timesleader.com
PAGE 3A
LOCAL
HAZLETON
United Way applauds PPL
P
atrick Ward, president and CEO of
the United Way of Greater Hazleton,
said PPL and its local employees gave
$106,397 to the United Way in the past
year, including a $15,000 contribution
through the Earned Income Tax Credit
program.
Once again, were gratied by the
overwhelming support we received from
PPL, said Ward. The employees and
the company have been major support-
ers of our United Way going all the way
back to our organizations earliest days.
We could not continue to perform the
important work we do without them.
In Hazleton and Schuylkill counties,
PPL consistently is among the United
Ways top contributors to the annual giv-
ing campaigns. Companywide, PPL, its
employees and retirees give $2 million
each year to the United Way agencies
throughout PPLs service territories.
In addition to monetary contributions,
PPL employees volunteer hundreds of
hours at the many agencies the United
Way serves and also are involved in the
agencys Day of Caring, during which
volunteers from organizations such as
PPL visit United Way member agencies
and other places throughout the com-
munity to offer their services.
HARRISBURG
School safety on agenda
Because a Feb. 13 joint state Senate
hearing on school safety raised many
questions about emergency planning in
child care centers, buses and colleges,
a second hearing will be held today to
explore strategies for protecting infants,
toddlers, college students and staff in
these venues.
The rst hearing included experts
who discussed the benets of armed
guards, school resource ofcers and ad-
ditional training and drills. The follow-
up hearing will again bring together the
Senate Veterans Affairs and Emergency
Preparedness Committee, chaired by
Sen. Lisa Baker, R- Lehman Township,
and the Senate Education Committee,
chaired by Sen. Mike Folmer, R-Leba-
non.
The hearing will be held from 9 to 11
a.m. in North Ofce Building, Hearing
Room 1, Harrisburg, and can be viewed
at www.senatorbaker.com and www.
senatorfolmer.com.
HARRISBURG
Job Corps hearing held
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton,
chairman of the Senate Health, Educa-
tion, Labor and Pensions Subcommittee
on Employment and Workplace Safety,
released the following statement after
holding a hearing Tuesday on the Job
Corps budget shortfall:
Jobs Corps plays a critical role in
helping at-risk youth to be competitive
in the workforce. While the Depart-
ment of Labor has provided some
insight into the budgetary gap, more
needs to be done to rectify the inad-
equate nancial management of this
valuable program. We should not allow
bureaucratic mismanagement to prevent
our qualied young people from getting
the training they need to obtain good
jobs.
Casey said he called for the hearing as
a rst step in providing a measure of ac-
countability at the Department of Labor
for recent shortfalls.
The department recently announced
an enrollment freeze at Job Corps Pro-
grams around the country, which Casey
said will cost 400 jobs in Pennsylvania
and prohibit the ability of at-risk youth
to receive critical job training skills.
Pennsylvania has four Job Corps sites
in the state, including one in Butler
Township, that provide disadvantaged
youth with skills needed to secure a
good job, enter the Armed Services or
further their educations.
I N B R I E F
Citys need for smartphones questioned
WILKES-BARRE Coun-
cilwoman Maureen Lavelle on
Tuesday questioned the need
for so many smartphones in
use by city employees.
Lavelle said she is con-
cerned about the cost to the
city to reimburse employees
for their cellphone usage.
Especially here at City
Hall. These employees have
phones in their ofces and
computers. If they need to talk
to another employee, they can
call on their ofce phone or
send an email. Why do we
need to have smartphones?
Lavelle asked.
Mayor Tom Leighton and
City Administrator Marie Mc-
Cormick said the employees
with the smartphones are sel-
domin their ofces. They said
the employees work out of the
ofce a lot, and with email on
their phone, they can receive
messages and emails much
more quickly.
And when I send out an
email, I can reach all of the
employees at the same time,
no matter where they are,
McCormick said. We have
dropped many cellphones and
weve downgraded others.
Leighton said a select group
of employees have the smart-
phones.
It increases the efciency,
he said.
Earlier this month, about
three months after a Times
Leader analysis of city cell-
phone bills raised questions
about cost and possible
abuse, city ofcials canceled
the plans in lieu of a stipend
system they expect will save
more than $13,000 a year.
Stipends were divided
into two categories: $40 per
month for employees who
were deemed to need only
a basic cellphone with talk/
text, and $80 a month for em-
ployees who were deemed to
need a smartphone with talk/
text and data, which will al-
low them to access email and
the Internet.
The city has approved 11
employees for the $40 stipend,
at a cost $5,280 per year, and
17 for the $80 stipend, at a
cost of $16,320 per year, for
a total of $21,600. Records
show the city paid for 60 city-
owned cellphones in 2012, at
By BILL OBOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
councilwoman Lavelle says
she is worried about cost of
reimbursing workers.
UGI ends
appeal
to delight
of some
By JON OCONNELL
joconnell@timesleader.com
End of planned compressor
station in West Wyoming
credited to opponents efforts.
WEST WYOMING Con-
cerned borough residents and
ofcials can breathe a deep sigh
of relief now that a natural gas
company has decided not to pur-
sue an appeal for permission to
install a compressor station in
the borough.
UGI Energy Services Inc. rep-
resentatives informed borough
council Monday that they will
not seek to overturn the ruling
that restricts the company from
constructing the station.
Council President Eileen
Cipriani said opponents efforts
to stop the plans paid off. Were
very excited. We tried very hard
to keep this from happening,
Cipriani said Tuesday.
The companys original instal-
lation plans were denied by the
Luzerne County
Zoning Hearing
Board and, ac-
cording Cipriani,
the rst steps
of an appeal fol-
lowed.
A l t h o u g h
some Luzerne
County municipalities have
their own zoning boards, the
county handles zoning matters
for others, including West Wyo-
ming, Cipriani said. During the
process, the council has had to
express its wishes through the
hearing board.
When this thing happened, it
wasnt really up to us, Cipriani
said. They had presented the
board with a list of conditions
to be met by the company if the
board were to approve the sta-
tions construction, she said.
At the end of the day, it was
really up to the county, and they
denied it, she said.
Community and council con-
cerns centered on emissions that
compressor stations produce,
said Cipriani, but she also said
a number of chemicals would be
stored on site and the amount
of timber-clearing needed could
have posed a sediment problem.
Compressor stations are
placed strategically along gas
pipelines to keep the gas mov-
ing.
Representatives from UGI En-
ergy Services were not available
for comment Tuesday.
The company initially had
cited possible benets of the sta-
tion such as improved services
to the region and the potential
to connect to the existing pipe-
line, known as the Auburn Line,
The May 21 primary election race for
Luzerne County Council is expected to
be subdued because only one candidate
wont land a nomination.
Six Republicans and ve Democrats
led nomination petitions to run by
Tuesdays deadline. Voters from each
party will choose ve candidates to ad-
vance to the general election.
The county controller primary con-
test might be more charged because
two candidates are running against
each other on each partys ticket.
On the Democratic side, county
Councilman Stephen A. Urban, of
Wilkes-Barre, will compete against Mi-
chelle Bednar, a Conyngham Township
tax collector and nancial securities
company ofce manager.
Incumbent Controller Walter Grifth,
Kingston Township, will face fellow Re-
publican Karen Ceppa-Hirko, a tax ac-
countant from Wilkes-Barre.
The following Demo-
crats led nomination
petitions in the county
council race: incumbent
Linda McClosky Houck,
Kingston; Renee Ciaruf-
foli-Taffera, Larksville; Eileen Sorokas,
Wilkes-Barre; Richard Kick Heffron,
Dallas; and Michael Giamber, Fair-
mount Township.
The six Republican council contend-
ers are: Sue Rossi, Butler Township;
Alex Milanes, Wilkes-Barre Township;
Kathy Dobash, Hazleton; Paul DeFabo,
Wilkes-Barre; and incumbents Eugene
Kelleher, Dallas Township, and Harry
Haas, Kingston.
Two other named Republican con-
tenders Joyce Dombroski-Gebhardt
and Michael Lacey did not le peti-
tions.
The council race will heat up before
November because voters can choose
ve candidates from any political party
in the general election. In addition to
the 10 candidates who make it through
the primary, Independent and third-par-
ty contenders probably will be added to
the mix.
Independent and third-party candi-
dates may enter the race after the May
primary if they collect at least 633 sig-
natures, according to the election of-
ce.
Councilman Rick Williams, an Inde-
pendent, said he is considering seeking
another term.
Elaine Maddon Curry, the remaining
council member in an expiring seat,
opted against seeking re-election.
The ve council members elected in
November will serve with six council
members in seats that dont expire un-
til the end of 2015: Edward Brominski,
Jim Bobeck, Rick Morelli, Tim McGin-
ley, Stephen J. Urban and Stephen A.
Urban.
If Stephen A. Urban wins a controller
seat, council chooses someone to serve
the rest of his council term, according
Woman gets probation for looting during 2011 ood
WILKES-BARRE
Brenda Wolfe, 30, lost her
composure Tuesday in the
courtroom before her case
came before Luzerne County
Judge Fred Pierantoni III.
She was escorted out of
the courtroom by a county
security ofcial, and she con-
tinued to cry when her case
was ready to begin.
Her attorney, Michael
Kostelaba, grabbed a chair
in which Wolfe could sit as
Pierantoni sentenced her to
36 months in the countys In-
termediate Punishment Pro-
gram, a special probationary
sentence for rst-time, non-
violent offenders, on charges
she looted a Kingston house
during the September 2011
ood.
Wolfe pleaded with Pier-
antoni, saying she has a new-
born child to care for and had
undergone rehabilitation.
Youre taking steps to
stay positive, Pierantoni
told her.
Wolfe was sentenced on
a charge of criminal con-
spiracy to commit burglary
and was ordered to wear an
ankle bracelet for the rst
10 months of the probation
sentence.
Prosecutors withdrew
charges of burglary, theft
and receiving stolen prop-
erty against Wolfe when she
pleaded guilty to the conspir-
acy offense in January.
The charges were graded
as felonies because the crime
occurred during a state of
emergency.
Kingston police said
Wolfe, who lived on Eley
Street, Kingston, during the
ood, was entrusted by her
neighbors to let their dog
outside during the evacua-
tion of the Wyoming Valley.
Wolfe had a key to the resi-
dence and stole a at-screen
television, DVDs, a DVD
player, a video game system,
games and toys valued at
$2,680, arrest records say.
Police recovered all of the
merchandise from the resi-
dence of Christopher Wil-
son, 42, and Marie Catherine
Zuccaro, 34.
Wilson was sentenced
by Pierantoni to 36 months
in the special probation
program with the rst 10
months on house arrest. Zuc-
caro is scheduled to be sen-
tenced on March 26.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Brenda Wolfe, 30, pleaded
for leniency, saying she
must care for child.
AIMEE DILGER /THE TIMES LEADER
Karla Cibello, a clerk at the Luzerne County Election Bureau, helps treasurer for Hanover Area Committee Roger Heydt,
right, le election petitions on behalf of Stacy McGovern, Lorraine Heydt, Frank Ciavarella Jr. and Evelyn Larson Evans.
Few enter county races
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
Eleven seek council seats, while four vie for controller
See RACES, Page 4A
20 1 3
ELECTION
SUBMITTED PHOTO
PPL and its Hazleton-area employ-
ees donated $106,397 to the United
Way during this years campaign. At
a check presentation honoring its
support are, from left, Pam Yale and
A.J. Onuschak, PPL employees; Pat-
rick Ward, CEO of the United Way of
Greater Hazleton; Martha M. Herron,
PPL regional community relations di-
rector; and Florie McNelis and Crystal
Harris-Smithnosky, PPL employees.
W h AT S n E x T ?
City Council will meet Thursday
at 6 p.m. in Council Chambers,
4th oor, City Hall. Public com-
ment is welcome.
See COUNCIL, Page 8A
See APPEAL, Page 8A
The race for Wilkes-Barre Area
School Board drew the most in-
terest among Luzerne Countys
11 school districts, a review of
nominating petitions led by
Tuesdays 4:30 deadline sug-
gested.
The ofcial list of candidates
likely wont be available until Fri-
day, and with a crowded eld of
local ofces this year, it appears
several petitions were not pro-
vided when The Times Leader
asked to review them. For exam-
ple, there were no candidates for
Northwest Area, where four in-
cumbent seats are up for re-elec-
tion, yet Board President Randy
Tomasacci who is not one of
those up for re-election said it
was his understanding all four in-
cumbents had led to run again.
But of those petitions reviewed
at the countys election bureau,
Wilkes-Barre Area had the most
candidates: 10 people competing
for four open seats.
Anthony Thom-
as who said he
is no relation to for-
mer Wilkes-Barre
City Councilman
Tony Thomas led the last
school board petition Tuesday,
just minutes before the deadline.
Thomas led to run only as a
Democrat, while James OMeara,
of Plains Township, led to run
for Wilkes-Barre Area School
Board as a Republican.
The lone incumbent in the pile
of paperwork provided at the elec-
tion Bureau Tuesday was Chris-
tine Katsock, who cross-led and
will appear on both ballots, along
with Barry Matthews, Kathleen
Grinaway, Ned Evans, Denise
Thomas, Joseph Caffrey, Joseph
Bernardo, and Leonard Cornish.
Cornish has been a frequent
critic of the districts failure to
recruit minority teachers.
Here are the candidates peti-
tions found for other districts.
Four seats are open in all but
Greater Nanticoke Area, where
there are ve seats available. All
candidates cross-led unless oth-
erwise noted.
Crestwood: The lone petition
in the pile was for Maureen Mc-
Govern.
Dallas: Incumbent Charles
Preece.
Greater Nanticoke Area: In-
cumbents Frank Shepanski Jr.,
Gary Smith, Jeff Kozlofski, Cindy
Donlin and Bob Reineri, and Me-
gan Tennesen and Wendy Wia-
terowski.
Hanover Area: No nominat-
ing petitions were found amid
the piles provided.
Hazleton Area: Incumbents
Clarence John, Steven Hahn and
Robert Mehalick, and Thomas
Chirico, James Chapman, Jared
Michael ODonnell and Frederick
Mariano.
Lake-Lehman: One of only
two districts that elect board
members by region and of-
ten one of the least competitive
only Robin Wesleys petition
was among those provided. Wes-
ley, who is running for region
2, led near the end of the day
after learning earlier his paper-
work was not complete. He said
incumbent region 2 representa-
tive Bo Keller was not seeking
re-election.
Northwest Area: No nominat-
ing petitions were found among
those provided.
Pittston Area: Incumbents
Bruce Knick, Kent Bratlee and
Marilyn Starna led, though
Starnas petition was marked as
Democratic only. Former Mem-
ber John Adonizio led as Demo-
cratic only. Martin Quinn and
Rosanne Ricotta also led.
Wyoming Area: Incumbents
John Marianacci and John Bolin,
and John Bonin, Kimberly Yo-
chem and Michael Brown.
Wyoming Valley West: The
other district that elects by dis-
trict, paperwork only for incum-
bent Gordon Dussinger of region
5 was among those provided.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDnESDAy, MARch 13, 2013 N E W S PAGE 4A
to the home rule charter.
Council members receive
$8,000 annually. Council ap-
proves the budget and larger
contracts, appoints members
to outside county boards and
passes and revises the countys
ethics, personnel and adminis-
trative codes.
The council also conrms
eight division head positions
and hires and evaluates the ap-
pointed manager who handles
day-to-day operations.
Council members are in the
process of evaluating the perfor-
mance of county Manager Rob-
ert Lawton, who completed his
rst year on the job last month.
Lawtons performance is expect-
ed to be one of the key topics of
debate in the council race. Sev-
en council votes a superma-
jority would be required to
terminate a county manager.
Some county observers have
cited theories on why more can-
didates did not surface in the
council race, including lengthy
council meetings and a charter
ban forbidding council members
fromworking for any businesses
that have county contracts.
Grifths decision to run for
controller falls in line with his
insistence that he did not ille-
gally record people. The county
district attorney said the state
Attorney Generals Ofce is in-
vestigating Grifth for alleged
wiretapping. At least two sourc-
es say state investigators have
been interviewing people about
the tapes.
The county controller over-
sees audits and reviews of coun-
ty operations.
A majority of council voted to
increase the controllers salary
from $36,562 to $64,999 for the
controller elected in November.
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RACES
WILKES-BARRE Nine
people have led nomination
petitions seeking to ll the
vacant seat for magisterial dis-
trict judge in the Pittston area.
The magisterial district will
be larger next year, as the state
Supreme Court last month ex-
panded it by adding the town-
ships of Jenkins and Pittston,
and Yatesville borough to the
city of Pittston and the bor-
oughs of Avoca, Dupont, Dur-
yea and Hughestown.
Realignment of the district
takes effect on June 1.
Candidates who led
nomination petitions for the
Pittston-based district judge
seat are: Arthur Bobbouine of
Pittston, attorney Alexandra
Kokura of Dupont, attorney
Jeffrey C. Kulick of Pittston, at-
torney Quiana Murphy Lehm-
an of Pittston, attorney Girard
Mecadon of Jenkins Township,
James OBrien of Pittston, at-
torney Len Sanguedolce of
Pittston, attorney Mark Singer
of Pittston and James OBrien
of Pittston.
All the candidates have
cross-led to be on both the
Democratic and Republican
ballots for the primary elec-
tions on May 21.
The two who receive the
most party votes will square off
in the Nov. 5 general election.
Mecadon was permitted to
enter the primary campaign
after Michael Butera, solicitor
for the Luzerne County Bureau
of Elections, said that the per-
son elected to ll the vacant
seat will take ofce on Jan. 1,
2014. By that time, Mecadons
hometown of Jenkins Town-
ship will be in the magisterial
district.
The seat became vacant
when Fred Pierantoni III was
elected to the county Court
of Common Pleas in the 2011
general election.
Senior District Judge An-
drewBarilla has been presiding
over cases during the vacancy.
Two district judges whose
seats are open this year will
face no opposition. No one
led petitions to challenge in-
cumbents Michael Dotzel in
Wilkes-Barre Township and Jo-
seph Zola in Hazleton.
District judges are elected
to six-year terms and are paid
$86,639 a year.
9 enter race for magisterial post
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
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By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
20 1 3
ELECTION
LOS ANGELES The Curios-
ity rover has answered a key question
about Mars: The red planet in the past
had some of the right ingredients need-
ed to support primitive life.
The evidence comes from a chemical
analysis by Curiosity, which last month
exed its robotic arm to drill into a
ne-grained, veiny rock and then test
the powder.
Curiosity is the rst spacecraft sent
to Mars that could collect a sample
from deep inside a rock, and scientist
said Tuesday that they hit pay dirt with
that rst rock.
We have found a habitable environ-
ment that is so benign and supportive
of life that probably if this water was
around and you had been on the planet,
you would have been able to drink it,
said chief scientist John Grotzinger of
the California Institute of Technology.
The rover made a dramatic seven-
minutes-of-terror landing last August
near the planets equator. A key task:
Find out if ancient Mars ever had con-
ditions favorable for microscopic organ-
isms.
The car-size rover is not equipped
to detect microbes, living or extinct. It
can only use its onboard laboratories to
examine Martian rocks to determine
the kind of environment they might
have lived in.
The analysis showed the rock con-
tained clay minerals that formed in a
watery environment. It also had traces
of sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen,
phosphorus and simple carbon es-
sential chemical ingredients for life.
Unlike some places on Mars, scien-
tists said the ancient water at the site
appeared to be neutral and not too salty.
NEW YORK A New York
City police ofcer was convicted
Tuesday of charges he plotted to
kidnap and cook women to dine
on their girl meat a macabre
case that subjected jurors to often
gory evidence and asked them to
separate fantasy from reality.
The Manhattan jury reached
the verdict in federal court at the
kidnapping conspiracy trial of Of-
cer Gilberto Valle, a 28-year-old
father with an admitted fetish for
talking on the Internet about can-
nibalism.
Valles lawyers, at what the tab-
loids dubbed
the Cannibal
Cop trial,
chose not to
hide what
they called his
weird proclivi-
ties. But they
insisted that he
was just fanta-
sizing and not-
ed that none of the women were
ever harmed.
Valle bowed his head and
looked teary-eyed when the ver-
dict was announced. He hugged
his lawyer, Julia Gatto, who said
later that she and Valle had been
crying.
Its a devastating verdict for us.
We poured our hearts and souls
into this, Gatto said of a defense
team that all dropped their heads
when the verdict was announced.
The jury was unable to get
past the thoughts, Gatto said.
Obviously, the case involved
thoughts that were unusual and
bizarre and frankly very ugly.
She called it a dangerous pros-
ecution when we start opening
our minds and prosecuting whats
in our brains and not whats in the
real world.
U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara
said in a statement: Today, a
unanimous jury found that Gil-
berto Valles detailed and specic
plans to abduct women for the
purpose of committing grotesque
crimes were very real, and that
he was guilty as charged. The
Internet is a forum for the free
exchange of ideas, but it does
not confer immunity for plotting
crimes and taking steps to carry
out those crimes.
Valle faces up to life in prison
when he is sentenced on June 19.
With the conviction, he loses his
job as a police ofcer.
The defense team said it would
ask the judge to set aside the
verdict. Defense attorney Robert
Baum said the verdict set a dan-
gerous precedent.
People can be prosecuted for
their thoughts and convicted, he
said.
Prosecutors countered that an
analysis of Valles computer found
he was taking concrete steps to
abduct his wife and at least ve
other women he knew.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDnESDAy, MARch 13, 2013 N A T I O N & W O R L D PAGE 5A
CENTENNIAL, COLO.
Plea entered for Holmes
T
he judge in the deadly Colorado
movie theater shooting case
entered a not guilty plea on behalf of
James Holmes on Tuesday after the
former graduate students defense
team said he was not ready to enter
one.
If Holmes is convicted, he could be
executed or spend the rest of his life in
prison. Judge William Sylvester said
Holmes, 25, can change his plea to not
guilty by reason of insanity later, if he
chooses.
The judge set Aug. 5 for the start
of the trial. Prosecutors and defense
attorneys declined comment.
WASHINGTON
Senators sour on new IDs
Senators working on a bipartisan
immigration bill are likely abandoning
the idea of requiring a new high-tech
federal ID for workers because its too
expensive.
Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of
South Carolina says cost estimates for
the biometric ID card he favors came
in higher than expected.
The card was intended as a way to
ensure employers dont hire illegal
workers.
Graham says no nal decisions have
been made but that the group is look-
ing at other options instead.
Outside experts say that likely
means expanding an existing system
called E-Verify that employers can use
to check the legal status of prospective
workers.
NEW YORK
Mayor: Soda ruling no biggie
Eateries from corner delis to movie
concession stands have gotten a last-
minute reprieve from the nations rst
ban on big sugary drinks.
But Mayor Michael Bloomberg is
urging them to shrink their cups and
bottles anyway.
After a judge struck down the
16-ounce size limit for sodas and some
other sweet drinks as arbitrary and
outside city health regulators pur-
view, Bloomberg defended it Tuesday
as a groundbreaking anti-obesity effort
that would prevail on appeal and is
already beginning to change attitudes
and actual practices.
Despite yesterdays temporary
setback, I dont think theres any doubt
that momentum is moving in our
direction, Bloomberg said during a
visit to a Manhattan diner that is now
voluntarily complying with the policy,
ditching 20-ounce bottles of soda and
reserving 24-ounce to-go cups for iced
coffee.
WASHINGTON
U.S. decit shrinking
The annual federal budget decit is
sinking out of $1 trillion-plus nose-
bleed territory where it has hovered
for the past four years.
Government borrowing has
dropped to roughly 25 cents for every
dollar it spends, down from more than
40 cents-per-dollar spent a few years
ago.
Tax receipts are rising and spending
is moderating.
For once, the governments nancial
shape is actually improving and will
get better still over the next few years
as the U.S. economy continues to pull
itself slowly out of the worst recession
since the 1930s.
But unless a long-term legislative x
can be found, the economy will soon
reverse course and start getting worse
again much worse.
I N B R I E F
Valle
AP PHOTO
Chavez a big draw in death
An action gure of Venezuelas late
president, Hugo Chavez, sits for
sale Monday on a vendors table in
Caracas. At Caracass choked Bolivar
Plaza, a favorite hangout for the late
presidents supporters, shoppers can
nd virtually anything Chavez-relat-
ed that the mind can dream up.
There could have been life on Mars
By ALICIA CHANG
AP Science Writer
NYC cop
convicted
in cannibal
plot case
Prosecutors alleged plans to
kill, cook women went too far.
Defense says it was a fantasy.
By LARRY NEUMEISTER
Associated Press
GOP budget would cut Obamacare, Medicaid, change Medicare
WASHINGTON House
Republicans unveiled their
latest budget outline on
Tuesday, sticking to their
plans to try to repeal so-
called Obamacare, cut do-
mestic programs ranging
from Medicaid to college
grants and require future
Medicare patients to bear
more of the programs cost.
The point is to prove its
possible to balance the bud-
get within 10 years by simply
cutting spending and avoid-
ing further tax hikes, even
though the scal blueprint
released Tuesday by Budget
Committee Chairman Paul
Ryan, R-Wis., will be dead on
arrival with the White House
and Democrats controlling
the Senate.
The latest Ryan plan gen-
erally resembles prior ones,
relying on higher tax reve-
nues enacted in January and
improved Medicare cost es-
timates along with some-
what sharper spending cuts
to promise balance.
Senate Democrats plan to
offer a counterproposal to-
day with higher spending on
domestic programs and addi-
tional tax hikes on top of the
higher rates imposed on top-
bracket earners in January.
That plan will, in turn, ar-
rive as a dead letter in the
GOP-controlled House.
The partisan exercise
comes even as President
Barack Obama travels to
Capitol Hill later on Tuesday
to meet with Senate Demo-
crats in an attempt to resus-
citate his failed efforts for
bipartisanship.
On the current path, well
spend $46 trillion over the
next 10 years. Under our pro-
posal, well spend $41 tril-
lion, Ryan said in an op-ed
in the Wall St. Journal. On
the current path, spending
will increase by 5 percent
each year. Under our pro-
posal, it will increase by 3.4
percent.
Ryans plan promises to
cut the decit from $845 bil-
lion this year to $528 billion
in the 2014 budget year that
starts in October. It would
drop to $125 billion in 2015
and hover pretty much near
balance for several years be-
fore registering a $7 billion
surplus in 2023.
The White House weighed
in against the Ryan plan, say-
ing it would turn Medicare
into a voucher program and
protect the wealthy from tax
increases.
AP PHOTOS
House Budget Committee Chairman Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks Tuesday about the 2014 Budget Resolution dur-
ing a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Its 2012 all over again
By ANDREWTAYLOR
Associated Press
Erratic N. Korea poses serious threat, security chief says
WASHINGTON An erratic North
Korea, with its nuclear weapons and in-
creasingly belligerent tone, poses a seri-
ous threat to the United States and East
Asia nations, the director of National In-
telligence warned Tuesday in the annual
accounting of the threats worldwide.
In his extensive overview, James R.
Clapper told Congress that a less de-
centralized terrorist network has sig-
nicantly altered the threats while the
Arab Spring uprising in the Middle East
and North Africa has created spikes in
the dangers facing American interests in
the regions
The intelligence chief offered a sober
assessment of threats from potential
cyber attacks, weapons of mass de-
struction and the months-long civil war
in Syria. North Korea, Iran and Syria
stirred the most concern as the Obama
administration and Congress weigh
the effectiveness of sanctions against
Pyongyang and Tehran.
Clapper testied just days after North
Koreas communist regime said it was
scuttling the 1953 armistice that ended
the Korean War and has maintained
peace on the peninsula for more than
half a century. The administration
slapped sanctions against North Koreas
primary exchange bank and several se-
nior government ofcials.
North Korea, led by its young leader
KimJong Un, has deed the internation-
al community in the last three months,
testing a long-range missile and a third
nuclear bomb.
These programs demonstrate North
Koreas commitment to develop long-
range missile technology that could
pose a direct threat to the United States,
and its efforts to produce and market
ballistic missiles raise broader regional
and global security concerns, Clapper
said.
While the intelligence community
has gured that Pyongyangs nuclear ef-
forts are designed for deterrence, world-
wide prestige and coercive diplomacy,
Clapper conceded that that the United
States does not knowwhat would be the
trigger that would prompt North Korea
to act to preserve Kims regime.
nIA director briefs senators on main
threats the United States faces.
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
AP PHOTO
The Curiosity rover exploring Mars
holds a scoop of powdered rock,
which it analyzed.
Rover finds the right stuff for primitive life
President Barack Obama traveled to Capitol Hill on Tues-
day to visit with Senate Democrats in the rst of four
meetings with lawmakers this week.
James Clapper listens as he testi-
es Tuesday on Capitol Hill before
the Senate Intelligence Committee.
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AMATO - Antonette, blessing
service 7 p.m. today at Peter J.
Adonizio Funeral Home, 251 Wil-
liam St., Pittston. Friends may call
4 p.m. until time of service.
CENTI - Eugene, funeral 9 a.m.
today at Peter J. Adonizio Funeral
Home, 251 William St., Pittston.
Mass of Christian Burial 9:30
a.m. in St. Joseph Marello Parish,
Pittston.
DAUTRICH - Kenneth Jr., fu-
neral 11 a.m. Saturday at Corcoran
Funeral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St.,
Plains Township. Friends may call
10 a.m. until time of services.
DAY - Helen, funeral 9 a.m.
Thursday at Simon S. Russin Fu-
neral Home, 136 Maffett St., Plains
Township, and 9:30 a.m. in Holy
Resurrection Orthodox Cathedral,
591 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 7 to 9 p.m. today
with service at 7 p.m.
FREW - Thomas, funeral 11
a.m. Thursday at Metcalfe-Shaver-
Kopcza Funeral Home Inc., 504
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Friends
may call 4 to 7 p.m. today.
HAYNES - Jerry, friends may
call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the Howell-
Lussi Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming
Ave., West Pittston. Service 11 a.m.
Thursday.
HEVERLY - William, funeral
this morning at Desiderio Funeral
Home Inc., 436 S. Mountain Blvd.,
Mountain Top. Mass of Christian
Burial 10:30 a.m. in St. Jude Ro-
man Catholic Church, Mountain
Top. Friends may call 9 a.m. until
time of Mass.
OMALLEY - Regina, funeral
9:30 a.m. today at Kearney Funeral
Home Inc., 173 E. Green St., Nan-
ticoke. Mass of Christian Burial 10
a.m. in St. Faustina Parish, Nanti-
coke. Friends may call 9 a.m. until
time of service.
MENN - Joseph Jr., Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. today in
St. Thereses Church, 64 Davis St.,
Shavertown.
MORENKO - Irene, funeral
10 a.m. Thursday at Richard H.
Disque Funeral Home Inc., 2940
Memorial Highway, Dallas. Fu-
neral Mass 10:30 a.m. in Gate of
Heaven Church, Dallas. Friends
may call 6 to 8 p.m. today.
RIZZO - Carolyn, memorial ser-
vices 11:30 a.m. Saturday at Earl
W. Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14
W. Green St., Nanticoke. Friends
may call 9:30 a.m. until time of
services.
RUTKOSKI - Beatrice, funeral
11 a.m. Thursday at Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 11:30 a.m. in Holy Ro-
sary Church, Duryea. Friends may
call 6 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral
home.
SIMKO - Dorothy, funeral 11
a.m. today at Gubbiotti Funeral
Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Ex-
eter. Friends may call 10 a.m. until
time of service.
SMITH- William, memorial ser-
vice 1 p.m. Thursday in Christian
and Missionary Alliance Church,
317 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston.
Friends may call noon until time of
service.
TEMPLETON - Eileen, celebra-
tion of life 8:30 a.m. Thursday at
McLaughlins, 142 S. Washington
St., Wilkes-Barre. Funeral Mass
9:30 a.m. in Church of St. Mary
of the Immaculate Conception.
Friends may call 2 to 4 and 7 to 9
p.m. today at the funeral home.
WEAVER - Donald, graveside
services 11 a.m. today in Oak Lawn
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
WILLIAMS - Albert Jr., funeral
10 a.m. today at McCune Funeral
Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd.,
Mountain Top.
WOEHRLE - Anne, funeral 9
a.m. today at E. Blake Collins Fu-
neral Home, 159 George Ave., Wil-
kes-Barre. Mass of Christian Burial
9:30 a.m. in St. Benedicts Church.
YURKO - Donna, memorial
service 6 p.m. Saturday at Yallicks
Farm Clubhouse, Dallas.
ZUREK - Irene, funeral 9:30
a.m. at Graziano Funeral Home
Inc., Pittston Township. Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. in Sacred
Heart of Jesus Roman Catholic
Church, Dupont. Friends may call
8:30 a.m. until time of services at
the funeral home.
FUNERALS
CHRISTINE AGNES ZINGA-
RETTI, 89, formerly of the Key-
stone section of Plains Township,
died Sunday, March 10, 2013, in
the Temple University Hospital,
Philadelphia. She was born in
Wilkes-Barre on Jan. 18, 1924,
a daughter of the late John and
Agnes Doktor Zaklukiewicz. She
was preceded by her husband,
John, in 1986; brothers, Andrew,
Francis, Gene, George, John,
Stanley; sisters, Mary and Vic-
toria. Surviving are daughters,
Janice Herman and husband Jay,
Glenside; Lois Nemcovsky and
husband D.J., Manhattan; son,
John, and his wife, Susan, Lake
Aleeda; grandchildren, Julia, Em-
ily, Jessica, Ashley and Melissa.
Private funeral services
were held with immediate family.
Arrangements by Yanaitis Funer-
al Home Inc., Plains Township.
GENEVIEVE GENE
WOJCEKIEWICZ, 92, formerly
of Kingston, passed away Mon-
day, March 11, 2013. She was
employed as a seamstress in the
garment industry. Preceding her
were parents, Alexander and Julia
Malinoski Pietrzykoski; husband,
Ted; sister Jenny Dickenson and
brother Edward. Surviving are
siblings Felix and wife Regina,
Buttonwood; Lillian Guest and
husband Leslie, Florida; Ray-
mond, Ashley, and Walter and
wife Ann, Hateld; sister-in-law,
Mary; and nieces and nephews.
Funeral services 9:30 a.m.
Friday at S. J. Grontkowski Funer-
al Home, Plymouth. Mass 10 a.m.
in All Saints Parish, Plymouth.
Interment will be in St. Marys
Nativity Cemetery. Friends may
call 8:30 a.m. until time of service
Friday. For information, visit
www.sjgrontkowskifuneralhome.
com.
DAVID R. BRIGHT, Glen
Burnie, Md., passed away Thurs-
day at home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Bernard J. Pi-
ontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea.
THERESA TINA CASA-
LDI, 70, of the Honey Pot sec-
tion of Nanticoke, passed away
Monday at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Arrangements are pend-
ing and entrusted to Kniffen
OMalley Funeral Home Inc., 465
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
BARBARA ANN WARNAG-
IRIS, Plains Township, passed
away Monday afternoon at her
residence.
Arrangements are pending
from the Michael J. Mikelski
Funeral Home, 293 S. River St.,
Plains Township. A full obituary
will appear in Saturdays edition.
The Times Leader publishes
free obituaries, which have a
27-line limit, and paid obituar-
ies, which can run with a photo-
graph. A funeral home repre-
sentative can call the obituary
desk at (570) 829-7224, send a
fax to (570) 829-5537 or e-mail
to tlobits@timesleader.com. If
you fax or e-mail, please call
to conrm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday. Obituaries
must be sent by a funeral home
or crematory, or must name
who is handling arrangements,
with address and phone num-
ber. We discourage handwritten
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 O B I T U A R I E S PAGE 6A
Bertha Ruda
March 11, 2013
B
ertha Ruda, 94, formerly of
Sugar Notch, passed away on
Monday at the Guardian Elder
Care Center, Newport Township.
She was born in Nanticoke on
June 29, 1918, a daughter of the
late Peter and Frances Grigas.
She was employed by Amy
Togs, Hanover Township, until
her retirement and was a mem-
ber of Holy Family Parish, Sugar
Notch.
She was preceded in death by
her husband of 61 years, Walter
J. Ruda; sisters, Frances Kitler,
Catherine Yanick and Mary Sim-
konis; brothers, Peter and John
Grigas; and son-in-law, Thomas
Kanavich.
Surviving is her daughter, Joan
Kanavich, Wilkes-Barre; son,
Walter Ruda, Sugar Notch; two
grandchildren, Debra Latzko and
her husband, David, York, and
David Kanavich, Wilkes-Barre;
two great-grandchildren, Emma
and Matthew Latzko; and several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
on Friday at 9:30 a.m. from the
George A. Strish Inc. Funeral
Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held at 10 a.m. in Holy Family
Parish, with the Rev. Joseph Ka-
kareka ofciating. Interment will
follow in St. Marys Cemetery,
Hanover Township. Family and
friends may call on Friday from
8:30 to 9:30 a.m. at the funeral
home.
Irene E. Morenko
March 7, 2013
I
rene E. Morenko, 85, Dallas,
passed away Thursday, March
7, 2013, at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital after being stricken ear-
lier.
Born in Larksville, she was
a daughter of the late Alex and
Victoria Dorescavage Makowski.
She was a graduate of Larksville
High School, Class of 1944. Irene
was a medical secretary with the
former NPW Hospital, now Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center, Plains Township. Irene
was a member of Gate of Heaven
Church, Dallas, and its Altar and
Rosary Society.
Irene was preceded in death by
her son Jeffrey; sister, Agnes Guil-
iani; and brothers, Joseph and Ed-
ward Makowski.
Surviving is her husband, Ste-
ven Morenko, with whom she cel-
ebrated 62 years of marriage; son
Thomas Morenko, Dallas; numer-
ous nieces and nephews; and sis-
ter, Margaret Heinze, San Diego.
Funeral services will be held
Thursday at 10 a.m. from the
Richard H. Disque Funeral Home
Inc., 2940 Memorial Highway,
Dallas. Funeral Mass will be held
at 10:30 a.m. at Gate of Heaven
Church, Dallas, with the Rev.
Daniel Toomey ofciating. Inter-
ment will be in St. Johns Cem-
etery, Dallas. Friends may call
today from 6 to 8 p.m.
Billie J. Savickas
March 11, 2013
B
illie J. Savickas, 73, of Dal-
las and formerly of Irving,
Texas, passed away Monday,
March 11, 2013, at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Born in Crockett, Texas, Billie
was a daughter of the late Joe L.
and Florence Jones Hicks.
She worked in the oil indus-
try in both the United States
and abroad. Billie and her hus-
band, John, enjoyed extensive
world travel, residing overseas
for a number of years. She was
a former member of the Red Hat
Society.
Preceding her in death, in
addition to her parents, were a
brother and sister.
Surviving is her husband of 36
years, John S. Savickas, Dallas;
three daughters, Lisa Cone and
husband, Rick, Longview, Texas,
Brandy Hateld, Seattle, and
Jennifer Boedeker and husband,
David, Katy, Texas; six grand-
children, Joey, Katie, Christian,
Joshua, Catherine and Sarah; sis-
ter, Patricia Hardy and husband,
Allan; her beloved cat, Callie.
A memorial service will be
held Saturday at 5 p.m. at the
Harold C. Snowdon Funeral
Home Inc., 140 N. Main St.,
Shavertown. Entombment will
be made in the columbarium at
Sell Chapel at Masonic Village,
Elizabethtown, at a date to be
announced.
In lieu of owers, memorial
donations, if desired, may be
made to Shriners Hospitals for
Children, 3551 N. Broad St.,
Philadelphia, PA 19140.
Glenn R. Stroh
March 10, 2013
G
lenn R. Stroh, 83, of Shaver-
town, passed away peaceful-
ly on Sunday, March 10, 2013, at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, Glenn
was a son of the late Glenn B.
and Leona Miller Stroh. He was
a graduate of Kingston Township
High School, Class of 1947.
Prior to retirement, Glenn was
a longtime employee of Air Prod-
ucts and Chemicals, Hanover
Township, where he worked as a
pipe-tter and welder.
Glenn was a life member of
the George M. Dallas Masonic
Lodge 531, Dallas. He was also
a member of Shavertown United
Methodist Church.
Preceding him in death, in
addition to his parents, was his
wife of 56 years, the former De-
lores A. Jilla.
Surviving are daughters,
Carol Dietrick and husband, Mi-
chael, Harveys Lake, and Judith
Bankus and husband, John, Wyo-
ming; grandson, John Bankus,
Wyoming; sister, Shirley S. Nice-
ly, Dallas; and nieces.
Funeral services will be held
Friday at 11 a.m. from the Har-
old C. Snowdon Funeral Home
Inc., 140 N. Main St., Shaver-
town. The Rev. Drew Cottle,
Pastor of Dunmore and Throop
United Methodist Churches,
will ofciate. Friends may call
at the funeral home on Thursday
from 5 to 8 p.m. Masonic Ser-
vices will be conducted at 8 p.m.
Thursday at the funeral home by
the George M. Dallas Masonic
Lodge 531, Dallas.
Rodney Girton
March 10, 2013
R
odney Girton, 58, Wapwallo-
pen, passed away on Sunday
at the Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center.
Born in Bloomsburg, he was
a son of Raymond Girton of Ca-
tawissa and the late Betty (Young)
Girton.
Rodney operated his business,
RG Poured Concrete, for 35 years.
He belonged to the Slocum VFW
and was a former coach in the
Mountaintop Little League and
Teeners League.
Surviving are his children, Jason
and wife Chasity, Wapwallopen,
and April Sink and husband Adam,
Berwick; grandchildren, Mayson
and Blake Girton, and Tessa Sink;
brothers and sister, Doug Girton,
Michigan; Roger Vezo, Wilkes-
Barre; Robert Vezo, Almedia, Pa.;
Craig Vezo, Wilkes-Barre; Gary
Girton, Buckhorn; Ed Girton, Har-
leysville, and Sheila Labate, Mt.
Carmel. Also surviving is his close
friend, Christine Yannes, White Ha-
ven, and her children, Ryan, Kevin
and Jon Lawrence.
Friends may call on Thursday
from 5 to 8 p.m. at the McCune Fu-
neral Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd.,
Mountain Top.
Antonette Nettie Dominick Amato
March 11, 2013
A
ntonette Nettie Dominick
Amato, 61, of Wyoming, passed
away peacefully at home on Mon-
day, March 11, 2013, after a seven-
year battle with cancer. Her loving
husband and family were at her
side.
Born in Wilkes-Barre on Aug. 1,
1951, she was a daughter of the late
Louis and Angela Winsko Domi-
nick.
She was a graduate of Pittston
Area High School and was em-
ployed by Omnicare Pharmacy.
In addition to her parents, she
was preceded in death by her sister,
JoAnn Dominick Gallo.
She is survived by her loving
husband of 38 years, Charles Ama-
to; stepdaughters, Lisa Hill and her
husband, Bruce, Forty Fort, and
Janine Dzanko and her husband,
Charles, Annapolis, Md.; grandchil-
dren, Carla Pereida and her hus-
band, Mike; Leonard Brunza III and
Chad Dzanko; great-grandchildren,
Alexa and Gianna Pereida; broth-
ers, Frank Dominick and his wife,
Josie, Pittston Township; Louie
Dominick and his wife, Beverly,
Michigan; several sisters-in-law,
brothers-in-law, nieces and neph-
ews.
Nettie was an extraordinary per-
son who loved life and everyone
around her. She handled her illness
with dignity, grace and strength.
Rest in peace, Nettie. We all love
you and now have a beautiful
guardian angel.
The family wishes to give spe-
cial thanks to the nurses and staff
at Medical Oncology Associates for
their excellent care, support and
compassion.
A blessing service will be held
at 7 p.m. today at the Peter J. Adon-
izio Funeral Home, 251 William St.,
Pittston. The family will receive
friends and relatives from 4 to 7
p.m. Interment will be at the conve-
nience of the family.
Memorial donations may be
made to a cancer organization of
the donors choice.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadoniziofuner-
alhome.com.
Ruth A. Johnson
March 11, 2013
R
uth A. Johnson, 94, of Har-
veys Lake, took her nal trip
on Monday, March 11, 2013, to
meet her maker.
Mrs. Johnson was born in
Rochester, N.Y. on June 7, 1918, a
daughter of the late Benjamin and
Anna Moss Smith.
Ruth graduated in 1936 from
the former Laketon High School,
where she was a star basketball
player. She resided at Harveys
Lake for most of her life. Ruth
enjoyed her young life swimming
and became an accomplished
swimmer. She was later known
for her cream puffs and had once
said that if she had a nickel for ev-
ery puff she had made, she would
be rich. Ruths passion was knit-
ting sweaters, scarves, slippers,
etc., for anyone who wanted or
needed one. As a result of her tal-
ents, she won several awards at
county fairs. Her favorite projects
were baby sweaters.
Mrs. Johnson fullled her role
on Earth and will be missed by so
many. She was loved by all who
met her and was known to many
as Mom-Mom or Gram. Ruth was
a dedicated mother, grandmother,
great-grandmother and great-
great-grandmother. She was one
of the few who lived to meet and
get to know her great-great-grand-
son. Heaven will be so lucky to
have such a wonderful, kind and
thoughtful person.
In addition to her parents, Ruth
was preceded in death by her
daughter Sally Gregg.
She is survived by a daughter,
Dianne Gregg; grandson, John
Pimm, Florida; great-grandsons,
Eric Pimm, Harveys Lake; Jeffrey
Pimm, Florida, and Greg Pimm,
Alabama; and great-great-grand-
son, Ashtun, Harveys Lake.
Funeral services will be held
Friday at 8 p.m. at the Curtis L.
Swanson Funeral Home Inc., cor-
ner of routes 29 and 118, Pikes
Creek, with the Rev. Dennis Gray
ofciating. Friends may call from
6 p.m. until time of service.
In lieu of owers, the family
requests that memorial donations
be made to the Harveys Lake Fire
and Ambulance Company, 1349
Lakeside Drive, Harveys Lake, PA
18618.
Online condolences can be
made at www.clswansonfuneral-
home.com.
Gary Chris Shumbris
March 10, 2013
G
ary Chris Shumbris, 42, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away sud-
denly on Sunday, March 10, 2013.
Born on Oct. 12, 1970 in Wil-
kes-Barre, he was a son of Gerald
(Gary) Shumbris, Florida, and
Anne Marie Zath, Plains Town-
ship. He was employed by Nardone
Brothers Pizza, Hanover Township.
Chris was an avid fan of both the
Kansas City Chiefs and NASCAR.
His most beloved pastime was sh-
ing with friends and family at THE
POND. He cherished his children
and loved them dearly.
He was preceded in death by his
maternal grandfather, Richard Zath
Sr.; paternal grandparents, Joseph
G. and Irma Sombers; and uncle
Mark Shumbris.
Chris is survived by his wife of
15 years, the former Lisa Kara-
bon; daughter, Hannah Lynn, age
11, and son, Mason Christopher,
age 4, both at home; stepmother,
Donna Shumbris, Florida; step-
brother, Matthew Shumbris, Plym-
outh; maternal grandmother, Anna
Zath, Florida; uncle Richard Zath,
Florida; niece, Abby Frazier; neph-
ew, Chase Karabon; uncle Den-
nis Shumbris and his wife, Terry,
Kingston; aunt Donna Mason, and
her husband, Steve, Texas; and sev-
eral aunts, uncles and cousins.
Funeral will be Friday at 9:30
a.m. from the Kopicki Funeral
Home, 263 Zerbey Ave., Kingston,
with a Mass of Christian Burial
at 10 a.m. in St. Ignatius Church,
North Maple Avenue, Kingston.
Friends may call Thursday from 3
to 6 p.m.
MORE OBITUARIES, Page 7A
ROBERT DALE, 65, of Oran-
geville and formerly of Old Forge,
passed away at Geisinger Medi-
cal Center, Danville, on Tuesday.
Arrangements are pend-
ing and have been entrusted to
Kniffen OMalley Funeral Home
Inc., 728 Main St., Avoca.
Phyllis R.
Spadafora
March 12, 2013
Phyllis R.
Spadafora, of
Whi t ecreek
Road, Me-
shoppen, died
Tuesday in
the Hospice
Unit of the
Regional Hos-
pital of Scranton.
She was born in Philadelphia
on Dec. 29, 1937, a daughter
of the late David and Gertrude
Walls Brecker.
Phyllis was a 1955 graduate
of Germantown High School
and before her retirement was
employed by Bridgeport Tex-
tron of Horsham. She was also a
member of the Springville Bap-
tist Church and its Bible study
group.
Surviving is her husband of 34
years, Carman A. Spadafora Sr.;
sons and daughters-in-law, Greg
D. and Michelle Brecker, Soud-
erton; Charles P. Allen, Holland,
Mich., and Mark C. and Carrie
Allen, Warminster; stepsons,
Carman A. Spadafora Jr. and
Melanie, Willow Grove, and Rob-
ert L. Spadafora, Warminster;
brother and sister-in-law, Harry
D. and Peggy Brecker, Philadel-
phia; and grandchildren, Leah,
Christopher and Karlee Brecker,
and Victoria Allen.
A service will be held on
Saturday at 11 a.m. at the
Springville Baptist Church with
Pastor Roger Rosenau as ofci-
ant. Interment will be in Lynn
Cemetery, Lynn, Pa. Family will
receive friends at the church
from 9:30 a.m. until the time of
service.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions may be made to
The Leukemia & Lymphoma
Society, 1311 Mamaroneck Ave.,
Suite 310, White Plains, NY
10605.
Online condolences may be
sent to www.sheldonkukuchka-
funeral.com.
HARRISBURG Gov. Tom
Corbett plans to ask Attorney
General Kathleen Kanes ofce to
reverse its rejection of a contract
with a British rm to manage the
$3.5 billion Pennsylvania Lottery,
a top lawmaker said Tuesday.
Senate President Pro Tempore
Joe Scarnati said administra-
tion ofcials told him Monday
that they are making changes in
the contract with London-based
Camelot Global Services that Kane
rejected last month over concerns
that parts of it contravene the state
constitution or violate state law.
The changes are in preparation
to resubmit it for her approval,
Scarnati said.
A spokeswoman for the Depart-
ment of Revenue, which oversees
the lottery, declined comment, ex-
cept to say that certain changes to
the contract would not trigger the
need for a new round of bidding.
The spokeswoman, Elizabeth
Brassell, said the Corbett adminis-
tration would say more later this
week, once it announces its next
steps. The administration has a
Saturday deadline to appeal Kanes
decision in court.
However, the head of the union
that represents lottery employees,
David Fillman, said making chang-
es to the contract is a very dan-
gerous path because of state laws
meant to ensure a fair contracting
process.
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Mary Jean Hovey
March 1, 2013
M
ary Jean Hovey, a librarian
who practiced her profes-
sion for many years in public,
school and university libraries,
passed away Friday, March 1,
2013, at Luther Crest Retirement
Community, South Whitehall
Township, Pa., where she had
been a resident since October of
1998. She and her husband, Gra-
ham Hovey, had moved to Allen-
town from Ann Arbor, Mich., to
be closer to their son, Thomas D.
Hovey, and his family, who live
in Forty Fort.
Mary Jean Landgraf was born
Aug. 12, 1917, in Waterloo,
Iowa. She graduated from that
citys East High School in 1935
and earned her bachelor of arts
degree in English from Iowa
State Teachers College, now the
University of Northern Iowa, in
Cedar Falls. Mary Jean received
her masters degree in library sci-
ences from Columbia University.
She was married to Graham
Hovey in Waterloo, Iowa, on
June 20, 1941, and thereafter ad-
justed her career as librarian to
his as journalist and university
professor. While a resident at Lu-
ther Crest, Mrs. Hovey was ac-
tive in their voluntary activities,
including its library.
Mary Jean was preceded in
death by her sister, Betty Ann
Dalton.
She is survived by her son,
Thomas D. Hovey, and his wife,
Barbara A., Forty Fort; three
grandchildren, Atty. Matthew T.
Hovey and his wife, Kristin M.,
Pottstown; Carolyn B. Hovey
and her ance, Timothy P. Mc-
Ginnis, Mountain Top, and Da-
vid L. Hovey, Forty Fort; niece,
Ann Dalton-Swenson, Washing-
ton; and nephew, Charles Dal-
ton, Texas.
Private services will be held
at the convenience of the family.
Arrangements by Stephens Fu-
neral Home Inc.
Online condolences may be
shared at www.stephensfuneral.
com.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions can be made to
the Landgraf-Hovey Scholarship,
University of Northern Iowa
Foundation, 205 Commons, Ce-
dar Falls, IA 50614; Salvation
Army, 144 N. Eighth St., Allen-
town, PA 18101; or Lutheran
Home Care Hospice Services,
798 Hausman Road, Allentown,
PA 18104.
Jean J. Ogren
March 12, 2013
J
ean J. Ogren, 88, of Kingston,
died Tuesday, March 12, 2013,
after a long battle with Alzheim-
ers disease.
Born March 31, 1924 in Glen-
dale, Calif., she was a daughter of
the late Frank and Katie Jackson
of Drexel Hill.
Jean was a graduate of Wheaton
College in Wheaton, Ill., where
she earned a bachelor of science
in chemistry. During World War
II, she worked as a chemist at the
Philadelphia Naval Yard.
After moving to the Wyoming
Valley, she worked as a teachers
aide for the gifted program of
the Wyoming Valley West School
District. Upon retirement, she re-
mained active in the local chapter
of the Pennsylvania Association
of School Retirees and enjoyed
meals out with her friends.
Jean was a member of the First
Presbyterian Church in Wilkes-
Barre. She was active in the choir,
the Presbyterian Womens Asso-
ciation and was a driver for Meals
on Wheels.
Her husband of 56 years, Dr.
Robert E. Ogren, and her brother,
Frank Jackson Jr., preceded her in
death.
She will be greatly missed by
her sons, Paul and his wife, Jeana
Ogren, St. Paul, Minn., and Philip
and his wife, Lynn Ogren, Kings-
ton; and nieces and nephews.
Celebration of Jeans life will
be led by her pastor, the Rev. Dr.
Robert Zanicky, at 11 a.m. on Fri-
day at McLaughlins The Family
Funeral Service, 142 S. Washing-
ton St., Wilkes-Barre. Visitation
will be held beginning at 10 a.m.
Friday at the funeral home.
Memorial contributions may
be made to First Presbyterian
Church, Wilkes-Barre, or to the
charity of the donors choice.
Permanent messages and mem-
ories can be shared with Jeans
family at www.celebrateherlife.
com.
Albina Sekulski
March 11, 2013
A
lbina Sekulski, 82, passed
away Monday, March 11,
2013, in the Summit Nursing
Home, Wilkes-Barre.
Born Dec. 20, 1930 in Nanti-
coke, she was a daughter of the
late Charles and Mary Bonner
Blockus.
Albina was a previous mem-
ber St. Marys Church, currently
St. Faustina Parish, Nanticoke.
She was employed as a waitress
at the Bluebird Restaurant, Nan-
ticoke.
She is preceded in death by
her husband, Carl.
Surviving are her broth-
ers, John Blockus and his wife,
Pearl, of Swoyersville, and Kaz
Blockus and his wife, Theresa,
Bound Brook, N.J.; niece, Kathy
Blockus, Bound Brook; nephews,
John Blockus and his wife, Bren-
da, Tunkhannock, and Kevin
Blockus and his wife, Michelle,
Swoyersville; great-niece, Beth-
any Ann Blockus, Swoyersville;
and great-nephews, Nicholas
and Matthew Blockus, Tunkhan-
nock, and Noah Blockus, Swoy-
ersville.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be held on Friday at 11 a.m.
in St. Faustina Parish, at the St.
Marys Church site. Family and
friends are asked to proceed di-
rectly to St. Marys Church on
Friday morning. Friends may
call Thursday from 4 to 7 p.m.
Interment will be in St. Marys
Cemetery, Nanticoke.
In lieu of owers, memorial
donations, if desired, may be
made to a charity of the donors
choice.
Arrangements are by the Earl
W. Lohman Funeral Home Inc.,
14 W. Green St., Nanticoke.
Mary
Featherstone
March 12, 2013
M
ary Featherstone, 65, of
Wilkes-Barre, died unex-
pectedly on Tuesday at Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center.
Born May 30, 1947 in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of the
late Mary Sherman Alles. Mary
was a graduate of E.L. Mey-
ers High School. Before retir-
ing, Mary was a nursing aide at
Golden Living Center - Summit
for 27 years.
Mary was a member of the
Parish of St. Andrew and a com-
municant at the Church of St.
Patrick.
She will be greatly missed by
her husband, Christopher Feath-
erstone; daughter, Toni, and her
husband, Dennis Fernandes,
Wyoming; grandchildren, Dal-
las Joseph Fernandes, Dion
Fernandes, Darren and his wife,
Stephanie Fernandes, and Dani-
ta and her husband, Jorge Pires;
great-grandchildren, Keenan and
Faylinn Fernandes, and Skylah
and Dacian Pires.
Celebration of Marys life
will be held Saturday at 8:30 a.m.
from McLaughlins The Family
Funeral Service, 142 S. Wash-
ington St., Wilkes-Barre, with
funeral Mass at 9:30 a.m. in the
Church of St. Patrick. Interment
will be in St. Marys Cemetery
in Hanover Township. Visitation
will be held at McLaughlins on
Friday from 5 to 9 p.m.
Permanent messages and
memories can be shared with
Marys family at www.celebrate-
herlife.com.
Gilbert P. Chesney
March 12, 2013
Gilbert Pe-
ter Chesney,
61, of Plains
Township, lost
his courageous
battle with Al-
zheimers dis-
ease on Tues-
day, March 12,
2013, at the Timber Ridge Nurs-
ing Facility, Plains Township.
Born in Nanticoke, he was a
son to Margaret Padagomas and
the late Thomas Chesney. He
was a graduate of the West Side
Vocational School, Class of 1970.
Gilbert worked for various com-
panies in his life, until he began
working for Pennsylvania Gas &
Water. He stayed with the compa-
ny through the change to Ameri-
can Water, working in the distri-
bution division.
Gilbert enjoyed amateur radio,
or Ham radio. His handle was
WB3HFU. He loved to grow a
garden full of vegetables for his
family. He was an active member
of the Plains Township Crime
Watch, a member of St. Joseph
Church, Hudson, until the merger
with Ss. Peter and Paul Church,
Plains Township.
He is preceded in death by his
father, Thomas.
Surviving are his wife of 31
years, the former Margaret
Thompson, Plains Township;
daughters, Theresa and Jennifer,
Plains Township; mother, Marga-
ret, Plains Township; brothers,
Thomas and his wife, Kristen,
Woodleaf, N.C.; Peter and his
wife, Gail, Hanover Township;
and two nephews, Peter and Mat-
thew, Hanover Township.
Funeral service for Gilbert
will be held Friday at 9 a.m. from
the Yanaitis Funeral Home Inc.,
55 Stark St., Plains Township. A
Mass of Christian Burial will be
held at 9:30 a.m. in Ss. Peter and
Paul Church, Plains Township. In-
terment will follow in St. Joseph
Cemetery, Hudson. Friends may
call at the funeral home on Thurs-
day from 5 to 8 p.m.
To send condolences to the
family or for directions, please
visit www.yanaitisfuneralhome.
com.
Christopher G.
Todd
March 10, 2013
C
hristopher G. Todd, 75, of
Rear East Main Street, Glen
Lyon, died on Sunday morning
at Commonwealth Hospice Care
Unit, Wilkes-Barre.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was
a son of the late Emerson and
Helen Lecher Todd. He gradu-
ated from Kingston High School
and Wilkes-Barre Business Col-
lege. Chris lived in Glen Lyon
for the past 14 years. Previously
he lived in Wilkes-Barre and, for
many years, in Forty Fort.
Prior to his retirement, he
was a well-known clothing sales-
man, working for various stores,
including Boscovs, Racunsins
Clothing Store, the Hub and the
Salvation Army Thrift Store.
He was a member of Forty
Fort United Methodist Church.
He was an avid Philadelphia
Phillies and a Pittsburgh Steel-
ers fan. He loved his miniature
schnauzers. Chris had a shining
spirit and a loving soul.
Surviving are his wife of 45
years, Susanne (Sears) Todd;
brother, Dr. John F. Todd, New
York City; sister, Virginia Schatz-
ki, and her husband, Dr. Stefan,
Massachusetts; sister-in-law,
Jean Sears, Latrobe; and several
nieces and nephews.
A memorial service will be
on Thursday at 2 p.m. from the
Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc.
Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort, with the Rev.
Dr. Philip T. Wanck ofciating.
Friends may call Thursday from
1 p.m. until time of service at the
funeral home.
In lieu of owers, memorial
contributions, if desired, can be
made to the SPCA, 524 E. Main
St., Plains Township, PA 18702.
For information or to send an
online message of condolence,
visit the funeral homes website
at www.hughbhughes.com.
MORE OBITUARIES, Page 6A
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 N E W S PAGE 7A
Corbett expected to resubmit Pa. lottery deal
The Associated Press
a cost of $32,337 in 2011.
On Thursday, council will
consider a resolution to enter
into an agreement with North-
ern Tier Research for blood
alcohol and drug laboratory
services. Rates are $75 per le-
gal blood alcohol test, $125
per blood drug screen, $150
per blood screen conrmation
and $125 for evidence analysis
of unknown substance.
Leighton said Police Chief
Gerard Dessoye recommended
the company and expects to re-
alize signicant savings to the
city.
Council Vice Chairman Tony
George questioned a resolution
to execute documents relative
to the restructuring of funding
for the Northampton and Main
Project. The city decided to
not hold the prospective buyer
of University Corners Joe
Amatos TLC Holdings LLC
responsible for repaying
$500,000 loaned to the devel-
oper of the retail space in the
downtown complex.
The complex, anchored by
R/C Wilkes-Barre Movies 14,
is nearly full, except for a large
section along East Northamp-
ton Street eyed for an Irish
pub. The 21 loft condomini-
ums that make up the residen-
tial component of the complex
are not part of the deal.
The loan is half of the $1 mil-
lion in local-share state gam-
bling account grant that the
city applied for and received
from the state Department
of Economic and Commu-
nity Development in 2009 to
complete construction of the
street-level retail space interi-
ors. DCED approved splitting
the money into a grant and a
no-interest loan for William
Geary Jr., whose Los Angeles,
Calif.-based Carlsberg Proper-
ties Inc. manages University
Corners LLC. Geary has led
for personal bankruptcy in
California.
Leighton said Amatos com-
pany is not buying the prop-
erty; he is assuming the mort-
gage.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDnESDAy, MARch 13, 2013 N E W S PAGE 8A
DALLAS TWP. Dallas Area
School District cheerleaders
and their parents addressed the
School Board on Monday night
regarding varsity cheerleading
coach Suzanne Powell.
Jennifer Sorber, a middle
school cheerleading coach in
the district and parent, said her
daughter was bullied by Powell,
and Sorber felt forced to protect
her from verbal taunts during
practices and games.
Im also a coach and it is im-
portant to motivate those we
coach, but there is a line we,
as coaches, do not cross, said
Sorber, saying she questioned
the appropriateness of Powell
sending text messages directly
to those she coached.
Lisa Cummings, parent of
cheerleader Aneilla Cummings,
14, said many cheerleaders were
afraid of the coach, and many
would not be going out for the
cheer team next year because of
its reputation of negativity and
drama.
Several varsity cheerleaders
Powell had coached addressed
the board indicating they had
successfully cheered under oth-
er coaches, but that Powell had
labeled themas starting drama
or not working hard enough.
Powell, who limited her com-
ments to the board, said that
it was sometimes necessary to
offer strong directives to those
she coached and cited improve-
ments in the varsity cheer team
during the 2 years during
which she had coached.
Karen Sebolka, who spoke
in defense of Powell, said, My
daughter cheered under Powell,
and although she wasnt always
happy, she learned responsibility
and respect.
Several board members laud-
ed those student cheerleaders
who spoke before them as hav-
ing courage and composure.
Parent Lisa Alves whose
daughter, Ashlie, had originally
addressed the board at a prior
meeting, said she would have
preferred to have addressed the
issues in a private forum, but
that the administration had not
responded to her request for a
meeting between administration
and parents of district cheerlead-
ers.
In another matter, a plaque
was presented in memory of
Gary Mathers, who served the
board as a teacher and a board
member.
His vision changed our tra-
ditional industrial arts program
into a technologically advanced
one, said Frank Galicki, super-
intendent.
In another matter, board
member Richard Coslett empha-
sized the boards commitment
to student security. The district
will be increasing the number
of cameras placed throughout
its buildings and will be utiliz-
ing iPads, cellphones, and other
devices allowing administration,
staff, and local police to access
the information streaming from
those cameras.
The next work session of the
Dallas School Board will be on
April 8 at 7 p.m.
Parents, cheerleaders
criticize Dallas coach
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
HUGHESTOWN Borough
Council announced the resigna-
tion of Solicitor Miriam DElia
during Monday nights regular
council meeting.
DElia served as solicitor for
Hughestown since 2010.
Mayor Paul Hindmarsh
thanked her for her service and
said that she felt she was no lon-
ger able to adequately balance
her duties as solicitor with her
responsibilities to her primary
employer, United One Resources.
Council did not announce a re-
placemenT.
In other matters, it was an-
nounced that a Pennsylvania De-
partment of Transportation trafc
study to test whether a stop sign
or trafc light would be appropri-
ate at the intersection of Laurel
and Rachel streets will take place
over the next several weeks.
If it is determined that an aver-
age of 200 cars pass through the
intersection each day and that
there are an average of at least
ve accidents each year, a sign or
light can be erected.
Regardless of the outcome,
state ofcials told borough rep-
resentatives that the speed limit
on Laurel Street will be reduced
from 35 mph to 25 mph.
The council also announced
the purchase of 200 new residen-
tial recycling containers during
the meeting.
The borough will have to pay
only $288 of the total $2,880
price tag with the remainder be-
ing funded through a grant from
the state Department of Environ-
mental Protection.
Information on how to obtain
a new recycling container will be
made available to residents once
the containers are procured by
the borough.
Hughestown accepts solicitors resignation
By B. GARRET ROGAN
Times Leader Correspondent
Wife forgives husband for shooting
WILKES-BARRE Patrick
Baran and his wife, Sundee
Baran, held each other as a Lu-
zerne County judge sentenced
him to jail on Tuesday.
Sundee Baran forgave her
husband for shooting her in the
lower stomach during a violent
domestic dispute inside their
Mountain Road, Shickshinny,
home, on Jan. 9, 2012. She
asked Judge Fred Pierantoni III
for leniency for her husband,
saying they have been married
for 15 years and have known
each other for 20 years.
He is a caring, gentle man,
Sundee Baran begged the
judge.
Pierantoni appreciated her
statements but reminded her
that he did indeed shoot her.
Patrick Baran, 40, was sen-
tenced to 10 months to 23
months in the county correc-
tional facility on charges of ag-
gravated assault, followed by
36 months probation on a ter-
roristic threat charge.
It took her a lot to come
here today to speak in your de-
fense, Pierantoni told Patrick.
Patrick Baran and his wife
were allowed to hug each other
before county sheriff deputies
shackled him in the courtroom
and transported him to the
county jail to begin serving his
sentence.
State police at Shickshinny
found Patrick Baran applying
pressure to a gunshot wound to
his wifes stomach. He told in-
vestigators he was arguing with
his wife and grabbed a handgun
from a couch.
He told his wife, If you
keep this up, youre gonna get
this, and aimed the revolver
between her legs, according to
the criminal complaint.
Patrick Baran claimed his
wife swiped at the handgun and
struck the hammer, causing it
to discharge, striking Sundee
Baran in the lower abdomen.
Patrick Baran called 911 and
helped his wife until state po-
lice and paramedics arrived at
the house.
Attorney Stephen Greenwald
represented Patrick Baran.
Patrick Baran was sentenced
to 10 months to 23 months
for January 2012 shooting.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
LEHMAN TWP. The
Lake-Lehman School Board on
Monday awarded the contact
for the replacement of the dis-
tricts articial turf to A-Turf
Inc. of Lancaster.
The price is not to exceed
$468,000 and includes the re-
moval of the existing turf and
the installation of a new 10mm
elastic rubber pad with a 25-
year warranty and new black
articial turf with a 12-year
warranty.
Superintendent James Mc-
Govern urged all parents and
residents to contact their state
representatives about the
grant package the district has
submitted in conjunction with
Jackson Township.
The gaming grant would pay
for the replacement of the turf
as well as many other improve-
ments including a sand vol-
leyball court and pavilion, two
practice elds, an ice skating
rink and a walking trail.
The facilities would be used
by the public as well as the
school district.
After the meeting, McGov-
ern said the bid for the re-
placement turf was $35,000 to
$40,000 under what the dis-
trict had expected.
When asked about his hopes
for obtaining the gaming grant,
McGovern said, If it goes by
ambition and work, Im 100
per cent sure.
He said he realized that
there were many grant applica-
tions but said, Were extreme-
ly hopeful.
Lake-Lehman
black turf bid
comes in
under $500K
By SUSAN DENNEY
Times Leader Correspondent
HAZLE TWP. A resident
renewed his call for an Attor-
ney Generals Ofce investi-
gation into what he alleged is
malfeasance at the Board of
Supervisors meeting on Mon-
day.
Richard Wienches had made
similar claims at the boards
February meeting. He voiced
a number of concerns to the
board in connection to past
closed bid practices and
alleged contractor impropri-
eties, including bid collusion
and misappropriation of con-
tracted materials.
Township Solicitor Charles
Pedri assured Wienches that
his concerns were noted and
said that his ofce has been
forthcoming in response to all
requests for information. Pedri
also said that an independent
engineering rm, the Alfred
Benesch Co., was recently
contracted to look into specic
claims leveled by Wienches.
A representative from the
engineering rm was on hand
to deliver a report disputing
any charge of impropriety or
misappropriation of materials
in regards to the specic mat-
ter it had investigated.
Pedri said Wienches con-
tinued calls for public records,
audits and investigations have
cost the township more than
$8,000 over the past severall
months.
In other business, the board:
Approved a preliminary
Land Development Plan from
The Hazleton Area School
District for the former Bishop
Haffey school building at 1700
W. 22nd St. in the township.
Voted unanimously to au-
thorize the advertisement for
bids to sell several pieces of
used vehicles and equipment
with bids to be opened at the
April 8 meeting. The vehicles
to be sold include a 1990 Inter-
national dump truck, a 1997
International dump truck and
a 1985 55CClark wheel loader.
Call for probe heard in Hazle Twp.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
Continued from Page 3A
COUNCIL
which connects to pipelines in
other states.
As of Tuesday afternoon, Adri-
an Merolli, director of the Lu-
zerne County Planning Commis-
sion, said he had not received
word about the companys deci-
sion.
Concerning reasons behind
the hearing board members de-
cision, he said he would not com-
ment, so as not to jeopardize any
further decisions regarding the
matter; however, he said repre-
sentatives from both the county
and the borough were each given
the chance to make their cases.
The zoning hearing board
makes their decisions based on
information provided by both
parties, Merolli said.
Cipriani said the companys
withdrawal arrived before an ap-
peal hearing was scheduled.
It had appeared to her as if
it was going to be a protracted
legal situation. I believe it was
going to be a long, drawn-out ap-
peal, Cipriani said.
Continued from Page 3A
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At the top of each of page is a
header reading privileged and
condential.
Under the section about the
scope of the work, the docu-
ment reads: Freeh Sporkin &
Sullivan has been engaged
to serve as an independent,
external legal counsel to the
task force to perform an in-
dependent, full and complete
investigation of the recently
publicized allegations of sexual
abuse at the facilities and the
alleged failure of The Pennsyl-
vania State University person-
nel to report such sexual abuse
to appropriate police and gov-
ernment authorities.
The investigation was to be
independent of and not inter-
fere with any parallel investi-
gation, the paperwork shows.
The work between Freeh and
the task force was to be subject
to attorney-client privilege and
attorney work-product privi-
leges unless otherwise waived.
The hourly rates that Penn
State was to pay Freeh and his
investigators were blacked out.
According to the document,
Freehs ndings were to focus
on failures in the reporting
process, the cause of those fail-
ures, who had knowledge of
the abuse and how those alle-
gations were handled by Penn
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PENN STATE
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDnESDAy, MARch 13, 2013 S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 8 1 PAGE 9
Editorial
IF YOU LIVE in the Wilkes-
Barre Area School District and
want your voice heard on next
years budget, speak up now,
tonight, 5 p.m., at the Wilkes-
Barre Area School District ad-
ministration building, 730 S.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
Continuing what has been
an underattended but highly
laudable effort launched a few
years ago, the Wilkes-Barre
Area School Board budget and
nance committee is seeking
public input as it shapes the
budget for the upcoming scal
year, running from July 1, 2013
through June 30, 2014.
It is true that, in the end,
the public comments and sug-
gestions are exactly that. The
board has nal say on what the
tax rate will be, how much will
be spent and what programs and
positions will be funded. But
these meetings are a chance to
offer input months before that
decision is made (a nal budget
must be passed by June 30, pre-
ceded by a preliminary budget
passed about a month earlier).
But lest anyone doubt the po-
tential value of a single voice,
remember that this board has
become fundamentally divided
along several fault lines, includ-
ing the level of willingness to
raise taxes. It is conceivable that
a well-made argument could
sway a swing vote on an issue
important to you.
It is also true that the board
is on course to losing a mem-
ber and seeking a replacement.
Robert Corcoran took a multi-
year job in Germany, eliminated
any physical residence in the
district and briey attempted to
retain his seat through his term
(expiring in December) by par-
ticipating in Februarys meeting
through an Internet Skype con-
nection.
But that plan prompted tu-
multous board debate and
drew the investigative eye of
the Luzerne County District
Attorneys Ofce, poised to
evaluate the legality of Corco-
rans thin claim to mandatory
district residency. According
to Board President John Quinn,
Corcoran has signaled his in-
tent to stop attending meetings
via Skype. He missed Mondays
meeting, and if he misses the
April meeting the board can
and, Quinn promised, will
vote to oust him as is its legal
right if a member misses two
consecutive meetings without
strong cause.
The board could legally vote
for a replacement without seek-
ing candidates, but Quinn sug-
gested that is not the way he
would prefer to go. If true, the
board would set a date for appli-
cations, then vote among that
pool of contenders.
A divided board with eight
members A chance for resi-
dents to land a seat on the board
through November And all
during the crucial budget-mak-
ing months of spring in an elec-
tion year? Conditions seem ripe
for these public budget meet-
ings to have greater weight than
cynics might expect.
So consider showing up for
tonights meeting. Candidates
running for the four board seats
should, in particular, show up,
but this is a chance to let your
voice be heard.
Our OpiniOn: W-B AreA Budget
Take opportunity
to have your say
A
Commonwealth Court
decision came too late
to save the adultBasic
health insurance plan
for Pennsylvanias working poor
in 2011, but the ruling now pro-
vides an incentive to reinstate
the successful program.
Commonwealth Court Presi-
dent Judge Dan Pellegrini de-
clared as unconstitutional two
bills that took tobacco settle-
ment proceeds away from adult-
Basic and used it for other items
in the state budget instead.
Without funds, the Corbett ad-
ministration ended adultBasic
in 2011, leaving 41,000 low-in-
come recipients without health
insurance.
The judge stopped short of
ordering adultBasics reinstate-
ment, leaving two possibilities
one good and one bad.
The state Legislature can get
around the constitutional ques-
tion by enacting a new law that
changes how the state agrees to
spend its future share of the na-
tionwide, $200 billion tobacco
settlement. If lawmakers simply
change the formula, theyll be
sidestepping the purpose of the
settlement, which was to have
tobacco manufacturers help
pay for states medical costs,
because use of their unhealthy
products drive them up.
The better option would
be for lawmakers to use the
money to expand health care
options for low-income Penn-
sylvanians by creating a new
version of adultBasic. Adult-
Basic shouldnt have been shut
down. Lawmakers should take
this chance to start it up again.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Other OpiniOn: heAlth AssistAnCe
Help insure poor;
renew adultBasic
There are many different candidates, so its
normal that its going to take longer than the last
time.
Cardinal Francisco Javier Errazuriz of Chile
Explaining why the election of a new pope could come later rather than
sooner.
MAllArd FillMOre dOOnesBurY
MAil BAg | letters FrOM reAders
Simple queries from kids
and grandpas response
N
ot only do I love our grandson beyond
belief, I like when he asks questions,
however difcult the answer may be. At
suppertime Connor asked if Adam and Eve
were born the same way we (granny, pop-
pop and he) were. Maneuvering to avoid
debate about whether the Adam and Eve
myth is literally true or a story illustrating
a moral lesson, I told him to look around
in Heaven when he gets there for two
people without belly buttons. They will be
Adam and Eve.
Bob Singer
Wilkes-Barre
A heartfelt thank-you
for rescue of two pets
O
n the Feb. 7 front page of The Times
Leader there was a picture of two
wonderful people aiding two pets after
their rescue. The photo included a woman
who was not identied and Captain Robert
Fannon; thank you from the bottom of my
heart. Thank you for your bravery and
concern for the animals. I understand the
cost of home fuel but wood burning is
dangerous. Nevertheless, thank you from
the bottom of my heart.
Shirley Williams
South Abington Township
Response to recent letter:
No shame in honest work
A
s I read George Races letter in the
March 8, 2013, edition. I would like to
comment.
If its true that a member of the teachers
union made that denigrating statement
about McDonalds workers, he or she
should be ashamed. Is there any way to
prove the veracity of the statement?
The reasons I ask are these. Im a Wyo-
ming Area School Director and the mother
of ve children who graduated from the
district. One of those children is a second-
ary math teacher at Wyoming Area.
We were and are, a working class fam-
ily, and proud of it.
My husband is a retired truck driver and
now pushes carts at Price Chopper. His
job status is no higher than a McDonalds
counter worker.
I was a bus driver for 12 years and have
been a real estate associate broker for 27
years.
My daughter, who is the Wyoming Area
teacher, worked in small town manufactur-
ing in the 1980s cleaning restrooms. She
was a waitress along with her other sister
and myself at Howard Johnsons to pay for
tuition at Penn State.
My other daughter was a teacher at
Bloomsburg State as a nursing instructor.
She spent her high school years emptying
bedpans at Leader Nursing home, because
I told her we couldnt break for tuition as-
sistance until she was absolutely sure she
wanted to be a nurse.
My son tore out asbestos when we
didnt know how dangerous asbestos was.
He biked four miles to work and back,
every day in rain and snow, to get to a job
in retail. He started his own business, Big
Top Rental.
My other two sons one who works in
the private sector and one who works for
the state worked in a factory making
party favors , picking tomatoes on a local
farm, working in one of the local pizza res-
taurants and delivering beer for minimum
wage.
Why am I telling you this? Because
none of my children, including the
teacher, would ever think less of someone
because they were a counter worker at
McDonalds. That job is an upgrade from
some of the jobs they performed.
If Georges unveried statement is
indeed accurate, we are all embarrassed by
it. If it isnt, then he should be ashamed.
Deanna Farrell
West Wyoming
A few thoughts on guns,
history and freedom
T
here has been extensive press cover-
age about the tragedy at Sandy Hook
Elementary School. Experts have jumped
on the solution bandwagon. Ive read the
arguments and have watched our leaders
state that they know what is best for my
family and me. Here are my thoughts.
Regarding guns: The U.S. has an active
gun culture that has existed since before
the framing of the Constitution.
The Second Amendment was written to
provide the people with a way to combat a
tyrannical government.
The liberal press and our government
are starting to inuence the populace
by deciding what is deemed acceptable.
The government and press are preying
on an uninformed public by stating that
we should ban certain rearms based on
how they look. Unfortunately, the public is
falling for it.
Also, most of the people doing the decid-
ing have never even handled a rearm.
They have no right to determine what is
socially acceptable and decide what I can
and cannot own.
I feel a larger problem stems from the
fact that we are raising a generation of chil-
dren who are quickly turning into adults
who have become narcissistic. They want
everything now, done their way, or theyre
going to have a temper tantrum. Some-
times, unfortunately, these tantrums are
violent. Our discussions should be centered
on what we, as adults, have done horribly
wrong in creating this generation, and more
importantly, what we can do to x it.
School security is generally based on the
premise of building in enough of a delay
to allow the good guys to show up and
hopefully, end the carnage before it even
starts. This is done with various physical
items multiple door locks, surveillance,
bullet proof glass, etc. If all of the delays
are breached before the good guys show
up, then the only way to stop a threat is
with overwhelming, decisive, and yes, even
deadly, force. This is the harsh reality of the
world we live in today. Ignoring this sad
truth does a great disservice to those we
say we value most our children.
In 1976, at a very impressionable 12 years
of age, I toured the Auschwitz concentra-
tion camp in southern Poland.
The minimum admission age was 18 and
since I was only 12 it looked like we were
going to have to spend the day somewhere
else. After some very animated conversa-
tion between the museum personnel and
my mom, they nally relented and let me
in. I walked past the crematoria, toured the
cell block where Dr. Mengele performed his
horric experiments on twins, and saw the
stand up punishment cells where people
were starved and died standing up. But
the one thing that haunts me to this day
was the sight of quarter inch deep claw
marks etched in the cinderblocks of the
gas chambers created by human beings
who literally, tried to claw their way out.
Standing in the middle of a gas chamber,
at the tender age of 12, I looked up at my
mother and told her that, No one, ever,
will do this to me.
Do I fear my government? Unfortunately,
the answer is yes. And to all the Bidens,
Metzenbaums, Feinsteins, syndicated
columnists, and members of the so called
intellectual, social elite who think they
know whats best for me Im sorry, but
you have no right to force your version of
social morality on my family and me, or
anyone else for that matter.
The reader of this article might ask why
I would spend so much time penning this
lengthy letter.
I have but one answer those claw marks
those damn claw marks.
Carl Yorina Jr.
Wyoming
send us YOur OpiniOn
Letters to the editor must include the
writers name, address and daytime phone
number for verication. Letters should be
no more than 250 words. We reserve the
right to edit and limit writers to one pub-
lished letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
editorial Board
quOte OF the dAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO / Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President / Executive Editor
ful time when she was hidden in
a bunker, asleep with the help of
chloroform, while her parents
worked in the Nazi-occupied
ghetto.
Jeral had been staying with
the Gecevicius family for two
years when her aunt and uncle
Nechama and Bezalel Tau-
man came to Lithuania for
her and took her to Israel. From
there she would be sent to her
cousins in the United States,
where she was adopted by Izz and
Edna Polsky of Philadelphia.
Her story is chronicled in the
book, Tikva Means Hope, writ-
ten by her husband, Sheldon
Jeral. Their oldest son, Joe, wrote
a short play The Story
about his mothers plight that is
included in the book. Sheldon and
Tikva live near Baltimore now.
They spent 20 years in Wilkes-
Barre and Mountain Top from
1982-2002 when Sheldon was ex-
ecutive director of Jewish Family
Services and Tikva worked as a
social worker.
A dark journey from the hell
of war to the light of freedom and
a new family, Tikvas story dem-
onstrates the tenacity and hope
inherent in each of us, Sheldon
Jeral wrote in the book. The true
story of Tikva Jeral is a frighten-
ing, powerful and, nally, uplift-
ing tale of one womans survival
through one of the most horric
evils perpetuated in recent his-
tory.
The students sat in silence and
awe as Tikva Jeral detailedher sto-
ry. After the presentation, which
included a lm on the Holocaust
Remember the Children
Tikva said she often thinks of her
parents and how they must have
struggled to make the decision to
send her to the arms of strangers.
I think about it all the time,
she said. But I would not have
survived. I wonder why did I sur-
vive and not somebody else.
Seven Wilkes University educa-
tion students who attended the pre-
sentation marveled at Tikvas story.
Vicky Klem, 35, of Plymouth, said
her youngest child is 18 months
old. I cant imagine ever having to
give my child to strangers.
Megan Petrochko, 21 of Nanti-
coke, was touched by the story.
They gave away their only
child not knowing if she would
survive, she said. And they died
never knowing what happened to
her.
Many students posed for pic-
tures with Jeral and asked for her
autograph.
Some 71 years later I feel very
lucky to be alive and to remember
those who kept me safe, she said.
So, thats my story.
Jeral said she enjoyed her time
living as a Catholic. She prayed to
Jesus; Christmas was her favorite
time of year. She said the schools
she attended taught that Jews
were bad very bad.
I didnt want to leave, she
said of the time her aunt and un-
cle came to get her. I was a good
little girl. I didnt want to be Jew-
ish.
She said she got used to her aunt
and uncle and learned what had
happened. But she will never forget
the people who took care of her.
They took great risks, she
said. We had to move to another
part of town because the neigh-
bors knew there were only two
children living in our house and
now there were three. Our lives
were always in danger.
Sheldon wrote in the books for-
ward:
It is so important to recognize
that every survivor of imprison-
ment in concentration camps, and
every hidden child have horrible,
painful and impossible stories to
tell. This story is just one among
those who survived and the mil-
lions who did not. It is a story of
survival and of some lives which
were lived thereafter.
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDnESDAy, MARch 13, 2013 N E W S PAGE 10A
David, thank you for your ser-
vice to our country, Leighton
said. We believe youre going
to do a great job for us Satur-
day.
The grand marshal appoint-
ment is reserved for those
whose commitment to public
service stands out above any-
one elses. But the grand mar-
shal also has to be dedicated to
preserving Irish traditions.
Peggy Morgan showed off
some of the tattoos her son got
before his deployment, a Celtic
Cross and a Welsh Dragon.
She said that when she rst
saw them, she got excited.
I asked Why did you get
such big tattoos? He said,
Mom, I want them to know
what I stand for, Peggy Mor-
gan said.
Before he joined the mili-
tary, Morgan also served in the
Army Reserve, he worked as a
corrections ofcer for the state
prison system.
Peggy Morgan said he was
an ambitious public servant
who worked with fervor. She
said the accident came about
because of his commitment to
his work.
He volunteered for that last
mission and thats why Im not
sad about it, because he was do-
ing what he loved, she said.
Peggy said Morgan still en-
joys the taste of beer. She said
her other son serves in the Air
Force and the two would always
try to meet each other in Ire-
land to swill beer.
She said that just before his
accident they had just missed
each other.
She laughed and said the two
of them could get rowdy.
Maybe thats good because
the two of them in the same
place, at the same time, with
beer her voice trailed off.
Also surprised on Tuesday,
Joe Clark of Ashley, son of an
Irish immigrant and an Ashley
native, was appointed as the
other grand marshal for the
citys 33rd annual parade.
As is tradition for the city,
Clark was brought to City Hall
for the announcement. Clarks
jaw dropped when the mayor
announced his appointment.
Clark was an iron worker
for his entire career, retiring in
1985. He is the the last surviv-
ing charter member of the An-
cient Order of Hibernians, St.
John Neumann Division 2. He
is also an active member of St.
Leos Church and the Knights
of Columbus.
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
A very surprised Joe Clark, left, reacts as he looks toward his
family after Wilkes Barre Mayor Tom Leighton announced that
Joe would be one of two parade grand marshals.
Continued from Page 1A
PARADE
do whatever it took to rise within
the ranks of the violent Mexican
gang, even if it meant killing a
friend.
The Mexican Maa is a blood
in, blood out organization, Green
explained in the pre-sentence re-
port, meaning the only way to gain
full membership was to kill anoth-
er person.
Garcia, also a member of the
gang, had made a fatal mistake: He
was trying to get out.
Because Carlos was not con-
tributing and doing the business
that the Maa expected of him, it
was decided that his punishment
would be death, Green said.
It was the in Con-Ui had been
waiting for.
Con-Ui agreed to help two fellow
gang members, Manuel Medrano
and Johnny Farinas, set up Garcia.
Since (Con-Ui) was fairly close
with Carlos, he used his friendship
as a means to trick Carlos into a
meeting at the laundromat, the
report says.
As Garcias girlfriend washed
clothes inside, Con-Ui struck up
a conversation to distract him, ac-
cording to the report. Medrano and
Farinas approached from behind.
Medrano red several shots into
Garcia, who managed to run away
before Farinas caught up with him
and red four rounds into his head.
Con-Ui pleaded guilty to rst-
degree murder on May 30, 2008
and was later sentenced to life in
prison. That sentence was to be
served once he completed the fed-
eral prison sentence.
The plea deal in the murder case
left open the possibility Con-Ui
could be paroled after serving 25
years, however. Concerned by that
possibility, Green led the pre-sen-
tence memorandum to ensure the
judge, and later, the Arizona parole
board, knew of Con-Uis past.
In the report, Green noted Con-
Ui had previously been twice con-
victed of theft charges, for which
he served 3 1/2 years in prison.
While on parole on those charges,
he continued to commit crimes as
a Maa member, including partici-
pating in a drug ring that resulted
in his 2003 federal conviction on
drug distribution charges.
Con-Ui also continued com-
mit crimes while he was behind
bars, including helping to arrange
a drug deal over the phone, with
the proceeds distributed to fellow
inmates who were members of
his gang. Con-Ui pleaded guilty to
money laundering charges in con-
nection with that case and was sen-
tenced to ve years in prison.
Those actions made it clear
Con-Ui had no interest in rehabili-
tation, Green said, leading to his
warning:
When one looks at the destruc-
tionandpainthat Jessie Con-Ui has
left in his wake, it simply wouldnt
seem fair that he should ever again
enjoy his freedom, Green said.
Con-Ui remains incarcerated at
the Federal Correctional Institu-
tion at Allenwood, where he was
transferred after the attack on Wil-
liams.
Federal prosecutors have not
said when charges will be led. Its
expected the case will be brought
before a grand jury, which will de-
cide if there is sufcient evidence
to issue an indictment.
Continued from Page 1A
INMATE
Monterrey
81/54
Chihuahua
71/39
Los Angeles
82/56
Washington
54/31
New York
50/32
Miami
78/57
Atlanta
52/31
Detroit
36/23
Houston
72/43
Kansas City
46/34
Chicago
34/21
Minneapolis
30/23
El Paso
71/46
Denver
66/37
Billings
66/42
San Francisco
68/49
Seattle
58/49
Toronto
36/22
Montreal
40/20
Winnipeg
23/17
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
todays weather.
Temperatures are
todays highs and
tonights lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
THU SAT
SUN MON
FRI
TUE
TODAY
46
26
Clouds and
sun; colder
36 19
Rain and
drizzle
possible
45 23
Variable
cloudiness
41 25
Some
sun, then
clouds
48 28
Partly
sunny and
warmer
45 31
Morning
rain;
overcast
45 22
Showers
of rain
and snow
HEATING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to heat.
Yesterday 16
Month to date 348
Season to date 4571
Last season to date 4149
Normal season to date 4965
Anchorage 27/13/s 23/11/sf
Baltimore 53/29/pc 43/27/pc
Boston 50/33/pc 40/25/pc
Buffalo 36/20/sf 30/22/sf
Charlotte 56/29/s 55/30/s
Chicago 34/21/pc 38/28/c
Cleveland 36/22/sf 34/25/pc
Dallas 68/46/s 75/52/s
Denver 66/37/s 68/42/s
Honolulu 79/63/c 79/66/pc
Indianapolis 36/22/pc 45/32/r
Las Vegas 79/59/s 81/57/s
Milwaukee 32/19/pc 36/27/sn
New Orleans 65/44/s 63/46/s
Norfolk 56/35/s 48/32/pc
Okla. City 62/41/s 74/48/s
Orlando 74/45/s 68/40/s
Phoenix 88/62/s 92/63/s
Pittsburgh 36/21/sf 36/23/pc
Portland, ME 48/30/pc 41/21/pc
St. Louis 44/29/s 55/35/pc
San Francisco 68/49/pc 66/48/pc
Seattle 58/49/r 59/47/c
Wash., DC 54/31/pc 47/32/pc
Bethlehem 1.92 -0.01 16
Wilkes-Barre 3.31 +0.34 22
Towanda 2.92 +0.81 16
Port Jervis 3.43 +0.21 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Tuesday.
Today Thu Today Thu Today Thu
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2013
Mar 19 Mar 27
Apr 2
First Full
Last New
Apr 10
7:19 a.m.
7:56 a.m.
7:08 p.m.
9:26 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 40-46. Lows: 18-24. Clouds and breaks of sun today; breezy
with a couple of snow showers. A few flurries tonight.
Highs: 49-55. Lows: 30-36. Breezy today with some sun; a shower in
the area in the afternoon. Partly cloudy tonight.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 42-48. Lows: 20-26. Mostly cloudy and breezy today with snow
at times, accumulating a coating to an inch.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 50. Low: 32. Breezy today with some sun; a shower in places
during the afternoon. A passing shower tonight.
High: 52. Low: 31. Breezy today with clouds and sun; an afternoon
shower in spots. Partly cloudy tonight. Cooler tomorrow.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Tuesday
High/low 55/42
Normal high/low 45/26
Record high 72 (1990)
Record low 1 (1960)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.84"
Month to date 0.95"
Normal m-t-d 0.88"
Year to date 4.30"
Normal y-t-d 5.28"
46/26
44/24
52/31
49/28
45/27
48/27
47/28
39/22
44/26
41/23
45/19
45/23
46/25
50/28
50/32
Summary: Chilly air with gusty winds will reach the Atlantic coast today. Snow
showers will stretch from the Great Lakes to the Appalachians. Much of the West
will be dry and warm. Rain will brush the Northwest.
Continued from Page 1A
SURVIVOR
SUBMITTED PHOTOS
Asya Chlamovitch, at top,
and Yosef Chlamovitch, the
parents of Tikva Jeral.
AP PHOTO
Monsignor Guido Marini, master of liturgical ceremonies, closes the double doors to the
Sistine Chapel in after shouting Extra omnes, Latin for all out, Tuesday.
the worlds 1.2 billion Catho-
lics has been elected.
The Catholic Churchs 115
cardinal electors were due to
resume voting today, with two
rounds in the morning followed
by another two in the after-
noon. The winning candidate
needs to secure a two-thirds
majority: at least 77 votes.
Most Vatican experts expect
the process to be completed by
weeks end.
The conclave started around
5:30 p.m., when the master of
ceremonies called the Extra
Omnes (everybody out). All
non-voting individuals were led
out of the chapel, and its doors
were locked.
The red-clad cardinals ar-
rived in the chapel in a proces-
sion. Once seated under Mi-
chelangelos famous frescoed
ceilings, they sung a hymn to in-
voke the Holy Spirits guidance
and took an oath of secrecy.
Speaking in Latin, they
pledged to maintain secrecy
regarding everything that in
any way relates to the elec-
tion of the Roman pontiff and
regarding what occurs in the
place of the election, directly or
indirectly related to the results
of the voting.
While the process is highly
secretive, and there are no for-
mal candidates, papal watchers
say this election is much more
open than the one in 2005 that
turned German-born Cardinal
Joseph Ratzinger into Pope
Benedict XVI after only four
rounds of voting.
The shortlist of papabili
(papal candidates) includes Ita-
lys Angelo Scola, Brazils Pedro
Odilo Scherer, Timothy Dolan
of the United States, Marc Ouel-
let of Canada, Peter Turkson of
Ghana and Leonardo Sandri of
Argentina.
The race is portrayed as a
clash between reformists and
curiali, those loyal to the Ro-
man Curia the equivalent of
the Vaticans government.
My guess is that wed have
a new Successor of St Peter
by Thursday evening, with a
hoped-for inaugural Mass on
March 19, Dolan wrote in
a letter to his priests in New
York, according to U.S. broad-
caster ABC News.
Continued from Page 1A
POPE
A board with odds regarding the possible new pope is
displayed in central London. Bookmakers in betting-mad
Britain are cashing in on the Roman Catholic conclave to
select a new pope.
8
0
6
9
4
9
(570) 825-8508
9999
6
9999
6
99999
6
999999999
6
9
6
99
6
999999999999999
6
99999
6
9
6666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666666
0
666
0
66
0
66
000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000
8
00000000000
8
0000
8
00
8
0000
8
00
8
0
8
0
8
0
8
00000
8
0
8888888888888888888888888888888888888888
99999999
4
9
4
9
4
9
4
9
4
9999
4
99
4
9999999
4
9
4
999999999
4
999
4
9
4
99999
4
999
4
9
4444444444444444444444444444444444444
Your Full Service Provider Offering the Latest in State-of-the-art Digital Cable,
HDTV, Video on Demand, High Speed Internet and Telephone.
Follow our local basketball team as they make
their run for the PA State Championship!
The Leader in Local Sports
On Service Electrics TV 2 Sports, Channel: 3 & 102
Second Round - 3 A Girls
Holy Redeemer vs. Villa Maria
TONIGHT! 8:30 PM
High School Basketball
PIAA State Championship
Sports SECTI ON B
THE TIMES LEADER WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 timesleader.com
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Alexis Lewis (center) and
the Holy Redeemer girls
basketball team will face
Villa Maria at 6 tonight in
the state quarternals in
Bethlehem.
P I A A G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L P L AYO F F S
Defensive storm awaits Royals
N F L
Baltimore
defense
loses two
key cogs
After clipping Athens in the -
nal minute Saturday in William-
sport, Holy Redeemer advances
to play the team that ended
Nanticokes season last year.
Villa Maria, the District 1
champion, is known to the area
as a eld hockey nemesis. The
Hurricanes are also a girls bas-
ketball roadblock, having shut
out the Trojanettes in the sec-
ond quarter
of their game
last season
also in
the second
round of the
state tourna-
ment.
But the Hurricanes team
that the Royals face in todays
6 p.m. PIAA Class 3A quarter-
nal at Freedom High School in
Bethlehem is not the same one
that stunned Nanticoke a year
ago. Sure, Villa Maria won the
District 1 crown for a third con-
secutive season. And this is the
Hurricanes 12th straight trip to
the state playoffs.
Even so, only one starter is
back from last season 5-foot-
9 guard Lisa Mirarchi. The lone
senior starter is Villas top scorer
this season, a campaign that fea-
tured her 1,000th career point.
The rest of the Hurricanes
lineup is juniors, ranging in size
from 5-5 guard Devon Tirney
to 5-11 Jackie Carlin and 5-11
Mora Fetterolf. Carlin is also a
main scoring option for Villa, as
is 5-10 guard Molly Namiotka.
The Hurricanes are not know
for their scoring, though. Villa is
built on defense, as evidenced
by its ability to hold opponents
under 30 points in 11 of its 27
Redeemer faces D-1 champion Villa Maria tonight
By JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
See ROYALS, Page 4B
U P N E X T
Holy Redeemer
vs.
Villa Maria
6 p.m. today
at Freedom
High School
Bethlehem
N B A
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Good-
bye Madison Square Garden,
Georgetown and Villanova. Hel-
lo Greensboro Coliseum, North
Carolina and Duke.
A year from now, Notre Dame
mens basketball team will be
preparing for the Atlantic Coast
Conference tournament instead
of its annual trip to New York,
where the Irish are a frustrating
9-17 all-time in the Big East tour-
nament and have never made
it to the league title game. The
school announced Tuesday it is
leaving the fractured Big East a
year sooner than originally antic-
ipated for the ACC in all sports
except football and hockey.
The switch was approved in
a vote by Big East university
presidents in the wake of a split
announced last week of the
leagues football schools and
seven Catholic schools that next
season are forming their own
basketball-focused conference
with the Big East name. The
vote means Notre Dame coaches
can move forward with schedul-
ing for the 2013-14 school year.
It removes the uncertainty
that made it hard for our coaches
and athletes, so were very happy
to resolve that for them, athlet-
ic director Jack Swarbrick said in
See NOtRe DAMe, Page 4B
Notre Dame
takes early
exit to ACC
By TOMCOYNE
Associated Press
C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
The Baltimore Ravens are pay-
ing the price for winning a Super
Bowl.
The NFL champions lost two
key components of their defense,
linebackers Paul Kruger and
Dannell Ellerbe, as free agency
began Tuesday. On Monday,
they traded star receiver Anquan
Boldin, a key to their title run,
to San Francisco the team
the Ravens beat 34-31 to win the
championship.
Kruger went north to division
rival Cleveland for a ve-year,
$40 million deal, while Ellerbe
headed south to Miami for $35
million over ve years.
The 49ers didnt go un-
touched, either. After giving up a
sixth-round draft pick for Boldin,
they saw tight end Delanie Walk-
er leave for Tennessee.
San Francisco also conrmed
the trade of backup quarterback
Alex Smith to Kansas City, a deal
that was known for weeks. The
49ers will receive the Chiefs sec-
ond-round pick, 34th overall, in
this years draft and a conditional
pick in next years draft.
The 32-year-old Boldin ex-
P I A A S W I M M I N G A N D D I V I N G C H A M P I O N S H I P S
As free agency period opens,
Ravens lose linebackers Paul
Kruger and Dannell Ellerbe.
The Associated Press
See NFL, Page 4B
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
tunkhannocks Ben Spencer is seeded third in the 200 IM for the PIAA championships at Bucknell University.
Miami streak
hits 19 with
win vs. Hawks
AP PHOTO
the Miami Heats Udonis Haslem
shoots against Atlanta Hawks John
Jenkins (12) during the rst half of an
NBA game in Miami on tuesday.
The Associated Press
MIAMI Dwyane Wade scored 23
points and the Miami Heat extended their
winning streak to 19 games, leading wire-
to-wire in beating the Atlanta Hawks 98-
81 on Tuesday night.
LeBron James scored
15 and Chris Bosh and
Mario Chalmers added
14 apiece for the Heat,
who matched the fth-
longest streak in NBA
history. They will try for
their 20th straight win
on Wednesday at Phila-
delphia, the start of a
ve-game trip.
Only three teams have
won at least 20 consecu-
tive games in the same
season: the 1971-72 Los
Angeles Lakers (33),
the 2007-08 Houston
Rockets (22) and the 1970-71 Milwaukee
Bucks (20). The Washington Capitols
also won 20 straight, spanning the end
of the 1947-48 season and the start of the
1948-49 campaign.
Josh Smith scored 15 for the Hawks,
who got 12 apiece from Al Horford and
Jeff Teague.
Ray Allen scored 12 and Udonis Haslem
grabbed 11 rebounds for the Heat, which
won easily even with James who shot
3 for 11 scoring less than 20 points for
the second straight game. James did n-
ish with seven rebounds and seven assists.
The crowd was 20,350, a record at
AmericanAirlines Arena for a regular-
season game.
Miami has the best overall record in the
NBA and now leads the Eastern Confer-
ence race by 9 games over Indiana and
New York, who were both idle Tuesday.
The Heat (48-14) have 20 games left,
while the Pacers have 19 and the Knicks
21.
98
HeAt
91
HAwkS
By JAY MONAHAN
For The Times Leader
T
here is no such thing as a
quiet swimmer.
If anyone comes close
to it its Tunkhannocks
Ben Spencer. For all of the amboy-
ance and pride that comes with the
sport, the Tigers senior spent four
years nding success in an unas-
suming way in the Wyoming Valley
Conference North Division.
But Spencer wont be qui-
etly sneaking up on anyone at this
weeks PIAA Class 2A Boys Swim-
ming and Diving Championships
today and Thursday. His competi-
tion will have an eye on the multi-
talented swimmer wearing black
and orange. As far as pre-meet
psych sheets go, hes positioned to
compete for two individual medals
and one relay medal.
He looks good, Tunkhannock
coach Tim Mislevy said. Hes got
it together mentally. He says feels
good, and hes been swimming
well in the water. Weve still been
spending some time on speed work,
starts, ne-tuning some things.
Spencer has the areas best
chance at a state gold, silver or
bronze at the Bucknell University-
based championships. Eyes will be
on Spencer in the 200 IM, where
he is seeded third with a time of
1:58.09. It was just two weeks ago at
districts when he took down senior
Tigers senior is
HuNtiNgfoRMeDAls
See MeDALS, Page 4B
District 2 state qualifers, Page 4B
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 S P O R T S
L o C A L C A L E N D A R
TODAYS EVENTS
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS BASKETBALL
PIAA Class 3A second round
Holy Redeemer vs. Villa Maria, TBA
HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING
PIAA Championships, at Kinney Natatorium,
Lewisburg, 8 a.m.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
PSU Worthington at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 3 p.m.
Misericordia at Neumann, 3:30 p.m.
PSU Hazleton at Kings, 4 p.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Marywood at Misericordia, DH, 3 p.m.
MENS COLLEGE LACROSSE
Hood at Misericordia, 4 p.m.
Marywood at Kings, 4 p.m.
THURSDAY
HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING
PIAA Championships, at Kinney Natatorium,
Lewisburg, 8 a.m.
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Kings at Muhlenberg, DH, 3 p.m.
WOMENS COLLEGE LACROSSE
Misericordia at Immaculata, 4 p.m.
Cedar Crest at Wilkes, 4:30 p.m.
Brockport at Kings, 7 p.m.
BULLETIN BOARD
CAMPS/CLINICS
Anthracite Curling Club will hold two
Learn to Curl clinics on March 19 and 26
from6-9 p.m. at The Ice Rink at Coal St.
Park. For more information, call Joshua
Sophy at 266-7978.
Sandlot Little League will have a
camp for boys and girls from ages 8-12
from 1-3 p.m. March 17, 24 and April 7.
The cost is $100. There will also be a be-
ginner camp for boys and girls ages 4-7
from 3:15-4:15 p.m. on the same days.
The cost is $50. Both camps include
hitting, pitching, elding and agilities.
For more information, call 445-1155 or
email CDD027@aol.com.
Wilkes University will have a youth
eld hockey clinic for girls in grades
1-8 (beginners are welcome) on Sunday,
April 28, from9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Uni-
versity Center on Main (UCOM). The fo-
cus of the clinic will be skill instruction
and game tactics and will include skill
drills and small game play. The clinic
will be held at the indoor facility in the
UCOM building on the corner of South
and Main in Wilkes-Barre. The cost is
$40 per person, which includes instruc-
tion and a Wilkes eld hockey t-shirt.
Registration runs from now through
April 18 and is limited to 40 players. For
more information, call head eld hockey
coach Mollie Reichard at 408-4018 or
email mollie.reichard@wilkes.edu.
MEETINGS
County Line Girls Softball League
will meet on Thursday March 14 at 6:30
p.m. in the Dupont boro bldg. All town/
team reps should attend as we will set
up divisions and discuss the upcoming
season. For more info call Bob at 881-
8744.
Crestwood Comets Football Adult
Social will be held on Saturday, April
13th at Sand Springs Golf Club in
Drums from6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The social
is a great opportunity to spend a fun
night out with family and friends, while
supporting our players. Crestwood
football T-shirts and ball caps will be
available for purchase. A basket rafe
will also be held. Please come out and
support this years team. For further
questions, please contact Deb Popson
at popsondeb@epix.net.
Crestwood Football Booster Club
will meet on Thursday, March 21 at
Tonys Pizza at 7 p.m. All parents of
players are encouraged to attend.
Crestwood Comets Boys Lacrosse
Adult Social will be held on Saturday,
April 6th at Ice House Pub in Nuan-
gola from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The social
is a great opportunity to spend a fun
night out with family and friends, while
supporting our players. Please come
out and support this years team. For
further questions, please contact Deb
Popson at popsondeb@epix.net.
GAR Football Booster Club will meet
Thursday March 14 at 7 p.m in the
Choral Room at the high school. Any
questions please contact Ron Petro-
vich, GAR Football Booster Club Presi-
dent at 970-4110 during the day or at
829-0569 in the evening or on his cell
phone at 380-3185.
Hanover Area Baseball Boosters will
meet at Buttonwood Cafe at 7:30 p.m.
on Thursday.
Wyoming Valley West Softball Boost-
er Club will have a meeting Monday,
March 18 at 7 p.m. at the WVW Middle
School. Parents of all players are en-
couraged to attend.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
County Line Girls Softball League is
looking for towns/teams/organizations
to join a girls fastpitch REC league.
CLGSL is comprised of both Lackawa-
nna and Luzerne counties. If interested
call Bob Cappelloni at 881-8744. CLGSL
will meet on Thursday, March 14, at
6:30 p.m. in the Dupont Borough build-
ing to discuss upcoming season.
Hanover Area Little League will have
its nal registrations at the Hanover
Area Jr/Sr High School in the cafete-
ria. Registration is open for all children
ages 4 to 16 as of April 30, who reside
in Hanover Township, Sugar Notch, War-
rior Run, Ashley and Newtown. Bring a
copy of the childs birth certicate as
well as three proofs of residency on
Saturday, March 9, from 9-11 a.m. Little
League girls softball registration is also
available for girls ages 8-16 will also
take place at the above listed date and
time.
Mountain Top Youth Soccer Associa-
tion will hold its rst player registration
for the fall soccer season on Saturday,
March 23, from 9 a.m. to noon at the
Crestwood High School cafeteria. Ad-
ditional registrations will be held on
Wednesday, April 3, from 6-9 p.m. and
on Saturday, April 6, from 9 a.m. to
noon. Eligible players must be from 4
to 18 years of age, as of July 31. Regis-
tration forms can be printed in advance
from the Handouts link on the MYSA
web site: www.eteamz.com/mttopysa.
For more information, contact Kelly
Leicht by email at kelly_leicht@hotmail.
com.
Next Level will have a hitting clinic
Sundays, starting April 7 thru April 28.
Please call Jim at 704-6255 for more
information. Cost $100.
The Next Level is offering a speed
and agility program for U/12 players.
Program runs Tues, Thurs and Sat.
starting March 19 and running until
APril 6. Please call 704-6255 or email
nextlevelkingston@gmail.com for
more info. Cost is $125.
Plains Yankees Football and Cheer-
leading Organization will have registra-
tions March 20, from 6-8 p.m. at the
Plains American Legion, 101 E. Carey
St., Plains. The cost is $60 for one child
or $75 per family, with additional uni-
form fees for rst-time players. Bring a
recent picture of the child along with a
copy of his or her birth certicate.
Sunday Softball League begins Sun-
day, April 4. Teams may register by
contacting John Leighton at 430-8437.
Deadline for entry will be March 31st.
All Games are played Sunday mornings
and early afternoon. Teams will play
doubleheaders each Sunday.
Swoyersville Slowpitch Girls Soft-
ball will hold sign-ups every Tuesday
and Saturday through March, Tuesday
sign ups are from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Sat-
urday signups are from 9 a.m. to noon.
All signups will be at the softball eld
on Tripp Street. The league is for those
ages seven and up and costs $45 per
child and $10 for each additional child.
For more information, call Richard
Harned at 991-1415.
Wilkes-Barre Jr./Sr. Legion Baseball
is holding registrations Thursday, March
14th from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 423 South
River Street. All players aged 13-19 and
residing in the Meyers and GAR school
districts are eligible. Proof of age and
residence are required. Any questions
please call 332-4650 or 824-8650.
UPCOMING EVENTS/OTHER
Athletes for Better Education and
African Missions Project Basketball
will have a basketball tournament in the
Greater Hazleton Area Saturday and
Sunday, March 23-24. All proceeds af-
ter expenses will go toward African Mis-
sions Project Ministries and Athletes
For Better Education Programs. The
age divisions for boys is 10 and under,
12 and under, 13 and under, 14and under,
15 and under, 16 and under, 18 and under
[ A + B ] and adult 18 and older [ A +
B ]. For girls it is 10 and under, 12 and
under, 13 and under, 14and under, 15 and
under, 16 and under, 18 and under [ A +
B ] and adults 18 and older [Only one di-
vision]. The cost is $ 225 per team and
is a four game guarantee format. All
games will be played in Hazleton Area
School District gyms. To register call
1-866-906-2323 Monday to Friday from
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. or email jbieber@afbe.
org or visit www.afbe.org (In right hand
column under Basketball Tournament
click on Hazleton Area High School
Basketball Tournament). The deadline
for registration and payment is March
15. Check rules format as they will be
strictly enforced.
West Pittston Little League will be
hosting their annual Easter Egg hunt for
kids 10 years old or younger on Satur-
day March 23 at the West Pittston Little
Fields. Registration begins at 12:30 p.m.
next to the concession stand. The Eas-
ter Egg hunt will be begin at 1 p.m. Event
will take place rain or shine.
Wyoming Area Baseball Meet the
Warriors will be held Sunday, March 24
at 1 p.m. in the Secondary Center Caf-
eteria. All players from grades 7-12 are
expected to attend and should arrive
by 12:45 p.m. The baseball mass will be
held on Sunday, April 7 at 10:30 p.m. at
St Barbaras Church, Exeter.
Wyoming Seminary will have its sec-
ond annual Wyoming Seminary Rusty
Flack Open Golf Tournament and Dinner
Party Monday, May 20 at the Huntsville
Golf Club, Lehman. The tournament
will begin at 1 p.m. The event will end
with a dinner. Proceeds will benet
the Wyoming Seminary Opportunities
Fund, the Alumni Scholarship Fund and
the Rusty Flack Fund. Registration and
lunch will begin at noon. To register for
the tournament or for more information
on sponsorship opportunities, call Julie
McCarthy Strzeletz at 270-2142.
AMERICAS LINE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the
Bucks - Wizards circle is for numerous Milwaukee
injuries; the Celtics - Raptors circle is for Boston
forward Paul Pierce (questionable) and Toronto
guard Rudy Gay (questionable); the Jazz - Thun-
der circle is for Utah forward Paul Millsap (ques-
tionable); the Kings - Bulls circle is for Sacramento
center DeMarcus Cousins (doubtful - possible
suspension).
BOXING REPORT: In the WBC welterweight
title fght on May 4 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Floyd
Mayweather Jr. is -$950 vs. Robert Guerrero at
+$650.
NBA
Favorite Points O/U Underdog
WIZARDS [2] NL Bucks
Heat 8.5 194.5 76ERS
PACERS 14.5 186.5 TWolves
HAWKS 1 205.5 Lakers
CELTICS [5] NL Raptors
THUNDER [1] NL Jazz
ROCKETS 12.5 215.5 Suns
Bulls [3] NL KINGS
WARRIORS 11.5 199.5 Pistons
NUGGETS 8 208.5 Knicks
CLIPPERS 5.5 187.5 Grizzlies
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
Big East Conference Tournament
New York, NY
Cincinnati 3.5 Providence
Syracuse 11.5 Seton Hall
or
Syracuse 12.5 S Florida
Villanova 5 St. Johns
Notre Dame 6 Rutgers
or
Notre Dame 10 DePaul
Pac 12 Conference Tournament
Las Vegas, NV
Stanford 3.5 Arizona St
Colorado 5 Oregon St
Usc 2 Utah
Washington 1.5 Washington St
Mountain West Conference Tournament
Las Vegas, NV
UNLV 10 Air Force
Colorado St 9.5 Fresno St
New Mexico 8.5 Wyoming
or
New Mexico 10.5 Nevada
San Diego St 4.5 Boise St
Conference USA Conference Tournament
Tulsa, OK
Uab 2 Smu
Houston 10.5 Rice
Tulane 3.5 Marshall
Mid American Conference Tournament
Cleveland, OH
Buffalo 2.5 Ball St
Miami-Ohio 2 E Michigan
Big 12 Conference Tournament
Kansas City, MO
W Virginia 8.5 Texas Tech
Texas 11.5 Tcu
SEC Conference Tournament
Nashville, TN
S Carolina 5.5 Mississippi St
Texas A&M 5 Auburn
Thursday
Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament
Greensboro, NC
Georgia Tech 1 Boston College
NC State 12 Virginia Tech
Maryland 5.5 Wake Forest
Florida St 2 Clemson
Big Ten Conference Tournament
Chicago, IL
Minnesota 1.5 Illinois
Michigan 14 Penn St
Purdue 6 Nebraska
Iowa 9.5 Northwestern
Atlantic 10 Conference Tournament
Brooklyn, NY
Richmond 5 Charlotte
Butler 3 Dayton
St. Josephs 1 Xavier
Massachusetts 2.5 George Wash
Big 12 Conference Tournament
Kansas City, MO
Oklahoma PK Iowa St
Oklahoma St 2.5 Baylor
SEC Conference Tournament
Nashville, TN
Lsu PK Georgia
Arkansas 2 Vanderbilt
Conference USA Conference Tournament
Tulsa, OK
E Carolina PK Tulsa
Western Athletic Conference Tournament
Las Vegas, NV
New Mexico St 6.5 Idaho
Utah St 3.5 Tx-Arlington
Big West Conference Tournament
Anaheim, CA
Pacifc 5.5 Cal-Santa Barb
Cal-Poly SLO 2 Cal-Davis
Long Beach St 7 CS-Fullerton
Cal-Irvine 4.5 Hawaii
Big Sky Conference Tournament
Missoula, MT
Weber St 13.5 No Arizona
N Dakota 2 Southern Utah
No Colorado 3.5 Montana St
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
CANADIENS -$175/+$165 Senators
DEVILS -$125/+$165 Flyers
FLAMES -$110/-$110 Red Wings
W H AT S o N T V
BASEBALL
7 p.m.
MLB World Baseball Classic, second round,
teams TBD, at Miami
MENS COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Noon
ESPN Big East Conference, second round,
Providence vs. Cincinnati, at New York
2 p.m.
ESPN Big East Conference, second round,
Syracuse vs. Seton Hall-South Florida winner, at
New York
3 p.m.
CBSSN Mountain West Tournament, quarterf-
nal, teams TBD
5:30 p.m.
CBSSN Mountain West Tournament, quarterf-
nal, teams TBD
7 p.m.
ESPN2 Big East Conference, second round,
Villanova vs. St. Johns, at New York
7:30 p.m.
CBSSN Patriot League Tournament, fnal,
teams TBD
PLUS SECTournament, frst round, teams TBD
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Big East Conference, second round,
Notre Dame vs. Rutgers-DePaul winner, at New
York
9:30 p.m.
CBSSN Mountain West Tournament, quarterf-
nal, teams TBD
10 p.m.
PLUS SECTournament, frst round, teams TBD
Midnight
CBSSN Mountain West Tournament, quarterf-
nal, teams TBD
NBA BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
CSN Miami at Philadelphia
8 p.m.
ESPN Utah at Oklahoma City
10:30 p.m.
MSG New York at Denver
NHL HOCKEY
7:30 p.m.
NBCSN Philadelphia at New Jersey
SOCCER
3:30 p.m.
FSN UEFA Champions League, Porto at Mal-
aga
8 p.m.
FSN UEFAChampions League, Arsenal at Bay-
ern Munich (same-day tape)
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Named Nelson Nor-
man director of baseball operations for the Domini-
can Republic.
BOSTON RED SOX Optioned OF Alex Has-
san and RHP Steven Wright to Pawtucket (IL).
Reassigned RHP Pedro Beato, 1B/OF Mark Ham-
ilton, OF Jeremy Hazelbaker and OF Juan Carlos
Linares to their minor league camp.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS Optioned LHP Chris
Dwyer and LHP Justin Marks to Omaha (PCL) and
LHP John Lamb to Northwest Arkansas (TL).
SEATTLE MARINERS Optioned LHP An-
thony Fernandez to Jackson (SL).
National League
ATLANTA BRAVES Optioned RHP Cory
Rasmus to Gwinnett (IL) and RHP Juan Jaime
and RHP Aaron Northcraft to Mississippi (SL).
Reassigned LHP Ryan Buchter, LHP Yohan
Flande, RHP Gus Schlosser, C Luis De La Cruz,
C Braeden Schlehuber, C Jose Yepez and INF Joe
Leonard to their minor league camp.
CINCINNATI REDS_Optioned LHP Tony Cin-
grani and RHP Daniel Corcino to Louisville (IL).
Optioned RHP Kyle Lotzkar and RHP Josh Ravin
to Double-A (SL). Optioned RHP Carlos Contreras
and OF Yorman Rodriguez to Bakersfeld (Calif.).
Optioned LHP Ismael Guillon to Dayton (MW). Re-
assigned RHP Nick Christiani, RHP Chad Rogers,
C Nevin Ashley, INF Kristopher Negron and OF
Ryan LaMarre to their minor league camp.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS Optioned LHP Kevin
Siegrist to Memphis (PCL). Reassigned LHP Bar-
ret Browning and C Cody Stanley to their minor
league camp.
BASKETBALL
USA BASKETBALL Named Davidson coach
Bob McKillop coach and South Carolina coach
Frank Martin and Michigan coach John Beilein
assistant coaches of the mens World University
Games team and Oklahoma coach Sherri Coale
coach and Marist coach Brian Giorgis and Penn
State coach Coquese Washington assistant
coaches of the womens World University Games
team.
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS Assigned G
Kent Bazemore and F Malcolm Thomas to Santa
Cruz (NBADL).
MIAMI HEAT Signed F Juwan Howard to a
second 10-day contract.
NEW ORLEANS HORNETS Signed F Lou
Amundson for the remainder of the season. Re-
leased F/C Henry Sims.
T R A N S A C T I o N S
FIGHT SCHEDULE
March 16
At Panama City, Panama, John Riel Casimero
vs. Luis Alberto Rios, 12, for Casimeros IBF ju-
nior fyweight title; Roberto Vasquez vs. John Mark
Apolinario, 12, for Apolinarios interim WBA World
bantamweight title.
At Ica, Peru, Alberto Rossel vs. Walter Tello, 12,
for Rossels interim WBAWorld light fyweight title.
At The Home Depot Center, Carson, Calif. (HBO)
Timothy Bradley, Jr. vs. Ruslan Provodnikov, 12,
for Bradleys WBO welterweight title; Jessie Var-
gas vs. Wale Omotosu, 10, welterweights.
B o X I N G
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
Providence 59 35 19 0 5 75 167 152
Portland 59 33 21 3 2 71 173 178
Manchester 59 28 24 3 4 63 174 163
Worcester 57 27 23 1 6 61 143 160
St. Johns 60 23 32 1 4 51 144 188
East Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
Syracuse 60 36 17 3 4 79 205 162
Binghamton 59 36 17 1 5 78 178 147
Penguins 60 32 25 2 1 67 141 138
Hershey 60 28 24 3 5 64 155 153
Norfolk 58 27 26 4 1 59 144 159
Northeast Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
Springfeld 58 34 16 5 3 76 182 139
Connecticut 61 28 25 5 3 64 175 185
Albany 57 26 20 1 10 63 154 160
Bridgeport 58 25 24 5 4 59 173 194
Adirondack 58 23 30 2 3 51 138 170
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
Grand Rapids 58 35 19 2 2 74 191 157
Chicago 56 29 19 4 4 66 153 147
Milwaukee 58 28 24 3 3 62 147 170
Rockford 59 30 27 1 1 62 184 176
Peoria 59 25 27 4 3 57 144 177
North Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto 57 31 20 2 4 68 180 153
Rochester 57 31 22 3 1 66 186 163
Abbotsford 62 28 25 3 6 65 133 151
Lake Erie 61 27 25 2 7 63 171 178
Hamilton 59 24 29 1 5 54 126 172
South Division
GP W LOL SL Pts GF GA
Texas 59 33 16 4 6 76 173 152
Charlotte 60 35 20 2 3 75 183 155
Houston 59 30 21 4 4 68 160 153
Oklahoma City 58 28 22 2 6 64 183 193
San Antonio 57 26 26 1 4 57 149 164
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one
point for an overtime or shootout loss.
Tuesdays Games
Bridgeport 3, Springfeld 2, OT
Todays Games
Adirondack at Portland, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m.
Lake Erie at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Norfolk at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Penguins at Worcester, 7 p.m.
Binghamton at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Peoria at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Abbotsford at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Abbotsford at Houston, 8:05 p.m.
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 27 19 8 0 38 100 78
New Jersey 26 12 9 5 29 65 75
N.Y. Rangers 25 13 10 2 28 64 61
N.Y. Islanders 26 11 12 3 25 77 88
Philadelphia 27 12 14 1 25 75 82
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Montreal 26 17 5 4 38 84 66
Boston 24 17 4 3 37 72 53
Ottawa 26 13 8 5 31 61 54
Toronto 27 15 11 1 31 81 75
Buffalo 27 10 14 3 23 70 84
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Carolina 25 15 9 1 31 79 69
Winnipeg 26 13 11 2 28 68 76
Tampa Bay 26 11 14 1 23 88 81
Washington 25 10 14 1 21 69 76
Florida 27 7 14 6 20 66 101
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 26 21 2 3 45 85 58
St. Louis 26 14 10 2 30 80 79
Detroit 26 12 9 5 29 68 66
Nashville 25 10 9 6 26 54 61
Columbus 27 10 12 5 25 62 74
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver 25 12 7 6 30 68 68
Minnesota 25 13 10 2 28 59 61
Colorado 24 10 10 4 24 62 69
Edmonton 25 9 11 5 23 60 76
Calgary 24 9 11 4 22 64 82
Pacifc Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Anaheim 25 19 3 3 41 87 63
Los Angeles 24 14 8 2 30 71 60
San Jose 25 11 8 6 28 58 61
Phoenix 25 12 10 3 27 72 72
Dallas 24 12 10 2 26 67 67
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Mondays Games
Boston 3, Ottawa 2, SO
Los Angeles 3, Calgary 1
Tuesdays Games
Vancouver 2, Columbus 1, SO
Buffalo 3, N.Y. Rangers 1
Carolina 4, Washington 0
Pittsburgh 3, Boston 2
Tampa Bay 3, Florida 2
Winnipeg 5, Toronto 2
St. Louis 4, San Jose 2
Anaheim 2, Minnesota 1
Nashville at Dallas, late
Edmonton at Colorado, late
Los Angeles at Phoenix, late
Todays Games
Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Detroit at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Florida at Boston, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Washington at Carolina, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Anaheim at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Nashville at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Fridays Games
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Calgary 9 p.m.
Detroit at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
H o C K E Y
H . S . B A S K E T B A L L
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
New York 38 23 .623
Brooklyn 38 27 .585 2
Boston 34 29 .540 5
Toronto 25 39 .391 14
Philadelphia 24 39 .381 15
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
x-Miami 48 14 .774
Atlanta 34 29 .540 14
Washington 20 42 .323 28
Orlando 18 47 .277 31
Charlotte 14 50 .219 35
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Indiana 39 24 .619
Chicago 35 28 .556 4
Milwaukee 32 30 .516 6
Detroit 23 43 .348 17
Cleveland 22 42 .344 17
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio 49 16 .754
Memphis 42 19 .689 5
Houston 34 30 .531 14
Dallas 30 33 .476 18
New Orleans 22 43 .338 27
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City 47 17 .734
Denver 43 22 .662 4
Utah 33 31 .516 14
Portland 29 33 .468 17
Minnesota 22 39 .361 23
Pacifc Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers 45 20 .692
Golden State 36 29 .554 9
L.A. Lakers 34 31 .523 11
Phoenix 22 42 .344 22
Sacramento 22 43 .338 23
x-clinched playoff spot
Mondays Games
Philadelphia 106, Brooklyn 97
San Antonio 105, Oklahoma City 93
Utah 103, Detroit 90
Denver 108, Phoenix 93
Golden State 92, New York 63
Tuesdays Games
Cleveland 95, Washington 90
Charlotte 100, Boston 74
L.A. Lakers 106, Orlando 97
Brooklyn 108, New Orleans 98
Miami 98, Atlanta 81
Minnesota 107, San Antonio 83
Dallas 115, Milwaukee 108
Memphis at Portland, late
Todays Games
Miami at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Washington, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 8 p.m.
Utah at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Detroit at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
New York at Denver, 10:30 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Dallas at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
New York at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
B A S K E T B A L L
BOYS STATE GLANCE
Numbers in parentheses are district and seeding
followed by record. District 2 teams are in bold.
CLASS 4A
FIRST ROUND
Saturday, March 9
Chester 74, Cumberland Valley 43
Williamsport 62, Bethlehem Liberty 60
Great Valley 39, Wilson 32
Parkland 63, Ridley 53
Norristown 79, Roman Catholic 66
Coatesville 52, Lancaster McCaskey 51
St. Josephs Prep 48, Abington 33
York 67, Methacton 63
Harrisburg 87, Central Bucks South 41
Upper Darby 47, Bethlehem Freedom 45
Lower Merion 77, Carlisle 36
Martin Luther King 71, Reading 61
New Castle 63, Gateway 43
North Allegheny 84, State College 76
Hampton 50, Perry Traditional 41
Erie Cathedral Prep 79, Seneca Valley 54
SECOND ROUND
Todays games
Chester (1-1, 25-3) vs. Williamsport (4-1, 23-2) at
Martz Hall, Pottsville, 7:30 p.m.
Great Valley (1-4, 27-3) vs. Parkland (11-1, 22-7) at
William Tennent H.S., Warminster, 7 p.m.
Norristown (1-9, 24-4) vs. Coatesville (1-5, 23-7) at
Spring-Ford H.S., Royersford, 7 p.m.
St. Josephs Prep (12-3, 22-5) vs. York (3-2, 27-3)
at Coatesville H.S., 7 p.m.
Harrisburg (3-1, 27-2) vs. Upper Darby (1-6, 19-9)
at Geigle Complex, Reading, 8 p.m.
Lower Merion (1-2, 26-3) vs. Martin Luther King
(12-2, 24-4) at Plymouth-Whitemarsh H.S., Plym-
outh Meeting, 7 p.m.
New Castle (7-1, 27-0) vs. North Allegheny (7-4,
22-4) at Slippery Rock University, 6 p.m.
Hampton (7-2, 22-5) vs. Erie Cathedral Prep (10-1,
22-2) at Farrell H.S., 7 p.m.
CLASS 3A
FIRST ROUND
Friday, March 8
Abington Heights 67, Shikellamy 37
Allentown Central Catholic 64, Northeastern 51
Archbishop Carroll 47, Berks Catholic 42
Beaver Area 60, Bradford 46
Chartiers Valley 71, Erie Strong Vincent 54
Donegal 64, GAR 44
General McLane 67, Thomas Jefferson 42
Girard 66, Mars 62
Johnstown 49, Lancaster Catholic 43
Imhotep Charter 79, Salisbury 34
Montour 52, South Fayette 43
Neumann-Goretti 81, Harrisburg Bishop McDevitt
54
Philadelphia Electrical 48, Palmyra 44
Pope John Paul II 59, Bethlehem Catholic 56
Scranton Prep 69, Milton 32
Susquehanna Township 62, Upper Moreland 42
SECOND ROUND
Tuesdays results
Neumann-Goretti 51, Scranton Prep 44 OT
Donegal 66, Allentown Central Catholic 57
Abington Heights 66, Philadelphia Electrical 63 OT
Imhotep Charter 57, Susquehanna Twp. 48
Archbishop Carroll 57, Pope John Paul II 40
Chartiers Valley 65, Johnstown 38
Montour 48, Girard 38
General McLane 69, Beaver Area 54
QUARTEFINALS
Fridays games
(Sites & times TBA)
Neumann-Goretti (12-1, 23-5) vs. Donegal (3-3,
28-2)
Abington Heights (2-1, 27-2) vs. Imhotep Charter
(12-2, 25-5)
Archbishop Carroll (12-4, 21-6) vs. Chartiers Val-
ley (7-2, 24-4)
Montour (7-1, 24-4) vs. General McLane (10-1,
22-5)
CLASS 2A
PLAY-IN
Thursday, Feb. 28
Conemaugh Township 55, Westinghouse 44
FIRST ROUND
Saturday, March 9
Communications Tech 68, Camp Hill 43
Loyalsock 63, Mid Valley 54
William Sayre 56, New Hope-Solebury 54
Camp Hill Trinity 57, Meyers 47
Holy Cross 60, Lewisburg 55
Del-Val Charter 63, Conwell-Egan 59
Delone Catholic 63, Wellsboro 47
Constitution 66, Notre Dame-Green Pond 28
Beaver Falls 92, Bald Eagle Area 48
Mercyhurst Prep 56, Brockway 46
Greensburg Central Catholic 66, Penn Cambria 56
Lakeview 44, Quaker Valley 40
Conemaugh Twp. 53, Brentwood 49
Northern Cambria 58, Apollo-Ridge 53
Bishop McCort 62, Burrell 43
West Middlesex 55, Jeannette 50
SECOND ROUND
Todays games
Communications Tech (12-1, 20-7) vs. Loyalsock
(4-1, 25-3) at Cumberland Valley H.S., Mechanic-
sburg, 7:30 p.m.
William Sayre (12-4, 18-9) vs. Camp Hill Trinity (3-
2, 19-7) at Governor Miffin I.S., Shillington, 6 p.m.
Holy Cross (2-1, 24-5) vs. Del-Val Charter (12-5,
10-15) at Freedom H.S., Bethlehem, 7:30 p.m.
Delone Catholic (3-1, 18-9) vs. Consti tution (12-3,
17-9) at Governor Miffin I.S., Shillington, 7:30 p.m.
Beaver Falls (7-1, 24-3) vs. Mercyhurst Prep (10-3,
18-8) at Sharon H.S., 6 p.m.
Greensburg Central Catholic (7-6, 23-2) vs. Lakev-
iew (10-2, 22-4) at Sharon H.S., 7:30 p.m.
Conemaugh Twp. (5-1, 24-3) vs. Northern Cambria
(6-2, 22-5) at Richland H.S., Johnstown, 7 p.m.
Johnstown Bishop McCort (6-3, 19-8) vs. West
Middlesex (10-1, 23-3) at Clarion University, 7:30
p.m.
CLASS A
FIRST ROUND
Friday, March 8
Bishop Carroll 58, Shanksville-Stoneycreek 32
Church Farm School 58, New Hope Academy
Charter 44
Clairton 76, Cochranton 48
Johnsonburg 62, Eisenhower 30
Lincoln Park Charter 54, Kennedy Catholic 45
Mahanoy Area 58, Muncy 44
Neumann 84, Harrisburg Christian 38
Philadelphia MC&S 86, Gospel of Grace 41
Pius X 50, Old Forge 47
Ridgway 63, Homer-Center 39
Sankofa Freedom 54, Lebanon Catholic 41
Shade 75, Pittsburgh North Catholic 47
Smethport 62, Bishop Guilfoyle 56
Sullivan County 56, Greenwood 32
Vaux 63, Delco Christian 42
Vincentian Academy 82, North Clarion 47
SECOND ROUND
Tuesdays results
Sankofa Freedom 61, Pius X 56
Math, Civics & Sciences 62, St. John Neumann 46
Church Farm 42, Mahanoy Area 36
Vaux 76, Sullivan County 41
Bishop Carroll 92, Vincentian 85
Lincoln Park 51, Ridgway 34
Smethport 37, Clairton 35
Johnsonburg 54, Shade 49
QUARTERFINALS
Fridays games
(Sites & times TBA)
Sankofa Freedom (12-3, 16-11) vs. Math, Civics &
Science (12-2, 25-2)
Church Farm (1-1, 23-6) vs. Vaux (12-1, 21-8)
Bishop Carroll (6-2, 23-5) vs. Lincoln Park (7-4,
21-6)
Smethport (9-4, 24-3) vs. Johnsonburg (9-1, 28-2)
GIRLS STATE GLANCE
Numbers in parentheses are district and seeding
followed by record. District 2 teams are in bold.
CLASS 4A
FIRST ROUND
Friday, March 8
Archbishop Carroll 54, Upper Dublin 43
Cardinal OHara 46, Methacton 34
Central Dauphin 57, Boyertown 39
Central Dauphin East 48, Central Bucks West 46
Chartiers Valley 70, Allderdice 41
Cumberland Valley 35, Mount St. Joseph 34
Dover 54, West Chester Rustin 53
Gateway 50, Erie McDowell 49
Manheim Township 61, Philadelphia Central 20
Mount Lebanon 37, Bethel Park 34
Nazareth 41, Pennsbury 28
North Penn 44, Pocono Mountain West 38
Penn-Trafford 50, Hollidaysburg 41
Spring-Ford 59, Hershey 41
Wallenpaupack 43, Parkland 40
Wilson 41, Garnet Valley 34
SECOND ROUND
Tuesdays results
Spring-Ford 58, Wallenpaupack 44
Dover 42, Nazareth 38
Cardinal OHara 47, Central Dauphin East 32
Central Dauphin 56, Archbishop Carroll 44
North Penn 56, Wilson 49
Cumberland Valley 55, Manheim Twp. 39
Mount Lebanon 59, Penn-Trafford 36
Chartiers Valley 53, Gateway 42
QUARTERFINALS
Fridays games
(Sites & times TBA)
Spring-Ford (1-1l 29-2) vs. Dover (3-4, 27-3)
Cardinal OHara (12-1, 23-5) vs. Central Dauphin
(3-2, 22-6)
North Penn (1-6, 24-5) vs. Cumberland Valley (3-
5, 23-6)
Mount Lebanon (7-4, 24-3) vs. Chartiers Valley
(7-2, 20-7)
CLASS 3A
FIRST ROUND
Saturday, March 9
Prep Charter 79, Eastern York 51
Gettysburg 45, Merion Mercy 36
Bethlehem Catholic 60, Archbishop Prendergast
43
Honesdale 44, Danville 30
Palmyra 68, Freire Charter 37
Scranton Prep 60, Southern Lehigh 57
Holy Redeemer 40, Athens 38
Villa Maria Academy 52, West York 40
Lancaster Catholic 89, Susquehannock 79 2OT
Archbishop Wood 60, Pope John Paul II 39
Forest Hills 46, Hampton 43
Blackhawk 86, Bradford 46
South Park 71, Hickory 44
Hopewell 45, Villa Maria 28
Elizabeth Forward 51, Central Valley 44
Franklin 66, Ligonier Valley 46
SECOND ROUND
Todays games
Prep Charter (12-1, 19-2) vs. Gettysburg (3-3, 22-
6) at Garden Spot H.S., New Holland, 7:30 p.m.
Bethlehem Catholic (11-1, 25-2) vs. Honesdale (2-
1, 24-3) at Hazleton H.S., 7:30 p.m.
Palmyra (3-1, 29-0) vs. Scranton Prep (2-2, 26-2)
at Martz Hall, Pottsville, 6 p.m.
Holy Redeemer (2-3, 21-7) vs. Villa Maria Acade-
my (1-1, 22-5) at FreedomH.S., Bethlehem, 6 p.m.
Lancaster Catholic (3-5, 29-1) vs. Archbishop
Wood (12-2, 18-9) at Geigle Complex, Reading,
6:30 p.m.
Forest Hills (6-1, 20-4) vs. Blackhawk (7-4, 25-1) at
Hempfeld H.S., Greensburg, 7:30 p.m.
South Park (7-1, 24-2) vs. Hopewell (7-3, 22-4) at
Chartiers Valley H.S., Bridgeville, 7 p.m.
Elizabeth Forward (7-2, 23-3) vs. Franklin (10-1,
25-1) at Slippery Rock University, 7:30 p.m.
QUARTERFINALS
Saturdays games
(Sites & times TBA)
Prep Charter/Gettyburg winner vs. Bethlehem
Catholic/Honesdale winner
Palmyra/Scranton Prep winner vs. Holy Redeem-
er/Villa Maria Acad. winner
Lancaster Cath./Archbishop Wood winner vs. For-
est Hills/Blackhawk winner
South Park/Hopewell winner vs. Elizabeth For-
ward/Franklin winner
CLASS 2A
FIRST ROUND
Friday, March 8
Bishop Canevin 51, Westmont Hilltop 37
Burrell 65, Bellwood-Antis 46
Delone Catholic 72, Holy Cross 48
Dunmore 44, Muncy 32
General McLane 51, Jeannette 34
Greensburg Central Catholic 58, Blairsville 39
Mohawk 52, Everett 44
Mount Carmel 80, GAR 70
Neumann-Goretti 76, Annville-Cleona 37
North East 59, McGuffey 49
Notre Dame-Green Pond 58, Southern Columbia
36
Pine Grove 49, Imhotep Charter 37
Seton-LaSalle 67, Kane Area 16
Sharpsville 38, Brookville 32
St. Basil 69, High School of the Future 29
York Catholic 72, Parkway Center City 30
SECOND ROUND
Tuesdays results
Notre Dame-Green Pond 51, Neumann-Goretti
49 2OT
Saint Basil 47, Delone Catholic 40
York Catholic 50, Dunmore 39
Pine Grove 50, Mount Carmel 43
Bishop Canevin 54, General McLane 36
Burrell 45, Sharpsville 18
Seton-LaSalle 58, Greensburg Cent. Cath. 38
Mohawk 56, North East 49
QUARTERFINALS
Fridays games
(Sites & times TBA)
Notre Dame-Green Pond (11-1, 21-5) vs. Saint
Basil (1-1, 18-8)
York Catholic (3-1, 27-2) vs. Pine Grove (11-2,
24-4)
Bishop Canevin (7-1, 24-3) vs. Burrell (7-3, 24-3)
Seton-LaSalle (8-2, 26-2) vs. Mohawk (7-5, 19-7)
CLASS A
FIRST ROUND
Saturday, March 9
Steelton-Highspire 91, Northeast Bradford 51
Jenkintown 58, Paul Robeson 27
Old Forge 60, High Point Baptist 26
Tri-Valley 52, Sayre 27
Lourdes Regional 51, Upper Dauphin 29
Girard College 35, Notre Dame-East Stroudsburg
33
Halifax 68, Motivation 25
Southern Fulton 63, Juniata Valley 30
Vincentian 58, Keystone 31
BerlinBrothersvalley 50, Portage 47
Port Allegany 52, Penns Manor 45
Kennedy Catholic 45, North Catholic 36
Bishop Guilfoyle 47, Johnsonburg 26
Serra Catholic 67, Cochranton 43
Conemaugh Twp. 49, Quigley Catholic 44
Clarion 52, Winchester Thurston 30
SECOND ROUND
Todays games
Steelton-Highspire (3-1, 24-4) vs. Jenkintown (1-2,
22-6) at Garden Spot H.S., New Holland, 6 p.m.
Old Forge (2-1, 25-0) vs. Tri-Valley (11-1, 24-3) at
Hazleton H.S., 6 p.m.
Lourdes Regional (4-1, 21-5) vs. Girard College (1-
1, 21-4) at Geigle Complex, Reading, 5 p.m.
Halifax (3-2, 17-10) vs. Southern Fulton (5-2, 24-3)
at Cumberland Valley H.S., Mechanicsburg, 6 p.m.
Vincentian (7-1, 26-1) vs. BerlinBrothersvalley (5-
3, 23-4) at Hempfeld H.S., Greensburg, 6 p.m.
Port Allegany (9-2, 22-4) vs. Kennedy Catholic (10-
1, 23-2) at Clarion University, 6 p.m.
Bishop Guilfoyle (6-1, 25-2) vs. Serra Catholic (7-
2, 24-3) at Indiana H.S., 7:30 p.m.
Conemaugh Twp. (5-1, 22-4) vs. Clarion (9-1, 24-
3) at Indiana H.S., 6 p.m.
QUATERFINALS
Saturdays games
(Sites & times TBA)
Steelton-Highspire/Jenkintown winner vs. Old
Forge/Tri-Valley winner
Lourdes Regional/Girard College winner vs. Hali-
fax/Southern Fulton winner
Vincetian/BerlinBrothersvalley winner vs. Port Al-
legany/Kennedy Cath. winner
Bishop Guilfoyle/Serra Catholic winner vs. Conem-
augh Twp./Clarion winner
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS Agreed to terms with
S Rashad Johnson on a three-year contract.
BALTIMORE RAVENS Signed LS Morgan
Cox and WR/KR David Reed to two-year con-
tracts.
BUFFALO BILLS Released QB Ryan Fitz-
patrick.
CINCINNATI BENGALS Signed DE Wallace
Gilberry to a contract extension.
DETROIT LIONS Agreed to terms with S
Amari Spievey on a one-year contract.
HOUSTON TEXANS Released WR Kevin
Walter.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS Traded WR Percy
Harvin to Seattle for 2013 frst- and seventh-round
draft picks and a 2014 third-round draft pick. Ter-
minated the contract of CB Antoine Winfeld. Re-
signed T Phil Loadholt.
PHILADELPHIA EAGLES Released CB
Nnamdi Asomugha.
SAN DIEGO CHARGERS Released TE
Randy McMichael.
TENNESSEE TITANS Announced the retire-
ment of G Steve Hutchinson.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS Recalled F Jim-
my Hayes from Rockford (AHL). Assigned D Steve
Montador to Rockford.
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS Activated F
Brandon Dubinsky from injured reserve. Assigned
F Matthew Ford to Springfeld (AHL).
DALLAS STARS Recalled F Tomas Vincour
from Texas (AHL). Assigned F Matt Fraser to
Texas.
DETROIT RED WINGS Recalled F Gustav
Nyquist from Grand Rapids (AHL). Reassigned
F Tomas Tatar to Grand Rapids and D Gleason
Fournier from Grand Rapids to Toledo (ECHL).
MINNESOTAWILD Traded F Matt Kassian to
Ottawa for a 2014 sixth-round draft pick.
NEW JERSEY DEVILS Placed D Henrik
Tallinder on injured reserve, retroactive to March
7. Recalled F Harri Pesonen fromAlbany (AHL).
PHILADELPHIA FLYERS Traded F Matthew
Ford to Columbus for future considerations.
PHOENIX COYOTES Recalled DChris Sum-
mers from Portland (AHL).
TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING Reassigned G Ce-
drick Desjardins to Syracuse (AHL).
SOCCER
North American Soccer League
NEW YORK COSMOS_Signed M Joseph Nane
and D Juan Gonzalez.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 PAgE 3B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com B A S E B A L L
BRADENTON, Fla. Neil
Walker knows what its like to
watch a Pittsburgh Pirates sea-
son slip away. It happened time
and again during his childhood,
when one fruitless summer led to
another for his hometown team.
It was exasperating, but it
wasnt nearly as painful as what
happened last fall, when the sec-
ond basemans back went out
and Pittsburghs hopes of mak-
ing the playoffs for the rst time
in 20 years soon followed.
The Pirates were 68-59 on
Aug. 27 when Walker began
to feel the effects of what was
eventually diagnosed as a herni-
ated disk. He missed 27 of the
teams nal 35 games, gritting
his teeth as the Pirates faded
from contention.
Theres not a more helpless
feeling as a guy thats used to
playing every day than to not
be out there and help the team,
especially in times of need,
Walker said.
Replacement Brock Holt
struggled to provide a spark ei-
ther at the plate or in the eld
and Pittsburghs offense all but
disappeared without help from
the steady switch-hitter deter-
mined to return the Pirates to
prominence.
Walkers absence was hardly
the only thing that went wrong
over the seasons nal six weeks,
though that didnt make it any
easier to swallow. Its one of
the reasons why the 27-year-old
started his offseason program
barely a week after the Pirates
ended up 78-84.
Working with a team of spe-
cialists, Walker gradually rebuilt
strength in his back and was as-
sured at every step along the way
it not be a recurring problem.
That was welcome news to a
6-foot-3 guy who spends half of
his time on the job in a defensive
crouch on the edge of the ineld.
A typical day now includes
a 15-20 minute series of exer-
cises designed to take some of
the pressure off his back. He fo-
cuses on his core and his hips.
The looser they are, the bet-
ter he feels. Its not quite yoga,
but its pretty close. Getting a
head start on his offseason pro-
gram also helped him avoid the
weight gain that tends to pop up
over the winter. He arrived in
Bradenton last month about 10
pounds lighter than he typically
is this time of year.
I felt great and I havent felt
any weaker or anything like
that, which has been good, he
said. To not carry a little extra
weight on top is probably good
for my back anyway.
Though Walker hasnt exactly
busted out during spring train-
ing hes hitting .158 (3 for 19)
in eight games hes condent
he can be just as productive
as he was a year ago when he
batted .280 with a career-high
14 homers and 69 RBI despite
missing more than a month.
Those numbers were good
enough for Walker to get a pay
bump from $500,000 to $3.3
million, a deal he worked out
with the Pirates just hours be-
fore going to arbitration.
It can turn into a spitting
match if you let it, but it wasnt
that way, he said. They sub-
mitted their numbers, we sub-
mitted ours and we met right
smack in the middle.
Even so, the Pirates have yet
to reach out to Walker to discuss
a longer term deal even though
he is considered part of the core
the team wants to build around.
Walker insists hes not worried
about his future, pointing out
that he still has three years of
arbitration remaining before he
becomes a free agent.
Maybe, but Pittsburgh made
sure to lock up All-Star center-
elder Andrew McCutchen last
spring. In a way, Walker may be
almost as valuable to the fran-
chise because of his steady pro-
duction and his western Pennsyl-
vania roots. The team promotes
Walker heavily. On Mothers
Day last year, every female fan
that walked through the gates
received a pink Walker jersey, as
did every child in attendance.
Walker is diplomatic when
talking about his long-term im-
portance to the Pirates.
The way I see it is if I prepare
myself like I have during the off-
season and every day I go out
and give my best effort and stay
healthy, all that stuff will take
care of itself, he said. When we
get to that bridge, well cross it.
That apparently wont happen
this spring. Owner Bob Nutting
has stressed the team is willing
to pay up for a great player but
that the club cant ever do it to
feel like its the popular thing
that were doing.
Walker doesnt believe his fu-
ture will be a distraction. Hes
more anxious to help the Pirates
get over the hump. That in-
cludes becoming more produc-
tive as a right-handed hitter. He
hit just .246 from the right side
and struggled to generate any
power. All but ve of his 29 hits
while batting right-handed were
singles and all of his home runs
came from the left side.
AP PHOTO
Pirates second baseman Neil Walker missed 27 of Pittsburghs
nal 35 games last season with a back injury, unable to help his
childhood team stop a late-season collapse.
Pirates Walker ready to put back issues to rest
W B C Philadel-
phia Phillies
starting
pitcher Roy
Halladay
delivers a
pitch in the
second inning
of a spring
training
game against
the Detroit
Tigers in
Clearwater,
Fla., on Tues-
day.
AP PHOTO
CLEARWATER, Fla. Roy Hal-
laday used two meaningful words
to alleviate concern over a terrible
outing.
Nothing hurts, Halladay said.
Considering hes coming off an
injury-plagued year, thats important
news for the Philadelphia Phillies.
Ramon Santiago hit a grand slam
and Don Kelly also homered off Hal-
laday, leading the Detroit Tigers to a
10-6 win over the Phillies on Tuesday.
The results arent satisfying and
thats obvious but the work weve
done, theres a lot of progress being
made, Halladay said. I just felt
lethargic. The good part is theres no
soreness, nothing hurts. Ill trade that
any day of the week feeling lethargic
over being sore like last spring train-
ing where there were times youre
hurt.
The Tigers roughed up the Hal-
laday for seven runs in 2 2-3 innings.
The two-time Cy Young Award
winner allowed six hits and walked
four in his poorest outing this spring.
He came in with a 2.16 ERA in three
starts.
Theres denitely work to be
done, adjustments to be made,
Halladay said, adding hes increased
the intensity of his workout program
and threw an extra bullpen ses-
sion between starts. Being that its
spring training and theres so much
to be worked on, so much to try and
achieve at this point, I felt like its
more important to work on this stuff
now and Id rather have that (feeling)
now.
Manager Charlie Manuel and pitch-
ing coach Rich Dubee seemed more
worried than Halladay about his start.
He says hes healthy, he feels
good and nothings wrong with him,
Manuel said. It concerns me, but Ive
been in the game long enough that if
nothing is wrong with him, just keep
working with him.
Braves 12, Cardinals 3
KISSIMMEE, Fla. Julio Teheran
pitched ve hitless innings, Freddie
Freeman was 2 for 2 with two RBIs
and the Atlanta Braves beat the St.
Louis Cardinals.
St. Louis ended a 29-inning score-
less streak with a three-run seventh
off Luis Avilan.
Teheran, on the verge of gaining
the fth spot in the Braves rotation,
struck out six and walked two while
lowering his ERA to 1.29 in four
starts. He has allowed four hits and
struck out 18 in 14 innings.
Astros 9, Marlins 4
JUPITER, Fla. Carlos Pena and
Brett Wallace hit back-to-back home
runs off Ricky Nolasco in the rst
inning and the Houston Astros added
three more long balls in a victory over
the Miami Marlins.
Matt Dominguez, Jason Castro and
Chris Carter also homered for the
Astros, who had 13 hits. Castro went
3 for 3 with a double.
Yankees 3, Rays 1
PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. Ivan
Nova continued to make a case to be
the New York Yankees fth starter by
pitching four scoreless innings during
a victory over the Tampa Bay Rays.
Nova allowed four hits, walked
none and struck out two in his third
exhibition start. The right-hander
who faltered down the stretch last
season has allowed one run over nine
innings this spring.
The Yankees scored three runs in
the eighth, two of them on Bobby
Wilsons pinch-hit single. Mike Fon-
tenot drove in Tampa Bays run with
an eighth-inning sacrice y. On a
day the Rays selected AL Cy Young
Award winner David Price as their
opening day starter, right-hander Alex
Cobb built on a solid spring showing
by working ve scoreless innings.
Red Sox 5, Blue Jays 3
FORT MYERS, Fla. Mike Napoli
played consecutive games for the
rst time this spring training and had
a run-scoring single and a double,
helping the Boston Red Sox over the
Toronto Blue Jays.
Napoli, diagnosed with avascular
necrosis in both hips during his
offseason contract negotiations with
the Red Sox, is batting .429 (6 for 14)
with two homers and six RBIs.
Winner Clay Buchholz allowed
three hits in four scoreless innings,
while loser Justin Germano, making
his rst exhibition start of the year,
gave up two runs and ve hits in
three innings.
Diamondbacks (ss) 5, Mariners 4
PEORIA, Ariz. Felix Hernandez
struck out three in three innings of
his second spring training start, but
the Seattle Mariners lost to an Ari-
zona Diamondbacks split squad.
Hernandez, who became the
highest-paid pitcher in baseball when
he signed a seven-year, $175 million
contract in February, walked one and
gave up one hit a solo home run to
Eric Hinske.
In two spring appearances, Hernan-
dez allowed two runs and three hits
in ve innings. He has one walk and
ve strikeouts.
Rangers 12, Brewers 3
SURPRISE, Ariz. Jeff Baker
homered off Tom Gorzelanny and
Mike Olt against Travis Webb,
helping the Texas Rangers rout the
Milwaukee Brewers.
Baker has a seven-game hitting
streak, going 12 for 15 (.800).
Rangers starter Alexi Ogando al-
lowed two hits and three walks and
struck out three over four innings, his
rst scoreless outing of spring train-
ing. Texas took a four-hit shutout into
the ninth before Tanner Scheppers
allowed three runs.
Athletics 6, Royals 3
PHOENIX Eric Sogard had a
tiebreaking double in the fth inning
and the Oakland Athletics bullpen
slowed the hot-hitting Kansas City
Royals in a victory.
Alex Gordon had two more hits,
including a home run off Tommy
Milone to lead off the game.
The Royals, who scored 30 runs in
their previous two games, increased
their lead to 3-0 in the fourth on
run-scoring hits by Max Ramirez and
Johnny Giavotella. Oakland tied it
against Royals starter James Shields
in the bottom half on an RBI double
by Yoenis Cespedes and a two-run
single by Brandon Moss.
Six As relievers combined for 5 1-3
innings of three-hit ball.
Halladay feels ne after dismal outing vs. Tigers
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Jose Reyes homered for the Dominican
Republic in the third inning of Tuesdays
game against Italy at the World Base-
ball Classic in Miami.
MIAMI Gio Gonzalez gave Team
USA its best start yet, and David Wright
provided a big nish.
Gonzalez pitched ve scoreless innings
and the Americans beat Puerto Rico 7-1
in the World Baseball Classic on Tuesday
night.
Wright drove in ve runs, the last three
with a bases-loaded double in the eighth.
That prompted chants of U-S-A! U-S-A!
from the crowd of 32,872.
The United States fell behind in all
three games in the opening round, but
led from the rst inning against Puerto
Rico. The Americans will play Thursday
night against the Dominican Republic,
which remained unbeaten in the WBC by
rallying past Italy 5-4 on Tuesday.
Puerto Rico plays Italy in an elimina-
tion game today.
Gonzalez (1-0), who grew up in nearby
Hialeah, struck out ve for the home-
town team and departed with a 3-0 lead.
Manager Joe Torre then went to his bull-
pen, and ve relievers combined to allow
one run over the nal four innings.
Dominican Republic 5, Italy 4
MIAMI Nelson Cruzs two-out RBI
single broke a seventh-inning tie, and the
Dominican Republic overcame an early
four-run decit to beat Italy in the World
Baseball Classic.
The Dominicans (4-0) remained
unbeaten and advanced to a winners-
bracket game Thursday night in the
double-elimination second round.
Robinson Cano had three hits, includ-
ing his second homer of the WBC with a
drive off the upper-deck facade in right
eld.
Japan 10, Netherlands 6
TOKYO Shinnosuke Abe homered
twice in an eight-run second inning as
two-time defending champion Japan beat
the Netherlands to secure rst place in
Pool 1 of the World Baseball Classic.
Japan and the Netherlands have quali-
ed for the seminals in San Francisco
on March 17-18.
Gio, Wright
lead U.S. past
Puerto Rico
The Associated Press
By WILL GRAVES
AP Sports Writer
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www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 4B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 S P O R T S
Di stri Ct 2 Pi AA swi MMi ng
QuAl i f i ers
games. Just once this season
did a team put up more than 45
points on the Hurricanes (by
comparison, the Royals scored
at least 57 points in 11 games,
while holding four opponents
to less than 30 points).
The teams have one common
opponent in Allentown Central
Catholic. Villa defeated ACC
39-25 on Jan. 5. Three weeks
later, ACC downed the Royals
49-35.
Holy Redeemer is led by
standout forward Alexis Lewis,
whos averaging 21 points per
game during the postseason.
Alyssa Platko is netting 10
points in the last three playoff
tilts, mainly in the paint, and
Alana Wilson is putting up nine
per game in the same stretch.
When (someone) isnt doing
so well, were right there try-
ing to pick her up, Wilson said
of the improved production
throughout the lineup.
Contributions from players
off the bench could be the dif-
ference today. Redeemer went
eight deep against Athens, with
seniors Sara Warnagiris and
Brianne Frascella lling key
minutes. First off the bench was
sophomore guard Chelsea Skre-
penak.
ALSOONTAP: If you didnt
get your ll of basketball Tues-
day the closest high school
games were in Pottsville
there are more opportunities to
take in games tonight.
If you go down to Bethlehem
to watch the Royals bid for a
spot in the girls quarternals,
they will be followed by District
2 Class 2A boys champion Holy
Cross. The Crusaders will play
Delaware Valley Charter, the
fth-place team from District
12, in the nightcap at Freedom
High.
Pottsvilles Martz Hall will
host a doubleheader for a sec-
ond straight day, as Scranton
Prep, the District 2 runner-up,
will meet District 3 champ Pal-
myra, one of the favorites for a
state title, at 6 p.m. They will
be followed by Class 4A boys
play featuring District 4 champ
Williamsport and state-power
Chester, the District 1 winner.
Hazleton Area High will have
two District 2 champions in ac-
tion as Class A Old Forge plays
District 11s top team, Tri Val-
ley, at 6 p.m., with Honesdale
meeting District 11 Class 3A
titlist Bethlehem Catholic.
VILLA MARIA HURRICANES
22-5, District 1 champions
No. Name Yr. Pos. Pts.
ww3 Devon Tirney
Jr. G 5.0
12 Jackie Carlin Jr. F 9.0
23 Molly Namiotka Jr. G 8.0
25 Lisa Mirarchi Sr. G 15.0
40 Mora Fetterolf Jr. F 4.0
Key reserves
5 Jess Walsh Sr. G 2.0
31 Lexi Daggett Sr. G 2.0
HOLY REDEEMER ROYALS
21-7, third place in District 2
Likely starters
10 Alexis Lewis So. F 20.0
11 Alana Wilson So. F 8.5
12 Alyssa Platko Jr. F 8.9
13 Lydia Lawson Fr. G 2.4
23 Sara Altemose Fr. G 3.5
Key reserves
5 Chelsea Skrepenak So. G 2.3
14 Sara Warnagiris Sr. F 4.0
34 Brianne Frascella Sr. C 2.5
ROYALS
Continued from Page 1B
Here is a list of District 2 athletes who will compete in the PIAA Swim-
ming and Diving Championships this week at Bucknell University.
CLASS 2A Girls
Today
(Diving begins at 1:30 p.m., swimming consolations
and nals at 5:30 p.m.)
Name School Grade Event Seed
Katie Voitik Scranton Prep So. 200 Free 13
Rachel Finnegan Holy Redeemer Jr. 200 Free 17
Mia Nonnenberg Scranton Prep Jr. 200 IM 2
Julie Ann Mahle Holy Redeemer Sr. 200 IM 20
Megan Carey Holy Cross Jr. 50 Free 30
Clare Sebastianelli Valley View Fr. 50 Free 31
Kelsey Williams Holy Redeemer Sr. Diving 4
Riley Williams Holy Redeemer Fr. Diving 22
Amanda OKane Berwick Jr. Diving 23
Kate Voitik Scranton Prep So 100 Fly 7
Mia Nardone Pittston Area So. 100 Fly 30
Relay teams: Holy Redeemer, 200 yard medley,11; Holy Redeemer, 200
Free, 13; Abington Heights, 200 Free, 21.
THURSDAY
(Swimming consolations and nals at 5:45 p.m.)
Rachel Finnegan Holy Redeemer Jr. 100 Free 26
Morgan Manglavitti Tunkhannock Fr. 100 Free 32
Mia Nonnenberg Scranton Prep Jr. 500 Free 1
Angela Stahl Scranton Prep Jr. 500 free 32
Julie Ann Mahle Holy Redeemer Sr. 100 Back 13
Megan Carey Holy Cross Jr. 100 Back 31
Sydney Gualtieri Abington Heights Fr. 100 Breast 21
Bethany Chmil Holy Redeemer Sr. 100 Breast 29
Relay teams: Scranton Prep, 400 Free, 11; Abington Heights, 400 Free
22.
CLASS 2A Boys
Today
(Swimming consolations and nals at 8 p.m.)
Marcus Wagner Dallas Sr. 200 Free 15
Joseph Grzech Crestwood Jr. 200 Free 20
Ben Spencer Tunkhannock Sr. 200 IM 3
Michael Robinison Scranton Prep So. 200 IM 28
Jack Matusiak Dallas Sr. 200 IM 29
Brian Stepniak Dallas Sr. 50 Free 6
Chris Lukasewski Crestwood Jr. 50 Free 16
Josh Grzech Crestwood Jr. 100 Fly 13
Relay teams: Tunkhannock, 200 Medley, 14; Dallas, 200 Free, 15.
Thursday
(Diving begins at 2 p.m., swimming consolations
and nals at 8:15 p.m.)
Matthew Edkins Lake-Lehman So. Diving 3
Andriy Molchanov Wyoming Sem So. Diving 9
Patrick Madaya Dallas Jr. Diving 10
Dustin Zeiler Lake-Lehman Sr. Diving 30
Josh Grzech Crestwood Jr. 100 Free 9
Brian Stepniak Dallas Sr. 100 Free 11
Ryan Sebastianelli Scranton Prep So. 100 Free 22
Marcus Wagner Dallas Sr. 500 Free 15
Ben Spencer Tunkhannock Sr. 100 Back 8
Joseph Grzech Crestwood Jr. 100 Back 19
Terry Vrabec Holy Redeemer So. 100 Breast 10
Ben Evans Scranton Prep So. 100 Breast 13
Joe Moftt Tunkhannock Jr. 100 Breast 27
Relay team: Dallas, 400 Free, 9.
CLASS 3A Girls
Friday
(Diving begins at 1:30 p.m., swimming
and consolations nals at 5:30 p.m.)
Erin Kazmierczak Scranton So. 200 Free 32
Baileigh Vanderhoof Wallenpaupack Jr. 200 IM 30
Hailey Kendall Hazleton Area Sr. 50 Free 32
Karina Zabresky Valley West Sr. Diving 7
Kayla Judush Hazleton Area Sr. Diving 32
Morgan Hanadel Valley West Sr. 100 Fly 30
Relay teams: Hazleton Area, 200 Medley, 23; Valley West, 200 Free, 24.
Saturday
(Swimming consolations and nals at 5:45 p.m.)
Morgan Hanadel Valley West Sr. 100 Free 32
Alexandra Podlesny Hazleton Area Sr. 500 Free 31
Amanda Hutzelmann Delaware Valley Sr. 100 Back 32
Stephanie Marcucci Delaware Valley So. 100 Breast 32
Relay team: Valley West, 400 Free 24.
CLASS 3A Boys
Friday
(Swimming consolations and nals at 8 p.m.)
Jeff Hicks Hazleton Area Sr. 200 Free 32
Tyler Farley Hazleton Area Sr. 200 IM 32
Ed Zawatski Valley West So. 50 Free 6
Collin Vest Valley West Sr. Diving 5
Ryan Paisley Hazleton Area Sr. 100 Fly 32
Relay teams: Hazleton Area, 200 Medley, 24; Valley West, 200 Free, 24.
Saturday
(Diving begins at 1:30 p.m., swimming consolations
and nals at 8:15 p.m.)
Ed Zawatski Valley West So. 100 Free 9
Collin Deans Delaware Valley So. 500 Free 32
Ryan Paisley Hazleton Area Sr. 100 Back 21
Eric Usbeck Wallenpaupack Sr. 100 Breast 17
Relay team: Hazleton Area, 400 Free, 22.
a telephone interview.
The move means stabil-
ity for all Notre Dame sports
and has some familiarity to
Irish fans, with Syracuse and
Pittsburgh joining the Irish
in moving to the ACC next
season and former Big East
teams Boston College, Miami
and Virginia Tech already part
of the ACC.
If the Irish had opted to stay
in the football-centric league,
they would have faced some
not-so-familiar opponents in
Memphis, Central Florida,
Houston, Tulane and SMU,
along with returning mem-
bers Cincinnati, Connecticut,
South Florida, Louisville and
Rutgers. Louisville joins the
ACC after next season, while
Rutgers joins the Big Ten.
If the Irish had chosen
to align with the Catholic
schools, they would have
faced DePaul, Georgetown,
Marquette, St. Johns, Seton
Hall, Providence and Villano-
va. Butler, Xavier and Creigh-
ton have been mentioned as
potential members.
The ACC will provide some
of Notre Dames non-revenue
sports with more challenging
opponents. North Carolinas
womens soccer team has won
21 national championships;
four different mens soccer
teams from the conference
have won national champi-
onships in the past six years;
Virginia and Maryland played
for the national title in mens
lacrosse in 2011; and Duke
has won four national champi-
onships in golf in the past 11
years.
Its a better situation than
the consequence of having the
Catholic 7 and the Big East
split, Swarbrick said.
The move comes six
months after Notre Dame an-
nounced it was opting to join
the ACC in all sports except
football and hockey. Big East
Commissioner Mike Aresco
said the move made sense for
the league.
The Big East can now fo-
cus fully on its future align-
ment and rebranding efforts,
he said.
ACC Commissioner John
Swofford said the league wel-
comed the early arrival of the
Irish, saying the additions of
Syracuse and Pitt this year and
Louisville next year will make
the leagues basketball sched-
ule brutal, which is a great
thing for our league and fans.
Swarbrick would not com-
ment on whether Notre Dame
paid an exit fee or other nan-
cial terms of the agreement.
He said the decision to join the
ACC early evolved over time,
saying Notre Dame had been in
constant touch with the ACC.
NOTRE DAME
Continued from Page 1B
pressed surprise that he was
traded.
I thought this was the last
stop of my career but regardless
of the circumstances I came
here to win a Championship
and in February we came home
Champions, he said on Twit-
ter.
Ellerbe also tweeted as he
took his talents to South Beach.
Just wanna take time to
THANK GOD for being in this
position Im in! Before I make
da BIGGEST DECISION in my
life I just wanna thank him!!!
Ellerbe said.
Kruger led the Ravens with
nine sacks and added 2 in the
playoffs and two in the Super
Bowl. But he was too expensive
for Baltimore to keep.
Denver ensured that Peyton
Manning will be the Broncos
quarterback through at least
2014.
The four-time MVPs con-
tract called for a guaranteed sal-
ary of $20 million in 2013 and
2014 if he was on the Denver
roster Tuesday. The nal two
years of his contract are worth
$19 million each, but are not
guaranteed.
Coming off multiple neck
operations, Manning threw for
4,659 yards and 37 touchdowns
last season and was the NFL
Comeback Player of the Year.
He turns 37 on March 24.
Kansas City was busy nding
support for Smith on both sides
of the ball. The Chiefs agreed
to a four-year, $16 million deal
with tight end Anthony Fasa-
no, a three-year, $12.6 million
contract with defensive tackle
Mike DeVito, and a three-year
deal with Saints backup quar-
terback Chase Daniel.
Teams also made cuts Tues-
day. The biggest were Ryan
Fitzpatrick in Buffalo and
Nnamdi Asomugha in Philadel-
phia.
The Bills starting quarter-
back was released 1 years
after getting a six-year, $59 mil-
lion contract extension. Fitzpat-
rick struggled after signing the
new deal, and the Bills went
6-10 in 2011 and in 2012.
Buffalo has not made the
playoffs since 1999, the longest
active streak in the NFL. For
now, the Bills No. 1 quarter-
back is Tarvaris Jackson.
Bills general manager Buddy
Nix said: Difcult decisions
often have to be made and so
we are moving forward. Our fo-
cus remains on adding another
quarterback to our roster and
we will continue to explore ev-
ery option available to us.
Philadelphia released corner-
back Asomugha, who two years
ago got a ve-year, $60 million
contract with $24 million guar-
anteed when he left Oakland as
a free agent. Asomugha was a
op in Philly, often victimized
in single coverage.
Asomugha was scheduled to
make $15 million next season,
with $4 million guaranteed.
Earlier, Tony Gonzalez
changed his mind and decided
to return to the Falcons.
The NFLs career leader
among tight ends with 1,242 re-
ceptions and 103 touchdowns
said he was 95 percent certain
he would retire after 2012, but
the other 5 percent won out.
Hours before free agency be-
gan Thursday, Gonzalez tweet-
ed:
The lure of being on such
a great team and organization,
along with unbelievable fan
support was too good to pass
up.
Also Thursday:
Defensive end Will Smith
and linebacker Jonathan Vilma,
both implicated in the Saints
bounty scandal, agreed to re-
structure their contracts to re-
main with New Orleans.
The 31-year-old Smith and
30-year-old Vilma, both veteran
defensive captains, would have
taken up about $23 million
combined in salary cap space
without the redone deals.
Minnesota fnalized the
trade of receiver Percy Harvin
to Seattle, released 14-year vet-
eran cornerback Antoine Win-
eld and re-signed right tackle
Phil Loadholt. The Seahawks
are sending their rst-round
and seventh-round draft picks
this year plus their third-round
selection in 2014 to the Vikings
for Harvin.
Tennessee agreed to terms
with Buffalo guard Andy Lev-
itre and Walker. Levitre, one
of the top offensive linemen on
the market, got a six-year deal
worth nearly $47 million. He
will replace Steve Hutchinson,
who announced his retirement
earlier Tuesday. Walker will
help replace Jared Cook, whom
the Titans declined to tag as
a franchise player because he
wants to be paid more like a
receiver.
The Titans waived safety
Jordan Babineaux and guard
Mitch Petrus.
Pittsburgh re-signed line-
backer Larry Foote and wide re-
ceiver Plaxico Burress, and ten-
dered offers to four restricted
free agents: receiver Emmanuel
Sanders, running backs Jona-
than Dwyer and Isaac Redman,
all of whom could be starters
in 2013, and nose tackle Steve
McLendon. Burress should
provide depth with the Steel-
ers losing Mike Wallace in free
agency, but Burress struggled
to get onto the eld after re-
turning to the Steelers last No-
vember.
Foote also came back to Pitts-
burgh last season and will stay
at inside linebacker, where the
other starter, James Harrison,
was released this week. Foote
got a three-year deal.
Denver agreed to terms
with guard Louis Vasquez, late
of San Diego. According to
STATS, he has allowed just 11
sacks and had one penalty dur-
ing his time with the Chargers.
Tight end Martellus Ben-
nett agreed to a four-year con-
tract with the Bears, leaving
the Giants after one season.
Defensive tackle Henry Melton
signed his franchise tag tender
at $8.45 million.
Cincinnati re-signed de-
fensive ends Robert Geathers
and Wallace Gilberry. Geathers
enters his 10th season with the
Bengals, the longest tenure on
the current roster.
Robert brings us not just
ne and consistent play, but
leadership and experience,
coach Marvin Lewis said. Hes
a big part of our success with
his own play, and I know our
younger guys have talked about
how hes made them more ef-
fective players.
Houston cut receiver Kevin
Walter, who was due to make
$2 million in salary. Walter nev-
er became the threat opposite
Andre Johnson that the team
hoped for. He caught 41 passes
for 518 yards and two touch-
downs in 2012.
Carolina cut linebacker
James Anderson, a seven-year
veteran who set a franchise re-
cord in 2011 with 174 tackles.
San Diego released 11-year
veteran tight end Randy McMi-
chael and signed kicker Nick
Novak to a four-year contract;
the New York Jets cut nose
tackle Sione Pouha and restruc-
tured the contract of receiver
Santonio Holmes; and Arizona
re-signed safety Rashad John-
son to a three-year contract.
Indianapolis agreed in prin-
ciple on contracts with tackle
Gosder Cherilus, linebacker
Lawrence Sidbury, guard Don-
ald Thomas, cornerback Greg
Toler and linebacker Erik
Walden. All deals are pending
a physical.
NFL
Continued from Page 1B
broke former Bishop Hoban
star Mark Bellows 23-year old
district record of 1:58.94 by
85-hundredths of a second.
But Mislevy said Spencer
wasnt so awless in his 50
backstroke his signature
stroke during the district IM
meet. Hell need to perfect his
backstroke if he wants to end
up on the awards podium.
When you get down there,
theres little room for error,
Mislevy said. Hes trying not
to think about that too much.
Hopefully puts his best race
together and see what that ends
up.
After reviewing tape of the
district meet, Mislevy noticed
two mishaps that, if corrected,
could cut down his time sig-
nicantly. Hell need to do that
in order to catch up to Mars
Christopher Georgiadis and
Lancaster Catholics Everett Al-
bert. Spencer is trailing three-
quarters of a second behind
Georgiadis and 2.15 seconds
behind the favored Albert.
Spencer also hopes to move
up the standings in the 100
back, where he is seeded
eighth. He admitted after
districts that he was not happy
with his time of 53.65 seconds.
Hell also compete as a
backstroker in a 200 medley
relay team that is positioned
in 14th at 1:41.17. Juniors Joey
Moftt and Matt Miller will
swim the breaststroke and
buttery, respectively. Fellow
senior James Proulx mans the
anchor slot. The team chemis-
try of the 200 medley team says
been attributed to Spencer and
Proulxs leadership, according
to Mislevy.
They are like brothers. They
are pushing each other to get
better, Mislevy said. They are
always talking swimming.
Spencer will conclude what
has been one of the most suc-
cessful swimming careers in
Tunkhannock history. Mislevy
noted that Spencer quietly stud-
ies the sport, often relying on
his mental ability to correct and
overcome mistakes that cost
valuable time in close races.
Hes come a long ways,
Mislevy said. Every year he
gets better technically we talk
about his races. Hes just got
a lot stronger mentally. He
thinks about what he has to
do and he goes about doing it.
Quite smart. When he makes a
mistake, he knows how to x it
during the race.
Hes been very coachable.
He takes constructive criticism.
Hes open minded to try new
things.
MEDALS
Continued from Page 1B
Hes got it together mentally. He says feels good,
and hes been swimming well in the water.
Tunkhannock coach Tim Mislevy
On Ben Spencer
Philadelphia released cornerback Asomugha, who two
years ago got a ve-year, $60 million contract with
$24 million guaranteed when he left Oakland as a free
agent. Asomugha was a op in Philly, often victimized
in single coverage. Asomugha was scheduled to make
$15 million next season, with $4 million guaranteed.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 PAgE 5B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com P R O G O L F
10+ Prime
Commercial Acres
w/200+ff on RT 315 &
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(RT 476) MLS#12-3849
ANN LEWIS 714-9245
State of
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Features 1000 SF data
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JUDY RICE 714-9230 OR
RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
Great Investment
Opportunity! Price reduced $905,000 from
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VIRGINIA ROSE 288-9371
Commercial opportunity awaits
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2nd flr storage. Plenty of pkg on 4.62 acres.
MLS#10-1110
JUDY 714-9230
High visibility
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Parcel has access from 2
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JUDY 714-9230 OR
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Outstanding brick
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RHEA SIMMS 696-6677
Ideal bldg for retail sales
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MIKE JOHNSON 970-1100
PRIME LOCATION - Vacant land
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DAVID 970-1117 or SANDY 970-1110
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Easy access to Rte 81. Motivated Seller!
MLS#12-2947
JUDY RICE 714-9230
5100 SF Masonry building
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Large 8000 SF building looking
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could be used as office. MLS#13-108
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Bank owned Warehouse with
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Additional pole building offers more space.
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TRACY 696-6674
Currently being used as 1 story
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commercial. Being sold as is. Additional
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PALM HARBOR, Fla.
Steve Stricker is in semi-re-
tirement from the PGA Tour,
though it sure doesnt feel that
way to him.
Consider the 48 hours since
his runner-up nish at Doral.
Stricker had to lm an Avis
commercial in Los Angeles the
next day. When he booked his
travel plans, he wasnt aware
the nal round would end an
hour later because of Daylight
Savings Time, so he missed his
ight. Phil Mickelson offered
him a ride on his plane to San
Diego, and Stricker took a char-
ter up the coast. He nally got
home to Wisconsin at 2 a.m.
Tuesday, and then woke up to
take his daughters to school
before heading off to a meeting
with his foundation until the
girls got out of school.
He chuckled when talking
about a text from caddie Jimmy
Johnson that said, What are
you up to?
I feel like Imbusier nowthan
when I played a regular sched-
ule, Stricker said. But its all
good. Im doing a lot of things
around home with the family,
and with what (wife) Nicki and
I are doing with the foundation.
Ill go to the grocery store with
Nicki. And theres still time to
do some fun things.
Deer hunting is done, but
Stricker was quick to point out
that coyote season is still open.
Hes thinking about driving down
to Chicago one day this week to
watch the Big 10 mens basket-
ball tournament. As for his golf?
Not bad for a part-time player.
In three starts this year, he has
made $1.82 million and is No. 4
on the money list. He has gone
up 10 spots to No. 8 in the world
ranking. Stricker was the runner-
up at Kapalua and Doral, and he
reached the quarternals of the
Match Play Championship.
He is doing more with less.
And along the way, his prole
is as high as it has ever been.
He already was considered as
nice a person as there is on the
PGA Tour, mainly for his good
manners and how he treats
people. His father-in-law, Den-
nis Tiziani, summed it up a few
years ago when he said Stricker
was as considerate talking to a
big executive on tour as he was
to the guy working in Aisle 4 at
the Home Depot.
And now he is jokingly re-
ferred to as the part-time put-
ting guru of Tiger Woods.
Their meeting Wednesday af-
ternoon at Doral was a planned
accident. Woods had wanted
to play a practice round with
Stricker on the eve of the tour-
nament, but Woods didnt arrive
until early afternoon and couldnt
nd him. It was only after Woods
played nine holes and nished
his media duties that he saw
Stricker on the putting green.
Stricker is humble enough
not to help unless asked. He has
given Woods a few tips over the
years, such as the Presidents
Cup in 2011, and they often ex-
change text messages or chat
about the art of putting. This
was the longest session, and the
most meaningful.
He noticed that Woods had
his hands behind the ball and his
posture was out of sync, prob-
ably from working so much on
his long game and the recent
hours Woods had spent chipping.
Woods walked away feeling as
good as he did at Torrey Pines,
where he won by four shots. Over
the next four days at Doral, he
had his fewest number of putts
(100) ever on the PGA Tour,
made 27 birdies and won by two
shots over Stricker, no less.
Stricker said he told Woods
after they nished that session,
If you put me on your payroll, I
could play a little bit less.
He was genuinely happy to
hear that Woods had putted
well in the opening round, and
the feeling didnt change when
Woods nished two shots ahead
of him.
Stricker noticed more than
just a putting stroke that was
back to where it should be.
His attitude, and what I saw
this week, and his belief in him-
self again looks very similar
to where he was in the early
2000s, Stricker said.
Stricker raising prole in semi-retirement
By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
I feel like Im busier now than when I played a
regular schedule. But its all good. Im doing a lot of
things around home with the family, and with what
(wife) Nicki and I are doing with the foundation. Ill
go to the grocery store with Nicki. And theres still
time to do some fun things.
Steve Stricker
AP PHOTO
Steve Stricker (left) is doing more with less. In whats supposed
to be semi-retirement, his prole has grown even higher. He al-
ready has earned $1.8 million in three events, hes keeping busy
at home in Wisconsin and has part-time work as Tiger Woods
putting coach.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6B WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 S P O R T S
F I G U R E S K AT I N G
Kostner has
a world of
love for sport
By NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer
LONDON, Ontario Caro-
lina Kostner could have taken
her gold medal from last years
world championships and run.
She nally had the title many
had been predicting for the bet-
ter part of a decade. Better yet,
shed redeemed herself from
those dismal performances at
the Vancouver Olympics and
2009 world championships,
where she spent more time
sprawling on the ice than a kid
learning how to skate.
But to retire would have meant
ignoring the precious lessons
those awful times taught her.
The reason is just that I love
it, the Italian said Tuesday. I
cannot expect from everyone to
love my skating, but I love to do
it. Im not ready to give that up
yet. I know that there is a small
chance that I can really repeat
that perfection like last season.
But its in my heart, and every
time I go on the ice I take it with
me and say, Youve got there
and now you should enjoy it.
I try, she said, smiling. Its
not so easy but I try.
The World Figure Skating
Championships begin today
with the mens and pairs short
programs. The womens com-
petition begins Thursday, and
Kostner is not even the favorite
in what could be the toughest
eld assembled since the Van-
couver Games in 2010.
Olympic champion Kim Yu-na
is back for the rst time since
2011, and Mao Asada is the best
shes been since winning her
second world title in 2010. The
Russians have their best team
since the days of Irina Slutska-
ya and Maria Butyrskaya. And
dont overlook U.S. champion
Ashley Wagner, silver medalist
at the Grand Prix Final.
This might be one of the
most challenging world cham-
pionships in the ladies event
weve seen in a while, Wagner
said. To get onto that podium
with everybody thats compet-
ing here would be such a huge
accomplishment, just because
everyone is so talented.
That Kostner was talented was
never in question. Tall and lithe
with the natural elegance of a
ballerina, she makes even the
simplest of stroking drills capti-
vating. She may not have Asadas
power, but shes a strong enough
jumper to contend with the best.
She went to her rst Euro-
pean championships at 16, sim-
ply hoping to make it out of the
qualifying round. She wound up
just missing a medal, nishing
fourth overall.
The next year, she was fth at
the world championships.
Expectations can be a heavy
burden, however, and Kostner
struggled under the weight. Her
bronze medal at the 2005 world
championships made her a fa-
vorite for the Turin Olympics,
and she was chosen to carry It-
alys ag in the opening ceremo-
ny. But she bombed in the short
program and was only slightly
better in the free skate, nishing
ninth overall. A month later, she
was 12th in the watered-down,
post-Olympic eld at the worlds.
N H L R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
Pittsburgh Penguins center Sidney Crosby (87) checks Boston
Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference (21) in the second period of
an NHL game in Pittsburgh on Tuesday.
Sutter keys rally as
Penguins top Bruins
PITTSBURGH Brandon
Sutter scored twice in the nal
seven minutes to cap a furious
rally and the Pittsburgh Pen-
guins slipped past the Boston
Bruins 3-2 on Tuesday night.
Chris Kunitz started Pitts-
burghs third-period surge with
his 18th goal of the season and
Sutter beat Bostons Anton
Khudobin twice in less than
four minutes, including the
game-winner with 2:03 remain-
ing.
Marc-Andre Fleury stopped
14 shots for the Penguins, who
broke loose late against the
NHLs best defensive team.
Zdeno Chara and Tyler
Seguin scored rst-period
goals for the Bruins. Khudobin
made 31 saves and the Bruins
kept Pittsburghs high-powered
offense in check until the nal
minutes of a matchup between
two of the Eastern Conferences
best teams.
Sabres 3, Rangers 1
BUFFALO, N.Y. Marcus
Foligno scored twice and
backup goalie Jhonas Enroth
made 18 of his 32 saves in the
third period of the Buffalo
Sabres win over the New York
Rangers.
Enroth, who started because
Ryan Miller was sidelined
because of a sinus infection,
earned his rst victory since
a 5-1 win over Washington on
Nov. 26, 2011. He was 0-9-3 in
16 appearances since then.
Folignos rst goal made it
1-1 at 5:35 of the second period.
His second gave the Sabres a
3-1 lead with 8:12 left in the
game.
Thomas Vanek also scored
for Buffalo (10-14-3), which
returned home after going 0-2-2
on a season-high, four-game
road trip.
Derek Stepan scored a short-
handed goal for the Rangers
(13-10-2), who lost for just the
second time in seven games.
Henrik Lundqvist made 19
saves.
Hurricanes 4, Capitals 0
WASHINGTON Riley
Nash scored twice, Joe Corvo
put one in off the goaltenders
mask, and Justin Peters got his
second career shutout as the
surging Carolina Hurricanes
beat the slumping Washington
Capitals, taking the rst leg of
a key home-and-home series
between the Southeast Division
rivals.
Patrick Dwyer added an emp-
ty-net goal, and Peters made
26 saves for the Hurricanes,
who have won six of seven and
have a 10-point lead over the
Capitals, whose struggles are
one of the big surprises of the
lockout-shortened season. The
division is essentially becoming
a two-team race between Caro-
lina and the Winnipeg Jets.
The Capitals lost their third
straight all by at least a
three-goal margin.
Canucks 2, Blue Jackets 1
COLUMBUS, Ohio Mason
Raymond scored the only goal
in the shootout, and seldom-
used Roberto Luongo stopped
26 shots through overtime to
lead the Vancouver Canucks
past the Columbus Blue Jack-
ets.
Luongo, playing in his second
game in 16 days, stopped
all three Blue Jackets in the
shootout.
Raymond, shooting second
for Vancouver, scored when
he came to a quick stop, got
goalie Sergei Bobrovsky on the
ice, and then easily tapped a
backhander into the net.
Jason Garrison had the lone
goal for the Canucks, who had
lost four straight (0-2-2).
Mark Letestu scored the lone
regulation goal for the Blue
Jackets, who matched a fran-
chise record by earning a point
in an eighth consecutive game
(5-0-3). Their ve-game win-
ning streak ended, one short of
tying the franchise mark.
Lightning 3, Panthers 2
SUNRISE, Fla. Steven
Stamkos snapped a third-period
tie with his NHL-leading 20th
goal, and the Tampa Bay Light-
ning held on to beat the Florida
Panthers despite recording only
13 shots.
Vincent Lecavalier and Mar-
tin St. Louis also scored for the
Lightning, and Anders Lind-
back made 37 saves. St. Louis
added had two assists.
Kris Versteeg and Tomas
Kopecky had goals for the
Panthers. Jacob Markstrom
stopped 10 shots in the loss.
Jets 5, Maple Leafs 2
WINNIPEG, Manitoba
Blake Wheeler scored twice and
Ondrej Pavelec made 24 saves
to lead the Winnipeg Jets to a
victory over the Toronto Maple
Leafs.
Nik Antropov, Kyle Wellwood
and Evander Kane also scored
for the Jets, who have won
three of their last four games.
Dustin Byfuglien had three as-
sists and Antropov had two.
Phil Kessel scored both goals
for Toronto, which is winless in
three straight.
The Jets outhustled and out-
muscled the Leafs while getting
solid goaltending from Pavelec.
The last playoff spot in the
Eastern Conference was again
in sight for the Jets, who were
tied with the New York Rangers
at 28 points apiece, following
the Rangers 3-1 loss to Buffalo
on Tuesday night.
Blues 4, Sharks 2
ST. LOUIS Rookie Jake Al-
len made 39 saves, Chris Stew-
art led a balanced attack with
two goals, and the St. Louis
Blues beat San Jose for their
second win over the Sharks in
three nights.
Brent Burns scored his rst
in his season debut at forward
and Dan Boyle had a late
power-play goal for the Sharks,
who have lost four in a row and
have dropped 10 of 12 to the
Blues, including the rst round
of the playoffs last season.
The Blues overcame a two-
goal decit in a 4-3 overtime
victory Saturday night in San
Jose and clinched this one on
Stewarts empty-netter with
1:16 to go, four seconds after
goalie Antti Niemi was pulled.
Allen has won six of his rst
seven career NHL starts, also
besting the Sharks in San Jose.
Ducks 2, Wild 1
ST. PAUL, Minn. Luca
Sbisa scored the winning goal
with 3:04 left in the third
period, Jonas Hiller made 30
saves, and the Anaheim Ducks
rallied for a victory over the
Minnesota Wild.
Patrick Maroon also scored
for the Ducks, who have won
four straight and gotten points
in eight consecutive games.
Devin Setoguchi scored for
the Wild.
The Associated Press
N B A R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
The New Orleans Hornets Robin Lopez goes up past the Brooklyn Nets Reggie Evans during
the rst half of an NBA game on Tuesday in New York.
The Associated Press
NEW YORK Brook Lo-
pez scored 26 points and had
a big dunk over twin brother
Robin, Deron Williams added
21 points and 13 assists, and
the Brooklyn Nets beat the
New Orleans Hornets 108-98
on Tuesday night.
Brooklyn squandered a
10-point lead in the third quar-
ter before pulling off some
timely baskets in the fourth to
hang on for the win, bouncing
back from a poor performance
in a loss Monday at Philadel-
phia.
Eric Gordon led New
Orleans with 24 points. Robin
Lopez had 15 points for the
Hornets, who played without
leading scorer Ryan Anderson
because of the u.
Cavaliers 95, Wizards 90
CLEVELAND Dion
Waiters scored 20 points,
Alonzo Gee added 17 and the
Cleveland Cavaliers held off a
late run to beat the Washing-
ton Wizards.
Cleveland played its rst
game since Kyrie Irving
sprained his left shoulder
Sunday against Toronto. The
All-Star point guard, who
watched the game from the
bench with his left arm in
a sling, could miss the next
month and maybe the rest
of this season. The Cavaliers
are 5-10 without him this
season.
Cleveland led 90-78 with
4:29 remaining, but the Wiz-
ards cut the margin to 91-88
with 45 seconds remaining.
Bobcats 100, Celtics 74
CHARLOTTE, N.C.
Gerald Henderson had a
career-high 35 points, and the
Charlotte Bobcats snapped a
10-game losing streak with a
win over the Boston Celtics.
Henderson was 11 of 19
from the eld and knocked
down all 12 of his foul shots.
Ben Gordon scored 17
points and new starting
forward Josh McRoberts had
his rst double-double for
Charlotte with 13 points and
10 rebounds.
Lakers 106, Magic 97
ORLANDO, Fla. Dwight
Howard scored a season-high
39 points, had 16 rebounds
and was sent to the free throw
line 39 times by his former
team as the Los Angeles Lak-
ers beat the Orlando Magic.
The victory came in How-
ards rst return to Orlando
since his drama-lled offsea-
son trade to the Lakers. He
endured a chorus of boos
throughout, and tied his own
NBA record for free throw
attempts.
The majority of them came
as the Magic tried to employ
an intentional foul strategy.
It backred, though, as the
All-Star center hit on 16 of 20
attempts in the second half.
Mavericks 115, Bucks 108
MILWAUKEE Vince Cart-
er hit three key 3-pointers in
the fourth quarter and scored
23 points off the bench as the
Dallas Mavericks won their
fourth straight with a victory
over the Milwaukee Bucks.
Dirk Nowitzki added 19
points while O.J. Mayo had 14.
Mavericks rookie and former
Marquette star Jae Crowder,
last years Big East player of
the year, was one off his career
high with 14 points.
Timberwolves 107,
Spurs 83
MINNEAPOLIS Ricky
Rubio had his rst career
triple-double with 21 points,
13 rebounds and 12 assists,
leading the Minnesota Tim-
berwolves to a victory over
the San Antonio Spurs.
Rubio made 9 of 17 shots
and grabbed his 10th board
with 9:14 to play in the game,
giving his home fans some-
thing to cheer about in a long,
frustrating season. Alexey Sh-
ved broke out of a big slump
to score 16 points and J.J.
Barea added 17 points for the
Wolves, who hit 12 3-pointers.
Lopez helps Nets sting Hornets
INDIAN WELLS, Calif.
Top-ranked Novak Djokovic
reached the fourth round at the
BNP Paribas Open on Tuesday
when he beat Grigor Dimitrov
7-6 (4), 6-1 for his 20th consecu-
tive victory.
Defending womens champi-
on Victoria Azarenka extended
her own streak despite a nag-
ging ankle problem, routing
Urszula Radwanska 6-3, 6-1 for
her 17th straight win.
No. 3 seed Andy Murray
and No. 8 Caroline Wozniacki
played night matches.
Djokovic trailed 5-3 in the
rst set when the 21-year-old
Bulgarian committed six dou-
ble faults, including four in one
game, to help the Serb force the
tiebreaker. Djokovic won it on a
backhand error by the youngest
player remaining in the draw.
It was not really a beautiful
match to watch, Djokovic said.
There were a lot of unforced
errors, and we both look quite
sluggish on the court.
Dimitrov was broken twice in
the second set while falling to
1-17 against top-10 opponents.
He did all the work making
winners and making unforced
errors, Djokovic said. I just
needed to hang in there and try
to be patient.
Djokovic moves on to play
Sam Querrey, a 7-6 (5), 6-7 (7),
7-5 winner over Marinko Mato-
sevic.
Djokovic hasnt lost since
Oct. 31, when Querrey beat
him at the indoors Paris Mas-
ters.
He does everything really
well: unbelievable forehand,
unbelievable backhand, moves
around the court great, re-
turns great. Its tough to pick
on something, Querrey said.
I might have to go outside of
my comfort zone a little bit and
do things I dont like to do, and
hopefully it will pay off for me.
Querrey is poised to take
over as the top-ranked Ameri-
can in the mens game albeit
not in the top 10 fromMardy
Fish, who lost 7-6 (4), 7-6 (0) to
No. 8 seed Jo-Wilfried Tsonga.
Maria Sharapova joined
Azarenka in the quarternals
with a 7-5, 6-0 win over Lara
Arruabarrena-Vecino of Spain,
someone she had never played
before.
Sharapova trailed 2-0 and 3-2
in the rst set before rallying
on a cloudless day in the desert
when temperature reached the
lower 90s.
Just didnt get a good
rhythm on her game from the
beginning, she said. Maybe I
was going for the lines a little
bit more than I had to, espe-
cially in the rst few games
when you dont know too much
about your opponent or havent
played her.
By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer
Djokovic, Azarenka, Sharapova win at Indian Wells
T E N N I S
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ADVISOR
Express Service
Dept. Busy shop.
Good people
skills, some
service and parts
experience
required. Great
pay and benefits.
Call or email
Ron Stone
Service Mgr.
for confidential
appointment.
570-558-2000
ext 16
Email Rstone@
tomhesser.com
Tom Hesser
NISSAN Scranton
557 Project/
Program
Management
ESTIMATOR/PROJECT
MANAGER
Fehlinger Construc-
tion Group, LLC is
currently looking for
an Estimator/
Project Manager
with a minimum of 5
years experience in
sewer, water, exca-
vation, structures
and storm sewer.
Candidate should
be proficient in
HCSS HeavyBid,
HCSS HeavyJob
and Microsoft
Office products.
PennDot experi-
ence helpful. We
offer a competitive
salary along with a
401(k), BS/BS, eye-
glass, dental and
a company vehicle.
Please submit your
confidential resume
or apply in person
at: Fehlinger Con-
struction Group,
LLC., 106 South
Lehigh Street,
Shavertown, PA
18708 or email
Anthony Barbose at
tbarbose@fehlinger
construction.com
744 Furniture &
Accessories
SALON
FURNITURE
free standing styling
station, sink with
backwash unit and
shampoo chair, 58x
36 rectangular anti-
fatigue mat, wall
mount mirror with
brackets, 58x36.
Other miscella-
neous items.
570-709-7271
DUPONT
LENTEN
POTATO PANCAKE -
CLAM CHOWDER
DINNER &
CHINESE AUCTION
FRIDAY, MARCH 15TH
SERVING 3-7 PM
TAKE OUTS
START AT NOON
$8.00 PER
PERSON
HOLY MOTHER
OF SORROWS
CHURCH
212 WYOMING
AVE, DUPONT
COME JOIN US
& ENJOY
CALL 654-4262
FOR MORE INFO
TAKEOUTS DAY
OF DINNER
CALL 654-0345
SHAVERTOWN
1035 Oak Drive
Friday, 2-6 only!
Furniture, lamps,
tables, patio set
with umbrella, rugs,
home decor, chil-
drens toys, Graco
stroller with car
seat, jogger stroller,
name brand chil-
drens clothing sizes
3 months to size 6,
boys & girls) bar
stools, filing cabi-
nets, marble tables,
stereo system
/speakers/tuner, air
filter, snow blower,
gas grill, DVDs CDs
& much more! Items
priced to sell.
CASH ONLY SALE!
Directions: Chase
Rd. to Huntsville Rd.
to Oak Drive
Meadowcrest
Manor Subdivision.
LUZERNE
ONE-OF-A-KIND
Beautiful brick
trimmed Colo-
nial, 2nd floor 2
bedroom unit
with wood pan-
eled loft. Remod-
eled completely,
maple kitchen,
all appliances,
gorgeous en-
closed porch,
covered carport,
gas fireplace,
more! $800 +
utilities. 2 YEAR
SAME RENT
LEASE, NO PETS
/ SMOKING.
EMPLOYMENT
VERI FI CATI ON
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
570-288-1422 570-288-1422
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, full
kitchen, large clos-
ets. No pets/smok-
ng. Sewer & trash
ncluded. $475.
Call 570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
Open House,
March 16 and 17
10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
231 West Noble St.
Very nice, first floor,
two bedrooms,
remodeled,
includes,
washer/dryer
hookup, range and
refrigerator.
$500/ month
plus utilities.
NO PETS.
Call: 570-760-3637
PLAINS
One bedroom, 2nd
floor. Recently reno-
vated. Bath with
shower, eat in
kitchen, stove &
refrigerator. Living
room, large bed-
room, air, plenty of
closet space. 2
entrances. Wash-
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basement. 1 off
street parking
space. $450 +
security & applica-
tion., Call (570)823-
0372
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3/1 Bath. Freshly
painted, newer
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kitchen with
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$635.00 + utilities
570-239-3887
DALLAS
PERFECT 2 BEDROOM
2 bath, 1 car
garage on 1 acre
cared for by
Landlord. All brand
new appliances
included. 1st Floor
laundry, full base-
ment for storage,
Great view, patio.
$1100/mo plus utili-
ties.
570-762-8481
JENKINS TWP.
Small 2 bedroom
single family house
for rent. $500 a
month. Security
deposit required.
Background check.
Some appliances
included. NO PETS.
Call 570-466-2233
for details.
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 PAgE 7B TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com S P O R T S
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To join these great stores, call Legend Properties Inc. 610.868.6720 x5407
Two Kings athletes were
honored on Tuesday as Chris
Sweeney and Maggie Gola were
named Freedom Conference
Player of the Week for baseball
and softball, respectively.
Sweeney, a senior, helped
lead the Monarchs to a 4-1
record last week, making some
history in the process. The
Crestwood grad became the
rst Kings player in more than
20 years to hit for the cycle,
accomplishing the feat in a 16-5
win over Emerson on March 4.
For the week, Sweeney batted
.619 with eight extra-base hits,
including three doubles, three
triples and two home runs. He
also had a 1.333 slugging per-
centage, seven RBI and seven
runs scored.
Gola, meanwhile, hit three
home runs to push the Lady
Monarchs to a matching 4-1
record on the week. She batted
.500 with ve extra-base hits
and a 1.167 slugging percent-
age.
A Nanticoke alum, Gola hit
two of her three home runs in
a 4-2 victory over York College.
In a game against Penn State
Harrisburg, she added another
homer and a three-run double
to lead the Lady Monarchs to a
14-0 win.
WOMENS LACROSSE
Alvernia 21, Misericordia 9
Catie Viegas scored three
times for the Cougars in a road
loss. Kate Pagnotta, Brooke
North and Alexandra Elmes
added two goals apiece for
Misericordia.
Erika Proctor recorded 10
saves in the loss.
WOMENS BASKETBALL
Pair named to century team
Wilkes alum Whitney Bull
and Kings grad Joanne Pola-
koski were both selected to the
Middle Atlantic Conference
All-Century team as the leagues
100th season draws to a close.
Both players won a national
player of the year award during
their careers.
Bull (2001-03) is the Lady
Colonels career leader in
rebounds, free-throw attempts
and ranks in the top 10 in made
free throws, steals and scoring.
Polakoski (1997-2000), a
Meyers grad, ranks second in
career scoring and rebounds for
the Lady Monarchs and was a
three-time All-American.
She holds the Lady Mon-
archs record for career shoot-
ing percentage and the top
three single-season shooting
percentages.
Kings duo
recognized
The Times Leader staff
L O C A L R O U N D U P
NEW YORK C.J. Garner
scored a career-high 31 points
and LIU Brooklyn punched its
ticket for the NCAA tourna-
ment with a 91-70 win over
Mount St. Marys on Tuesday
night in the nals of the North-
east Conference tournament.
Jamal Olasewere added 15
points and 10 rebounds for
the Blackbirds (20-13), who
became the only team to win
three straight conference tour-
nament titles. Coach Jack Perri
also became the third coach in
the conference to win the title
in his rst year on the job.
After a frantic back-and-forth
rst half, LIU Brooklyn opened
the second half with a 35-31
lead. Led by a decisive dunk
by Olasewere and a three-point
play from Garner, the Black-
birds went on a 13-4 run to go
ahead by 13 only 6 minutes into
the half.
LIU Brooklyn didnt allow
Mount St. Marys to pull closer
than 12 the rest of the way.
Sam Prescott scored 21
points for the Mountaineers
(18-14).
The enthusiastic LIU Brook-
lyn crowd, which spent much
of the second half chanting
Brooklyn Three-peat, stormed
the oor to celebrate what was
a career night for Garner and
a denitive statement for the
small LIU program.
It also cut the Mount Saint
Marys comeback from an ugly
start to the season a bit short.
The fth-seeded Mountaineers
came in riding a nine-game
win streak after upsetting
top-seeded Robert Morris for a
chance to play in the nals. A
win for Mount St. Marys would
have topped an impressive
turnaround for the team, which
started a dismal 2-6 in confer-
ence play.
During the rst half, it
seemed as though the Moun-
taineers would take this one.
LIU Brooklyn didnt grab its
rst lead until more than 10
minutes had passed. From
there, it was back-and-forth
with ve lead changes until
the Blackbirds took over in the
second half.
Prescott started 4-for-4 from
3-point range before going cold
in the second half for the Moun-
taineers, while Garner scored
17 of his points and Olasewere
10 after the break. The Black-
birds for close 68 percent in the
second half.
Garner, who averaged 28
points during the tournament,
was named its most valuable
player.
Seton Hall 46,
South Florida 42
NEW YORK Fuquan Ed-
win scored 17 points, including
the nal six in regulation, and
Seton Hall rallied past South
Florida in overtime in the
unsightly opener of a last-of-its-
kind Big East tournament.
Gene Teague added 14 points
and 10 rebounds for the 12th-
seeded Pirates (15-17), who
face No. 19 Syracuse in the
second round on Wednesday
afternoon.
Even after playing an extra
5 minutes, the teams barely
eclipsed the lowest-scoring
game in Big East tournament
history, Georgetowns 46-41
rst-round victory over Villa-
nova in 2003.
Zach LeDay had 13 points
and 15 rebounds to lead No.
13 seed South Florida (12-19),
which shot 24.2 percent and
squandered an eight-point cush-
ion down the stretch in a game
between offensively challenged
squads that both went 3-15 in
conference play this season.
WOMEN
Notre Dame 61,
Connecticut 59
HARTFORD, Conn. Nata-
lie Achonwas layup with 1.8
seconds left lifted No. 2 Notre
Dame to its rst Big East tour-
nament championship with a
61-59 victory over third-ranked
UConn on Tuesday night.
Skylar Diggins stole an errant
pass from Kaleena Mosqueda-
Lewis with 8 seconds left, and
after dribbling through a few
defenders, found Achonwa for
the uncontested lay-in.
Kelly Faris 3-point heave
from 65 feet fell harmlessly off
the backboard, setting off a wild
celebration for the Irish, who
have won 26 straight games.
Notre Dame (31-1) had been
in the title game six times,
including the previous two, and
lost to the Huskies in each one.
The Irish werent going to be
denied in their nal chance to
win an elusive Big East tourna-
ment championship. Earlier
in the day, Notre Dame an-
nounced it would be joining the
ACC starting next season a
year earlier than expected.
S. Dakota St. 56,
South Dakota 53
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. Me-
gan Waytashek scored 11 points
and grabbed a key rebound in
the last minute to help South
Dakota State beat South Dakota
56-53 on Tuesday in the Sum-
mit League tournament nal.
Gabrielle Boever had seven
steals for South Dakota State
(25-7), which secured an auto-
matic bid to the NCAA tourna-
ment with its fth consecutive
Summit League title.
LIU Brooklyn headed back to NCAA tournament
C O L L E g E B A S K E T B A L L
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
LIU Brooklyns Jason Brickman breaks away from Mount St.
Marys Shivaughn Wiggins during the rst half of Northeast
Conference championship on Tuesday in the Brooklyn borough of
New York.
K
BUSINESS
IN BRIEF
Geisinger CMC earns seal
G
eisinger-Community Medical
Center has ofcially earned the
Joint Commissions Gold Seal of Ap-
proval for certication as a Primary
Stroke Center. The Joint Commissions
Primary Stroke Center Certication
is based on on-site evaluations that
evaluate a medical centers compliance
with the recommendations for primary
stroke centers published by the Brain
Attack Coalition and the American
Stroke Associations statements and
guidelines for stroke care.
G-CMC is one of 54 medical centers
in Pennsylvania to be certied as a
Primary Stroke Center. It is also the
only hospital in Lackawanna County to
be honored with the distinction.
Bon-Ton results higher
The Bon-Ton Stores Inc. reported
Tuesday its operating results for the
fourth quarter and scal year 2012
showing that comparable store sales
increased 1 percent as compared with
the same period last year, according to
a news release.
Gross margin rate increased 160
basis points to 36.2 percent, compared
with 34.6 percent in the fourth quarter
of scal 2011. Operating income in-
creased $14.9 million to $95.3 million,
compared with $80.5 million in the
fourth quarter last year.
Net income decreased to $74.4 mil-
lion, in comparison with $78.2 million
in the same period last year.
More jobs are advertised
U.S. employers advertised more job
openings in January, suggesting that
hiring will remain healthy in the com-
ing months.
Job openings rose 2.2 percent in Jan-
uary from December to 3.69 million,
the Labor Department said Tuesday.
Openings had fallen nearly 5 percent
in December. They are still below
Novembers level of nearly 3.8 mil-
lion. There were other positive signs:
Employers laid off the fewest workers
in January than in any month since re-
cords began in 2001. And the number
of Americans quitting their jobs rose
to the highest in more than four years.
People usually quit when they have
another job, so more quitting suggests
it is easier to nd work.
There is still a lot of competition
for open positions. About 12.3 million
people were unemployed in January.
That means there were 3.3 unem-
ployed people, on average, competing
for each job.
THE TIMES LEADER WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 timesleader.com
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PitnyBw 14.66 +.43 +37.8
Praxair 112.92 -.52 +3.2
PSEG 32.76 -.10 +7.1
PulteGrp 19.75 -.40 +8.8
Questar 23.58 -.31 +19.3
RadioShk 3.37 -.11 +59.0
RLauren 174.41 -2.09 +16.3
Raytheon 56.13 +.15 -2.5
ReynAmer 42.99 -.40 +3.8
RockwlAut 88.54 -1.52 +5.4
Rowan 35.02 +.32 +12.0
RoyDShllB 67.74 -.34 -4.4
RoyDShllA 65.98 -.17 -4.3
Safeway 23.87 +.56 +32.0
Schlmbrg 77.44 -.34 +11.7
Sherwin 167.63 -.10 +9.0
SilvWhtn g 31.28 +1.07 -13.3
SiriusXM 3.19 -.01 +10.4
SonyCp 15.55 -.41 +38.8
SouthnCo 45.20 -.11 +5.6
SwstAirl 12.34 +.01 +20.5
SpectraEn 28.95 -.36 +5.7
SprintNex 5.92 +.06 +4.4
Sysco 33.60 +.01 +7.1
TECO 17.34 -.02 +3.5
Target 67.11 -.23 +13.4
TenetHlt rs 43.65 +.45 +34.4
Tenneco 37.68 -.15 +7.3
Tesoro 57.79 +.29 +31.2
Textron 30.66 -.04 +23.7
3M Co 105.13 -.68 +13.2
TimeWarn 56.42 -.84 +18.0
Timken 56.63 -.49 +18.4
Titan Intl 20.89 -.07 -3.8
UnilevNV 40.29 -.25 +5.2
UnionPac 139.00 -.69 +10.6
UPS B 84.53 -.15 +14.6
USSteel 20.69 -.05 -13.2
UtdTech 93.14 +.23 +13.6
VectorGp 16.07 -.08 +8.1
ViacomB 61.95 +.10 +17.5
WestarEn 31.67 -.09 +10.7
Weyerhsr 30.20 -.31 +8.6
Whrlpl 118.86 -.43 +16.8
WmsCos 34.79 -.24 +6.3
Windstrm 8.81 +.10 +6.3
Wynn 117.98 -.17 +4.9
XcelEngy 28.96 -.04 +8.4
Xerox 8.59 -.07 +26.0
YumBrnds 68.73 +.89 +3.5
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 15.35 -.03 +9.8
GlblRskAllB m15.31 -.01 -0.4
American Cent
IncGroA x 29.82 -.08 +9.7
ValueInv x 7.03 -.02 +10.6
American Funds
AMCAPA m 23.69 ... +9.2
BalA m 21.71 ... +6.4
BondA m 12.84 +.01 -0.4
CapIncBuA m54.88 +.03 +4.0
CpWldGrIA m39.41 -.02 +5.9
EurPacGrA m42.88 -.09 +4.0
FnInvA m 44.24 -.04 +8.5
GrthAmA m 37.07 -.04 +7.9
HiIncA m 11.50 +.01 +2.5
IncAmerA m 19.04 +.01 +5.4
InvCoAmA m 32.47 ... +7.7
MutualA m 30.73 -.02 +8.4
NewPerspA m33.42 -.05 +6.9
NwWrldA m 55.88 -.21 +2.6
SmCpWldA m43.29 -.09 +8.5
WAMutInvA m33.94 ... +8.7
Baron
Asset b 55.08 -.13 +12.7
BlackRock
EqDivI 21.42 -.03 +7.5
GlobAlcA m 20.59 -.03 +4.3
GlobAlcC m 19.14 -.03 +4.1
GlobAlcI 20.69 -.03 +4.3
CGM
Focus 33.65 -.41 +14.8
Mutual 31.39 -.22 +10.5
Realty 30.80 -.10 +4.9
Columbia
AcornZ 33.27 ... +9.3
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 20.57 -.14 +0.9
EmMktValI 30.16 -.19 +1.1
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 11.33 +.02 -0.3
HlthCareS d 29.50 +.10 +13.1
LAEqS d 33.96 -.22 +3.9
Davis
NYVentA m 38.55 -.09 +10.8
NYVentC m 37.10 -.09 +10.7
Dodge & Cox
Bal 84.34 ... +8.0
Income 13.86 ... +0.1
IntlStk 36.60 -.13 +5.7
Stock 134.98 -.13 +10.7
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 36.52 -.21 +5.9
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.62 ... +2.6
HiIncOppB m 4.63 +.01 +2.4
NatlMuniA m 10.29 -.01 +1.2
NatlMuniB m 10.29 -.01 +1.0
PAMuniA m 9.25 -.02 +1.2
FPA
Cres d 30.06 -.04 +6.8
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.31 ... +1.5
Bal 21.23 -.04 +5.2
BlChGrow 53.22 -.19 +8.5
Contra 82.84 -.33 +7.8
DivrIntl d 31.17 -.08 +4.1
ExpMulNat d 23.56 -.06 +7.6
Free2020 14.86 -.01 +3.8
Free2030 14.94 -.02 +5.0
GNMA 11.67 +.01 -0.3
GrowCo 100.53 -.40 +7.8
LatinAm d 46.45 -.18 +0.3
LowPriStk d 42.62 +.05 +7.9
Magellan 79.48 -.35 +8.5
Overseas d 34.14 -.05 +5.6
Puritan 20.47 -.04 +5.5
StratInc 11.29 +.01 0.0
TotalBd 10.87 +.01 -0.2
Value 85.83 -.14 +12.4
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 31.98 -.01 +8.7
Fidelity Select
Gold d 30.93 +.61 -16.4
Pharm d 16.63 +.04 +10.6
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 55.20 -.13 +9.3
500IdxInstl 55.20 -.13 +9.3
500IdxInv 55.19 -.13 +9.3
TotMktIdAg d 45.22 -.10 +9.7
First Eagle
GlbA m 50.83 -.02 +4.6
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 7.49 -.01 +0.4
GrowB m 51.41 -.14 +6.9
Income A m 2.31 ... +4.7
Income C m 2.33 ... +4.5
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 30.96 +.01 +8.1
Euro Z 22.46 +.05 +6.2
Shares Z 24.47 -.01 +8.9
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBond A m 13.58 +.01 +2.1
GlBondAdv 13.54 +.01 +2.1
Growth A m 20.91 +.03 +7.6
Harbor
CapApInst 45.14 -.19 +6.2
IntlInstl d 64.44 -.08 +3.7
INVESCO
ConstellB m 22.54 -.08 +6.2
GlobQuantvCoreA m12.55-.01+10.3
PacGrowB m 21.03 -.16 +3.7
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.97+.02 -0.3
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 50.75 -.30 -4.5
AT&T Inc 36.72 +.12 +8.9
AbtLab s 34.98 +.05 +11.6
AMD 2.61 +.02 +8.8
AlaskAir s 57.03 -.08 +32.4
Alcoa 8.62 -.05 -.7
Allstate 47.71 -.04 +18.8
Altria 34.16 -.10 +8.7
AEP 47.29 -.09 +10.8
AmExp 65.29 -.21 +14.0
AmIntlGrp 39.11 -.36 +10.8
Amgen 91.75 +.31 +6.4
Anadarko 84.26 +.68 +13.4
Annaly 15.38 +.07 +9.5
Apple Inc 428.43 -9.44 -19.5
AutoData 63.97 +.10 +12.4
AveryD 42.88 +.25 +22.8
Avnet 36.07 -.07 +17.8
Avon 20.19 ... +40.6
BP PLC 40.41 -.19 -3.0
BakrHu 46.29 +.45 +13.3
BallardP h 1.08 -.16 +76.8
BarnesNob 16.33 -.43 +8.2
Baxter 69.28 -.69 +3.9
Beam Inc 61.37 -.09 +.5
BerkH B 103.01 -1.06 +14.8
BigLots 35.76 -.11 +25.7
BlockHR 27.71 +.37 +49.2
Boeing 84.16 +1.22 +11.7
BrMySq 38.22 +.70 +18.5
Brunswick 34.50 -.90 +18.6
Buckeye 59.20 -.03 +30.4
CBS B 45.92 +.02 +20.7
CMS Eng 26.97 -.21 +10.6
CSX 23.38 +.04 +18.5
CampSp 41.52 +.02 +19.0
Carnival 35.34 -.30 -3.9
Caterpillar 89.74 -1.44 +.1
CenterPnt 21.77 -.08 +13.1
CntryLink 34.57 +.14 -11.6
Chevron 118.25 -.48 +9.3
Cisco 21.70 -.18 +10.4
Citigroup 46.95 -.65 +18.7
Clorox 84.35 -.15 +15.2
ColgPal 115.06 -.58 +10.1
ConAgra 34.70 -.03 +17.6
ConocPhil s58.73 +.29 +1.3
ConEd 58.87 -.18 +6.0
Corning 12.67 +.04 +.4
Cummins 118.63 -.99 +9.5
DTE 66.66 -.09 +11.0
Deere 90.85 -.59 +5.1
Diebold 29.10 +.11 -4.9
Disney 57.11 -.55 +14.7
DomRescs 56.02 -.28 +8.1
Dover 73.21 -.68 +11.4
DowChm 33.24 +.25 +2.8
DryShips 1.95 -.10 +21.6
DuPont 49.71 +.38 +10.5
DukeEn rs 69.54 -.25 +9.0
EMC Cp 24.47 -.09 -3.3
Eaton 62.84 -.55 +16.0
EdisonInt 50.71 +.03 +12.2
EmersonEl 56.82 -.67 +7.3
EnbrdgEPt 28.54 -.19 +2.3
Energen 47.89 +.11 +6.2
Entergy 63.47 -.05 -.4
EntPrPt 56.96 -.58 +13.7
Ericsson 12.94 +.13 +28.1
Exelon 32.07 -.34 +7.8
ExxonMbl 89.16 ... +3.0
FMC Cp s 61.27 -.12 +4.7
Fastenal 50.86 -.46 +9.0
FedExCp 106.43 -.98 +16.0
Fifth&Pac 18.69 -.43 +50.1
FirstEngy 41.17 ... -1.4
Fonar 6.72 -.36 +55.2
FootLockr 32.76 +.27 +2.0
FordM 13.39 +.05 +3.4
Gannett 21.55 ... +19.7
Gap 36.53 +.15 +17.7
GenCorp 12.42 -.26 +35.7
GenDynam 68.77 -.39 -.7
GenElec 23.41 -.21 +11.5
GenMills 46.27 +.57 +14.5
GileadSci s 46.18 +.24 +25.7
GlaxoSKln 44.65 ... +2.7
Hallibrtn 41.96 -.04 +21.0
HarleyD 54.55 -.22 +11.7
HarrisCorp 44.93 +.11 -8.2
HartfdFn 25.65 +.03 +14.3
HawaiiEl 27.48 -.05 +9.3
HeclaM 4.38 +.09 -24.9
Heico s 45.52 +.53 +1.7
Hess 70.38 +.49 +32.9
HewlettP 21.40 +.37 +50.2
HomeDp 70.75 -.18 +14.4
HonwllIntl 73.59 -.27 +15.9
Hormel 38.58 +.05 +23.6
Humana 68.54 +.21 -.1
INTL FCSt 17.38 -.26 -.2
ITT Corp 27.65 -.11 +17.9
ITW 61.26 -1.23 +.7
IngerRd 55.03 +.20 +14.7
IBM 210.55 +.47 +9.9
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
92.79 76.11 AirProd APD 2.56 88.91 +.08 +5.8
40.69 32.75 AmWtrWks AWK 1.00 40.13 -.23 +8.1
45.52 37.00 Amerigas APU 3.20 43.67 -.08 +12.7
30.33 21.52 AquaAm WTR .70 30.22 +.05 +18.9
33.98 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 32.56 +.10 +18.9
399.10 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 388.87 +.54 +9.7
12.44 6.72 BkofAm BAC .04 12.01 -.14 +3.4
28.71 19.30 BkNYMel BK .52 28.61 -.02 +11.3
14.99 3.50 BonTon BONT .20 12.50 +.59 +2.8
52.77 43.08 CVS Care CVS .90 52.08 -.55 +7.7
62.22 39.01 Cigna CI .04 61.55 +.98 +15.1
41.25 34.67 CocaCola s KO 1.12 38.96 -.35 +7.5
42.00 28.09 Comcast CMCSA .78 40.72 -.42 +9.0
29.52 25.38 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.08 29.10 +.01 +6.4
43.52 20.71 CmtyHlt CYH .25 43.47 +.10 +41.4
51.85 34.78 CoreMark CORE .76 48.55 +.33 +2.5
58.67 43.59 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 56.82 -.67 +7.3
58.21 34.00 EngyTEq ETE 2.54 56.89 -.44 +25.1
8.42 4.74 Entercom ETM ... 7.79 -.07 +11.6
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 14.60 +.06 +1.4
5.15 3.06 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.13 +.07 -3.5
18.25 13.06 Genpact G .18 17.83 -.14 +15.0
9.81 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 7.61 -.14 +29.0
72.70 51.91 Heinz HNZ 2.06 72.50 -.01 +25.7
85.50 59.51 Hershey HSY 1.68 84.29 +.07 +16.7
39.98 24.76 Lowes LOW .64 39.04 -.63 +9.9
105.90 76.92 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 104.09 -.09 +5.7
99.50 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 98.76 -.13 +12.0
28.75 24.05 Mondelez MDLZ .52 28.21 -.22 +10.8
22.89 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 21.77 -.17 +7.4
17.50 6.00 NexstarB NXST .48 16.94 -.30 +60.0
67.89 53.36 PNC PNC 1.60 65.42 -.45 +12.2
31.35 26.68 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.39 +.12 +6.1
19.39 11.81 PennaRE PEI .72 19.33 -.04 +9.6
77.41 63.01 PepsiCo PEP 2.15 76.89 +.04 +12.4
94.13 81.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 90.89 -.32 +8.7
77.77 59.07 ProctGam PG 2.25 77.17 -.18 +13.7
65.17 44.47 Prudentl PRU 1.60 59.87 -.54 +12.3
2.12 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 1.68 +.01 +23.5
20.13 12.85 SLM Cp SLM .60 19.74 +.33 +15.2
60.00 42.35 SLM pfB SLMBP 1.96 58.75 +.76 +10.8
46.67 37.65 TJX TJX .46 44.59 -.20 +5.0
37.19 26.30 UGI Corp UGI 1.08 37.20 +.09 +13.7
48.77 36.80 VerizonCm VZ 2.06 48.36 +.55 +11.8
77.60 57.18 WalMart WMT 1.88 73.60 +.62 +7.9
45.96 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 40.76 +.59 +4.1
37.14 29.80 WellsFargo WFC 1.00 36.66 -.47 +7.3
USD per British Pound 1.4909 -.0020 -.13% 1.6102 1.5637
Canadian Dollar 1.0261 -.0003 -.03% .9764 .9934
USD per Euro 1.3026 -.0012 -.09% 1.2894 1.3150
Japanese Yen 95.93 -.34 -.35% 77.87 82.26
Mexican Peso 12.4567 -.0683 -.55% 13.0375 12.7031
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.54 3.50 +1.09 -4.64 -9.20
Gold 1591.50 1577.80 +0.87 -8.04 -6.03
Platinum 1595.00 1601.20 -0.39 -3.31 -6.28
Silver 29.13 28.81 +1.11 -12.34 -13.16
Palladium 773.40 777.10 -0.48 +13.94 +9.34
Foreign Exchange & Metals
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.18 -.02 +4.6
LifGr1 b 14.31 -.03 +6.2
RegBankA m 15.56 -.09 +9.3
SovInvA m 17.21 -.06 +7.3
TaxFBdA m 10.41 -.01 +0.1
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 19.76 -.15 +1.1
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 15.29 +.01 +1.9
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.64 ... +0.5
MFS
MAInvA m 23.57 -.07 +9.7
MAInvC m 22.75 -.06 +9.6
Merger
Merger b 15.83 ... 0.0
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.88 +.02 +0.5
TotRtBd b 10.88 +.01 +0.4
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 14.53 ... +8.8
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 21.13 -.01 +9.9
Oakmark
EqIncI 30.04 -.03 +5.4
Intl I 22.67 +.02 +8.3
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 45.40 -.14 +7.2
DevMktA m 35.88 -.21 +1.7
DevMktY 35.48 -.20 +1.7
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.72 +.01 +1.1
AllAuthIn 11.06 +.03 -0.3
ComRlRStI 6.58 +.02 -0.9
HiYldIs 9.72 +.01 +2.0
LowDrIs 10.48 +.01 +0.1
TotRetA m 11.20 +.01 0.0
TotRetAdm b 11.20 +.01 0.0
TotRetC m 11.20 +.01 -0.1
TotRetIs 11.20 +.01 +0.1
TotRetrnD b 11.20 +.01 0.0
TotlRetnP 11.20 +.01 +0.1
Permanent
Portfolio 48.85 +.11 +0.4
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.37 -.03 +6.7
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 33.57 -.09 +7.5
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 17.15 -.04 +7.5
BlendA m 20.01 -.07 +8.5
EqOppA m 17.30 -.04 +9.1
HiYieldA m 5.77 ... +2.3
IntlEqtyA m 6.62 -.01 +5.4
IntlValA m 20.78 -.03 +4.3
JennGrA m 22.16 -.09 +6.1
NaturResA m 47.04 +.16 +4.3
SmallCoA m 24.73 -.07 +10.3
UtilityA m 12.91 -.05 +8.2
ValueA m 17.19 -.02 +10.1
Putnam
GrowIncB m 16.18 ... +10.8
IncomeA m 7.33 ... +1.3
Royce
LowStkSer m 14.05 +.05 +1.5
OpportInv d 13.49 -.03 +12.9
ValPlSvc m 15.04 -.02 +8.7
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 24.26 -.05 +9.3
Scout
Interntl d 34.47 -.05 +3.4
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 49.36 -.18 +8.2
CapApprec 23.77 -.02 +6.8
DivGrow 28.78 -.06 +9.3
DivrSmCap d 19.46 -.04 +11.6
EmMktStk d 33.91 -.15 -0.4
EqIndex d 41.97 -.10 +9.3
EqtyInc 29.07 -.07 +9.9
FinSer 16.68 -.08 +11.6
GrowStk 40.50 -.18 +7.2
HealthSci 46.99 -.02 +14.0
HiYield d 7.12 +.01 +3.3
IntlDisc d 48.80 -.18 +5.9
IntlStk d 14.94 -.04 +3.8
IntlStkAd m 14.88 -.04 +3.7
LatinAm d 38.79 -.14 +2.0
MediaTele 56.98 -.27 +6.9
MidCpGr 62.51 -.07 +10.7
NewAmGro 38.55 -.02 +7.3
NewAsia d 16.93 -.07 +0.7
NewEra 44.48 +.01 +6.1
NewHoriz 37.19 -.15 +12.1
NewIncome 9.77 +.02 -0.3
Rtmt2020 18.80 -.02 +5.1
Rtmt2030 20.11 -.03 +6.3
ShTmBond 4.84 ... +0.1
SmCpVal d 42.89 -.10 +9.5
TaxFHiYld d 11.93 -.01 +0.9
Value 29.56 ... +12.1
ValueAd b 29.25 ... +12.0
Thornburg
IntlValI d 29.21 -.07 +4.0
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 25.11 +.02 +8.0
Vanguard
500Adml 143.64 -.33 +9.3
500Inv 143.60 -.34 +9.3
CapOp 38.25 +.01 +13.8
CapVal 12.52 ... +12.9
Convrt 13.44 -.01 +6.2
DevMktIdx 10.24 -.04 +5.0
DivGr 18.21 -.03 +9.4
EnergyInv 62.72 +.04 +5.9
EurIdxAdm 62.84 -.10 +3.8
Explr 88.56 -.16 +11.4
GNMA 10.83 +.02 -0.3
GNMAAdml 10.83 +.02 -0.3
GlbEq 20.12 -.04 +7.8
GrowthEq 13.21 -.04 +7.6
HYCor 6.13 +.01 +1.5
HYCorAdml 6.13 +.01 +1.5
HltCrAdml 67.22 +.30 +11.2
HlthCare 159.32 +.69 +11.2
ITGradeAd 10.24 +.02 -0.1
InfPrtAdm 28.21 +.05 -1.2
InfPrtI 11.49 +.02 -1.1
InflaPro 14.36 +.03 -1.2
InstIdxI 142.71 -.34 +9.3
InstPlus 142.72 -.34 +9.3
InstTStPl 35.41 -.08 +9.7
IntlExpIn 15.71 -.03 +6.8
IntlStkIdxAdm 25.96 -.11 +3.6
IntlStkIdxIPls 103.83 -.43 +3.6
LTInvGr 10.57 +.06 -1.7
MidCapGr 22.48 -.04 +10.4
MidCp 24.98 -.04 +11.2
MidCpAdml 113.34 -.19 +11.2
MidCpIst 25.04 -.04 +11.2
MuIntAdml 14.31 -.01 +0.1
MuLtdAdml 11.15 ... +0.3
PrecMtls 14.17 ... -11.2
Prmcp 77.77 +.02 +11.9
PrmcpAdml 80.68 +.03 +11.9
PrmcpCorI 16.58 -.01 +11.1
REITIdx 23.17 -.09 +6.0
REITIdxAd 98.89 -.40 +6.1
STCor 10.82 ... +0.3
STGradeAd 10.82 ... +0.3
SelValu 23.21 +.01 +10.6
SmGthIdx 27.80 -.06 +11.1
SmGthIst 27.85 -.06 +11.1
StSmCpEq 24.31 -.04 +12.0
Star 21.80 -.02 +4.8
StratgcEq 24.08 ... +12.3
TgtRe2015 13.91 -.01 +4.0
TgtRe2020 24.95 -.03 +4.7
TgtRe2030 24.78 -.04 +6.0
TgtRe2035 15.02 -.03 +6.6
Tgtet2025 14.32 -.02 +5.4
TotBdAdml 10.97 +.01 -0.6
TotBdInst 10.97 +.01 -0.6
TotBdMkInv 10.97 +.01 -0.6
TotBdMkSig 10.97 +.01 -0.6
TotIntl 15.52 -.06 +3.6
TotStIAdm 39.10 -.09 +9.7
TotStIIns 39.11 -.09 +9.7
TotStIdx 39.08 -.09 +9.7
TxMIntlAdm 11.83 -.05 +5.1
TxMSCAdm 34.26 -.12 +9.9
USGro 23.14 -.09 +8.8
USValue 13.35 -.01 +12.6
WellsI 24.86 +.03 +3.1
WellsIAdm 60.25 +.08 +3.2
Welltn 35.99 -.01 +6.4
WelltnAdm 62.16 -.01 +6.3
WndsIIAdm 56.77 -.12 +8.9
WndsrII 31.99 -.06 +8.9
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 7.65 -.01 +9.1
DOW
14,450.06
+2.77
NASDAQ
3,242.32
-10.55
S&P 500
1,552.48
-3.74
RUSSELL 2000
940.26
-2.25
6-MO T-BILLS
.12%
...
10-YR T-NOTE
2.02%
-.04
CRUDE OIL
$92.54
+.48
p p n n p p n n
q q q q q q q q
NATURAL GAS
$3.65
...
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
GAS PRICES
YESTERDAY MONTH AGO YEAR AGO
Average price of a gallon of
regular unleaded gasoline:
RECORD
$3.69 $3.77 $3.74
$4.06
7/17/2008
Source: AAA report for the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre/Hazleton area
More thantwo dozenof the
worlds largest pharmaceuti-
cal companies have agreed
to provide funding and other
support to Interpols battle
against counterfeit prescrip-
tion drugs, the international
police agency said Tuesday.
Interpols newly created
Pharmaceutical Crime Pro-
gram aims to help health
agencies, police and customs
bureaus in countries around
the globe stem the supply of
bogus brand-name and ge-
neric medicines, as well as
identify and dismantle the
organized crime rings dis-
tributing them.
Those rings, which operate
across borders, are raking in
billions of dollars every year,
costing legitimate drugmak-
ers a small fortune in lost
sales. Meanwhile patients
who unknowingly take coun-
terfeit drugs often are poi-
soned or get sicker because
theyre not receiving what the
doctor prescribed. Experts es-
timate hundreds of thousands
of people around the world
die because of counterfeit
medicines each year.
The pharmaceutical com-
panies have pledged a total of
nearly $5.9 million over three
years to help Interpol with
efforts including training lo-
cal law enforcement ofcials
on investigative procedures,
evidence handling and how
to better work with partners
outside their countries.
Interpol also will help
those authorities build up
their infrastructure and tar-
get enforcement actions
against crime rings that
make and sell fake drugs,
and also divert medication il-
legally to countries where its
not approved.
We will develop a program
according to what is best for
the international commu-
nity and what will save lives,
Aline Plancon, head of Inter-
pols counterfeiting and phar-
maceutical crime program,
told The Associated Press in
an exclusive interview.
Drugmakers, Interpol crack down on fake meds
By LINDA A. JOHNSON
AP Business Writer
WASHINGTON Applying for
benets under President Barack
Obamas health care overhaul could be
as daunting as doing your taxes.
The governments draft application
runs 15pages for athree-personfamily.
An outline of the online version has 21
steps, some with additional questions.
Seven months before the Oct. 1
start of enrollment season for millions
of uninsured Americans, the idea that
getting health insurance could be as
easy as shopping online at Amazon or
Travelocityis startingtolooklikewish-
ful thinking.
At least three major federal agen-
cies, including the IRS, will scrutinize
your application. Checking your iden-
tity, income and citizenship is sup-
posed to happen in real time, if you
apply online.
Thats only the rst part of the
process, which lets you know if you
qualify for nancial help. The govern-
ment asks to see what youre making
because Obamas Affordable Care Act
is means-tested, with lower-income
people getting the most generous help
to pay premiums.
Once youre nished with the mon-
ey part, actually picking a health plan
will require additional steps, plus a ba-
sic understanding of insurance jargon.
Andits a mandate, not a suggestion.
The law says virtually all Americans
must carry health insurance starting
next year, although most will just keep
the coverage they now have through
their jobs, Medicare or Medicaid.
Some are concerned that a lot of un-
insured people will be overwhelmed
and simply give up.
This lengthy draft application will
take a considerable amount of time to
ll out and will be difcult for many
people to be able to complete, said
Ron Pollack, executive director of
Families USA, an advocacy group sup-
porting the health care law. It does
not get you to the selection of a plan.
When you combine those two pro-
cesses, it is enormously time consum-
ing and complex, added Pollack. Hes
calling for the government to simplify
the form and, more important, for an
army of counselors to help uninsured
people navigate the new system. Its
unclear who would pay for these navi-
gators.
Drafts of the paper application and
a 60-page description of the online
version were quietly posted online
by the Health and Human Services
Department, seeking feedback from
industry and consumer groups. Those
materials, along with a recent HHS
presentation to insurers, run counter
to the vision of simplicity promoted by
administration ofcials.
Health plan
chock-full
of red tape
By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
PLAINS TWP. Chris Bellezza is
one of the 9.5 percent of the Wilkes-
Barre metro areas labor force thats un-
employed.
His lack of a job is not for lack of try-
ing. Over the past ve years the Dallas
woman has lled or sent out more than
400 applications or resumes, she said.
None has led to a job.
She was back at it again Tuesday as
one of hundreds of people who visited
the annual spring career fair hosted by
The Times Leader and held at The
Woodlands Inn & Resort. Most par-
ticipants seemed to be experienced job
seekers, thanks to the aftereffects of the
recession that began in 2009, and came
armed with resumes in hand.
Others, such as Jack Brock of Wilkes-
Barre, are newtothe game. Brockwas at-
tendinghis rst jobfair. Only20years old
and anxious to nd full-time work with
benets, he wasnt sure what he would
ndat the event, but he knewthat sitting
at home wouldnt have led to a job.
He declined to mention where he cur-
rently works, other than it deals with
food, but said he knows that having only
a high school diploma makes it tough to
landa decent jobinany jobmarket, espe-
cially in this one.
Im trying to prove to someone that
Im a hard worker and will be a good t,
but theres plenty of people like me say-
ing the same thing, so its stiff competi-
tion and I knowit, Brock said.
Bellezza previously heard the same
thing about the lack of higher-education
listings on her resume. Everywhere I
went, if you had a high school diploma,
it was unacceptable, she said.
So she spent nearly $10,000 over the
past two years attaining her associates
degree online through Everest Univer-
sity, based in Orlando, Fla. She hopes it
will be the difference between the reject-
ed pile and the potential interviewpile.
Immuch more marketable now, she
said condently.
For Tabitha Walters, of Dallas, the past
two months felt like an eternity. She quit
her job in Northampton County when
she moved to Luzerne County to live
closer to her parents. Employed in some
capacity since she was 12 her rst
job was as a babysitter she said being
without work for this amount of time is
getting to her.
I have the smell of desperation, she
said, before heading into the career fair
and toward the booth for Sallie Mae, the
nancial services provider with a loca-
tion in Hanover Township. That compa-
ny, one of the bigger draws Tuesday, had
about 100 jobs that needed to be lled.
Thirty-seven companies were repre-
sented at the fair; they included Express
Stafng, which is contracted by 100 area
businesses to ll temporary stafng posi-
tions. Emily Socha, an Express represen-
tative, said the career fair is a smart way
to nd the right talent for good compa-
nies.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Ken Getz of Shavertown, right, talks with Robin Vellis, branch manager of CGA Stafng Services, at The Times
Leader Spring Career Fair held Tuesday at the Woodlands Inn & Resort in Plains Township.
Hopefuls hit job fair
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
Taste
THE TIMES LEADER WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 timesleader.com
CHEFS CORNER
RAY FEI ST
WYOMI NG VALLEY
COUNTRY CLUB
Tilapia grinder
elevates the
humble sh
sandwich
March is the
wild-card month.
Were almost
out the door with
winter, but Mother
Nature might still
give us a jab or two.
I hope not, because
I just nished burning my snowshovel
to stay warm.
Between my stand-up comedy and
cooking career, I bring to you a great
recipe for a Friday during Lent. St.
Peters sh, as tilapia is referred to in
some parts of the world, is most com-
monly farm-raised. It has a very neutral
avor and suits many culinary applica-
tions well. The best tilapia to purchase
would be found in the fresh-sh section
at your grocery, but you can use the
frozen variety.
What I ampresenting is simply a
sh sandwich, a very good one. Stay
home and cook on Friday and save the
pizza for Saturday. Large pie with sweet
sauce and pork sausage please.

PANKO-CRUSTEDTILAPIA
GRINDERWITHCHEDDAR,
SPINACH, CITRUS
TARTARSAUCE AND
ORANGE/CARROT SLAW
FORTHE SANDWICH
3-5 ounce tilapia llets, enough for
everyone
our, egg-wash and panko bread-
crumbs for breading
oil for pan-frying
sliced cheddar cheese
submarine rolls
baby spinach, sauted
Start out by breading your sh. Flour,
egg-wash, panko; then reserve in your
refrigerator until the tartar sauce and slaw
is made.
FORTHE CITRUS TARTARSAUCE
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup sour cream
zest of an orange
juice and zest of a lemon
3-4 dashes of hot pepper sauce
2 tablespoons pickle relish
salt and pepper to taste
Combine all ingredients. Refrigerate
until ready to use.
FORTHE ORANGE/CARROT SLAW
2 oranges, peeled and wedged
2 large carrots, peeled and grated
1/2 mediumred onion, sliced
2 tablespoons rice-wine vinegar
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon whole-grain mustard
2 tablespoons sesame oil
salt and pepper, to taste
In a small bowl add the vinegar, honey
and mustard. Slowly whisk in the oil. Sea-
son with salt and pepper. Add the carrot
and oranges and incorporate.
Put a large saut pan on the stovetop.
Pour about 1/4inch of oil into pan and wait
for it to heat. The sh will be pan-fried
for about 3-4minutes on each side. Its
important for the oil to be hot when you
begin frying. Also, a sh spatula is a great
tool to have in your culinary toolbox. When
the sh is cooked, place on a plate with a
paper towel to absorb some of the extra
oil. Season the sh with salt and pepper.
Panko breadcrumbs are great to fry with
because they already absorb less oil than
regular breadcrumbs. Put sh on the roll,
cover with cheese and spinach and top
with tartar sauce. Serve with some of the
carrot and orange slawon the side and
boom! Agreat sh sandwich for some
even better people.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Chef Ray Feist prepared this Tila-
pia Grinder at the Wyoming Valley
Country Club in Hanover Township,
where he is executive chef.
On a trip to Dublin last summer,
my husband and older daughter spent
an afternoon studying the Book of
Kells, my younger daughter browsed
the racks at Topshop, and I spent a
couple of hours at the charming Avoca
Caf, sipping tea and devouring an en-
tire loaf of the places signature seeded
brown bread. The combination of obvi-
ous healthfulness and luxurious rich-
ness was unforgettable, and Ive had
it in the back of my mind ever since
to re-create this perfect quick bread in
my own kitchen. Finally, I gave it a try.
I began with the recipe in the Avoca
Caf Cookbook but learned quickly
that it would require some tweaking.
First of all, there was the issue of our.
Avocas brown bread is made with two
parts white our and 3 parts coarse-
ly ground whole meal our, which can
be mail-ordered from specialty baking
websites such as The Bakers Catalog,
but is difcult to nd in local super-
markets and health-food stores outside
Ireland and England. This our is rela-
tively low in protein and ecked with
wheat germ. Quick breads baked with
whole meal our have a soft, crumbly
texture and nutty avor. Substitut-
ing regular American whole wheat
our resulted in a tough bread with a
tight crumb. To get a more authentic
and pleasing result, I used two parts
white our to 1 parts whole wheat,
and some extra wheat bran and wheat
germ for texture.
Then there was the issue of seeds.
The Avoca recipe contained a combi-
nation of sunower, sesame, ax, pop-
py and pumpkin seeds. I happened to
have the rst three in my pantry, so I
stuck with those. I didnt feel bad, be-
cause this combination lent plenty of
nutritional value, as well as avor and
crunch. Sunower seeds are rich in fo-
late, vitamin E and minerals. Sesame
seeds add calcium and a cholesterol-
lowering ber called lignan. Flaxseeds
have become famous for their heart-
Irish brown bread with a twist
By LAUREN CHATTMAN
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
MCT WIRE PHoToS
A combination of
sunower, sesame and
ax seeds gives this
traditional Irish quick
bread avor, texture and
richness.
See BROWN BREAD, Page 2C
Tilapia is a forgiving sh. Its rm esh
means it takes well to grilling, broiling, baking
and pan sauting. And generally one tilapia l-
let is a decent serving for most appetites.
Tilapia can be bland. So if youre cooking tila-
pia, look to other ingredients to avor the sh.
Todays recipe pairs tilapia with ngerling
potatoes, tomatoes, olives and capers.
Kalamata olives and capers are great pantry
staples. Both have great salty-briny avor, and
a little of each goes a long way. Because of their
saltiness, you can scale back on much of the
salt in the recipe.
Kalamata olives are Greek black olives that
are about to 1 inch long and almond-shaped.
Many are a deep purplish color. Typically, they
are packed in a brine and sometimes in olive oil.
Simple uses of kalamata olives include set-
ting them out as an appetizer, processing them
into a paste with olive oil and other ingredi-
ents to make tapenade, and roasting themwith
sh, chicken and even lamb. Kalamata olives
are common fare at stores that have so-called
Mediterranean olive bars. These olive bars typ-
ically have several varieties of olives, including
green olives, sometimes along with artichoke
By SUSAN M. SELASKY - Detroit Free Press
MCT WIRE PHoTo
Mild-avored tilapia is a forgiving ingredient and goes well with kalamata olives, tomatoes and ngerling potatoes.
hen many
Christians
observe Lent,
sh becomes a menu mainstay.
For an extremely mild-
avored sh, try tilapia the
fth most-consumed sh in the
United States, according to the
National Fisheries Institute. See TILPIA, Page 2C
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healthy omega-3 fatty acids.
And the oils in all of these
seeds gave the bread the rich
avor I craved.
Any combination of seeds
will work, as long as you add
about 7 tablespoons total.
Avoid roasted seeds, which
lose much of their heart-
healthy oils when processed.
The technique couldnt be
easier.
Mix together the dry ingre-
dients, add the milk and a few
tablespoons of molasses, and
stir.
The dough came together
in ve minutes at. As with
all quick breads, minimal han-
dling is important for the best
result. Stir just until the dough
comes together.
Overmixing will toughen
it up. At Avoca, the bread is
baked in a loaf pan, but I want-
ed my bread to look as well as
taste Irish, so I shaped it into
a round and then cut an X into
the top with a sharp knife to
give it a traditional soda bread
shape.
I cranked the oven tempera-
ture up to 400, so the bread
would rise quickly and devel-
op a thick, crunchy crust. A
sprinkling of wheat germ on
top added to the craggy, rustic
look of the baked bread.
Perhaps the most difcult
thing about making this bread
is the nal step: Allowing it to
cool at least one hour before
eating it up.

SEEDED BROWN
BREAD
Slathered with butter (try Irish
Kerrygold for maximum au-
thenticity) and marmalade, this
bread is perfect for breakfast or
afternoon tea.
But it could just as easily be
served alongside a stew for a
hearty winter dinner. Or serve it
with corned beef and cabbage
on Sunday, St. Patricks Day.
2 cups unbleached all-purpose
our
1 1/2 cups stone-ground whole
wheat our
1/4 cup wheat bran
1/4 cup plus 2 teaspoons
wheat germ, divided
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon
sesame seeds
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon
sunower seeds
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon
axseeds
2 cups whole milk
3 tablespoons dark (not black-
strap) molasses
1. Preheat oven to 400 de-
grees. Line a baking sheet with
parchment paper.
2. Whisk together ours,
wheat bran, 1/4 cup wheat
germ, baking powder and salt
in a large mixing bowl. Stir in
sesame, sunower and ax-
seeds. Add milk and molasses
to bowl and mix with a spatula
until just moistened.
3. With oured hands, shape
dough into a ball and transfer
to baking sheet. Pat gently into
a 7-inch round and sprinkle the
top evenly with remaining 2
teaspoons wheat germ. Using a
very sharp knife, cut a shallow
X in the top of the loaf. Bake
until well-browned and when
tapped on underside it sounds
hollow, 45 to 50 minutes. Cool
on a wire rack for at least 1
hour before slicing and serving.
Makes 6 to 8 servings.
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 2C WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 T A S T E
BREAD
Continued from Page 1C
MCT WIre PhOTOS
A combination of sunower, sesame and ax seeds gives this
traditional Irish quick bread avor, texture and richness.
THIS WEEK: MarCH 13 To MarCH 19
Spaghetti and Pasta Dinner 4-6:30 p.m.
every Thursday at St. Marys Antiochian
Orthodox Church, 905 S. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre. $7. Includes choice of five pastas
and five sauces, salad and dessert. Take
outs available. Call 824-1674 Thursdays.
Homemade Rolls, 1-4 p.m. March 20,
holy resurrection Orthodox Cathedral,
591 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Nut, poppy,
apricot or lekvar (prune) filling. $9 each.
Deadline, Thursday.
Homemade Paska Bread, 1-4 p.m. March
20, holy resurrection Orthodox Cathedral,
591 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. $6 small; $7
large. With or without raisins. Deadline for
orders, Thursday.
Baked Fish Dinner, 4-7 p.m. Friday,
Maple Grove United Methodist Church,
5876 Main road, Sweet Valley. $8 adults;
$5 children. Take outs available. Call 477-
2294.
Pierogie Sale, noon-4 p.m. Friday, St.
Johns russian Orthodox Cathedral, church
center, hill Street, Mayfield. Deep fried or
frozen uncooked. $6 dozen. First come,
first serve. Fax business orders to 876-
2534 by Thursday.
Potato Pancakes, Pierogies and
Halushki Sale, 4 p.m. every Friday during
lent, exeter Borough hose Company 1, 1405
Susquehanna Ave., exeter. Good Fridays
sale begins at noon. Call 602-0739.
Lenten Meals, 3-7 p.m. every Friday dur-
ing lent and noon-7 p.m. on Good Friday,
Masonic Lodge 468, 821 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming. Potato pancakes, pierogies, red
clam chowder and haluski. eat in or take
out.
Lenten Food Sales, 4-7 p.m. Fridays to
March 22, Malty Fire Company, 253 Owen
St., Swoyersville. eat in or take out. home-
made pierogie, haluski, potato pancakes,
clam chowder and varied fish dinners with
French fries and coleslaw.
Fried Fish or Shrimp Dinners, 3-7 p.m.
Friday and March 22, The Good Shepherd
Polish National Catholic Church, 269 e.
Main St., Plymouth. Fish dinner, $8; shrimp
dinner, $9; potato pancakes, clam chowder
and pierogies also available. Call 690-5411.
eat in or take out.
Lenten Sales, noon-5 p.m. Fridays
during Lent, except Good Friday, holy
Name Society of St. Leos/holy rosary,
33 Manhattan St., Ashley. New england
clam chowder, mushroom soup, pierogies,
haluski, tuna hoagies and desserts. Potato
pancake batter will be sold on Ash Wednes-
day. $5 per quart.
Fish, Shrimp Fry and Pierogie Sale,
noon-7 p.m. every Friday during lent,
Good Will hose Co. No. 2, 451 W. Main St.,
Plymouth, every Friday during lent. $8
haddock meal; $9 shrimp meal; or $12 for
the chief feast (fish and shrimp). Includes
fries, hush puppies, coleslaw, drink and
dessert. rentkos pierogies, $7.50 per
dozen. red clam chowder, $3.50 small and
$7 large. Walk in or delivery in Plymouth.
Call 779-9778.
Fish Fries, 3-7 p.m. every Friday during
lent, except Good Friday, Good Shepherd
Polish National Catholic Church, 269 e.
Main St., Plymouth. Fried haddock, $8,
fried shrimp, $9. Clam chowder, pierogies,
potato pancakes and haluski with home-
made noodles. eat in or take out.
Fish Dinner, 4-7 p.m. Friday, The Maple
Grove United Methodist Church, 5876 Main
road, Sweet Valley. $8 adults; $5 children.
Take outs available. Baked fish, French
fries, coleslaw, cake.
Home Made Soups, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday,
Noxen United Methodist Church, route 29.
Variety buffet. Served with bread, butter,
beverage and dessert. Free will offering.
Chili Cook Off, 2 p.m. Saturday, County
Seat Tavern, Maple Street, Montrose. Music
by DJ ringmaster. Proceeds benefit end-
less Mountains Medical Care Foundation.
Applications available at County Seat. Call
278-9996 for Noni or her staff.
All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Supper, 4:30-
7 p.m. Saturday, Mt. Zion United Methodist
Church, Mt. Zion road, harding. Take outs,
4 p.m. $8 adults; $5 children 5-12. Advance
tickets, call Carole, 388-6565, or Bob, 823-
2484.
Ham and Cabbage Dinner Dance, 5-8
p.m. Saturday, Wyoming VFW Post 396,
Wyoming Avenue. Take outs, 4-5 p.m.. en-
tertainment by D.J. Mike, 8 p.m.-midnight.
$8 for dinner only. Call 885-3089 after 3
p.m. for dinner ticket or purchase at the
door.
Ham and Cabbage Dinner, 4-8 p.m.
Saturday, The West Side Social Club, Avoca.
$7. Take outs available.
Homemade Easter Eggs, March 24,
after each service, Friendship Circle, Christ
United Methodist Church, 175 S. Main road,
Mountain Top. Peanut butter cream, peanut
butter crunch, butter cream and coconut
cream. $1 each. Call Karen, 474-5649 or fill
out the form in the church bulletin begin-
ning Feb. 10. Deadline for orders is Sunday.
Ham Bingo, 1 p.m. Sunday, St. Nicholas
Byzantine Catholic Church, 140 Church St.,
Old Forge. $3 per person. Door prizes and
a 50-50 money raffle with three prizes.
Doors open at 11 a.m. Games start at 1 p.m.
Variety of food, refreshments and a bake
sale.
Breakfast Buffet, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Sun-
day, The Noxen Volunteer Fire Company,
Stull road, Noxen. $8 adults, $4 children
younger than 12. Bring a non-perishable
food item and receive a free raffle ticket
for a ham.
Ham and Cabbage Dinner, 2-6 p.m.
Sunday, Ladies Auxiliary, VFW Post 7069,
Clarks Summit. $8. homemade desserts,
take outs available.
All-You-Can-Eat Breakfast Buffet,
8 a.m.-noon Sunday, The hunlock Creek
Volunteer Fire Company Ladies Auxiliary.
$8 adults; $5 children 5-11; and free for
children younger than 4. Scrambled eggs,
ham, sausage, pancakes, home fries, sau-
sage, gravy over biscuits and more.
Vegetable Soup, Halushki and Bake
Sale, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. March 22, St. Nicholas
Ukrainian Catholic Church, 153 e. Main St.,
Glen Lyon. $5 per quart. Call 735-7682 or
736-6908. Deadline for orders is Sunday.
Cookbook available to order.
Homemade Easter Eggs, March 24, The
Friendship Circle of Christ United Method-
ist Church, 175 S. Main road, Mountain
Top. Peanut butter, peanut butter crunch,
coconut cream and butter cream. $1 each.
Call Karen at 474-5649. Deadline for orders
is Sunday. Pick up at church after each
service.
Baked Haddock Fish Dinner, 5-7 p.m.
March 22, sponsored by SS. Cyril & Metho-
dius Ukrainian Catholic Church, Olyphant,
regal room (ballroom/side entrance), 216
Lackawanna Avenue, Olyphant. Sit down or
take out. Pre-sold tickets only. $12. Baked
haddock, potato, vegetable, coleslaw, roll
and dessert. Call 489-4348 for reserva-
tions. Deadline is Monday.
Free Dinner, 5-6:30 p.m., every Monday,
for those in need, Christian and Missionary
Alliance Church, 317 Luzerne Ave., West
Pittston.
gooD EAts!
hearts, roasted red peppers and
fresh mozzarella.
If you buy kalamatas with
pits, its easy to remove them:
Press a long chefs knife along
the back of the olive and smash
it. The olives semi-soft esh
will split, revealing the pit.
When you buy olives from an
olive bar, choose those that are
already pitted unless youre
going to set them out on an ap-
petizer tray. It will save time and
money because most olives bars
charge by the pound whether
the olives are pitted or not.
Capers are the ower bud of a
bush indigenous to the Mediter-
ranean and parts of Asia. They
are green and smaller than a pe-
tite pea.
Along with a salty taste, they
have a hint of herbs. You will
nd them in small jars near the
olives at most grocery stores.
Capers are packed in salty brine,
so they should be drained and
rinsed before using to get rid of
some of the salt. Be sure to re-
serve the brine, pouring it back
into the jar, to keep any remain-
ing capers submerged. Once
opened, capers should be stored
in the refrigerator.

ROASTED TILAPIA
WITH TOMATOES,
OLIVES AND
FINGERLING
POTATOES
Serves: 4
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Total time: 45 minutes
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
1 1/4 pounds small ngerling
potatoes, cut diagonally into
1/2-inch pieces
3 teaspoons chopped fresh
thyme, divided
Kosher salt and freshly
ground pepper
2 cups grape tomatoes
1/3 cup pitted kalamata olives
2 tablespoons capers, rinsed,
drained
3 cloves garlic, peeled,
smashed
1/4 cup white wine vinegar,
divided
4 tilapia llets or other rm
sh, about 5-6 ounces each
Sprigs of thyme for garnish
Preheat the oven to 400 de-
grees. Drizzle a sided baking sheet
with 1 tablespoon olive oil and
place in the oven for 5 minutes.
remove from the oven. P lace
potatoes on the sheet and sprinkle
with 1 teaspoon thyme leaves,
about 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt and
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black
pepper. roast potatoes about 15
to 20 minutes or until browned
and crisp, tossing halfway through.
remove from oven; wrap potatoes
in foixzl to keep warm.
Place the tomatoes, olives, ca-
pers and garlic on the same bak-
ing sheet. Drizzle with 1 teaspoon
olive oil, 2 tablespoons vinegar
and 1 teaspoon thyme. Place in
oven and roast until just beginning
to soften, 15 minutes.
In a small bowl, mix the remain-
ing 2 teaspoons olive oil and 1
teaspoon thyme, 2 tablespoons
vinegar, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and
pepper to taste; brush on the
sh. Place the sh on top of the
roasted tomato mixture and return
to the oven until sh is just cooked
through, about 10 minutes.
Divide among plates and serve
with the potatoes. Garnish with
sprigs of thyme.
From and tested by Susan M.
Selasky for the Free Press Test
Kitchen: 367 calories (27 percent
from fat), 11 grams fat (2 grams
sat. fat), 29 grams carbohydrates,
38 grams protein, 535 mg sodium,
85 mg cholesterol, 4 grams ber.
tilApiA
Continued from Page 1C
Chef Jon Molnar

, a
major specialty food com-
pany, has announced a
breakthrough new prod-
uct, The Namath Infrared
RapidCooker

produced
by EdenPURE

.
The Namath Infrared
RapidCooker

is guaran-
teed to cook steaks better
than any steak you ever
had at a restaurant.
It is also guaranteed
t o cook steaks that taste
as good as Peter Lugers
in New York City which
is the nations top rated
steak restaurant.
When you taste a steak
or other food cooked in
this RapidCooker

, you
will never go back to your
old cooking appliances.
You cannot come close
to getting this quality of
taste in meat with your
kitchen broiler or your gas
grill or even a $10,000.00
commercial restaurant
broiler or gas grill.
The Namath Infrared
RapidCooker

has far in-


frared heat which cooks
faster, saves money, makes
food taste much better and
has many health benefits.
It cooks a one inch thick
porterhouse steak in 4
minutes.
Here is my exclusive
interview with Joe Na-
math to provide details of
this sensational new prod-
uct, The Namath Infrared
RapidCooker

.
Q: How did a famous
Hall of Fame NFL Foot-
bal l Quarterback get
i nvolved with a Rapid-
Cooker

?
A: My cousin is Chef
Jon Molnar who runs The
Chef Jon Molnar

Spe-
cialty Food Company.
I mentioned to Jon that,
now that I live in Florida,
I really miss the food in
New York rest aurant s,
especially the steaks and
pizzas. The top NewYork
steak restaurants have the
best tasting steaks in the
world, especially Peter
Lugers which was rated
the best steakhouse in the
nation by USA Today.
I asked Jon if he could
fi gur e out what Pet er
Lugers does to make the
steaks taste so good. So,
Jon went t o New Yor k
with one of his assistants
and goes to this nations
best steakhouse in Brook-
lyn, Peter Lugers.
Jon was able to look in-
side Peter Lugers kitch-
en. He found their big se-
cret is this. They cook
their steaks with infrared
heat. Infrared cooks much
faster than all other heat
sources. The infrared heat
caramelizes the surface of
the steak which seals in
the flavor, nutrit i on and
juices.
All of this has many
health benefits. My Rapid-
Cooker

is better. It has
infrared heat that cooks
even fast er t han Pet er
Luger s and has mor e
health benefits. My Rapid-
Cooker

cooks 2 times
faster than conventional
heat sources.
Q: What are these
health benefits?
A: First, you can put
the heat source above the
food you are cooking. The
excess f at dr i ps down
which is caught in a pan.
This reduces the fat con-
tent and calories of food.
The process also seals in
more nutrition in foods.
Far infrared heat is well
documented scientifically
to have health benefits.
Also, when you grill
meat, it is hard not to burn
it. Burnt meat is a carcino-
gen which is well docu-
mented in the medical
profession. With the heat
above, it is very easy to
avoid burning meat.
Q: What are all the
foods you can cook with
The Namath Infrared
RapidCooker

?
A: It will make the best
tasting steaks, ribs, chick-
en, burgers, and fish that
you ever tasted. It will al-
so cook vegetables in a
way that maximizes their
taste and crispness. You
can buy frozen French
fries and instead of baking
them in a regular oven
which leaves them soggy,
you can broil them, and
they will be crisp.
Q: How does The Na-
math Infrared Rapid-
Cooker

save the con-


sumer money?
A: It saves money in a
number of ways. The far
infrared heat produces
heat for 30% less than
conventional heat sources.
So, you can save 50% on
cooking costs. My Rapid-
Cooker

cooks so fast
you do not have to cook
l arge bat ches of food.
Government studies show
that 25% of food is wast-
ed because people cook
more than the amounts
they need. Therefore, my
RapidCooker

will pay
for itself in a very short
time.
Q: Where can you use
The Namath Infrared
RapidCooker

?
A: It comes in your
choice of gas or electric
so you can use it any-
where. The gas model uses
a small bottle of pro-
pane and it will also use a
large bottle of propane
gas. It is portable and
weighs only 18 pounds.
You can use it in your
kitchen, on your patio or
on your porch. It is perfect
for tailgating. It is great if
you have a camping trailer
or motor home. You can
also use it in motel rooms
when you travel and save
a lot of money on food yet
eat like a king.
You can feed a large
group really fast because
my RapidCooker

cooks
twice as fast as gas grills,
charcoal grills or stoves.
You cannot come close
to getting this quality of
taste in meat with your
kitchen broiler or your gas
grill or even a $10,000.00
commercial restaurant
broiler or gas grill.
Q. How can my read-
ers get The Namath In-
frared RapidCooker

?
A. Today I am offering
your readers a major dis-
count of $75.00 off the
regular price, plus free
shipping and handling if
they respond in the next
10 days. There is a 60-
day unconditional satis-
faction guarantee. Re-
turn shipping is paid.
Try it free for 60 days.
But there is a strict limit
of 3 RapidCooker

s at
this major discount and
free shipping and han-
dling no exceptions
please.
By John Whitehead, Media Services
2013 Media Services S-9635 OF26783R-1 PAID ADVERTISEMENT
New Namath Infrared Rapid
Cooker

makes steaks taste 2


times better than gas grills
and better than any restaurant
Makes all meats and vegetables taste
better than any other cooking appliance
JOE NAMATHS AUTHORIZED
DISCOUNT CLAIM FORM
The regular price of The Namath Infrared RapidCooker

produced by EdenPURE

is $372.00, plus $42.00 shipping


and handling for a total of $414.00. Today readers can get a
major discount of $75.00 off the regular price, plus free
shipping and handling. Therefore, readers who order in the
next 10 days can get The Namath Infrared RapidCooker

for only $297 delivered. There is a 2-year warranty.


There is also a 60-day unconditional satisfaction guar-
antee where you can return it for a full refund, return
shipping paid and no questions asked. The RapidCook-
er

comes in your choice of gas or electric. But, there is a


strict limit of 3 total RapidCooker

s at this major discount


with free shipping and handling no exceptions please.
Check belowthe number you want (limit 3 per customer)
The Namath Infrared RapidCooker

,
Electric, number I want: _____
Gas, number I want: _____
I am ordering within 10 days, therefore I get a $75.00
discount, free shipping and handling and my price is
only $297 for The Namath Infrared RapidCooker

delivered.
I amordering past 10 days, therefore I pay full price of
$414.00 for The Namath Infrared RapidCooker

.
To claim your discount and order by phone: call toll-
free 1-800-284-9557. Operators are on duty Monday -
Friday 6am - 3am, Saturday 7am - 12am and Sunday
7am - 11pm, EST. Give operator your Offer Code on
this coupon.
To claim your discount and order online: visit
www.buynamathproducts.com and enter Offer Code
K1157.
To claim your discount and order by mail: fill out and
mail in this Authorized Discount Coupon.
______________________________________________________________________
NAME
______________________________________________________________________
ADDRESS
______________________________________________________________________
CITY STATE ZIP CODE
Enclosed is $_______ in: Check Money Order
(Make check payable to Chef Jon Molnar) or charge my:
VISA MasterCard Am. Exp./Optima Discover/Novus
Account No. ________________________Exp. Date ____/____
Signature ____________________________________________
MAILTO: Chef Jon Molnar
Offer Code K1157
7800 Whipple Ave. N.W.
Canton, OH 44767
The Namath Infrared RapidCooker

goes anywhere. It weighs only 18 pounds. It


is available in gas or electric so you can use it anywhere. You can use it in your
kitchen, backyard, garage, tailgating, the beach and at campsites. Because the
infrared heat cooks twice as fast as conventional heat sources, you can cook a lot
of food in a short period of time to feed large groups. The gas model uses small
bottle propane gas and can also use large bottle propane gas.
Pictured above is Joe Namath and his cousin Chef Jon Molnar with
the breakthrough new Namath Infrared RapidCooker

. With this
RapidCooker

you can make meat and other foods that taste 2


times better than gas grills or any other conventional cooking ap-
pliance. The RapidCooker

also cooks 2 times faster, saves money


and has many health benefits.
The Namath Infrared RapidCooker

produced by EdenPURE

uses
far infrared as the heat source. Far infrared cooks much faster than
all other heat sources. The RapidCooker

cooks 2 times faster than


other heat sources which seals in flavor and nutrition in foods. It
cooks a one inch thick porterhouse steak in only 4 minutes.
The RapidCooker

makes steaks taste as good as


Peter Lugers in Brooklyn, NY, the nations top rated
steak restaurant.
349 Union St., Luzerne 283-3004
Open Fridays During Lent 9:00 am-6:00 pm
Cash & Personal Checks Accepted
Please Call Ahead
To Guarantee
Your Order!
Please Call Ahead
To Guarantee
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Featuring: Sweet Pizza
Pierogies: Farmers Cheese, Cabbage,
Prune, and Potato & Cheese
Pagach: Cabbage and Potato & Cheese
Cinnamon Buns and Tandy Cakes
Rye Bread
8
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Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
Your information must be typed
or computer-generated. Include
your name and your relationship
to the child (parent, grandparent
or legal guardians only, please),
your childs name, age and birth-
day, parents, grandparents and
great-grandparents names and
their towns of residence, any sib-
lings and their ages. Dont forget
to include a daytime contact
phone number. Without one, we
may be unable to publish a birth-
day announcement on time.
We cannot guarantee return of
birthday or occasions photos and
do not return community-news
or publicity photos. Please do
not submit precious or original
professional photographs that
require return because such
photos can become damaged, or
occasionally lost, in the produc-
tion process.
Email your birthday announce-
ment to people@timesleader.
com or send it to: Times Leader
Birthdays, 15 North Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250. You
also may use the form under the
People tab on www.timesleader.
com.
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
GUIDELINES
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 4C TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
PITTSTON: The Knights of
Columbus Council 372 and the
Pittston City and West Pittston
Fire Departments are hosting a
Blue Mass at 6:30 p.m. on Fri-
day at St. John the Evangelist
Church, WilliamStreet, Pittston,
to mark the 20th anniversary of
the Main Street re that claimed
the lives of reghters John
Lombardo, Pittston, and Leon-
ard Insalaco, West Pittston.
John Lombardo was a proud
member of the Knights of Co-
lumbus. The re departments
have been offering an annual
Mass for the reghters since
their tragic death in 1993. All
public safety personnel will be
honored.
The Knights of Columbus will
host a light social at the council
home after the Mass.
PITTSTON: The Pittston
Knights of Columbus and the
Pittston City Fire Department
are sponsoring a fundraiser for
the Lehigh Burn Trauma Center.
A St. Patricks Day Eve celebra-
tion will take place on Saturday
at the Knights Hall, 55 S. Main
Street. Music will be provided
by Optimum Entertainment. A
ham and cabbage dinner, pizza,
cheeseburgers and hot dogs will
be available. There will be a $4
cover and all proceeds will go to
the burn center. Doors open at
5 p.m. Music will start at 7 p.m.
All are welcome.
The Knights Hall will be open
on Sunday.
For updated information go to
pittstonknights.com.
Today
SHICKSHINNY: Mocanaqua
Ladies VFW Auxiliary Memorial
Post 6434, 6 pm., at the Shick-
shinny Senior Center. RoseMarie
and Anna will host. Beverly is the
springer bringer.
WILKES-BARRE: The Reginas
of Kings College, 7 p.m., Campus
Ministry Center Building, Jackson
and North Franklin streets. The
status of the penny auction will
be discussed and April meeting
menu selections will be made. New
members welcome.
Thursday
HANOVER TWP.: The Society
of Our Lady of Czestochowa of
the Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Church, 1 p.m., in the church hall.
Regina Kotchick will preside. The
Rev. Kevin P. Mulhern is pastor
and club moderator. Hostesses are
Regina Kotchick and Rosemarie
Kaminski.
SWOYERSVILLE: The Andrew
Lawrence American Legion Auxil-
iary Post 644, 6 p.m., at the post
home, 259 Shoemaker Street. All
Auxiliary members are encouraged
to attend.
Friday
NANTICOKE: The Wyoming
Valley Mushroom Club, 7 p.m.,
in Room 104 of the Advanced
Technology Center at Luzerne
County Community College. New
members welcome. All attendees
should bring a type of fungi to be
indentied. For more information
contact Phil Yeager at 779-3594 or
332-4841.
Jenna Baron, daughter of William
and Jolann Baron, Nanticoke,
is celebrating her 10th birthday
today, March 13. Jenna is a grand-
daughter of Joseph and Barbara
Olshefski, Nanticoke; Thomas and
JoAnn Capotosti, Timmonsville,
S.C.; and Williamand LuAnn Baron,
Lain. She has a sister, Jilann, 12.
Jenna Baron
J.J. Delaney, son of Joanna
Tyminska, Parsons, and Jamie
Delaney, Wilkes-Barre, is celebrat-
ing his fth birthday today, March
13. J.J. is a grandson of Jay and
Valerie Delaney, Wilkes-Barre.
He is a great-grandson of Jay
and Dorothy Delaney, Pittston;
Bernice Sakaduski and the late
Joseph Sakaduski, Wilkes-Barre;
and Halina Tyminska and the late
Janusz Tyminski, Bayshore, N.Y.
J.J. Delaney
Maxwell Graham Magistro, son
of Carmen and Meighan Magis-
tro, Mountain Top, is celebrating
his rst birthday today, March
13. Max is a grandson of Dennis
and Nancy Garvey, Dallas; Frank
Magistro, Forty Fort, and Patri-
cia Magistro, Swarthmore. He is
a great-grandson of Shirley Re-
gan, Dallas; Vincenzina Magistro
Forty Fort; Margaret Swanson,
Swoyersville; and Oscar Kroll,
Wilkes-Barre. Max has three
brothers, twins Frankie and Ro-
man, 4, and Luca, 3.
Maxwell G. Magistro
Rachel Elizabeth Havey, daugh-
ter of Sean and Sally Havey,
Woodland Hills, Calif., celebrat-
ed her seventh birthday March
7. Rachel is a granddaughter
of Marge Janosik, Dallas; the
late Ed Janosik; and the late
Russ and Caroline Havey. She
is great-granddaughter of Mike
and Mary Kolessar and Joe and
Veronica Janosik.
Rachel E. Havey
IN BRIEF
MEETINGs
Big Brothers Big Sisters of The Bridge is seeking local businesses to
sponsor lanes and assemble teams for its upcoming Bowl For Kids Sake
on March 23 at Stanton Lanes, Wilkes-Barre. Big Brothers Big Sisters
of The Bridge, a program of Catholic Social Services, is a United Way
partner agency and Bowl For Kids Sake is its largest annual fund-
raiser. All proceeds from the event provide mentors for young people
of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Local businesses or individuals wishing
to sponsor a lane or assemble a team of bowlers can call 824-8756 or
visit www.bbbsnepa.org. Some of the event planners, from left, rst row:
Melanie Maciejczak, caseworker; Tanya Olaviany, program director; and
Sue Jones, caseworker. Second row: Alan Stout, community and resource
development coordinator; Sandy Frazier, program assistant; Pilar Marino,
caseworker; Melissa Conrad, caseworker; and Steve Craig, caseworker.
Bowl for Kids sake tobe heldonMarch23at stantonLanes
Beta Sigma chapter of The Delta Kappa Gamma (DKG) Society Interna-
tional recently welcomed Louann Shrader, Alpha Alpha state president,
to its annual holiday dinner held at Vanderlyns, Kingston. DKG is an
honor society of key women educators that promotes professional and
personal growth of members and excellence in education. A collection
of hygiene items were given to the Salvation Army for summer campers
during the meeting. Some of the participants, from left: Carol Williams,
president, Beta Sigma; Lee Sikora, rst vice-president; Shrader; and Jane
Maneval, past-president.
Local chapter of Delta Kappa Gamma holds holiday dinner
Luzerne County Community College and the Tri-Vets Community
Action Team recently co-sponsored the third annual Tri-Vets Com-
munity Action Team conference at the colleges Educational Confer-
ence Center. Topics of discussion included overview of treatment for
PTSD on campus; the deployment cycle and its impact on students;
reintegration on campus and introduction to outreach efforts;
and culture and experience of service members and veterans on
campus. Lisa French, cognitive behavioral therapy trainer for the
Center for Deployment Psychology, served as the guest speaker. At
the program, from left: Karla Porter, director, program development,
The Arc of Luzerne County and vice president, NEPA Veterans
Healthcare Alliance; Amy Freeman, chief program ofcer, Family
Service Association and member, Tri-Vets Community Action Team;
French; and Jim Shovlin, counselor, LCCC and member, Tri-Vets
Community Action Team.
Tri-Vets Action Team conference held at LCCC
Skip Sensbach, a professor at Misericordia University, Dallas,
recently received a certicate of appreciation in recognition of his
continued support of the Back Mountain Food Pantry. The board of
directors gave the certicate in appreciation of Sensbachs efforts
to raise funds for the past eight years. He has hand-crafted and
sold more than 100 bowls per year at the Food Pantry booth at the
Luzerne County Fair. The bowls sell for $10 each and the project
has brought in donations exceeding $8,000. At the award presen-
tation, from left: the Rev. Roger Grifth, president, Food Pantry
board; Sensbach; and Carol Eyet, manager, Food Pantry.
Back Mountain Food Pantry honors sensbach
The Pittston Knights of Columbus recently held the TomRedding Memo-
rial Bowling Tournament at Chacko Lanes followed by a dinner at the
Knights of Columbus Hall in Pittston. Winners of the tournament, fromleft:
Joe Man, High Game 279; Mike McGavin, High Game Handicap 269; John
Diaco, High Series 766; and Greg Serfass, High Series Handicap 773.
Pittston Knights hold Memorial Bowling Tournament
The Pittston Knights of Columbus recently held a fundraiser for
the Care and Concern Pantry at the Knights Hall. Food and funds
were collected for this worthy cause during a night of food, fun
and music.The Back Mountain Jam Band played three great sets of
classic rock favorites and donated their pay to the pantry. At the
event, from left: August Bednar; Joel Derhammer; Mike Reardon;
Jay Maria; Rick Korpusik,vice presdient, Knights of Columbus
Home Association; Jim Shappert, president, Knights of Columbus
Home Association; and Fran Ankenbrand, secretary, Knights of
Columbus Home Association.
Fundraiser benets Care and Concern Pantry
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RAE 714-9234 $174,500
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KINGSTON TWP. FIREWOOD FARMS - Cus-
tom Cedar home on 5acres in serene setting
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RHEA 696-6677 $425,000
MOUNTAINTOP Beautifully maintained
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dry, gorgeous sunroom off kitchen &
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CORINE 715-9331 $164,900
WEST PITTSTON Stately 3-story home
w/spacious rooms & all redone having
everything new! 6BRs, deep lot w/drive-
thru garage! MLS# 12-3833
LISA 715-9335 $199,500
DALLAS Pretty Ranch in quiet country
setting. Features hdwd foors, LR w/FP,
1st fr FR & offce, huge LL rec room.
MLS# 12-2918
ANN LEWIS 714-9245 $189,000
BEAR CREEK NEW LISTING Custom
designed NEW CONTRUCTION 4BR, 3.5
bath, ultra kitchen, open foor plan, LR
w/FP, DR, HW, beautiful tile baths. Many
upgrades! Close to Golf Course, I-80,
I-81 & Turnpike. MLS# 13-802
CLYDETTE 696-0897 $399,000
MOUNTAINTOP NEW LISTING Wonder-
ful features in this 4BR home in lovely
Greystone Manor! Flat lot on .77acres
having berry bashes & walking trails
nearby! MLS# 13-633
LISA 715-9335 $354,900
DALLAS NEW LISTING Condo time &
the living is easy - no grass to mow, no
snow to shovel. Attention to detail shows
throughout this 2BR, 2 bath Ranch.
MLS# 13-683
KATHY M. 696-0870 $189,900
SHAVERTOWN NEW LISTING 3BR
Ranch situated on level double lot. Open
LR/DR, eat-in kitchen, MBR with 3/4
bath. Quiet neighborhood. Convenient
location! MLS# 13-685
CLYDETTE 696-0897 $154,900
TRUCKSVILLE Charming 3BR Ranch on
large corner lot offers large MBR, sun-
room, built-in garage, C/A & more.
MLS# 13-364
MIKE D. 714-9236 $139,500
PLAINS NEW LISTING Stunning NEW
CONSTRUCTION 3BR, 2 bath Ranch in
Mill Creek Acres - Kitchen w/granite &
stainless steel appliances, LR w/gas FP.
A must see! MLS# 13-820
CHRISTINA K. 714-9235 $235,000
PLAINS Spacious home on corner lot
in convenient location. 3 BRs, 3 baths,
DR, LR, eat-in kit, FR, detached 1 car gar.
Must see! MLS# 12-2900
DEBORAH KROHN 696-0886 $68,000
FORTY FORT NEW LISTING Modern kitchen
w/maple cabinets, Italian tile foor, Quartz
countertops, stainless steel appliances w/
breakfast nook, ductless A/C, HW foors,
3BRs, 2 baths, gas heat. A must see home!
MLS# 13-796
DEB K. 696-0886 $219,900
MOUNTAINTOP Impressive custom-built
home in Walden Park with 3BRs, 3 baths,
granite kitchen, HW foors, gas freplace,
fnished lower level w/tons of loads of
storage in a quiet area. MLS# 13-686
MARY M. 714-9274 $259,900
PLYMOUTH Nice 2-story, 2BR, 1.5 bath
on large lot. Modern kitchen, 1st foor
laundry, covered deck, fenced yard.
MLS# 12-3927
PATTY A. 715-9332 $69,900
1941 GRAVEYARD HILL RD
HARVEYS LAKE REDUCED COUNTRY SETTING - Up-
dated 3BR ranch w/granite kit, stone FP, C/A, 2 sepa-
rate garages & more on almost 2acs. MLS# 13-153
KIM 585-0606 $174,000
DIR: From Back Mountain, Route 309 north to Beau-
mont, turn right at Nultons on Graveyard Hill Road, 1
mile to home on left.
OPEN HOUSE SUN, 3/17
1:00-3:00PM
SHAVERTOWN Beautiful Contemporary in serene 3+ acre Bulford Farm setting
features an open foor plan & 1st foor Master Suite. Attention to detail is evident
throughout. Silver glazed maple frs blend w/neutral tones & custom built-ins. Stun-
ning European kitchen has terrifc storage & Miele & Sub Zero appliances. Great
lighting, new wrap around composite deck, large screened porch, speakers inside
& out. MLS# 13-489. RHEA 696-6677 $609,000
SHAVERTOWN This striking two-story w/open foor plan features living rm, dining
rm, family rm w/gas freplace, bonus rm w/surround sound & 2 laundry rooms. This
4 bedroom home has 2 1/2 baths, hardwood fooring, kitchen w/breakfast bar &
granite countertops. 3 car garage & fantastic views make this one to see!
MLS# 12-1433
JUDY 714-9230 $439,990
Thursday Is
WING NIGHT
Wings - 25 EACH
AT RAMADA INN
20 Public Square Wilkes-Barre
www.timesleader.com TIMES LEADER PAGE 6C WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 T E L E V I S I O N
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SNITCH (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:50AM 2:35PM 5:10PM 7:50PM 10:30PM
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
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Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
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*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
MET OPERA
March 16th - Francesca da Rimini
240 min - 12:00 PM
Oz: The Great and Powerful in 3D/DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG -140 min.
(1:20), (4:20), 7:20, 10:10
***Oz: The Great and Powerful RealD 3D -
PG - 140 min.
(1:20), (4:20), 7:20, 10:10
*Oz: The Great and Powerful 2D - PG -
140 min.
(1:00), (1:40), (2:00), (4:00), (4:40), (5:00),
7:00, 7:40, 8:00, 9:50
*Dead Man Down - R - 130 min.
(1:45), (4:30), 7:15, 9:55
***Jack the Giant Slayer in RealD 3D -
PG-13 - 125 min.
(1:10), (3:50), 7:00, 9:35
Jack the Giant Slayer 2D - PG-13 - 125
min.
(2:00), (4:45), 7:30, 10:05
21 and Over - R - 100 min.
(2:30), (4:45), 7:15, 9:40
The Last Exorcism Part II - PG-13 - 95
min.
(2:30), (4:45), 7:20, 9:35
Snitch - PG-13 - 120 min.
(2:30), (5:00), 7:30, 9:55
Escape From Planet Earth - PG - 100 min.
(1:30), (3:50), 7:00
Safe Haven - PG-13 - 125 min.
(1:45), (4:20), 7:20
Identity Thief - R - 120 min.
(2:00), (4:50), 7:30, 10:00
Silver Linings Playbook - R - 130 min.
(1:30), (4:10), 7:15, 10:00
A Good Day to Die Hard - R - 105 min.
10:00
Dark Skies - PG-13 - 105 min.
9:50
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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 Page 7C TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I have
been married 30
years and have raised
four children. I re-
cently found out my
husband has been
having an affair with
a prostitute from a
strip club. He promised to marry her.
She was 26 when it started; he is 56.
He told her he was divorced. When I
confronted him, he lied, lied, lied.
He wants to continue living togeth-
er and pretend nothing happened. He
went to counseling and quit. Then he
went to a psychiatrist, who diagnosed
him with a mixed personality disor-
der. He says he wants to make up for
his mistake with me, but all the while
he was having unprotected sex.
I doubt hell ever stop lying to me
because he always has. I cant spend
the rest of my life looking over my
shoulder because this has happened
before, although not to this extent.
During this long affair, he was
brazen, arrogant and abusive to me.
Now he wants to be attentive, but he
makes me sick. What do I do?
Cant Trust Him in New Jersey
Dear Cant Trust Him: Only you can
decide that, but in order to do it ratio-
nally, without anger or vengefulness,
Im advising you to make up your
mind AFTER some sessions with a
psychologist on your own. What your
husband wants at this point is far less
important than what YOU want. And
why you would want to continue in a
marriage to an abusive philanderer is
something only you can answer.
Dear Abby: I am a gay man who has
been single for years. I met this guy,
Mark, about 10 months ago and we
hit it off immediately. We have almost
everything in common except that
Im a Democrat and hes a Republi-
can. We both know how we feel about
our political differences and decided
to continue dating anyway.
My problem concerns my other gay
friends, mostly Democrats, who dont
like Mark because hes a Republican.
I have tried explaining to them that
we overlook our differences and con-
centrate on the many things we have
in common, and they should try to do
the same. But they no longer invite
me to gatherings and their phone
calls have ceased.
I feel hurt and rejected by my
friends, some of whom I have known
my whole life. I feel torn between
them and Mark, who is someone I re-
ally care for. Is it wrong to continue
my relationship with my boyfriend at
the expense of my friends?
Politically Incorrect
Dear Politically Incorrect: Twenty-
twelve was a particularly heated
election year, with important issues
at stake and negative campaign-
ing bringing out the worst in many
people. Now that the election has
been decided, one would hope that
inflamed emotions will settle down
and life can return to normal.
I know several couples who have
strong and happy mixed marriages
in which the spouses do not always
agree politically. It is a shame that
you would be required to choose be-
tween the man you care for and your
longtime friends, who want to ignore
that there are also gay Republicans.
I see nothing wrong with continu-
ing your relationship with Mark; how-
ever, I think it may be time for you to
expand your circle of friends if this is
how your old ones behave.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Wife cant forgive man who cheated on her for years with a prostitute
To receive a collection of Abbys most memo-
rable and most frequently requested po-
ems and essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check or money
order for $3.95 ($4.50 in Canada) to: Dear
Abbys Keepers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Mor-
ris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). Even
though science has made it
unnecessary for you to spend
hours washing clothes or prepar-
ing food, you may still feel like
the responsibilities of domestic
life are consuming your energy.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). A bit
of comic drama is played out
delightfully before you. Were you
supposed to see this? Maybe
not, but youll be glad your sense
of timing put you in this position.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Youre
connected to people. You feel
their absence when they are not
around, and you wonder what
they might be doing and thinking
in their bubble of experience so
far away from you.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Those
who dont know you will watch to
see what role you take on. Youll
show them that you are not frail
and dependent on the might and
salvation of another. Rather, you
are the hero of this story.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Youll be lit
up with the excitement of some
secret that you are sharing with
a kindred spirit. Tonight offers
the chance to let the cat out of
the bag, but you probably wont.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You will
be drawn to enigmatic people.
This could send you Googling or
asking others who might know
the inside scoop. The informa-
tion you gather will be mostly
speculation.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Youll be
aware of the complexities and
varieties involved in words such
as friend, married or sister.
Do not assume to know what
these words mean when others
say them.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Do your
best, but dont vow to give your
whole self to any person or task
today. How could you possibly do
that when you dont even know
your whole self just yet? Youre
better off learning more.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
The color blue can soothe your
soul. Just imagining it can
change your physiology, slow-
ing your pulse and making you
breathe deeper. Use this and
other tricks to remain calm in
the excitement of the day.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). This
is an excellent day to change
your diet. Youll enjoy learning
about new foods, tasting differ-
ent combinations and, afterward,
gauging the way those foods
made you feel.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Your
intellectual self doesnt often
think about your natural self, but
no matter. Your natural self isnt
reliant on a thought process, but
rather on the kind of instinctive
moves youll make today.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Maybe
you dont always use the right
words or know the appropriate
thing to say in every situation.
But you come at people with
your heart open, and thats just
what they need now.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (March 13).
Youll tap into a younger part of
you and reclaim the hope you
once had. Only this time, youll
be smarter about how to go
about bringing your wishes into
reality. Someone close to you
will have a change of mood, and
everything will suddenly be more
fun in April. Your lucky numbers
are: 30, 1, 15, 45 and 22.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 PAGE 1D
CALL TO PLACE 24/7
570.829.7130
800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED
EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM
MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale
135 Legals/
Public Notices
412 Autos for Sale
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS FOR
SCHOOL YEAR OF 2013-2014
Sealed bids are solicited by the
Lake-Lehman School District, Lehman,
Pennsylvania 18627 for the following:
Art Elementary & Secondary Supplies
Athletic Medical Supplies
Caps, Gowns, & Scholastic Hoods
Custodial Supplies
Diplomas & Covers
Fall Sports Supplies (includes
Cheerleading, Cross Country, Field
Hockey, Foot- ball, Boys & Girls Soccer,
Golf, Girls Volleyball)
Fuel
General Art Supplies
General Office Supplies
Health Room Supplies
Industrial Arts Supplies (includes Drafting,
Graphic Arts, Lumber, 7th Grade
Supplies, Wood Shop)
Music Supplies
Band Supplies
Physical Education Elementary &
Secondary Supplies
Rubbish Removal
Sports Reconditioning
Science Supplies
Student Accident Insurance
Bid specifications may be picked up in the
Administration Office of the Lake-Lehman
School District located in the Junior/Senior
High School, 1128 Old Route 115, Lehman,
Pennsylvania 18627-0038 or by calling
Mrs. Barbara Baigis at 570-255-2703.
Bids will be accepted at the Office of the
Board Secretary of the School District
located in the Junior/Senior High School
Building, Lehman, Pennsylvania 18627-
0038 up to 1:30 PM,Wednesday, April 3,
2013. Bids will be publicly opened at that
time in the District Administrative Office of
the Lake-Lehman Junior/ Senior High
School.
The envelope containing the bid shall be
marked Bid for _______ - 2013-2014
School Year.
The School Board reserves the right to
accept or reject any and all bids or any
part of any bid, or to order any item from
any bid, and to waive any and all informal-
ities in connection with them at its discre-
tion.
LAKE-LEHMAN SCHOOL DISTRICT
MARY JO CASALDI, SECRETARY
BOARD OF SCHOOL DIRECTORS
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2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags. **See dealer for details.
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$
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2003 Ford
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197 West End Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
570-825-7577
YOMING VALLEY
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FINANCING AVAILABLE
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06 PONTIAC G6 38K, 4 Cyl..................
$
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02 HONDA ACCORD One Owner...
$
7,550
06 TOYOTA SCION XA.................
$
7,450
07 KIA SPECTRA EX 79K..............
$
7,425
07 HYUNDAI ACCENT 75K.......
$
6,950
08 SUZUKI FORENZA 81K........
$
6,925
07 FORD FOCUS SE........................
$
6,450
05 FORD TAURUS SE 65K..........
$
6,450
07 CHEVY COBALT 78K.................
$
5,925
03 CHEVY VENTURE 73K...........
$
5,975
07 SUZUKI RENO 74K.......................
$
5,875
03 HYUNDAI SONATA 74K........
$
5,425
99 VW BEETLE GL 75K....................
$
4,950
05 SUZUKI FORENZA 88K........
$
4,925
04 CAVALIER LS 83K...........................
$
4,925
01 HYUNDAI ACCENT 72K.......
$
4,495
03 FORD FOCUS.....................................
$
4,450
02 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GT........
$
4,425
00 CHRYSLER CIRRUS 58K....
$
4,250
97 MAZDA 626 46K.................................
$
4,250
99 DODGE NEON 69K.........................
$
3,595
4WD SPECIALS!
03 NISSAN MURANO 83K...........
$
8,950
02 SUBARU OUTBACK.............
$
5,400
01 SUBARU LEGACY....................
$
4,475
NORTHEAST PA TOP JOBS
The following companies are hiring:
Your company name will be listed on the front page
of The Times Leader Classieds the rst day your ad
appears on timesleader.com Northeast PA Top Jobs.
For more information contact The Times Leader sales
consultant in your area at 570-829-7130.
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
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120 Found
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&
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for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is hereby
given that the
report of the Audi-
tor of the Pittston
Area School District
for the fiscal year
ended June 30,
2012, in the Office
of the Prothonotary
of Luzerne County
and the same will
be confirmed
absolutely unless
an appeal is taken
therefrom within
thirty (30) days
after the filing
thereof. The audit
report is also avail-
able for inspection
at the Office of the
Secretary, Pittston
Area School Dis-
trict, 5 Stout St.,
Yatesville, Pittston,
Pennsylvania.
By order of the
Board
Deborah Rachilla
Secretary
Pittston Area
School District
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135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the Let-
ters Testamentary
have been granted
in the Estate of
Ruth E. Hall,
Deceased, late of
Hanover Township,
Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, who
died on February
16, 2013. All per-
sons indebted to
said Estate are
required to make
payment, and those
having claims or
demands to pres-
ent the same with-
out delay to the
Executor, Robert J.
Hall, c/o Jannell L.
Decker, Esq., 1043
Wyoming Avenue,
Forty Fort, PA.
18704.
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Lackawanna Valley
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PAGE 2D WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
.40 cent Wings
In House Only. Cannot be combined with
other offers. Minimum purchase of a dozen.
Home of the Original
O-Bar Pizza
MULTI-ESTATE
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570-823-9006
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ATTORNEY
MICHAEL KELLY
For aggressive
affordable repre-
sentation in the fol-
lowing matters:
Divorce, Child cus-
tody, Child support,
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kellylaw.com
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135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
civitasmedia.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
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LEGAL NOTICE
BLASTING
SCHEDULE
Reading Materials,
Inc., P.O. Box 1467,
Skippack, Pennsyl-
vania 19474 pro-
poses blasting at its
Pikes Creek quarry
operation, SMP
Nos. 5077SM1 (Pit
1) and 40960303
(Pit 1 Addition II),
located in Lehman
Township, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia. The subject site
in which blasting
will occur is located
east of the inter-
section of Route 29
(S.R.0029) and
Marchakitus Road
(T-706). Blasting will
be conducted in
compliance with all
State and Federal
laws between the
hours of 8:00 AM
and 4:00 PM as
necessary Monday
through Friday,
weather permitting.
This time schedule
may vary on occa-
sion depending on
the following emer-
gency conditions:
1. Weather condi-
tions such as fog,
heavy rain, snow-
storms, lightning
storms, low cloud
cover, and thermal
inversions.
2. Mechanical
and/or electrical
failure such as to
vehicles, charging
equipment or blast-
ing machinery.
3. Dangerous con-
ditions to company
personnel, private
individuals or
equipment.
Warning signs will
be placed along the
perimeter and at
the entrance to the
operation, and the
following signals will
be used for the
blast:
WARNING BLAST
SIGNAL- Three (3)
blasts lasting
approximately 5
seconds at least
one minute prior to
detonation.
ALL CLEAR
SIGNAL - One (1)
long blast lasting
approximately 10
seconds.
Signals shall be of
sufficient power to
be heard 1,000-feet
from the blast site.
LEGAL NOTICE
West Side Career
and Technology
Center, 75 Evans
St., Kingston, PA
18704-1899, solicits
bids from responsi-
ble vendors until
March 25, 2013, at
1:00 p.m. at which
time bids received
will be opened in
the Office of the
Administrative
Director for:
General and Edu-
cational Supplies
and Equipment
for the 2013-
2014 school
year.
Specifications and
instructions to bid-
ders may be
obtained by con-
tacting the Busi-
ness Office of the
school during nor-
mal business hours.
The school
reserves the right
to reject any and all
bids and to waive
any informality in
bids received.
Elaine Pallone,
Secretary
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
ESTATE OF ANTHO-
NY M. SACCOMAG-
NO, late of Wilkes-
Barre City, PA (died
September 21,
2012). Letters of
Administration in
the above Estate
having been grant-
ed, all persons hav-
ing claims or
demands against
the Estate of the
decedent shall
make them known
and present them,
and all persons
indebted to the said
decedent shall
make payment
thereof without
delay to JOSEPH A.
SACCOMAGNO,
Administrator, c/o
Timothy B. Fisher II,
Fisher & Fisher Law
Offices LLC, Attor-
neys for the Estate,
525 Main Street,
PO Box 396,
Gouldsboro, PA
18424.
LEGAL NOTICE
Newspaper
Notification of
Receipt
Of Final Report
(for site-specific
standard)
(Section
304(n)(2)(i))
Notice is hereby
given Quad Three
Group, Inc. on
behalf of Sherman
Hills Realty, LLC,
has submitted a
Final Report to the
Pennsylvania
Department of Envi-
ronmental Protec-
tion, Northeast
Regional Office, to
demonstrate attain-
ment of the site-
specific standard
for a site located at
300 Parkview Cir-
cle, Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18701. Quad
Three Group, Inc.
has indicated that
the remediation
measures taken
have attained com-
pliance with the
site-specific
cleanup standard
established under
the Land Recycling
and Environmental
Remediation Stan-
dards Act.
This notice is made
under the provision
of the Land Recy-
cling and Environ-
mental Remediation
Standards Act, the
Act of May 19,
1995, P.L. #4, No. 2
LEGAL NOTICE
The Wyoming Area
Board of Education
will hold a work
session on Tuesday,
March 19, 2013 at
7:00 P.M. in the
auditorium of the
Secondary Center,
20 Memorial Street,
Exeter. The regular
meeting will be held
on Tuesday, March
26, 2013 at 7:00
P.M. Both meetings
will be preceded by
a non-public execu-
tive session.
Denise Holmes
Secretary of the
Board
150 Special Notices
ADOPTION
WOULD LOVE TO
ADOPT YOUR
BABY!
Will provide a lov-
ing, warm, nurtur-
ing, secure home.
Extended family &
lifetime of opportu-
nities await.
Expenses paid.
1-800-261-8330
ADOPTION: A safe,
secure life filled with
forever love awaits
your baby. Wendy
888-959-7660
Expenses paid.
For that
Hallmark
Moment..Start
planning your
Oyster Wedding
today and make
your special
day Nothing
But The Best!
bridezella.net
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
IF YOURE NOT SELLING
YOUR JUNK VEHICLES AND
HEAVY EQUIPMENT TO
HAPPY HAPPY
TRAILS TRAILS
YOURE LOSING MONEY
WEEKL WEEKLY Y
SPECIAL SPECIAL
Extra $150 for
bulldozes
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
6am to 9pm
Travel
380 Travel
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
CAMEO
HOUSE
BUS TOURS
___________________
NEW YORK
CITY
SAT. MAR., 23
___________________
12 TH ANNUAL
ARCHITECTURAL
DIGEST SHOW AT
THE PIER
Shop. Be Inspired.
Celebrate Design
With Latest In
Home Furnishings
-------------------------
F.I.T. EXHIBIT
SHOES - SHOES -
An Obsession
BOOTS - BOOTS -
Height of Fashion
A MUST FOR
SHOE LOVERS!!
-----------------------
UNION SQUARE
------------------------
for more info
570-655-3420
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
VISIT US
FUN GETAWAYS!
PHILADELPHIA
FLOWER SHOW
March 9th
Theme: Brilliant
THE PASSION
PLAY
March 23
WASHINGTON
CHERRY
BLOSSOM
3 Day, April 12-14
Includes: Dinner
cruise, parade
seating, sightsee-
ing & much more!
SENECA LAKE
Wine & Cheese
Weekend
Apr. 27 & 28
YANKEES
Call for Schedule
1-800-432-8069
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Mackinac
Island,
Michigan
Board the high
speed Hydro-Jet
Ferry for a fun
ride to the
Island. Have
breakfast at the
Grand Hotel,
take a horse
drawn carriage
for a narrated
tour & much
more!
June 22-28
Israel:
The Holy Land
Includes high-
lights such as:
Bethlehem,
Jerusalem &
walking the Way
of the Cross by
Our Lord on His
Way to the
Crucifixion
October 9-17
Call Theresa
654-2967
NYC BUS $36
Wed. & Sat.
NYC
ST. PATRICKS
DAY PARADE
3/16
CINDERELLA
JERSEY BOYS
3/16, 3/23
$99-$125
MATILDA 6/29
ORCH. $155
WICKED 4/17
Orch. $142
Only 8 open
RAINBOW
TOURS
570-489-4761
LEAVE FROM
PARK & RIDE
Rt. 309 or Rt.
315
SPEND THE 4TH OF
JULY IN BOSTON
on board
Cunards Queen
Mary II
Travel from NY to
Canada and Boston
July 1 to July 6,
2013
From only $1099.
per person
ALSO OTHER CRUISE
SPECIALS:
Carnival Splendor
from $682. per
person - 8 nights
Royal Caribbeans
Explorer of Seas
from $642.
per person - 7night
Please Call Now!
First come, first
served!
All rates are per
person, based on
two sharing one
cabin.
First come, first
served!
570-288-8747
1-800-545-7099
409 Autos under
$5000
CHEVROLET `97 SIL-
VERADO
Extended cab, 4
wheel drive, all
power, new radia-
tor, new fuel tank
and lines.
99,000 miles,
$3,500, negotiable.
(570)328-2091
CHEVY 00 BLAZER
4 door, 4 x4 LT
Power windows
& locks. Auto,
2 owners.
Not a Nicer One!
$3,995
DODGE 03
CARAVAN SE
103,000 miles.
Silver. New
Inspection.
1 Year Warranty
$4,895
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
FORD 97 ESCORT
4 door. 77,000
original miles.
Extra Clean,
No Rust
$3,495
HONDA 97 CIVIC
Hatchback, 5
speed. All stock
except for rims.
Looks nice, runs
well, $3200 OBO.
Call or text:
570-407-4541
JEEP 99 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4X4 LAREDO
Small V-8, 182K
highway miles, very
clean. All power,
sunroof, alloy
wheels, runs excel-
lent. $4995
570-696-1896
MERCURY 02
SABLE LS
Leather, moon
roof, 103,000
miles. New
Inspection &
1 Year Warranty.
$3,995
SUZUKI 03
GRAND VITARA 4X4
93,000 original
miles. Absolutely
Impeccable
Condition!
$5,495
412 Autos for Sale
BUICK `97 LESABRE
Excellent running
condition, mainte-
nance free. $3,200.
570-287-0600
CHEVY 10
MALIBU LS
Air, all power,
cruise, CD. Like
new. Sporty
Balance of GMs
Warranty
SALE PRICE
$11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BENS AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegmans
570-822-7359
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT
silver, V6, 50k miles
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
blue, auto, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 FORD FUSION SEL
red
06 AUDI A8L
grey, blue leather,
navigation AWD
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
silver
05 AUDI A6
All Road. Green
2 tone, leather
AWD
05 VW JETTA GLS
grey, black leather,
sunroof, alloys
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 SUZUKI AERO
Silver, 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
spd, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
09 DODGE JOURNEY
RT black.
3rd seat, leather,
navigation AWD
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT
SILVER, V6, 4X4
07 GMC YUKON 4X4
DENALI black, 3rd
seat, Navigation
07 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT green,
4 door, 7 pass
mini van
06 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO REG CAB
truck red, 4x4
06 BUICK RENDEZVOUS
ULTRA white, tan
leather, 3rd seat,
AWD
06 GMC ENVOY XL
silver, 3rd seat
4x4
06 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
06 CHRYSLER
PACIFICA TOURING
silver, grey leather,
navigation, 3rd
seat, AWD
06 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
gold, V6 4x4
06 JEEP COMMANDER
black, 3rd seat,
entertainment
center, 4x4
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, gold,
3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT
black, 4 door, V8,
4x4 truck
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
LX WHITE, V6, 4X4
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE silver 3rd seat
4x4
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Red, V6 4x4
05 SUZUKI XL7 EX
gold, V6, 4x4
05 TOYOTA SIENNA LE
gold, 7 passenger
mini van
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX
green auto, AWD
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
green, 4 door 4x4
04 DODGE DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT blue,
4 door, 4x4 truck
04 JEEP GRAND 4X4
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SPECIAL EDITION,
black/black leather
04 KIA SORENTO EX
blue, auto, V6 AWD
03 NISSAN XTERRA
silver, V6, 4x4
03 FORD F150 XLT
SUPERCREW 4x4
truck, gold
03 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN EL red,
4 door 7
passenger mini van
02 FORD EXPLORER
XLT white 4x4
02 TOYOTA TUNDRA
SR5 XCAB TRUCK
white 4x4
01 DODGE RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
SLT 5.9 liter,
brown, 8 box 4x4
truck
01 FORD RANGER XLT
red, super cab,
B6, 4x4 truck
00 JEEP WRANGLER
SPORT blue, 2
door, soft top,
4x4 5 speed
99 FORD F150 SUPER
CAB, silver 4x4
truck
FORD `09 FOCUS SE
Excellent condition,
blue, 28,000 miles,
one owner. New
tires, Sirius, CD, all
power, air, great
gas milage. $10,500
570-407-0910
FORD 08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$7200 negotiable.
570-578-9222
FORD 08 FOCUS
SES Coupe. 57,000
miles, AC, leather,
moonroof, sync, 6
disc cd, cruise, tilt,
power group, 1
owner. Very nice
$9900
570-574-0960
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
FORD RANGER XCAB94
4x4, 5-speed
$3,495
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
412 Autos for Sale
BARBUSH
AUTO
SALES
223 Sleepy
Hollow Road
Drums, PA 18222
(570) 788-2883
(570) 233-3360
99 CHRYSLER
CIRRUS......$1,999
99 MERCURY
TRACER GS
..................$2,499
00 GMC JIMMY
SLE ...........$3,599
00 FORD TAURUS
LX.......$2,599
01 SATURN SL1
..................$3,499
01 CHEVY
VENTURA VAN
...................$1,799
01 GMC
SOMNOMA
EXCAB 4X4
..................$5,899
02 CHEVY
CAvaLIER
..................$3,499
02 NEON 95K
..................$2,999
03 DODGE
GRAND CARAVAN
SE .............$3,999
03 FORD TAURUS
SE..............$3,699
04 PONTIAC
GRAND AM
..................$4,300
05 CHEVY MAIiL-
BU CLASSIC
..................$3,299
FORD 10
FOCUS SE
Auto, air, power
steering, power
brakes, CD, 4 CYL.
Gas $aver. Sharp!
SALE PRICE
$9,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BENS AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegmans
570-822-7359
FORD 10
FUSION SE
Auto, all power,
cruise, tilt, alloys.
43k. Economical.
Like new. Sporty.
SALE PRICE
$12,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BENS AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegmans
570-822-7359
VITOS
&
GINOS
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
90 GMC Pickup
with Plow.
$1,995
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $8,995
94 Jeep
Grand Chero-
kee
V8. Runs great.
Power windows
& doors.
$2,495
96 F150 Pickup.
auto, runs good.
$2,495
96 Pontiac
Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good,
106K. $2,995
96 Plymouth
Voyager, 81,000,
runs and looks
excellent,
$2,995
98 Buick
Lesabre, 4-door,
looks and runs
excellent,
$2,995.
01 Ford Taurus
SES
4 door, air, power
doors & win-
dows.
$2,995
99 Chevy S10
Blazer 4 door,
power windows,
doors & seats.
126,000 miles.
$3,995
03 Ford Wind-
star 4 door, all
power options.
96,000 miles.
$4,300
04 Chevy Impala
4 door, air,
power windows.
$4,695
03 Ford Wind-
star 4 door, all
power options.
75,000 miles.
$4,995
04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pass-
enger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $10,900
09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pass-
enger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$42,500
Buying
Junk Cars
Used Cars
&Trucks
Highest Prices Paid
574 -1275
TOYOTA `05 PRIUS
Grey, with tan, new
tires, air, power win-
dows/locks. 118K.
Keyless entry, GPS,
Balance of Toyota
Extended Warranty.
Clean Car Fax.
$8,500, OBO.
570-881-1760
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA ACCORD EXL 10
Leather and well
Equipped.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
JEEP WRANGLER 10
Sahara Unlimited,
4X4
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA 3 08
Extra clean. 5
speed. 41K miles
$12,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
PONTIAC GRAND AM 02
$3,995
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
SUBARU OUTBACK 11
Station wagon,
AWD.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA 03 COROLLA LE
5 speed
$3,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition, needs
battary.
NEW PRICE
First $750 takes!
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY 04 DAVIDSON
NIGHT TRAIN
Screaming Eagle
Package. Lava Red.
$8,000, firm
570-735-3934
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `98 SIL-
VERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB LS
Runs great! 211,000
miles, 4x4, new
windshield, alter-
nator, front wheel
studs, spark plug
wires, ignition mod-
ule, brakes, throttle
body gasket, 3 oxy-
gen sensors, fuel
pump, tank, & filter.
New tires with alloy
rims. New transmis-
sion. $4,500, OBO.
570-793-5593
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
DODGE 08
DAKOTA SLT
Club Cab, V6, all
power, cruise, tilt,
cloth seats, alloys,
utility cap.
PLUMBERS
/ELECTRICAL
SPECIAL
SALE PRICE
$10,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title
Transfers
BENS AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegmans
570-822-7359
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD 04 F150
4x2. Nice Truck!
$11,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
FORD 95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
HONDA 09 CIVIC
Low miles, 4 door,
4 cylinder, auto.
$14,400
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
JEEP 04 WRANGLER
6 cylinder. 5 speed
4x4
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
LEXUS ES 300
One owner, 59,000
miles. Showroom
Condition. Warranty.
$8.999
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
MERCEDES 01 BENZ
CLK 320
Coupe. Extra clean
& sharp. $10,999
444 Market St.
Kingston
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 PAGE 3D
554 Production/
Operations
551 Other
468 Auto Parts
554 Production/
Operations
551 Other
468 Auto Parts
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
551 Other 551 Other
FULL-TIME PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT
Lackawanna Valley Dermatology seeks full-time
Physician Assistant. We are looking for a candi-
date to join our expanding dermatology practice.
Initial training will take place in our downtown
Scranton office, and then primarily practicing in
our future Kingston office.
This Physician Assistants job description, under
our physicians supervision, will include: general
dermatology and surgical dermatology.
Qualifications: Graduate of accredited Physician
Assistant degree program, current Pennsylvania
PA licensure, and unrestricted prescriptive author-
ity in Pennsylvania, current NCCPA, and CPR
certification. Applicant should be comfortable
with computers since our practice is totally
computerized with Medents Electronic Medical
Records system. Office hours are Monday
through Friday with involvement in our on call
rotation. Competitive salary and benefit package
based on experience.
Please fax cover letter and resume to:
Kathryn Colombo
Practice Manager
(570)207-5579
MAINTENANCE/
CAMP RANGER
Non-Profit seeking professional candidate to man-
age and maintain camp in Kingsley, PA. Responsi-
bilities include maintenance of site, safety and
security of the property, and campers safety.
Perform routine and/or emergency repair and
maintenance or supervise contractor performing
repairs. Develop positive relationships with
campers and community. Five years experience in
construction trades or camp maintenance preferred.
Valid drivers license. Ability to handle power tools
and operate machinery and lift up to 100 pounds.
Housing is provided. Forward resume and cover
letter to careers@gshpa.org or mail to GSHPA,
Attn: HR, 350 Hale Ave., Harrisburg, PA 17104
PROCESS ENGINEER
Fabri-Kal Corporation, a major plastics compa-
ny is seeking a Process Engineer to develop and
enhance process capabilities in thermoforming,
extrusion and supporting manufacturing processes
in Hazleton, PA. Demonstrated expertise in tech-
nical leadership, team building and problem-solv-
ing skills. Lead/support technical initiatives to
achieve plant goals in the areas of Safety, Quality,
Productivity and Cost.
Qualifications: 4 year technical degree with min-
imum 7 years relevant experience or equivalent
combination of education and experience in engi-
neering and manufacturing. Strong communica-
tion, technical and analytical skills a must. Under-
standing of plastic polymers/processes. Experience
in Lean Manufacturing, Total Productive Mainte-
nance (TPM) SQC/SPC, and people/Project Mgmt
preferred.
Competitive salary and benefits package:
Health Insurance, Dental & Vision, Disability,
401K, Life, AD&D, Tuition Reimbursement, Paid
Leave. Drug screening and background checks are
conditions of employment.
Forward resume to:
FABRI-KAL Corporation, EOE
Human Resources Dept.
Attn: K. Shaffer
150 Lions Drive
Hazle Township PA 18202
Email: HRPA@Fabri-Kal.com
Fax: 570-501-0817
IF YOU ARE FROM
Hanover Green
South Wilkes-Barre
Buttonwood
Korn Krest
Nanticoke
$ Are at least 14 years old
$ Are dependable
$ Have a great personality
$ Can work evenings & Saturdays
$ Would like to have fun while
working with other teenagers
Then Call Mr. John at
570-735-8708
and leave a message
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT - EOE
www.dallassd.com
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS:
Assistant Middle School Track
& Field Coach
7th grade Track and Field Coach
For clearance information and applica-
tion process, visit ww.dallassd.com >
Employment page. Mail application
packet to: Ms. Nancy Roberts, Athletic
Director, Dallas School District, PO Box
2000, Dallas, PA 18612
DEADLINE: March 18, 2013
or until the positions are filled
503 Accounting/
Finance
COLLECTIONS
Excellent opportuni-
ty for highly motivat-
ed individual to trav-
el to various areas
of Pennsylvania to
collect and gather
information on past
due accounts. Can-
didate must be able
to make weekly
trips (Monday-Fri-
day) as necessary,
possess a reliable
car, and have a valid
drivers license.
Previous collections
experience a plus.
Excellent pay and
benefits for the suc-
cessful candidate.
Reply to:
Office Manager
PO Box 216, Dallas,
PA 18612 or email:
INFO@GHHARRIS.COM
No phone calls.
All inquires will be
strictly confidential.
506 Administrative/
Clerical
AR/AP
Our client is a confiden-
tial Wyoming Valley
company seeking a full
time office assistant with
proficiency in AR/AP,
accounting, quickbooks
and MS Office.
Call Harvis
Interview Services
at 570.542.5330
or send resume
jobs.harvis@
gmail.com
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTER
EXPERIENCED
Full-Time.
Non Smoker
(570) 793-5501
CARPENTERS
NEEDED
Call 570-654-5775
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
CUSTOMER SERVICE
DATA ENTRY
Discount Dance
Supply has immedi-
ate openings for
Customer Service/
Data entry repre-
sentatives at our
Forty Fort, PA loca-
tion. Daily tasks will
include: responding
to inquiries, solving
customer issues as
well as placing
orders for ship-
ments, and handling
daily reports.
Qualifications:
Basic internet expe-
rience, Microsoft
office programs,
excellent written
and verbal commu-
nication, reliable,
and must pass
background check.
Pay: $10.00 per
hour. Full benefits
available after 90
day probation. 401K
available after 1 year
of employment.
Send resumes to:
mcollosi@
discountdance.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
Part Time.
Apply in person at
Summit
50 N. Pennsylvania
Ave, Wilkes-Barre
EOE M/F/D/V
COOK/DIETARY
AIDES
PIZZA MAKER
& KITCHEN HELP
PART TIME
EXPERIENCE
A MUST!
WHITE HAVEN
CALL 570-956-1961
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
SHIFT LEADER
W WANT ANT TO TO R ROLL OLL IN IN
S SOME OME D DOUGH OUGH? ?
Auntie Annes
Pretzels
is looking for quali-
fied candidates to
be a Shift Leader
at our Wyoming
Valley Mall loca-
tion. Must have
some manage-
ment experience,
as well as avail-
able days or nights
& weekends. Also
looking for individ-
uals for day shift
hours to fill count-
er help positions.
Apply in person
or online at
auntieannes.com
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AUTO MECHANIC
WANTED
Preferably with
Inspection License
570.788.4934 or
570.474.1331
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
AUTO DETAILER
Dealership seeking
individual to prep
new and used
vehicles. Full time
position with
benefits package.
Apply in person
Pat & Dans
Del Balso Ford
249 Market Street
Kingston, PA 18704
Call 570-288-4501
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE ADVISOR
Express Service
Dept. Busy shop.
Good people
skills, some
service and parts
experience
required. Great
pay and benefits.
Call or email
Ron Stone
Service Mgr.
for confidential
appointment.
570-558-2000
ext 16
Email Rstone@
tomhesser.com
Tom Hesser
NISSAN Scranton
FORD CERTIFIED
TECHNICIANS
Our award winning
dealership is now
accepting applications
for FORD TRAINED
TECHNICIANS. We
are seeking individuals
that are trained in
brakes, steering, elec-
tronics,driveability,
gasoline/diesel engine
diagnosis and repair.
We are offering top
wages with an excel-
lent benefit package.
Please apply to:
Rudy Podest
Parts and Service
Director
Coccia Ford Lincoln
577 East Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, Pa
18702
570-823-8888
rpodest@
cocciacars.com
All Applicants Are
Confidential
542 Logistics/
Transportation
D DRIVERS RIVERS W WANTED ANTED
Class A CDL, Haz-
mat certification,
2 years experience.
Tunkhannock area.
Contact Jack at
570-881-5825
MECHANIC/TECH
Mechanical ability
and experience
with automotive
electronics. Apply:
197 Main Street
Luzerne,PA
Monday-Friday
8am-4:30pm
Solomon
Container Service
hiring:
FRONT-LOAD
DRIVER &
SCALEMAN
Apply:
495 Stanton St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-829-2206
TRUCK DRIVER
The nations largest dis-
tributor of automotive
aftermarket accessories
is now hiring drivers.
CDL CLASS A
We offer a competitive
mileage rate of 45.4
cents per mile and full-
time benefits including
medical, dental, 401K,
sick days, paid holi-
days, and paid
vacation.
Applicants must have 2
years recent verifiable
experience, a clean
driving record, & meet
all DOT requirements.
A pre-hire drug screen
& DOT physical will be
required.
Apply in person:
Monday-Friday
8am-4pm
Keystone Automotive
Operations, Inc.
44 Tunkhannock
Avenue
Exeter, PA 18643
E.O.E.
542 Logistics/
Transportation
TRUCK DRIVER
Immediate open-
ings for experi-
enced class B with
tanker endorse-
ment. Must be able
to work flex sched-
ule including some
nights & weekends.
Clean MVR req.
No DUIs. Excellent
pay, & benefits.
Must have stable
work record.
Leave message.
570-298-0924
548 Medical/Health
NURSES , MED TECHS,
HOUSEKEEPING
All shifts for PCA.
Call for an inter-
view. If no answer,
leave message.
570-883-2255
Ext #2
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
RN/LPN
for OBGYN
Practice. Send
resume & salary
requirements to:
P.O. Box 1463
Kingston, PA
18704
RSA, LPN, MEDTECH,
ACTIVITY AID,
HOUSEKEEPING.
Apply in Person
No Phone Calls
TIFFANY COURT
700 Northampton St
Kingston, PA
SERVICE REP
Lincare, Leading
National Respiratory
Company seeks
caring Service Rep.
Service patients in
their home for oxy-
gen and equipment
needs. Warm per-
sonalities, age 21+,
who can lift up to
120 pounds should
apply. CDL with
DOT not required,
but helpful . Growth
opportunities are
excellent. Stop by
our office to fill out
application:
Lincare, Inc.
1574 Highway 315
Plains Twp.PA 18702
Drug-free
workplace. EOE.
551 Other
LOCAL SEO
SPECIALIST/
BLOGGER
Modular Media
Pros, a National
Advertising Agency
that works exclu-
sively with the Mod-
ular Home Industry,
is seeking a quali-
fied local SEO Spe-
cialist/Blogger that
will handle the fol-
lowing:
- backlinking
- link exchange
- blog posts
Qualified individual
will work out of our
new location in Old
Forge, Pennsylva-
nia. Position is part-
time to start with
health benefits
offered and Full-
Time hours will be
available within 90
days.
Please submit your
resume to:
modularmediapros
@gmail.com.
Hourly rate: $10.
per hour to start.
SUMMER SUMMER
LABORERS LABORERS
Part-Time Summer
help for various
commercial building
& grounds mainte-
nance projects.
Start date: May 13,
rate: $11/hour, flexi-
ble schedule for
enrolled college
students. Must be
18+ have valid dri-
vers license &
reliable transporta-
tion. Apply to:
Box 4305
Times Leader
15 N. Main St
Wilkesbarre Pa 18711
554 Production/
Operations
HELP WANTED
EARTH/CIVIL DIVISION
Excavator/Dozer
Operators
UTILITY DIVISION
Sewer & Water
Pipe Layers
CONCRETE DIVISION
Superintendent/Foreman
Structural & Flat Concrete
Workers
5 Years Minimun Experience
Apply at:
PIONEER
CONSTRUCTION
116 West 11th Street
Honesdale, PA 18431
or email resume to:
pccimp@ptd.net
E.O.E.
POWDER COATING
KMS FAB LLC
is hiring all shifts:
POWDER COATING
LINE LEADERS
POWDER COATING
OPERATORS
Please apply in
person at
KMS FAB LLC,
100 Parry Street,
Luzerne, PA
Or email resume to
Kbrunges@kmspa.com
554 Production/
Operations
SHIPPING/PACKER
Full Time
Monday-Friday.
Apply in Person
9am-4pm
Barhill Mfg. Corp
396 S. Township
Blvd., Pittston, PA
557 Project/
Program
Management
ESTIMATOR/PROJECT
MANAGER
Fehlinger Construc-
tion Group, LLC is
currently looking for
an Estimator/
Project Manager
with a minimum of 5
years experience in
sewer, water, exca-
vation, structures
and storm sewer.
Candidate should
be proficient in
HCSS HeavyBid,
HCSS HeavyJob
and Microsoft
Office products.
PennDot experi-
ence helpful. We
offer a competitive
salary along with a
401(k), BS/BS, eye-
glass, dental and
a company vehicle.
Please submit your
confidential resume
or apply in person
at: Fehlinger Con-
struction Group,
LLC., 106 South
Lehigh Street,
Shavertown, PA
18708 or email
Anthony Barbose at
tbarbose@fehlinger
construction.com
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
BonWorth
(ladies wear factory outlet)
MALL AT STEAMTOWN
300 Lackawanna Ave.
Scranton, PA,
is looking for
FULL TIME
ASSISTANT MANAGER
Days, nights, and week-
ends. Flex hours a
necessity.Competitive
wages, discount, EOE
To apply please leave
voicemail for:
Donna Lynd
828-697-2216 Ext. 340
Retirees welcome to
apply.
600
FINANCIAL
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
704 Alarm &
Security
LOCK by U-Haul.
Stainless Steel, 3
round, like new, 2
keys. $7. 851-4545
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
AMISH BUGGY.
Authentic. Antique
wood style, light
grey. No yolk to
horse. Lights have
not been tested.
Moving must sell,
you must pick up no
delivery. $700
570-899-6434
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
ANTIQUES
One item or entire
contents of homes.
570-814-3371
570-328-4420
ATTENTION VENDORS
Accent items,
ceramics, baskets,
holiday items,
glasses, much
more. ALL EXCEL-
LENT PRICES AND
IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
570-675-5046
after 5:30 P.M.
BOOKS, selling my
collection of Wars
and battles history
of the US, over 10
historical books
worth over $100. All
in good shape. Add
to your own private
home library. $25.
Jim 570-655-9474
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
BASEBALL, very
nice for a beginning
collector, 800-1991
Upper Deck base-
ball cards, $10. N.Y.
Yankees Baseball
cards, 165, $5. Bal-
timore Orioles
Cards, 200, $6.
570-313-5214 or
570-313-3859
DOOR, solid oak,
antique, 77 1/2x30x1
3/4. Has original
brass hardwood
leaded glass, dia-
mond pattern.
Round top. $300,
OBO. 570-824-6278
ICE CREAM SCOOP
Antique, over 100
years old. $25.00 or
best offer. Call
Mary: 779-9464
POPLAR SCIENCE
MAGAZINE-
Antique. 1 dated
Feb. 1965 another
dated Sept. 1968
$20.00 each. Call
Mary 779-9464
SEWING MACHINE,
Antique Singer, with
black metal base,
collectors item.
$30.
570-824-6278
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (30)
1928-2000. GAR -
(18)) 1937-2006,
MEYERS (15) 1953-
2003, PITTSTON (6)
1967-75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,
KINGSTON (11)
1932-52, HAZLE-
TON, (8) 1940-61,
PLAINS, (3) 1966-
68, HANOVER 1951-
74. Prices vary
depending on con-
dition. $20-$40
each. Call for further
details and addition-
al school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
710 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER.
GE 6300 btu, box
and spare filters inc.
$75, DEHUMIDIFIER,
GE, 65 pint, $50,
REFRIGERATOR,Frig
idaire Mini, $50
570-472-9167
DRYER, Magic Chief
heavy duty, gas,
super capacity plus
needs barrel gas-
ket, otherwise good
condition.$50.
570-852-1636 or
570-793-7412
DRYER, White, GE,
very good condition.
$200. Moving, dont
need. Pick up ONLY
570-301-4744
MICROWAVE, 1000
watt, with nice cart.
$50. Bath seat, new
in the box, $25.
TOASTER, new in
the box, $10. CAN
OPENER, $5. Steam
Iron, $5. 333-7065
REFRIGERATOR,
Frigidaire, 18 cubic
Ft. Four months old,
$300. 829-0520
REFRIGERATOR,
Frigidaire, brand
new, white, electric
stove top coils, self
cleaning, free
standing, 30, glass
door with built in
oven light, has two
oven racks. $330.
Range cord, sku-
392-10713, 6 50
amp, 4 prong, brand
new, $29.69. Both
items, $350 cash.
570-430-2311
REFRIGERATOR, GE
18 cu ft, $150, DISH-
WASHER, GE, $75,
STOVE, Spectra,
$125. All 5 years old
and in great shape.
570-902-9805
STOVE. U43
Regency Propane
Gas. 38,000 BTU
with thermostat.
Black with gold trim
$500 OBO email
photos available .
570-477-2281
WASHING
MACHINE, Sears,
New in the box, paid
$449, selling for
$250. 822-7752
712 Baby Items
BABY JOGGER,very
good condition, fits
a child up to four
years. Can be acti-
vated by pressing
the handle, straps
for safety. $89.
Call:570-829-3261
716 Building
Materials
BLOWER ASSEM-
BLY, Utica DC
00402, new in box,
$50, PUMP, Flotec
Sump, new in box,
inc. 24 ft hose and
discharge kit, $100
570-472-9167
SINK, white cast
iron, double bowl.
Moen single lever
faucet. Good condi-
tion. $70
570-881-3929
SOLDER. Plumbers
4-1 lb rolls lead free.
Dutch Boy. $60
570-288-0691
SUPPORTS,
wrought iron, for
porch or patio. Sup-
ports 8 high, black,
four available. $15
each.
570-883-7007
724 Cellular Phones
CELL PHONE
Kyocera for Virgin
Mobile. C5155
Smartphone with
Android 4.0 Charg-
er, case extra
screen protector
and 2 gig SD card.
Fully functional. $65
570-825-6254
726 Clothing
COAT. Mens Camel
Hair. Size 40, $49.
570-283-2552
COATS, ladies, two,
black leather, new.
Size large. $60.
570-779-7658
726 Clothing
COMMUNION
DRESS, size 8,
beautiful. Originally
$149. Asking $35.
570-902-9363
JACKET, Tourmaline
Mink 3/4 Stroller.
Cleaned, glazed and
conditioned as new,
one owner, excel-
lent condition. Fur
origin, USA, 32 in
length, contains 35
pelts, w/65.
Sweep, size 12,
tourmaline mink hat
included. Appraised
professionally at
$4,500 replacement
value, selling for
$450.
570-881-0569
LEATHER JACKET,
ladies petite, was
$250, selling for
$50. Handbag,
Dolce Gabbana,
$150. 654-4440
VINTAGE WEDDING
GOWN: Over 50
years old. White
with beaded and
jeweled top. 3/4
sleeves. Size 10-
Cleaned and boxed.
$95.00 or best offer
Call Mary 779-9464
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
LAPTOP, Acer,
Aspire. New in box,
Intel 17 processor,
top of the line. Paid
$850, selling for
$550. Great buy.
570-212-2393
LAPTOP. GATEWAY
P4 XP. Good condi-
tion. $175.
570-283-2552
ROUTER - wireless,
by Cisco, E 1000.
Like new. $40.
570-851-4545.
732 Exercise
Equipment
HARD CORE GYM,
Plate loaded cable
pulley machine; lat
pull down, chest
press, pec deck, leg
ext, lower pulley for
curling. $150.
570-868-6024
LEG EXTENSION
MACHINE Hammer
Strength ISO-Later-
al. 4 years old, plate
loaded, platinum
frame, navy uphol-
stery. New condi-
tion. $1000. SEATED
L E G C U R L
MACHINE, Ham-
mer Strength ISO-
Lateral. 4 years old,
plate loaded, plat-
inum frame, navy
upholstery, New
condition. $1000.
Call Jim
570-855-9172
734 Fireplace
Accessories
FIREPLACE TOOLS
4 pieces and stand,
bronze, old. $25
570-864-3587
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
COAL STOVE Dick-
son approximately
60 years old, gray
with 6 lids & top
warming closet,
bottom oven, very
good condition ask-
ing $450, or best
offer. 570-288-0204
FURNACE. Carrier
oil. Forced hot air
with 2 zone system.
Good condition.
$800. 570-574-1791
HEATER, Electric by
Edison. $15.
570-851-4545.
HEATER, electric by
Edison. 2 speeds.
$15. 570-851-4545.
HEATER: Dayton
portable kerosene
torpedo heater
70,000 btu model
3ve49b with ther-
mostat control,
brand new in box.
asking $150. obo
(570) 675-0005
TOTAL WOOD HEAT
Safe, clean, efficient
and comfortable
OUTDOOR WOOD
FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C
Outdoor Wood Fur-
naces LLC
570-477-56922
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BED queen size,
head & footboard
with side runners,
tubular steel $175.
Antique desk, brown
wood, 7 drawers
$300.
570-654-4440
BEDFRAME, brass,
head board and
footboard. Polished,
54x75, full size.
Excellent condition.
Free delivery within
10 miles. $325.
570-824-9049
BEDROOM SET -
double bed with
headboard, double
width dresser with
hutch mirror, 5
drawer hi-boy
dresser & night-
stand. Pecan wood
finish. Very good
condition. $400
OBO. Kathy @
570-654-7847
BEDROOM SUITE. 4
piece. Excellent
condition, real
wood. Queen bed
frame with mirror,
dresser with mirror,
dresser and night
stand. $600
570-788-5005
BEDROOM SUITE.
Queen/full head-
board, large dress-
er with attached
mirror, chest of
drawers, night-
stand. Good condi-
tion. $500
570-991-5300
CABINET, wooden,
46 high, 25 wide,
with a glass door
and two adjustable
shelves. Dark wood.
$50. (570)868-5066
744 Furniture &
Accessories
QUEEN
BEDROOM Set
Beautiful 3 piece
set looks and feels
like new.
Guaranteed cost
875 sell for $95. In
plastic wrapper Will
deliver. Phone or
text 570 614 3877
CABINET, wooden,
46 high, 25 wide,
with a glass door
and two adjustable
shelves. $50.
570-868-5066
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
CHASE LOUNGE,
With pad-red wood
$25.00
W O O D P I C N I C
TABLE with benches
$25.00, PFALTZ-
GRAF 1 Coffee Pot, 1
Tea Pot both new
$20.00. call
570-639-1975
COUCH & loveseat
blue, beige floral
print. Paid $2800
sell for $250. Must
sell. 570-457-7854
CURIO, corner, oak.
Beautiful, must see,
mint condition.
$200. DRESSER,
American Drew,
mint condition.
$120. 570-825-4031
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DESK, corner, com-
puter. Great shape.
OSullivan-Sauder.
Lots of storage and
shelves. $60 OBO
can email pics.
570-477-2281
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER, solid oak,
59 length, 54
height and 21
depth. Holds up to
32 television. Paid
over 1,000, selling
for $500 OBO.
570-824-6278
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
FURNITURE, 2 end
tables, coffee table,
television console.
Like new, one year
old. Paid $1,100,
selling for $700.
570-287-1150 or
570-709-8383
KITCHEN SET- Five
piece. Along with
matching hutch.
Good condition.
Asking for $700.00,
negotiable. Call
570-655-0983 for
details & inquiries.
KITCHEN TABLE,
1940s, wood with
Formica top, $10.
Grandfather clock,
6 tall, $200. Desk
top with drop down
front, $10.
570-674-7692
KITCHEN TABLE- 42
inch, round with 2
extensions (12 inch
each) 6 chairs, dark
wood. $150.00
TABLE-Maple, 4 x
3 with 4 chairs and
1 side chair. 2
Extensions for table,
1 each. $85.00
BUTCHERS RACK-
Gray steel with
glass shelves and 4
stools. $250.00.
Call and leave mes-
sage for Florence.
570-474-5142
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $239
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
MATTRESS TOPPER
Very thick, brand
new, with gel &
feathers. Full size.
$60. FUTON, white
oak, well built, stick-
ley style, heavy duty
cushion. $300.
570-823-2709
RECLINING, sofa,
love seat, and rock-
er, blue, in good
working condition.
$400 for all three
pieces. 735-6920
SALON
FURNITURE
free standing styling
station, sink with
backwash unit and
shampoo chair, 58x
36 rectangular anti-
fatigue mat, wall
mount mirror with
brackets, 58x36.
Other miscella-
neous items.
570-709-7271
TABLE. Kitchen,
oak, round with Indi-
an tile. 4 chairs.
$175. 283-8420
TABLES, 2 end with
glass tops $20
each, Desk, Sauder
with hutch, $50,
China closet, glass
doors, $125.
570-793-1696
TELEVISION CABI-
NET, blonde finish,
approximately 39
wide by 65 high,
with one shelf, three
drawers. Excellent
condition, $100 firm.
570-288-0060
DUPONT
LENTEN
POTATO PANCAKE -
CLAM CHOWDER DIN-
NER &
CHINESE AUCTION
FRIDAY, MARCH 15TH
SERVING 3-7 PM
TAKE OUTS
START AT NOON
$8.00 PER
PERSON
HOLY MOTHER
OF SORROWS
CHURCH
212 WYOMING
AVE, DUPONT
COME JOIN US
& ENJOY
CALL 654-4262
FOR MORE INFO
TAKEOUTS DAY
OF DINNER
CALL 654-0345
SHAVERTOWN
1035 Oak Drive
Friday, 2-6 only!
Furniture, lamps,
tables, patio set
with umbrella, rugs,
home decor, chil-
drens toys, Graco
stroller with car
seat, jogger stroller,
name brand chil-
drens clothing sizes
3 months to size 6,
boys & girls) bar
stools, filing cabi-
nets, marble tables,
stereo system
/speakers/tuner, air
filter, snow blower,
gas grill, DVDs CDs
& much more! Items
priced to sell.
CASH ONLY SALE!
Directions: Chase
Rd. to Huntsville Rd.
to Oak Drive
Meadowcrest
Manor Subdivision.
To place your
ad call...829-7130
754 Machinery &
Equipment
SNOW BLOWER:
New Craftsman
electric start. Used
once. 21 path. Sell
$295.00
Call George: 817-
2389
756 Medical
Equipment
BATH TUB TRANS-
FER BENCH. (2) 1
36 and 1 45. $50
each. 570-288-9180
JAZZY CHAIR, with
charger, arm, head
and foot rests. Must
sell ASAP. $300
OBO.
1-215-436-0987
756 Medical
Equipment
STAIRWAY ELEVATOR
Chair gently used,
have manual.
$1,500, negotiable.
570-454-9813
758 Miscellaneous
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA.
SORRY NO
PHONE CALLS.
Air conditioner, two
hanging racks, a
garden cart, leather
chair, standing fan,
several lamps, one
hand truck, car car-
rier, bed tray, a lot of
decorations. All for
$125. 570-417-4180
All
Junk
Cars
&
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
PAGE 4D WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
758 Miscellaneous
AUTO PAINT, 1965
to 1967 Corvette
Rally Red, base coat
only. One gallon
$150, paid $395.
570-883-7007
CANISTER SET, 3
piece vintage clear
glass, $25, ICE
BUCKET, ceramic,
$25, COMPRES-
SOR. farm master
$25, FENDERS,
inflatable boat 4)
$125, TABLE rattan,
$45, HEDGE TRIM-
MER, $20
570-639-1975
CART, for
microwaves, tall
with spice rack and
bottom storage,
$30. Grape fruit
spoons, antique, six,
$5. Picnic basket,
large vintage,
includes inside tray,
$10. Clothing racks,
two, large, chrome,
$10 each. 674-7692
CLOTHES. Boys,
over 50 items, (lg-xl
14-16, $45,
NASCAR, Die cast
collectibles and
many various items,
25 pieces, $125.
T E C H D E C K S
(ramps & skate-
boards, over 50-
$35, DVDS, chil-
dren, various kids
shows, 12 for $25,
BOOKS, kids 25 for
$20, DVDs 12 for
$25, WWE DVDs 4
for $40, Skechers,
womens, size 9, 3
for $30 Call for
details 237-1583
COAT RACK - holds
4 caps, 4 coats,
white floor model
with gold trim. $10.
FLOOR FAN - White,
41 high, 18 d. Like
new. $8.
570-851-4545.
COUNTERTOP
WARMER, Cretars
Brand for popcorn,
Nacho chips, etc.
Two racks, lighted
inside, slide doors
front and back. Very
good condition was
$1,700 new, asking
$675. 570-636-3151
DINNERWARE 64
piece dishwasher &
microwave safe
$35. Coffee urn,
Farberware 12-55
cups needs steam
$35. Wedding
bows, white satin,
new, $4 each.
570-654-4440
FLATWARE, 50
pieces, gold plated
from China. New in
original box. $50.
570-654-4440
FUTON, wood arms,
metal frame, gently
used. $300 neg.
WEDDI NG GOWN,
spring/summer,
sleeveless size 8.
Sequins & ruffles.
Must sell, pics avail,
$375, DVD, Core
rhythm exercise set.
new. $30
570-871-3052
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
GRILL, Char Broil,
two burner, gas,
with full propane
tank. Very good
condition, $85.
570-825-4031
HOOD 1967
Corvette 427, Big
Block, After market
$795. Good condi-
tion in primer.
570-883-7007
HUMIDIFIER, Sears,
new. $20. Turkey
roasting pan, $10.
Grolight for new
plants, $5. Silver
bread tray, $10. Cof-
fee set, four pieces,
silver, $20.
570-674-7692
IRISH PICTURE, of
the famous, Geor-
gian Doors of
Dublin, 2 by 3,
framed. $20.
570-788-0621
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
PROJECTOR: Slide
in case with 10
carousal, like new.
$100.00 Call George
570-817-2389
SNOW BLOWER,
John Deere 828D
8hp electric start
with light, 6 speed
forward, 2 reverse.
Like new. $500,
570-905-5442 after
4 PM
STOVE, Coal Burn-
ing, White Dickson.
$550. CANES &
WALKING sticks,
over 30, made from
slippery maple trees
$5 each. Christmas
& household items.
over 200 items,
includes trees,
lights, ornaments,
flowers, vases, bas-
kets, figurines, knic
knacs, cups
saucers, dishes,
slippers, 3 piece
luggage, samsonite
belt massager from
the 60s! much
more! all for $60!
570-735-2081
TABLE, dining room
with 1 leaf, 4 chairs.
Like new, $400. Din-
nerware, complete
set of 12. Rose Pat-
tern. $45. Chairs,
outdoor lounge
chairs with cush-
ions, set of 2, solid
medal, $50 each.
570-735-7619
TIRES (2) Winter-
force snow.
175/70R/13, mount-
ed on 92 Corolla
rims. Like new, $100
570-825-8438
WHEEL SET. Ford
Mustang. 17x7 fac-
tory wheels with tire
sensors. $425
570-696-2212
758 Miscellaneous
TIRES. BF Goodrich,
M&S, (4)-265-70-
R17, $60 all.
Goodrich M&S (4)-
265-70-R17, $40. (1)
Goodrich, 235-55-
R-16, $20, (2)
Bridgestone 2-225-
55R17, $40
570-690-2721
WINDOW SASHES,
from 1925, wavy
type glass in them,
first come first
serve, must take all.
24 count, 12 top and
12 bottom.
570-574-0301
WIPER BLADES,
Rain-X. 18 2 for
$12. BOTTLE JACK
6 ton. $20. Blitz
Drain pan, 15 quart.
$5. Framed
Seascapes repro-
duced on canvas
board. Set of 2. Size
16 by 16. Both for
$15. (2) bed com-
forters identical.
yellow & green size
56 by 80. $7.50
each or (2) for $10.
570-851-4545.
762 Musical
Instruments
ACCORDION. Black
with musette bar
$500 OBO. Like new
570-822-3102
BANJO, Fender, FB-
59, Gold Hardware,
Hardshell case, like
new condition,
$650. 826-1582
DRUM PAD, elec-
tronic.Akai profes-
sional mpd18 com-
pact pad controller
drum pad. Comes
with usb cord &
operating CD. $35.
570-852-1636 or
570-793-7412
GUITAR, Fender,
1983 USA Precision
Bass. Nice condi-
tion, plays well,
comes with original
case. $975.
570-457-4084
GUITAR, Gibson
Melody Maker, 2 PU
w/hardshell case,
$399, CABINET,
Ampeg 412 speaker,
$275, PEDAL, Proco
Road Kill distortion,
$29. 570-283-2552
ORGAN, electric,
Thomas Trouba-
dour, 186. Free.
Call: 570-836-4636
SYNTHESIZER.
Roland Juno Stage
76 Keyboard. Mint
condition. New
$775, PIANO,
Roland SRX01 Con-
cert, sound expan-
sion board. $150.
570-881-3929
TRUMPET-Buescher
Super Aristocrat. 45
years old, excellent
condition. $500.
570-883-0265
766 Office
Equipment
ATTACHE CASE
aluminum, hard shell
with combination
locks. $20.
570-851-4545.
ATTACHE CASE
Aluminum. Hard -
Shell. 3 deep with
combination locks.
$25. 570-851-4545.
CABINET. Cole flat
files/artwork 38x25.
5 drawers. $350
570-822-2766
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA Nikon 4
megapixel camera
$35. 570-855-3113
774 Restaurant
Equipment
SIX BURNER
STOVE, salamander,
3 radiant charbroil-
er, 4 flat top grill,
french fryer, 4 bain
Marie, 20 qt. mixer.
LP gas All new For
Sale. 570-620-2693
776 Sporting Goods
BATS aluminum
baseball bats, Little
League, Babe Ruth
& tee ball, all in
good condition. 11
bats for $30.
570-735-6638
GOLF BALLS. Used.
Very good, cleaned,
no scrapes or cuts.
Most major brands,
Pinnacle, Callaway,
Slazenger etc. $150
for all. Call for com-
plete details.
570-836-3778
GOLF CLUBS, set of
Dunlap Dyna, bag, 3
dozen unused balls,
putter, $125, PUT-
TER, brand new
Max FL, never used,
$20, DRIVER, Jack
Nicklaus, Titanium
Air Bear, $40. Call
for details
570-829-5410
GOLF CLUBS. All left
handed. Taylormade
R9 Super Tri Driver,
$50, Titleist Vokey
Wedges, (4) $40
each, Taylormade
Burner Hybrids, (2)
$30 each, (4) 2012
Muzno JPX Fli-Hi
Hybrids, $45 each.
Call for further
details. 881-1001
GOLF CLUBS. Ping,
Taylor and Maxfil.
Putter, bag, driver
and woods. Also
excellent starter
set. Call for all
details. $200
570-18644
MINI BIKE, Razor
inc. new charger,
needs repair, $15.
DRIFTER, Razor
Ground Force, $50
570-472-9167
POOL TABLE,
(3-in-1) AIR
HOCKEY TABLE,
and PING PONG
TABLE, accessories
included. Great
condition. Asking
for $250.00, nego-
tiable. Call 655-
3089 for details.
776 Sporting Goods
YEARBOOKS,
Nascar hardcover.
1960s through
2004. 38 books
mint condition. $10
each. Firm
570-826-9049
778 Stereos/
Accessories
BASS BLASTER,
Road Master, in
box, 200 watts,
mega subwoofer
system. $90.
570-574-0271
CD RECORDER &
RADIO CROSLEY
Record your vinyls
to CDs or cassettes
plus FREE 100 blank
CDs does every-
thing machine, used
once. $100.
570-740-7446
780 Televisions/
Accessories
HOME THEATER,
Martin Ash HD
series 6985, 5.1
channel profession-
al, in box, 200-400
watts. Cost $2,299,
asking $250.
570-574-0271
TELEVISION, RCA,
color, 19, Not a flat
screen. Good condi-
tion. $17.50, firm.
570-430-2311
TELEVISION, Sony,
32 console model,
not HD. $150.
570-883-7007
TELEVISION. with
remote, 13 Cable
ready. $25
570-313-7590
TV 19 COLOR
With remote and
DVD/VCR combo
player. $25.00 each
or $40.00 for both.
Call 570-814-9574
784 Tools
JACK 6 TON Bottle
Jack. $20.
570-851-4545.
SAW HORSES,
wood, heavy duty.
$25. 674-7692
SNOW THROWER
24 cut, two stage,
electric start, tire
chains, $249.
570-636-3151
786 Toys & Games
BARBIE DREAM
Townhouse, new
box never opened-
fully furnished work-
ing elevator. Asking
$70. 570-735-1545
DART BOARD, Eng-
lish, includes cabi-
net and new darts.
$39. 570-636-3151
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
VCR Panasonic 4
head. with universal
RCA remote. $15.
570-851-4545.
792 Video
Equipment
DVD players 2 Mag-
navox $10.00 each
570-855-3113
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
March 12 - $1,594.00
WANTED:
Miners Candle-
sticks and Miners
Carbide Lamps.
Paying $10-$45,
Plus Postage.
E-Mail, mace837116
@bellsouth.net
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
815 Dogs
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
FOR SALE
570-436-2762
815 Dogs
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPPIES
ACA registered.
Males & females.
Vet checked.
$650 each.
570-336-6162
570-417-3107
GREAT DANE PUPPIES
black and blue $800
Vet certified. Will be
ready on 5/1/13.
Deposit will hold.
570-262-1492
ROTTIES HUSKIES
Yorkies, Chihuahuas
Labs & More
Bloomsburg
389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
FOR SALE, Pure
Breeds with
papers, three girls.
570-436-2762
840 Pet Services
SPRING INTO A
FRESH START
PUPPY & BASIC
OBEDIENCE
CLASSES
Starting 3/23
& Therapy Dog
Training starting
3/17
570-332-4095
for info
845 Pet Supplies
CAGE, parrot, large
size. Like new. $200
570-288-9940
DOG CRATE.
25x37x27. Good
condition. Plastic
with metal door. $40
570-574-4888
ELECTRIC CLIPPER.
Andis Dog groom-
ing. Hardly used,
Model MBG $20
570-675-0460
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DALLAS
Beautiful home in a
lovely setting in the
Village of Orange. 2
or 3 bedrooms, 1st
floor bedroom,
hardwood flooring,
large eat in kitchen,
1st floor laundry,
2nd floor cedar
closet. Detached
garage, barn style
shed with loft, many
upgrades. New fur-
nace, kitchen floor &
recently drilled pri-
vate well & PIX
plumbing. Dont
wait, make this
home yours & enjoy
serenity on the back
deck. $119,900
MLS# 13-283
Call/text Donna Cain
947-3824 or
Tony Wasco
855-2424
570-901-1020
DALLAS
NEW LISTING
Freshly painted
ranch. Hardwood
floors, new roof, fin-
ished basement.
1st floor laundry
room, covered rear
patio. Level lot,
1 car garage plus
2 car carport.
MLS#13-557
$139,000
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
DALLAS
Nestled in the trees
on a 1.5 acre corner
lot. 4 bedroom, 2
bath home in Glen-
dalough.
MOS# 13-693
$249,900
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
PITTSTON
3 APARTMENTS
FULLY RENTED
Asking $77,500
Motivated Seller
570-656-2645
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
4 bedroom home,
new construction,
with deck & patio.
Public water &
sewer, 2 car gar-
age. $223,900.
Lots Available
Build To Suit
Call 822-1139
or 829-0897
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
DALLAS
Priced to sell on
West Center Hill Rd.
3 bedroom, 2 bath
home with finished
basement.
MLS 13-770
$134,900
JOSEPH P. GILROY
Real Estate
288-1444
Call Brenda at
570-760-7999
to schedule your
appointment
DALLAS
Newberry Estate -
The Greens
4,000 sq. ft. condo
with view of ponds
& golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2
floors. 5 1/2 baths, 2
car garage & more.
$449,900.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
Sun, Mar. 17, 12-2
2691 Carpenter Rd.
Magnificent raised
ranch on estate set-
ting. Total finished
four bedroom, 2
bath home. This
house features
hardwood floors
throughout. Finished
basement with
working fireplace.
Large deck with
swimming pool, two
car detached gar-
age set on 2.4
acres.
MLS# 12-3158
$298,000
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
885-2693
Rubbico Real
Estate, Inc.
826-1600
DUPONT
424 Simpson St.
Good condition
Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in
quiet neighborhood.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
$72,000
Brian
Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
$339,900
316 Raspberry
Rd.
Blueberry Hills
Like new 2 story
home with first
floor master
bedroom and
bath. Inground
pool on nice
corner lot with
fenced in yard.
Sunroom, hard-
wood floors, 2
car garage, full
unfinished
basement
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-610
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DURYEA
534 Phoenix St.
Reduced to
$79,900
Newer Handicap
accessible one
story home in great
location. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath on
double lot. Off
street parking.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4490
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
$79,00
AFFORDABLE REN-
OVATED HOME!
Youll enjoy the
space of the living
room/dining room
open floor plan with
hardwood floors.
Large trendy
kitchen with new
appliances. Spa-
cious 2 bedrooms
and bath with tiled
jetted tub for relax-
ing. Peace of mind
with new furnace,
hot water heater &
electrical box. Plen-
ty of parking and
nice yard.
MLS 13-96
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
DURYEA
76 Main St.
$69,900
Newly remod-
eled two bed-
room home.
Kitchen is very
nice with granite
counters and tile
floor, bathroom
is modern with
tub surround,
tile floor and
granite vanity.
New vinyl win-
dows through-
out. Off street
parking for 2
cars. MLS #12-
3966 For more
information and
photos visit
www. atlasreal-
t y i n c . c o m .
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
DURYEA
89 MAIN STREET
$89,900
This home has it all.
4 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, fireplace in
family room, new
kitchen with appli-
ances, gas heat, 2
car garage. For
additional
photos and infor-
mation go to
www.atlasrealty.
com MLS 12-895
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
EXETER
$149,000
126 Mason St.
Charming 2 story
home with 2 bed-
rooms and 2 baths,
has it all! Profes-
sionally designed
and remodeled with
ultra modern
kitchen and baths
with granite, mar-
ble, hardwood,
stainless appli-
ances. Large lot
with detached
bonus cottage, gar-
den shed and off
street parking.
Everything is new
including plumbing,
electrical, furnace
and central air.
WWW.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4156
Angie
570-885-4896
Terry
570-885-3041
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
EXETER
$89,900
25 Washington
St.
Neat little Cape
Cod in nice
location. Very
well cared for 2
bedroom home
with gas heat,
good size lot
with driveway.
Beats a Town-
house any day
for this price.
www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 13-231
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
$89,900
19 Thomas St.
4 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
on quiet street.
Super yard, home
needs TLC, being
sold AS IS.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS 13-317
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EXETER
$89,900
19 Thomas St.
4 bedroom, 2 bath
with 2 car garage
on quiet street.
Super yard, home
needs TLC, being
sold AS IS.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
MLS 13-317
Call Tom
570-262-7716
ATLAS REALTY,
INC.
570-829-7200
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
NEW PRICE
$549,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
EXETER TWP.
311 Lockville Road
Stately brick 2 story,
with in ground pool,
covered patio, fin-
ished basement,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3 car
attached garage
5 car detached
garage with
apartment above.
MLS# 11-1242 NEW
NEW PRICE
$549,000
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
FORTY FORT
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Mar. 17, 2-4
Immaculate, attrac-
tive & spacious 3
bedroom, 2 story.
Freshly painted,
new carpet, well
insulated. New
energy efficient
hybrid water heater.
Charming back
yard, mature trees
& landscaping.
Off street parking.
MLS# 12-3421
$119,900
Call Marie Montante
570-881-0103
288-9371
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
REDUCED TO
$249,900
Brick fronted
rancher situated on
a 1.23 acre parcel
in Liberty Hills,
Hanover Township.
Excellent condition
describes this
2900SF, 10 room, 4
bedroom home.
Elevated covered
rear deck overlooks
the kidney shaped
in-ground pool, full
finished lower level,
2-car garage, hard-
wood floors, central
air conditioning,
plus wood burning
fireplace.
#12-2904
$259,900
Ted Poggi 283-9100
x25
HUNLOCK CREEK
OWNER FINANCING
Newly remodeled
mobile home on
beautiful private
land. 2 bedroom
with a 30 x 10
addition. $4,990
Down, We Finance
Balance. Call
570-332-8922
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Three bedroom
town house ready
for new owners.
Nice level, over
sized yard & con-
venient location.
New hardwood
floors in some
rooms. Almost new
washer & dryer are
included. Large
patio off dining
room.
MLS #13-403
$113,900
Call Paul for
appointment
760-8143
696-2600
HANOVER TWP.
209 Constitution
Avenue
Meticulously main-
tained 4 bedroom, 2
story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situ-
ated on a generous
lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st
floor family room, 2
car garage, deck
and soooo much
more!
MLS #11-2429
$274,900
Call Florence
Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
474-6307
Line up a place to live
in classified!
HANOVER TWP.
SELLER SAYS
MAKE ME
AN OFFER
Come tour this well-
maintained 2-story
at 10 Rowe St. This
1 owner, brick &
vinyl home, in a
great neighborhood,
is in move-in condi-
tion. Large living
room, formal dining
room, large eat-in
kitchen with tile
floor, counter &
backsplash. 3 bed-
rooms & modern
bath with a tile tub/
shower. Finished
lower level 21 x 15
family room with
built-in storage, a
2nd full bath & laun-
dry area/utility
room. A B-Dry
System, freshly
painted & new car-
peting on 1st & 2nd
floors. Central air &
new electric serv-
ice. Attached 1 car
garage with work-
shop or storage.
Screened-in patio
overlooks a large,
level private back
yard. For more in-
formation & to view
photos online, go to:
www. pr udent i al
realestate.com &
enter PRU7W7A3 in
the Home Search.
PRICE REDUCED TO
$132,900.
MLS#12-3160.
Call Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
or Walter Belchick
696-2600, Ext. 301
696-2600
HANOVER TWP.
Custom built colo-
nial two-story. 4
bedrooms, 4 baths,
two vehicle garage.
View of the Wyo-
ming Valley. Located
on a dead end, pri-
vate street, just
minutes from the
Wyoming Valley
Country Club, Han-
over Industrial Park,
& public transporta-
tion. Sun room, fam-
ily room with wood
burning fireplace,
hardwood floors on
1st & 2nd floors, 1st
floor laundry room &
bathroom. Central
cooling fan. Lower
level recreation
room with bar, lots
of closets & stor-
age, coal/wood
stove, office/5th
bedroom & bath.
MLS #12-4610
$280,000
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
283-9100
LAFLIN
7 CONCORD DRIVE
$244,900
Two story, 1,800 sq.
ft., in Oakwood
Park. 8 rooms, cozy
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, dining
room, sunroom with
hardwood floors.
Two car garage,
central air. Lot 100
x 125. Move in
Condition. Call Ed at
570-655-4294 for
appointment.
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
$249,900
1385 Mt. Zion Rd.
Great country set-
ting on 3.05 acres.
Move in condition
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
inground swimming
pool, hardwood
floors. Finished
basement with wet
bar. 2 car garage,
wrap around drive-
way. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 12-2270
Call Tom
570-262-7716
HARDING
PRICE REDUCED
$69,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
2:30-4
2032 ROUTE 92
RIVER VIEWS PLUS
EXTRA LOT ON
RIVER. Just 1/4
miles from boat
launch, this great
ranch home is
perched high
enough to keep you
dry, but close
enough to watch
the river roll by.
Surrounded by
nature, this home
features large living
room and eat in
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, full unfin-
ished basement.
Ready to move
right in and enjoy
country living just
minutes from down-
town. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HUGHESTOWN
$84,500
64 CENTER ST.
Large 4 bed-
room with mas-
ter bedroom
and bath on 1st
floor. New gas
furnace and
water heater
with updated
electrical panel.
Large lot with 1
car garage, nice
location.
www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
Must be sold to
settle estate
MLS 13-294
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
$198,900
184 Rock St.
Spacious brick
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, large living
room with fireplace.
3 baths, large Flori-
da room with AC.
Full finished base-
ment with 4th bed-
room, 3/4 bath,
large rec room with
wet bar. Also a
cedar closet and
walk up attic. www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3626
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
$27,900
151 E. Saylor Ave.
Fixer upper with
great potential in
quiet neighborhood.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
with off street park-
ing and nice yard.
Directions: Rt 315,
at light turn onto
Laflin Rd to bottom
of hill. Turn right
onto E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3672
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2
bath cape cod with
central air, new
windows, doors,
carpets and tile
floor. Full concrete
basement with 9'
ceilings. Walking
distance to Wilkes
Barre. Electric and
Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
KINGSTON
NEW LISTING!
Quality home in con-
venient location.
Move in ready. Nice
size rooms, finished
room in basement
used as 4th bed-
room or office. Gas
heat, off street
parking. Three sea-
son porch.
MLS#13-560
$115,500
Call Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
KINGSTON
177 Third Avenue
COMPARE WHAT
YOU GET FOR YOUR
MONEY! Modern 3
bedroom end unit
townhouse, with 2
1/2 baths (master
bath). Central air.
Family room, foyer,
deck with canopy,
patio, fenced yard,
garage. Extras!
PHFA financing:
$3,500 down; $557
month, 4.375%
interest, 30 years.
$115,000.
MLS # 12-3012
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
LAFLIN
$129,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
12-2
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split Level
home with hard-
wood floors, 1 car
garage, large yard
and covered patio
in very convenient
location. Great curb
appeal and plenty
of off street park-
ing. Rt. 315 to light
@ Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin Rd.
Home is on left.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
To place your
ad call...829-7130
LAFLIN
$254,900
24 Fordham Road
Great Split Level in
Oakwood Park,
Laflin. 13 rooms, 4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. 2 car garage
and large corner
lot. Lots of space
for the large or
growing family.
www. atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-452
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
NANTICOKE
For Sale by
Owner, two rental
properties, side
by side, close to
schools & LCCC.
Great income
potential, currently
rented, recently
remodeled.
252 and 254 East
Grand Street.
Buy now, interest
rates low. Low
taxes. Must See!
$150,000 for both.
Contact Vince
570-258-2450
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 PAGE 5D
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
8
0
6
5
3
3
Professional Ofce Rentals
Full Service Leases Custom Design
Renovations Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial
Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call:
1-570-287-1161
New Bridge Center
480 Pierce Street
Ofcenter250
250 Pierce Street
Ofcenter270
270 Pierce Street
Park Ofce Building
400 Third Ave.
Ofcenter220
220 Pierce Street
KINGSTON OFFICENTERS
www.lippiproperties.com
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
$389,900
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
12-2
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spa-
cious custom built
cedar home with
open floor plan and
all of the amenities
situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting.
Create memories in
this 5 bedroom, 4
bath home with 18
ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace,
granite kitchen,
large 2 story foyer,
huge finished lower
level for entertain-
ing with bar/full
kitchen & wine cel-
lar. Inground pool &
hot tub. Directions:
Rt 315 to Laflin Rd.,
right onto Oakwood
Dr., right onto Ford-
ham Rd, left onto
Fairfield Dr., home
is on the right.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4063
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
NEW LISTING
OAKWOOD PARK
If you like comfort &
charm, youll love
this sparkling
3,800+ sq. ft. 5 bed-
room, 4 bath two
story traditional
home in perfect
condition in a great
n e i g h b o r h o o d .
Nothing to do but
move right in. Off-
ers formal living &
dining rooms, 1st
floor family room
with fireplace, gran-
ite countertops in
kitchen & baths,
lower level recre-
ation room with fire-
place & wet bar.
MLS #13-549
Only $335,000
Call
Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
NANTICOKE
BIG PRICE
REDUCTION!
Nice home in great
area. New Kitchen
with many updates.
great starter home!
MLS#12-3870
$45,000
Dave Rubbico, Sr
881-7877
Rubbico Realty
826-1600
906 Homes for Sale
MOOSIC
$99,900
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home
with endless possi-
bilities. 3-4 bed-
room, 1 bath, cen-
tral air, plenty of
storage. Enclosed
porch, garage with
carport. Situated on
3 lots. Directions: 1-
81, Exit 180 Moosic
(Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile.
Turn R onto 8th St.,
up hill, turn left,
house 3rd on right.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
MOUNTAINTOP
46 Farmhouse Road
Large, fabulous
ranch with vinyl sid-
ing and stone front,
central air, gas heat,
modern kitchen &
baths. Two car
garage, gas fire-
place, finished lower
level, deck & securi-
ty system. A must
see home.
MLS #12-1359
$265,900
Call Florence
Keplinger @
715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
474-6307
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
MOUNTAINTOP
This one acre set-
ting features a nice
1 bedroom home
with good sized
rooms that needs
updating. 1 car
garage. Enclosed
back porch. Shed.
Partially finished
basement with 2nd
kitchen (for can-
ning). Coal burner in
basement.
MLS# 13-185
$99,900
Mary Ann
Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
WEST PITTSTON
Split level, stone
exterior, multi-tiered
deck, bluestone
patio, flood dam-
aged, being sold as
is condition.
$73,500
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP/
GLEN SUMMIT
Beautifully appoint-
ed home on 2
acres. Community
amenities include
private lake with
sandy beach, tennis
courts, trails for hik-
ing & biking. This
home boasts per-
ennial gardens &
mature landscaping,
fenced rear yard
enclosing a 20x40
heated in-ground
pool, raised garden,
custom dog house
& run. Entertain &
dine on the wrap-
around porch with
mahogany flooring
& electric hurricane
shutters. The resi-
dence features
hardwood flooring,
French doors, cher-
ry kitchen, 3-4 bed-
rooms, updated
heating/air. Emer-
gency generator for
inclement weather.
MLS# 12-1647
$410,000.
696-2600 ext. 210.
Maribeth Jones
696-6565
NANTICOKE
$125,000
WOW. Modern
Ranch! King size
brick Ranch located
on the outskirts of
Nanticoke, Youll fall
in love with the
open floor plan.
Sunny, large sunken
living room, tiled
modern kitchen,
formal dining room,
3 bedrooms. Bath
with tiled garden
tub & glass shower.
Additional amenity,
finished lower level
with fireplace. 3/4
bath with laundry
area.
MLS 12-4107
Michele Hopkins
570-540-6046
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1,460 sq. ft house.
2 or 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, gas heat.
Can convert to two
1 bedroom apart-
ments with sepa-
rate entrances.
MLS#13-472
$29,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1,460 sq. ft house.
2 or 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, gas heat.
Can convert to two
1 bedroom apart-
ments with sepa-
rate entrances.
MLS#13-472
$29,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
25 W. Washington
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Newer kitchen
appliances and w/w
carpeting. Supple-
ment your heating
with a recently
installed wood pel-
let stove. New roof
installed 11/17/12.
This home also has
a one car
detached garage.
MLS 12-2171
$76,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SWOYERSVILLE
317 Kossack St.
First floor laundry,
new carpet, lami-
nate flooring and a
great 3 season
porch to entertain
in. Lots of potential!
MLS 12-4408
$72,500
Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
393 E. Noble St.
Check out this 4
bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with 1 car
detached garage.
This home features
a Jacuzzi tub,
newer roof, fur-
nace, hot water
heater, replacement
windows, fenced
yard and large
covered deck.
MLS 13-613
$77,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-7846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
260-262
E. Green Street
Double Block
Plenty of parking
with paved back
alley. Close to
LCCC. New roof
installed in 2007
along with a kitchen
& bath update
in #260.
MLS #13-694
$65,900
Call Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
REDUCED
1457 S. Hanover St.
Beautiful Tudor
style split level
home. This home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
recreation room
with a bar, wood
burning stove, 2 tier
patio, storage shed,
fenced yard and 1
car garage. Securi-
ty system and
more.
MLS 12-3292
$179,900
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained bi-
level. This home
features 2 bed-
rooms, 1 3/4 baths,
recreation room
with propane stove.
Walk out to a 3
season porch.
Professionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
NANTICOKE
24 S. Prospect St.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION!
Former firehouse
uniquely designed
for multipurpose.
Building includes a
clubhouse in base-
ment with bar and
restrooms. Huge
office, computer
training room, large
carpeted exercise/
utility room, garage
and central air. Two
(2) newer 150,00
BTU Modine over-
head heaters. Off-
street parking
behind building. This
is a very solid struc-
ture located in a
prime business area
in Nanticoke!
DONT MISS
THIS FANTASTIC
INVESTMENT
OPPORTUNITY!
$86,000
MLS# 12-1666
Call Ron
570-817-1362
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
PITTSTON
NEW PRICE
$64,900
9 rooms, aluminum
sided, new
windows & wrap
around porch.
Kitchen with all
appliances, w/w
carpet, laundry
room with washer
& dryer, nicely
painted. Gas heat,
walk up attic on
50 x 150 lot with
shed.
Call Joe, 613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
$119,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home
with Victorial fea-
tures, large eat in
kitchen with laun-
dry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath
with claw foot tub,
lots of closet
space. Move in
ready, off street
parking in rear.
MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-883-7594
PITTSTON
Amazing Property!!!
Five bedrooms, 4
with private bath.
spectacular master
suite with sitting
room + 3 room clos-
et. Four fireplaces
All hardwood floors.
Gazebo style ceiling
in library. 3 car
garage. Resort-like
yard with in-ground
pool with cabana &
outside bath. Adult
amenities, full fin-
ished basement.
PREQUALIFIED
BUYERS ONLY
MLS# 12-1091
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
Joseph P. Gilroy
Real Estate
570-288-1444
PITTSTON
Room for all your
needs! 4 bedroom
home offers living
& dining rooms
AND an extra room
for whatever you
need. Separate
laundry room on 1st
floor, new carpeting
in 3 bedrooms, new
water heater in
2010, new Bath
Fitter tub/shower.
Recently re-grav-
eled driveway, nice
sized outdoor stor-
age shed & plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #13-360
$95,000
Call/text Donna at
947-3824 or
Tony at 855-2424
901-1020
PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED
$39,900
514 Main St.
Grand older home
being sold as-is.
Four bedrooms,
large kitchen, hard-
wood floors on first
floor, vinyl sided,
some newer win-
dows. Needs work
but makes a great
winter project. MLS
#12-2873. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
$144,900
10 Norman St.
Very nice, classic
two story brick
home with large
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, plenty of
baths, large base-
ment, open deck
and covered deck.
Large eat in
kitchen, plenty of
off street parking.
MLS #11-2887. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
YATESVILLE
TOTALLY
RENOVATED,
MODERN, OPEN
FLOOR PLAN
TOWNHOUSE.
Great Location,
convenient to
Wilkes-Barre &
Scranton. 2 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
single car attached
garage, kitchen,
dining & living
rooms, deck.
Stainless steel
appliances, Corian
countertops, no
HOA. $159,900
570-654-1964
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Mar. 17, 12-2
32 Brians Place
Townhouse in pris-
tine condition. Move
right in! Has location
& view. Tastefully
finished with two
large bedrooms,
two full baths and
over sized closets.
Living room with
corner fireplace.
Custom kitchen with
hardwood floors.
Well manicured
lawns with privacy
walls. 2,400 sq. ft.
Recreation & multi-
use room. A must
see!! MLS#12-3622
$210,000
David Rubbico, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
PLAINS TWP.
$67,900
This 2 story, 3 Bed-
room Home located
close to Solomon
School is move-in
r eady. Feat ur es
include the fenced
backyard, above-
ground pool, large
deck, off-street
parking & 1st floor
laundry. Call Today!
MLS #13-144
Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
Signature Properties
570-675-5100
PLAINS
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Mar. 17, 12-2
Great 3 bedroom, 1
bath with a large eat
in kitchen & finished
basement with a dry
bar. Large fenced
yard & extra lot
included for addi-
tional parking. With-
in walking distance
of Wyoming Valley
Mall!
$134,900
MLS# 12-2479
Dave Rubbico, Sr.
881-7877
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
SHAVERTOWN
2 years old, open
floor plan, hard-
wood floors 1st &
2nd floors. 2 story
great room with
floor to ceiling fire-
place, 3 sides brick
exterior. Lower level
finished with French
doors out to patio,
breathtaking views,
upgraded landscap-
ing with 3 waterfalls.
MLS #12-4215
PRICE REDUCED
$599,000
Call Geri
570-862-7432
Lewith & Freeman
696-0888
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Lake Front Property
at Shickshinny Lake!
4 Bedrooms, 2.75
baths, 2 kitchens,
living room, large
family room. 2 sun-
rooms, office &
laundry room. Two
car attached gar-
age with paved
driveway, above
ground pool, dock &
100' lake frontage.
$375,000
MLS #12-860
Call Kenneth
Williams
570-542-2141
Five
Mountains
Realty
SHICKSHINNY
BILBY HILL ROAD
Manufactured home
located on quiet
country acre. 3
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Eat in kitchen, front
porch & rear deck.
Surround yourself in
Nature! Not in flood
zone!
$82,500.
Call Patsy
570-204-0983
570-759-3300
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
$129,900
115 Hemlock St.
Lots of updates in
this roomy Cape
Cod in a desirable
neighborhood.
Large eat in kitchen
with new flooring.
Finished basement
with theater/rec
room. Large level
yard. Priced to sell!
MLS 12-4231
Call Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
SWOYERSVILLE
187 Shoemaker St.
Totally Redone! This
cozy Cape Cod has
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
Modern kitchen with
granite countertops,
ceramic tile back-
splash and floor, all
new hardwood
throughout, new
furnace, new wiring,
new windows, duct
work in place for
central air, much
more! Vinyl siding,
large unfinished
basement, deck,
Off street parking.
24 hour notice to
show.
Asking $135,000.
Call Don at
814-5072
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
SWOYERSVILLE
STEEPLECHASE
50 Grandville Drive
Outstanding 3 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath
townhouse out of
the flood zone.
Formal dining room,
family room, master
bedroom suite.
Central air & central
vacuum. Deck,
garage + many
extras. Freshly
painted and carpet-
ed, so move right in!
$5,300 down,
monthly payment
$847. interest rate
of 4.375. $175,000.
MLS # 13-195.
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty Inc
570-822-5126
WILKES-BARRE
Large, move-in con-
dition 10 room, 4
bedroom, 3 bath, 2-
story home with off-
street parking near
Barney Farms. This
is a well maintained
home with a large
eat-in kitchen, map-
le cabinets & par-
quet floor. The fur-
nace/central air
conditioning is only
2 years old. Buy this
home & enjoy your
summer days &
nights in your large
screened in rear
porch or in the
fenced yard with a
black top patio/bas-
ketball court.
MLS#13-69
$169,900
Karen Altavilla
283-9100 x28
696-2600
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
Beautifully updated
home in convenient
Wyoming location.
New foyer, updated
kitchen, bathroom,
walls & flooring.
Nice size deck &
front porch. Hard-
wood floors &
stained glass win-
dow make the foyer
a stunning entrance.
Open floor plan be-
tween living room &
dining room gives
the rooms a larger
feel. Great neigh-
borhood & schools.
#12-3852
REDUCED TO
$139,000
Chris Jones
696-6558
696-2600
906 Homes for Sale
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldnt
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$49,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WEST PITTSTON
128 LINDEN ST.
Motivated Seller!
Beautiful Cape
Cod. 3+ bed-
rooms, 2 full
baths. Ultra-mod-
ern kitchen with
granite counter-
tops, tile floors &
laundry area. Din-
ing room has
French doors,
with laminated
floors. Plenty of
closet space. 2nd
floor master bed-
room & adjoining
den. New win-
dows, water
heater, electric,
gas furnace.
Three season
porch, mudroom
& fenced yard.
$125,900.
570-883-9943
570-212-8684
WEST PITTSTON
112 Clear Springs
Court
NEW PRICE
$164,000
Ledgeview Estates
Updates, Updates,
Updates New
hardwood floors,
granite counter
tops in kitchen, new
granite vanities, tile
floor, finished, walk-
out basement with
gas fireplace.
Call Donna
570-613-9080
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
WHITE-HAVEN
501 Birch Lane
Beautiful 4 bed-
room, 3 bath. Enjoy
the amenities of a
private lake, boat-
ing, basketball
courts, etc. The
home has wood
floors and carpeting
throughout. French
doors in the kitchen
that lead you out to
the large rear deck
for entertaining. The
backyard has 2 utili-
ty sheds for storage
MLS 12-1695
NEW PRICE
$174,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES BARRE
$44,900
70 N. Meade
3BR, 1 bath in move
in condition with
new electric box,
water heater, and
plumbing. Off
street parking in
rear for 3 cars,
good credit and
your house, taxes &
insurance would be
under $400/month.
MLS #12-3900. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WILKES BARRE
$54,000
735 N. Washington
Street
Spacious 2 story, 3
bedrooms with 2 ca
detached garage,
good starter home,
needs TLC. MLS #12
3887. For more
information and pho
tos visit www.atlasre
altyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES BARRE
$69,900
253 Parrish St.
Spacious home,
ready to move into.
Large open floor
plan offers a great
layout for all your
needs. Three bed-
rooms, plus lower
level family room.
Modern bath and
open kitchen.
Shared driveway
gives you off street
parking for a couple
of cars,detached
garage. MLS #12-
3628. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES BARRE
REDUCED
$45,000
61 Puritan Lane
Very well main-
tained home fea-
tures large rooms,
first floor bath &
laundry, large
fenced in yard,
potential for drive-
way for off street
parking. MLS #12-
1823. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com.
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
$72,900
35 Hillard St.
Hardwood floors,
fenced in yard,
large deck. Off
street parking. 3
bedroom home with
1st floor laundry.
Move in condition.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1655
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
$99,900
77 Schuler St.
NOTHING to do but
move right in! This
home has every-
thing you need...3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, large fenced
in yard, screened in
porch, off street
parking, quiet
neighborhood.
Home recently
remodeled inside &
out. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 13-467
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
68 Jones Street
This 2 story home
features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1.5
baths, an attached
sunroom, private
back yard, large liv-
ing room all great
for entertaining.
Close to schools &
shopping.
$44,900.
MLS 12-3211
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Three bedroom
ranch on corner lot,
convenient to
Wilkes-Barre Blvd.
& Rt. 81. Living
room, dining room
& modern kitchen.
Enclosed porch with
large deck and hot
tub, full basement, 1
car garage, shed
and carport. All
electric.
Maintenance Free.
$99,900
Leave Message
570-824-8245
WILKES-BARRE
21 Caffrey Street
Country living in the
city! Almost one
acre corner lot.
Newer roof. Fantas-
tic views, fruit trees
& quiet street.
Large room sizes
and wrap around
porch. Additional
enclosed porch in
back. Finished
basement with bar,
kitchen & 1/2 bath -
could be used as
separate apart-
ment. Two car
detached garage.
Very private proper-
ty. A must see!
MLS 12-4268
$93,000
Linda Cuono
570-715-7743
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
WYOMING
Great area with a
fenced yard, one
car detached gar-
age, and above
ground pool. Mod-
ern kitchen & baths.
Vinyl siding & re-
placement win-
dows. Too good a
house in this neigh-
borhood to pass up!
Please contact
Dave Wychock at
885-1670
for showing.
MLS #13-221
$125,000
RUBBICO
REAL ESTATE
570-826-1600
WYOMING
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. MARCH 10
12-2
575 Susquehanna
Avenue
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
NEVER
FLOODED
4 bedroom, 2 full
bath in a great
neighborhood.
New windows
entire home, fin-
ished lower level,
detached garage,
4 season sun-
room. Master
suite has new full
bath and large
walk in closet.
New above
ground pool with
deck. Must see!
PRICED TO
SELL $179,000
570-885-6848
YATESVILLE
$139,900
617 Willowcrest Dr.
End unit. 2 bed-
room townhome
with master bath on
2nd floor. Needs a
little TLC.
MLS 13-569
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PAGE 6D WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
YATESVILLE
$174,900
603 Willowcrest Dr.
Super end unit
townhouse, no
fees. 2 bedrooms,
3 baths, central air,
electric heat, cathe-
dral ceiling with
skylights. Large
family room with
propane stove and
its own ductless
air. MLS 13-482
Call Tom
570-262-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
BEAR CREEK
$149,900
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
$39,900
93 Main St.
Four units. 3 resi-
dential and one
storefront.Great
corner location,
flood damaged
home being sold as
is. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1948
Call Tom
570-262-7716
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit property.
Lots of off street
parking and bonus 2
car garage. All units
are rented. Great
income with low
maintenance.
$139,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
Out of flood area
5 apartments, 2
buildings on one lot
in excellent condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors. $95,000
570-822-9697
HANOVER TWP.
COMMERCIAL
LEASE
8,500 sq. ft. building
$4,000/month, ten-
ant pays utilities.
Building Ready for
many uses. Owner
will build to suit.
Custom Leases
Available. Property
has 5 garage bays,
office space & plen-
ty of parking and
fenced side yards.
Heated with rest-
rooms. unlimited
potential.
MLS #13-63
Call Today!
Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
Signature Properties
570-675-5100
PLYMOUTH TWP.
Route #11 Two Bay
Garage in high traf-
fic location. 250
frontage ideal for
contractor, auto
repair, small busi-
ness. priced to sell
at $95,000.
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
KINGSTON
Great opportunity
for this 2,900 sq. ft.
professional office
building in high traf-
fic area. Currently
used as a veterinary
clinic but is easily
adapted for other
uses. See how this
space can be used
for you! Open
entry space, individ-
ual offices, full base-
ment for storage,
central air, and gas
heat. Parking for 12
cars.
MLS-12-416
$339,000
Call Rhea for
details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
341 Wyoming Ave.
3 story Victorian
home located in a
high exposure area.
Has all the lovely
signature wood-
work of a grand
VIctorian of yester-
year! Can be
restored for use as
a residential home
or a landlord invest-
ment. Currently
subdivided into mul-
tiple office spaces
and 2 apartments.
MLS 12-617
$149,000
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING
Newly remodeled,
immaculate office
building. 1,600 sq.
ft., central air, plenty
of parking, abun-
dant storage areas,
handicapped acc-
essible.
MLS#13-667
$79,900
Dana Distasio
570-715-9333
NANTICOKE
105 S. Market St.
Superb, brick com-
mercial building with
second floor apart-
ment. Well main-
tained. Ideal for
beauty salon, start-
up small business.
Call for details.
Priced to sell at
$125,000.
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
PITTSTON
Completely remod-
eled with new addi-
tion in prime loca-
tion. 2 separate
Main Street ent-
rances. Can be
used as one office
or two. Handicap-
ped accessible,
security system,
garage, 2 kitchens,
2 baths, newer roof
and heating system.
MLS# 13-9
A Must See!
$289,000.
Call Christine
570-332-8832
570-613-9080
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
PITTSTON
$115,000
142-144 Carroll St.
Well maintained,
fully rented 4 unit
investment property
in quiet neighbor-
hood. Owner took
good care of this
property. www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-4514
Call Terry
570-885-3041 or
Angie
570-885-4896
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
$129,900
224 William St.
Are you a hair-
dresser or barber?
Need a space for
an in home busi-
ness? This might be
just what youre
looking for. Well
maintained 4 bed-
room home with
salon (previously a
barber shop for 60
years). Very well
established, high
visibility location
and additional home
with 3 bedrooms
currently rented to
a tenant. Must be
sold as one pack-
age. www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 13-216
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
68 William St.
Great investment
property with 3
units and separate
utilities. Each unit
has 2 entrances
and washer hook
up. Roof is 5 years
old. For more info
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1897
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
UNION TWP
Great Old 80 Acre
Farm, Location Next
to Northwest High
School with approx.
35 acres of fields &
45 acres wooded.
Small pond, barn,
old farmhouse with
out buildings(in poor
condition - little or
no value) plenty of
road frontage.
MLS #13-807
$359,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
675-4400
SWEET VALLEY
3.8 acres, zoned B2
with home & pond.
Priced for quick
sale. High traffic
area Located at the
intersection of
Rt. 118 & Main Road.
$89,000
Call Richard Long
406-2438
675-4400
WILKES-BARRE
Owner Retiring
Turn Key Night
Club For Sale.
Two full bars,
game area.
Four restrooms.
Prime Location!!!
Creative financing
Available $80,000,
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
WEST SIDE
Well established
Italian Restaurant
on the West Side
with seating for 75.
Business only
includes good will,
all furniture and fix-
tures, all kitchen
equipment and
delivery van for
$150,000. Building
sold separately.
Restaurant on 1st
floor and 2 bed-
room luxury apart-
ment on 2nd floor
for $250,000.
www.atlasrealty
inc.com
MLS 12-3433
Call Charlie
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
Bear Creek Blvd.
Wonderful opportu-
nity! Beautiful 3.45
acre wooded build-
ing lot for your new
home. 200' front-
age.
MLS #13-157
$39,900
Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS
Commercial -
Vacant Land
2.12 acres of
commercial land
in a prime Back
Mountain location.
Ideal spot to build
an office or profes-
sional building.
Corner wooded lot.
Water,electric &
gas available to be
run to site. Call
Rhea for details
MLS#12-4281
570-696-6677
$249,900
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
DALLAS
Memorial Highway
3.65 acre B-2 com-
mercial parcel with
488 of prime
frontage on busy
Rt. 415. Ideal for
retail/office devel-
opment, bank,
restaurant. The
possibilities are
endless. Property
has a 30x40 Pole
Barn with concrete
floor.
MLS 12-4396
$425,000
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about
5,000 roadfront on
2 roads. All Wood-
ed. $385,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
EARTH CONSERVANCY
Land For Sale
61 +/- Acres
Nuangola $95,000
46 +/- Acres
Hanover Twp.
$79,000
Highway
Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp.
Acreage Zoned
R-3
Sugar Notch Lot
$13,500
See Additional
Land for Sale at:
www.earth
conservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot
with utilities avail-
able. Ideal home
site. Affordable at
$12,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY RE CO
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Hughestown Boro
LAND
1/2 acre of land for
sale in Hughestown
Boro. 92 road
frontage & over
300 deep. Public
sewer, water, &
gas. Located
behind Grace Luxu-
ry Apts. on Division
St. $55,000.
17,000 sq. ft. lot for
sale in Hughestown
Boro. 118 road
frontage x 137
deep. Back proper-
ty line is 132 wide.
Public sewer, water,
& gas. Located
behind Grace Luxu-
ry Apts on North
View Drive. $35,000
570-760-7326
KINGSTON
HUGE PRICE
REDUCTION!
302-304 Wyoming
Avenue
One of the only
commercial building
lots available on
Wyoming Ave.
Make this extremely
busy site the next
address of your
business.
MLS 08-1872
$59,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LEHMAN
9 Acres on Lehman
Outlet Road. 470
front, over 1,000
deep. Wooded.
$125,000. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
MOOSIC
BUILDING LOT
$29,900
Corner of Drake St.
& Catherine,
Moosic. 80x111
building lot with
sewer & water
available, in great
area with newer
homes. Corner lot.
For more details
visit www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com.
MLS #12-1148.
Call Charlie
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS
1 mile south of
L.C.C.C.
Established
developement with
underground utili-
ties including gas.
Cleared lot. 100
frontage x 158.
$35,000.
Lot 210 frontage
158 deep on hill
with great view
$35,000.
Call 570-736-6881
912 Lots & Acreage
PLAINS TWP.
VACANT LAND
KING OF THE
MOUNTAIN!
Truly a 360 degree
view from the high-
est point of this
property. 48.49
acres to be sold as
one parcel. Build
your dream house
here or buy and
sub-divide. Will
require well and
septic system. Just
minutes from High-
way 315, near the
Casino but very pri-
vate. www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4142
Only $149,000
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
SHAVERTOWN
Beautiful 1 acre
building lot located
in established back
Mountain sub-divi-
sion. Buy now and
start building your
dream home in the
spring. Lot has
underground utili-
ties, public sewer
and private well.
MLS #13-137
$62,400
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHICKSHINNY
23+/- acres of
wooded land and
farmland with barn
in good condition
and a nice travel
trailer. Well on
property.
MLS#12-2572
$115,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY
26 acres of mostly
open land for
a beautiful
homesite near
Shickshinny Lake.
MLS #12-3394
$130,000
Ken Williams
542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
542-2141
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Location, Location,
Location
A most unique &
desirable lakefront
property. This is an
opportunity to
purchase a
centrally situated
lot with an
unmatched view of
this beautiful lake.
If you are looking
for that special
building site, this is
it! MLS# 11-1269
$169,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains
Realty
570-256-3343
915 Manufactured
Homes
HANOVER TWP.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath
mobile home locat-
ed in a park on a
rented lot along a
quiet, dead end
road. Covered car-
port and shed. In
good condition, but
needs updating
$8000. OBO. Please
call 570-829-3476
or 570-994-6308
938 Apartments/
Furnished
SHICKSHINNY
1 bedroom no smok-
ing, heat water,
parking. 542-4187
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
AVAILABLE NOW
2nd floor, modern
living room &
kitchen. 2 bed-
rooms & bath. Off
street parking.
Washer/dryer hook-
up. Appliances. Bus
stop at the door.
Water Included.
$575 + utilities &
security. No pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
ASHLEY
Quiet 2nd floor, 2
bedroom. Laundry,
off street parking
with carport. Large
yard. Includes
water, sewer &
garbage. Refer-
ences, 1st, last +
security required.
No pets. $550/mo.
570-735-8730
570-332-8080
BACK
MOUNTAIN
Large 1 bedroom,
living room, kitchen
with appliances,
tiled bath, deck.
No Pets. $425.
570-696-1866
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
AVOCA
3 rooms includes
heat, hot water,
water, garbage &
sewer + appliances,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off street park-
ing. Security. No
pets. $490/month.
570-655-1606
AVOCA
3 rooms includes
heat, hot water,
water, garbage &
sewer + appliances,
washer/dryer hook-
up, off street park-
ing. Security. No
pets. $490/month.
570-655-1606
BACK MOUNTAIN
2nd floor.
NON SMOKING
Spacious 2 bed-
room. Modern kit-
chen, separate liv-
ing & dining rooms.
Includes: heat, hot
water, cable & gar-
age. $800/month,
no pets, references,
1 month security.
570-675-4128
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
DALLAS
HI-MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
1075 Memorial Hwy.
Low & Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
*Electric Range &
Refrigerator
*Off Street Parking
*Community Room
*Coin Operated
Laundry *Elevator.
*Video Surveilence
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-675-5944
8a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-675-6936,
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DALLAS
Municipal Rd. 1st
floor 2 bedroom,
Living room, dining
room, kitchen, bath.
Forced air propane
heat, carport. $595.
Call 570-332-3562
EXETER
BEAUTIFUL 1st floor
1 bedroom 1/2
duplex. Eat-in
kitchen, appliances
included refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer, & washer/
dryer hook-up. No
pets. $720/ mo +
security & electric
heat, water,
garbage & sewage
included.
570-301-7247
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, Wyoming
Avenue, 2 bedroom
wall to wall carpet,
tile bath, stove &
fridge furnished,
washer/dryer hook
up. Heat, public
water, sewer & re-
cycling furnished by
landlord. Use of
attic, yard & porch-
es. Good location,
off street parking.
No pets. 1 year
lease & security.
$675 570-655-0530
LUZERNE
ONE-OF-A-KIND
Beautiful brick
trimmed Colo-
nial, 2nd floor 2
bedroom unit
with wood pan-
eled loft. Remod-
eled completely,
maple kitchen,
all appliances,
gorgeous en-
closed porch,
covered carport,
gas fireplace,
more! $800 +
utilities. 2 YEAR
SAME RENT
LEASE, NO PETS
/ SMOKING.
EMPLOYMENT
VERI FI CATI ON
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
570-288-1422 570-288-1422
GLEN LYON
1 bedroom, 2nd
floor apt. Living
room, kitchen, full
bath, background
check & references
required. $575
month + security.
heat included. Ten-
ant pays electric.
201-304-3469
GLEN LYON
1st floor 4 room apt.
Electric & propane
gas heat. Off street
parking. Washer
/dryer hookup, ref-
rigerator, garbage
included. No dogs.
$400/month refer-
ences required, 1
year lease + 1 month
security.
570-714-1296
HANOVER AREA
2 Bedroom apart-
ment. Immediately
available near
Hanover. appli-
ances, bay windows
washer/ dryer hook-
up. $595.
570-709-0170
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK
APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate
Income Elderly
Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications
Accepted by
Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessi-
ble
Equal Housing
Opportunity
HANOVER
Newly remodeled, 5
rooms, new appli-
ances, w/d hookup,
w/w carpet, off
street parking, BBQ
area. No pets, no
smoking. $625 in-
cludes water. Secu-
rity & credit check.
570-650-7083
HANOVER TWP.
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. New kitchen,
bath & carpeting.
Fresh paint, off
street parking. No
pets or smoking.
One year lease.
$625/month
+ security. Heat,
hot water &
garbage included.
570-825-6720
570-430-9836
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom , wall to
wall carpet, appli-
ances, Lake rights.
Off street parking.
No pets. Lease,
security and
references.
570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
GRACE LUXURY
APARTMENTS
has an opening. It is
our largest unit. 3
bedrooms, 2 & 1/2
baths. Hardwood
floors, granite coun-
ters, extra large
kitchen, stainless
appliances, gas
heat, central air,
washer/dryer.
Beautiful grounds
with plenty of park-
ing. Property main-
tenance & garbage
included. Apart-
ment only 1 year old.
Rock St. $1,500.
570-760-7326
KINGSTON
1st Ave. 1 bedroom,
single occupancy,
off-street parking,
no pets, references.
$450 + utilities.
Call 570-655-9229
KINGSTON
2 bedrooms. Hot &
cold water included.
$595/month.
NO PETS.
Section 8 OK.
570-817-3332
KINGSTON
28 East Vaughn St.
Beautiful 1 bedroom
apartment in nice
neighborhood.
Hardwood floors,
French doors, natu-
ral woodwork,
includes refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer, garbage
disposal, washer &
dryer. $450/month
plus utilities & secu-
rity. Off street park-
ing. No pets / No
Smoking, Available
April 1st. Please call
570-287-4047
for appointment
KINGSTON
3rd floor, 1 bed-
room, living & dining
rooms. Large kit-
chen with enclos-
ed back porch, new
appliances. Heat &
water included. No
pets/smoking. $650
/month & security.
570-714-3332
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted. Security
system, garage
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No pets.
References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $730.
month. Call
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Modern 2nd floor.
Spacious 3 bed-
room, hardwood
floors, modern
kitchen with appli-
ances, laundry in
unit. Electric heat.
Would consider
small dog. No
Smoking. $800
month plus utilities
& $800. security
deposit.
Call Rae
570-714-9234
KINGSTON
Newly renovated
duplex, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
new gas furnace
with central air,
all new
appliances and
carpeting. Garbage
included off-street
parking, $750 plus
security and
utilities/per month.
Call (570)288-1561
WILKES-BARRE TWP
3 bedroom newly
remodeled available
immediately. appli-
ances $600. month.
570-793-6256
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
SECOND FLOOR
Efficiency
Apartment
Refrigerator and
stove provided. All
utilities included.
Nice neighbor-
hood. $475 per
month. Lease, first
& security deposit.
R e f e r e n c e s
required. No pets.
570-288-5569
KINGSTON
Near Kingston Cor-
ners, 2nd floor,
totally remodeled.
clean & bright. One
bedroom, living
room, office/den,
laundry room off
large kitchen. Gas
range, oak cabinets,
modern bath, walk
up attic, ceiling fans
in each room. New
flooring, mini-blinds,
2 air conditioners,
yard parking, water
& sewer included.
No pets, smoking.,
$600/month + utili-
ties, lease & securi-
ty. 570-288-9843
LUZERNE
1 bedroom, wall to
wall, off-street
parking, coin laun-
dry, water, sewer &
garbage included.
$495/month +
security & lease.
HUD accepted.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
LUZERNE
276 Bennett St.
2nd floor, large,
2 bedroom, large
living room, den,
dining room, tiled
bath, kitchen with
stove and refrig-
erator, washer
and dryer hook
up, off street
parking. Water
and sewer includ-
ed. $600 plus utili-
ties and security,
no pets or smok-
ing. References.
Call
570-288-7309
Leave Message
LUZERNE
3 rooms & bath on
2nd floor. Washer,
dryer, range &
refrigerator. Off
street parking, no
pets or smoking.
$450/month + utili-
ties & security.
. 570-696-1763
MINERS MILLS
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms. Refrigerator
& stove, washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking. $500
/month + utilities,
security, references
570-881-7372
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
NANTICOKE
1st floor, 4 rooms.
Washer/dryer hook
up, stove & refrig-
erator. Newly reno-
vated. No pets. Non
smoking. Heat &
hot water included.
$555/month.
570-287-4700
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, full
kitchen, large clos-
ets. No pets/smok-
ing. Sewer & trash
included. $475.
Call 570-262-5399
NANTICOKE
2nd floor, 1 bedroom
non smoking. Water
& sewer refuge
included. No pets. 1
year lease + refer-
ences. $400/month
+ security & utilities.
Call
570-735-3719
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom, wall to
wall carpet, off-
street parking,
$595/month + utili-
ties, security, lease.
HUD accepted. Call
570-687-6216
or 570-954-0727
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON LEXINGTON
VILLAGE VILLAGE
2 bedroom, 1
bath apartments.
Refrigerator,
stove,
dishwasher &
washer/dryer
provided.
Attached garage.
Pet friendly.
Water, sewer &
trash included.
59 Agostina Drive
570-735-3500
PITTSTON
AVAILABLE NOW
3rd floor, 3 bed-
room. $600 +
security. Sewer &
garbage included.
570-574-4380
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
Open House,
March 16 and 17
10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
231 West Noble St.
Very nice, first floor,
two bedrooms,
remodeled,
includes,
washer/dryer
hookup, range and
refrigerator.
$500/ month
plus utilities.
NO PETS.
Call: 570-760-3637
NANTICOKE
Very clean, nice 1
bedroom. Heat, hot
water & garbage
fees included.
Washer/dryer avail-
able, stove, refrig-
erator, air condi-
tioning. No pets/no
smoking. $525 +
security.
Call 570-542-5610
PITTSTON
1st floor, large 1
bedroom apart-
ment. Newly reno-
vated, off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up.
SUB-ZERO
SPECIAL!
$725/month, all utili-
ties included.
570-443-0770
PITTSTON
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Includes
stove & refrigerator.
Laundry hook-up.
Heated garage, off
street parking.
Heat, sewer, water
& garbage included.
$695/month + sec-
urity & lease. No
smoking or pets.
570-430-0123
PITTSTON
MUST SEE!
2 bedroom apart-
ment, completely
renovated with new
hardwood floors &
ceramic tile. New
appliances, off
street parking, coin
operated washer &
dryer in basement.
No pets, no smok-
ing. $600/month +
security & utilities.
570-357-1383
PITTSTON
One & two bed-
room apartments.
1st & 2nd floor.
Newly painted.
$500/month + secu-
rity. Includes range
& refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook
up & sewage. Off
street parking.
Call Bernie
570-655-4815
ROTHSTEIN INC.
REALTORS
288-7594
PLAINS
One bedroom, 2nd
floor. Recently reno-
vated. Bath with
shower, eat in
kitchen, stove &
refrigerator. Living
room, large bed-
room, air, plenty of
closet space. 2
entrances. Wash-
er/dryer hook up in
basement. 1 off
street parking
space. $450 + secu-
rity & application.,
Call (570)823-0372
PLYMOUTH
176 Orchard St.
1st floor, very nice.
2 bedroom washer
dryer hookup. $485
plus security.
570-779-4240
PLYMOUTH
2 ROOM
EFFICIENCY
All appliances, no
pets/no smoking.
Utilities paid. Back-
ground check & ref-
erences required.
Near bus stop.
$475/month + 1
month security.
(570)592-2902
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PLYMOUTH
2nd floor. Bus stops
at door. 5 rooms.
Range, refrigerator,
washer/dryer. Wall
to wall carpet.
Newly remodeled.
Utilities by tenant.
$495/month + sec-
unity. no pets.
570-574-1276 or
570-288-4860
PLYMOUTH
Available
Immediately.
Nice clean 3 (or 2)
bedroom with new
carpeting, stove/
fridge included.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Off street park-
ing. Call quick,
wont last long.
$595/month + utili-
ties. I pay sewer.
Phone
570-674-3120,
day or night.
Marilyn K. Snyder
Real Estate
825-2468
SCRANTON
GREEN RIDGE SECTION
Large 1 bedroom.
Heat included.
Bathroom, eat in
kitchen, living room.
Off street parking.
$625/month
(631) 821-8600 x103
WEST PITTSTON
1 room apt. 2nd
floor. Full kitchen,
full bath, hardwood,
washer/dryer heat
included, pets neg.
$550.
267-745-8616.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
SWOYERSVILLE
Must see! Brand
new 1st floor, 3 bed-
room. Comparable
to a Ranch home.
Large living room,
stove, fridge dish-
washer, washer/
dryer, laundry room,
Air & heat. Your
dream home. Wall
to wall carpeting,
hardwood floors, off
street parking, large
back yard. All utili-
ties paid except
e l e c t r i c .
$1075/month + sec-
urity & references.
570-762-2471
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room with off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up,
stove. No pets.
$525/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other
utilities by tenant.
570-760-0458
WEST WYOMING
Large modern 2
bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment on quiet
street.
$550 a month
plus utilities.
(570)479-0302
WILKES BARRE
renovated 1 bed-
room! 216 Carlisle
St. May be used as
2 bedroom. Fresh
carpets, floors,
paint, new stove &
refrigerator, new
cabinets. HOT
WATER, HEAT &
SEWER INCLUDED!
2nd floor apt. Quiet
1-way street, park-
ing on street and
behind house.
$625mo & $625
security deposit to
move in. Call 215-
565-6761 for more
info, proof of
employment req.
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390 to $675.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom, 1 bath
2nd floor. Off street
parking. All appli-
ances including
washer & dryer.
Gas heat. No pets.
$575/month
+ utilities, security.
570-881-3359
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom apart-
ment. 1 bath. Eat in
kitchen. Closed in
terrace. Full usable
attic. $625 + utilities
& security.
Call: 718-809-3338
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedrooms, living
room, kitchen, fin-
ished attic off street
parking. 1st & last
months rent + secu-
rity. Leave message
570-817-0601
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St.
1.5 bedrooms, new-
ly renovated build-
ing. Washer & dryer
available. $650/mo.
includes heat, hot
water & parking.
570-855-4744
646-712-1286
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with
study, off street
parking, laundry
facility. Includes
heat and hot
water, hardwood
floors, appliances,
Trash removal.
$580/mo Call
(570)821-5599
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 PAGE 7D
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
1 BEDROOM
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call
570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
A Place To
Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen
acres.com
Call today for
move-in
specials.
WILKES-BARRE
EXCELLENT
DOWNTOWN
LOCATION!!!
STUDIO, 1 & 2
BEDROOMS
Equipped Kitchen
Free Cable
Wall to Wall Carpeting
570-823-2776
Monday - Friday,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
CALL AN EXPERT CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1015 Appliance
Service
A.R.T. APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all
major brands.
Work guaranteed.
570-639-3001
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and
inexpensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money,
Let us take a look
at it first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION CO.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / Repair
Kitchens and
Baths
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding
Carpentry
40 yrs experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan
570-881-1131
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
BATHROOMS,
KITCHENS,
ROOFING, SID-
ING, DECKS,
WINDOWS, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 855-2506
(570) 332-7023
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
1024 Building &
Remodeling
MARCH MADNESS
$200 cash off
any painting or
drywall job.
GENERAL
CONTRACTOR
& LOCAL HOME
BUILDER
30 Years Exp.
Make Your Home
Beautiful Interior /
Exterior.
WE DO IT ALL!
Why pay more!
Pay when youre
pleased. All work
guaranteed.
FREE
ESTIMATES!
570-899-3123
PR BUILDERS
Any and all types of
remodeling from
windows to design
build renovations.
Licensed
Handyman
Services
also, Electric,
Plumbing,
Building.
PA license 048740
accepts Visa
call 570-826-0919
SEE OVER
100
VENDORS
AT THE
BUILDERS
EXPO
MARCH
1, 2 & 3
call 287-3331
FOR INFO
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
1039 Chimney
Service
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHRIS MOLESKY
CHIMNEY SPECIALIST
New, repair, rebuild,
liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete
& metal caps.
Licensed & Insured
570-328-6257
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
CLEANING WHIZ
GREEN PRODUCTS
For Special Deals
Contact Jaymee at
570-852-7497
Connies Cleaning
15 years experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
GIFT CERTIFICATES
AVAILABLE!
570-430-3743 570-430-3743
Connie does the
cleaning!
DEB & PATS
CLEANING
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-371-3857
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
B.P. Home Repairs
570-825-4268
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Sidewalks,
Chimneys, Stucco.
New Installation &
Repairs
C&C MASONRY &
CONCRETE
Absolutely Free
Estimates. Masonry
& concrete work.
Specializing in foun-
dations, repairs and
rebuilding. Footers
floors, driveways.
570-840-9913
570-346-4103
PA084504
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
STESNEY
CONCRETE & MASONRY
Brick, block, walks,
drive, steps, stucco,
stone, chimneys and
repairs.
Lic. & Ins.
570-283-5254
1057Construction &
Building
FATHER & SON
CONSTRUCTION
Interior & Exterior
Remodeling
Jobs of All Sizes
570-814-4578
570-709-8826
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
ECONOLECTRIC
No Job
Too Small.
Generator
Installs.
Residential &
Commercial
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
PA032422
(570) 602-7840
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
20 YEARS EXPERI ENCE
All types of home
repairs & alterations
Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-256-3150
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, were
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
Mikes $5-Up
Hauling Junk &
Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 472-4321
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
APEX TREE AND
EARTH
TREE REMOVAL
Pruning, Stump
Grinding, Hazard
Tree Removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot Clearing.Insured.
Reasonable Rates
apextreeandearth.com
570-550-4535
SPRING CLEAN UPS
Lawn Cutting
Shrub Trimming,
Mulching
Landscaping
Services
25+ Years Exp.
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
570-287-4780
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SPRING SPECIAL
$100 + materials for
average size room.
18 years experience
Power washing
/deck staining.
570-820-7832
ART NEWTONS
PAINTING
& Drywall Repairs
Fully Insured
32 Yrs Experience
570-332-0882
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING.
Quality Work,
Reasonable Prices.
Floating Floors
Installed
570-762-6889
JACOBOSKY PAINTING
NEPAs Finest
Painters
Int./Ext. Painting,
Building Restoration
Dont worry about
them running off
with your money,
get it done right
the first time!
Free Estimates
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Spring & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Cant Lose!
570-822-3943
1213 Paving &
Excavating
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
HARTH & SONS
General
Contractor
15% off
with this ad.
570-815-8294
1252 Roofing &
Siding
SPRING ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured.
Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
GILROY
Construction
Your Roofing
Specialist
Free Estimates
No Payment
til Job is
100% Complete
570-829-0239
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW SNOW
PLOWING PLOWING
VITOS & GINOS
570-574-1275
Commercial
Industrial
Residential
Driveways
Sidewalks
Salting
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio, 1 & 2
bedroom apart-
ments. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence & all
doors electronically
locked.
1 bedroom - $450.
2 bedroom - $550.
Water & sewer paid
1 month security
deposit. Email
obscuroknows@
hotmail.com or Call
570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to
schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
HEIGHTS
Townhouse type
apartments. 2 bed
rooms, Stove,
fridge, washer/
dryer hookup. Off-
street parking.
Utilities by tenant.
No pets or smok-
ing. $475/month
570-825-8355
6 to 8 pm ONLY
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison Street
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included.
1 Bedroom$550
2 Bedroom$650.
Call Jazmin
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 + tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH END
17 Thompson Street
Good neighborhood
& good landlord
requests good ten-
ants. 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er/dryer hook up in
basement. Heat,
hot & cold water
included. Shared
yard & off street
parking. Newly ren-
ovated. Section 8
OK. Small pets con-
sidered. Refer-
ences, credit &
background
checked. $625/
month + security &
lease. Now avail-
able. Leave name &
phone number.
570-825-0151
WI L KE S - BA RRE
RENTALS
Two, 3, & 4 bed-
rooms. $650-$900.
613-9090
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 OK
570-357-0712
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-
BARRE
TOP OF HILL
NORTH MAIN
Maple kitchen,
all appliances,
laundry, FIRST
FLOOR $625 +
utilities. Beauti-
fully done Victori-
an, fireplace
(ornamented), 1
bedroom. NO
PETS /SMOKING.
EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
570-288-1422 570-288-1422
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
By General Hospital
Large 1 bedroom,
hardwood floors,
appliances. Eat in
kitchen. Parking
space available.
$500/month +
utilities. No pets.
570-540-5312
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
water included
3 bedroom
single
HANOVER
2 bedroom 1/2
double.
4 bedroom
double
LUZERNE
2 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
Large 1 bed
room water
included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WYOMING
Charming 2nd floor,
1 bedroom, appli-
ances included.
Clean quiet neigh-
borhood. $625/mo
includes heat,
water, sewer and
refuse. No Pets.
570-693-2148
570-430-1204
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
944 Commercial
Properties
CLARKS SUMMIT
Beautiful 2,000
square foot com-
mercial building
available, within
Main Clark Summit
area. Will lease first
and second floors
separately or
together. More
than adequate
parking with rental.
Professional
inquiries only.
Call:
570-499-6409
570-587-5048
For information.
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315 2,400 Sq.
Ft. professional
office space with
beautiful view of
Valley & Casino.
will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
GLEN LYON GARAGE
1,200 sq.ft.
New roof & door.
$395/month.
Please call
570-881-0320
GLEN LYON
STOREFRONT
Unique opportunity
at 61-63 East Main
St. High Traffic
Area. 570-881-0320
944 Commercial
Properties
FORTY FORT
Modern space avail-
able in a nice Forty-
Fort location, high
traffic area, was
used as dental
office with reception
area. $700/month
plus utilities.
Cathy Tkaczyk
696-5422
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
LAFLIN
GYM FOR RENT
Set up as a full
court basketball
court with hard-
wood floors, mens
& ladies room and
changing room.
Could be put to any
related use ie: fit-
ness gym, basket-
ball camp or any-
thing that requires a
large open space.
Lots of free parking,
heat and utilities
are included. Rent
is is $3,000 per
month
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
108 S. Main Street
5,000 square feet.
Suitable for many
businesses. Park-
ing for 100 cars.
$600/month + secu-
rity. 570-540-0746.
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for
rent on the Pittston
By-Pass. Highly vis-
ible location with
plenty of parking.
$1,800 sq. ft. of
beautifully finished
space can be used
for any type office
use. $1,750/ mo.
plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
RETAIL SPACE
RTE 315 LAFLIN
1200 SQ. FT.
$600. PER
MONTH
INCLUDING
UTILITIES.
Business must be
related to Home
Furnishings.
Call 570-650-6265
SCHOOL FOR RENT
Finished basement
with classrooms, 1st
floor contains bas-
ketball court, stage
area & kitchen area,
second floor is fin-
ished with class-
rooms. Parking for
25+ vehicles. Prop-
erty maintenance
included. $2,500.
570-760-7326
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
WAREHOUSE/
OFFICE SPACE
5,000 sq. ft. with
parking lot. Office,
1,000 sq. ft.
Off I-81, EXIT 165
Call 570-823-1719
Mon. Through Fri.
7 am TO 3 pm.
WILKES-BARRE
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES YOULL
EVER SEE!
Warehouse, light
manufacturing. Gas
heat, sprinklers,
overhead doors,
parking for 30 cars.
Yes, that $1 sq.ft.
lease!
We have 9,000
sq.ft., 27,000 sq.ft.,
and 32,000 sq. ft.
Can combine.
There is nothing
this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @
570-696-4000 or
570-430-1565
WILKES-BARRE
Great Location to
have a business.
Excellent access.
Building has many
spaces of computer
access. Configura-
tion may permit
multi-use of building
$185,000
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
947 Garages
ASHLEY
4,200 sq. ft.
building with two
overhead garage
doors. $300/month.
Option to buy,
leave a message.
570-592-3575
950 Half Doubles
ASHLEY
3 bedrooms, laun-
dry room on main
floor. Newly reno-
vated. Fenced in
yard. Hanover
School District.
$670. plus utilities.
570-851-2929
leave message
DURYEA
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths, separate
laundry area. Large
yard. Off street
parking. $700/
month + security,
utilities & garbage.
570-466-0401
570-655-6475
950 Half Doubles
KINGSTON
3 bedroom, 1 bath
1/2 double. Living
room, dining room,
eat-kitchen off
street parking. No
smoking or pets. 1
year lease. $800
month + security.
Call Rae
570-714-9234
KINGSTON
3/1 Bath. Freshly
painted, newer
carpeting, modern
kitchen with
appliances.
$635.00 + utilities
570-239-3887
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath 1/2 double in
excellent condition
with large living &
dining rooms,
kitchen & pantry.
Washer/dryer hook
up. 1 car garage.
No pets or smok-
ers. $750/month +
security. Call
Barbara Metcalf at
696-0883
NANTICOKE
3 bedroom. Washer
dryer hookup. $600
+ utilities. Call
570-954-7919
PLAINS
Spacious, modern 2
bedroom. Wall to
wall carpeting,
bath, living room,
kitchen with all
appliances, off
street parking.
$600 + utilities, 1st
& last months rent
& security.
Absolutely no pets
or smoking!
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
SHAVERTOWN
3 BEDROOMS
Gas heat, wall to
wall carpet. Security
and lease. No pets.
$650 month plus
utilities.
570-675-4424
953Houses for Rent
BACK MTN. AREA
3 bedroom, 1 bath,
3 garage stalls on
approximately 3
acres. Lawncare &
snow plowing in-
cluded. Tunkhan-
nock School District.
$1,200/month. Call
Richard Long
570-406-2438
570-675-4400
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS BOROUGH
1,700 square feet
bi-level, living room
with hardwoods,
oak kitchen, with
granite counter
tops, three bed-
room, and full bath,
14 by 16 deck all
upstairs. Family
room, bedroom or
office, full bath, 1
car garage and
patio all downstairs.
100 by 150 lot.
Rent, $1,450 month
plus utilities
no pets.
Call Kevin Smith,
696-5420.
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
DALLAS BOROUGH
2 bedroom town
home, 1 1/2 baths,
living room, dining
room, kitchen with
all appliances. Full
basement, 12 by 14
deck. No pets.
$800 a month plus
utilities.
Call Kevin Smith,
696-5420.
Smith Hourigan
Group
696-1195
DALLAS
Modern, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath con-
temporary. $895 +
utilities, security &
lease. No smokers.
570-696-5417.
DALLAS
PERFECT 2 BEDROOM
2 bath, 1 car
garage on 1 acre
cared for by
Landlord. All brand
new appliances
included. 1st Floor
laundry, full base-
ment for storage,
Great view, patio.
$1100/mo plus utili-
ties.
570-762-8481
PLYMOUTH
3 bedrooms, 1
bathroom, living
room, dining room,
kitchen, off street
parking. $600 a
month plus utilities
and security.
Call (570)825-4268
953Houses for Rent
FORTY FORT
45 Butler Street
2 huge bedrooms,
brand new carpet-
ing, refrigerator &
stove, washer/dryer
hook up. Off street
parking. Beautiful!
No pets. $650/
month & security.
570-479-5092
570-417-4180
HANOVER TWP.
34 Allenberry Dr.
End Unit! Many
windows make this
2 bedroom, 2 bath
Townhouse bright
and pleasant.
Please contact
David at
570-235-7599
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
JENKINS TWP.
Small 2 bedroom
single family house
for rent. $500 a
month. Security
deposit required.
Background check.
Some appliances
included. NO PETS.
Call 570-466-2233
for details.
KINGSTON
Fully remodeled. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath.
close to schools &
shopping. All new
appliances. Front &
rear porches, full
basement & attic.
Off street parking.
$850/month +
utilities, security &
lease.
Call 570-824-7598
KINGSTON
Single family home,
3 bedrooms, one
and a half bath,
with washer and
dryer hook up.
Hardwood floors,
tile floor and
kitchen.
$875/month plus
utilities, security
deposit and
references.
No pets,
No smoking.
570-693-1511
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
1 bedroom, large
kitchen, living room,
one bathroom,
refrigerator, stove,
washer/dryer, air
conditioner. Base-
ment, yard, off
street parking and
deck. No smoking
no pets. $1,000
Security, $595 a
month plus utilities.
Call (570) 586-3015
953Houses for Rent
LUZERNE
374 Miller Street
Lovely, remodeled,
two huge bed-
rooms, 4 oversized
closets, ceiling fans.
Full bath on each
floor. Huge living
room, hardwood
floor. Laundry room
off large kitchen.
Many oak cabinets,
gas range, dish-
washer. Enclosed
porches, concrete
patio, full basement
with exit. New gas
baseboard heat,
wiring, plumbing,
flooring. Large
shed & yard. Park-
ing for 3 cars. No
pets, smokers.
Lease & security.
$850/month + utili-
ties. 570-288-9843.
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
MOUNTAINTOP
Private setting, 3
bedroom, 2 bath
home. Hardwood
floors, area rugs,
large kitchen, dish-
washer, stove &
fridge and gas fire-
place. Office &
second floor bonus
areas. Laundry
hook up in base-
ment. Enjoy this
beautiful setting
with an enclosed
front and back
porch. Sewer &
water included.
No Smoking. No
Pets. $1,350/month
+ security, lease &
background check.
available mid/late
April.
570-678-5850
SHAVERTOWN
Good location,
excellent schools.
Modern, 4 bed-
rooms, office, 2 full
baths. Living, dining
rooms. Finished
family room, granite
kitchen with ceram-
ic tile . Large wrap
around deck, out
door Jacuzzi, in
ground heated pool.
Gas heat. Four car
off street parking.
$1,500/month +
utilities, security +
last month deposit.
Includes fridge,
stove, washer/dry-
era, sewer & trash.
Available July 1st.
Pictures available
through e-mail. Call
570-545-6057.
SWOYERSVILLE
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
full basement, off
street parking, large
yard. Electric stove,
washer/dryer
hookup, $750 plus
utilities & security
r e q u i r e d . N i c e
neighborhood. pets
considered. Non
smoking.
570-316-1559
953Houses for Rent
OLD FORGE
LUXURY
TOWNHOUSE
Built in 2003 this
luxurious 3 bedroom
townhome features
hardwood floors on
main floor, finished
basement, large
master suite, pri-
vate outdoor deck
and back yard, off
street parking,
granite countertops,
stainless steel appli-
ances, DirecTV,
high-speed internet
(all other utilities
NOT included),
garbage, sewer,
gas heat with brand
new furnace, cen-
tral air conditioning
with brand new
compressor, (all
other utilities NOT
included), brand
new carpeting on
2nd floor in all bed-
rooms, extra closet
space, large base-
ment storage room,
wood blinds in ALL
rooms, all yard
maintenance and
snow plowing
included. This is an
end unit with only
one other unit
attached. Rent is
$1,500. per month &
requires $2,000.
security deposit.
Minimum one year
lease required.
Must fill out credit
application.
NO PETS.
570-840-1960
WEST PITTSTON
1/2 double, 7 rooms
& bath, hardwood
floors, natural wood
work, garage. Great
neighborhood. Non-
smokers. No pets.
Call 570-655-2195
WEST WYOMING
Beautiful brick ranch
home for rent. 2
bedrooms, 2 large
full baths, gas heat,
central air, washer
/dryer, extra large
kitchen, huge two
car garage. Great
quiet location .
Property mainte-
nance & garbage
included. $1,200.
570-760-7326
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath.
All appliances
including washer &
dryer. Small fenced
yard. 1st floor hard-
wood. Large
kitchen. No pets
$650/month +
utilities & security
570-881-3359
WILKES-BARRE
4 bedroom, 2.5
baths. Off street
parking. $800 + util-
ities & security. No
pets. 570-820-7861
Leave Message.
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 5 room
2 bedroom, car-
peting, hookups,
yard, electric heat.
$525 + utilities.
No pets. 868-4444
959 Mobile Homes
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Affordable New &
Used Homes For
Sale & Rental
Homes Available.
HEATHER HIGHLANDS
MHC 109 Main St
Inkerman, PA
570-655-9643
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
WEST PITTSTON
Gorgeous, furnished
room for rent in Vic-
torian home. Every-
thing included. Only
$150/week + securi-
ty. 570-430-3100
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WYOMING
Sleeping room.
Private entrance &
bath. Non smoking,
drug free. Subject
to background
check. $100 weekly
+ $200 security.
570-239-3997
Leave Message!
965 Roommate
Wanted
MOUNTAIN TOP/DRUMS
SANDS SPRINGS
GOLF COMMUNITY
Room to rent/
townhome share.
Room with private
bath. Kitchen, deck,
washer/dryer.
410-707-7473
968 Storage
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Lease 20,000 sq. ft.
I-81 on Casey Ave.
Zoned M-3 for
manufacturing,
warehouse storage.
Electric, gas heat,
sprinkler. HE light-
ing, 21 ceilings,
1 drive in &
3 dock doors.
Can be subdivided.
Call Bob Post
570-270-9255
F U N N I E S WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
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BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
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DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA