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Pali Text Society

THE
ANGUTTARA-NI KAYA.
EDITED BY
THE REV. RI CHARD MORRI S, M.A., LL.D.,
EX-PRESI DENT OP THB PHILOLOGICAL SOCIETY.
PART I .
EKANIPATA, DUKANIPATA, AND TIKANIPATA.
LONDON:
PUBLISHED FOR THE PALI TEXT SOCIETY, BY HENRY
FROWDE,
OXFORD UNI VERSI TY PRESS WAREHOUSE, AMEN CORNER, E.C.
1885.
THE
.ANGurrTARA-NIKAYA.
BDITBD BY
THE REV. RICHARD MORRIS, M.A., LL.D.,
BX-l'REBIDBNT Ol' THB l'HILOLOOICAL BOCIBTY.
PART I.
EKANIPATA, DUKANIPATA, AND TIKANIPATA.
LONDON:
PUBLISHED FOR THE P ALI TEXT SOCIETY,
BY HENRY FROWDE,
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS WABEHOUBE, AMEN CORNEB, E.C.
1!!85.
TO
PROFESSOR FAUSBtL;
OF COPENHAGEN
1
THE FIRST SCHOLAR IN EUROPE
WHO EDITED AN IMPORTANT PALl TEXT
1
IN CORDlAL ACKNOWLEDGHENT OF HIS GREAT SERVICES T()
HISTORICAL ENQUIRY
1
THIS EDITIO PRINCEPS OF THE ANGUTTARANIKAYA
IB
RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED.
PRELIMINARY REMARKS.
For the text of these three
1
nip&tas of the A:NGUTTARA-
NtKAYA I have made use of the following manuscripts :-
1. T.=Tumour MS. (written in Shihalese character), in
the India Office Library.
2. Ba.=No. 2276 (in Sinhalese writing) of the Oriental
MSS. in the Library of the British Museum.
3. Bb.=No. 2412 (in Sinhalese character) of the same
collection.
4. Ph. =Phayre MS. (in Burmese writing), in the India
Office Library.
5. Com. (1.) Buddhaghosha's Commentary (Turnour collec-
tion), in the India Office Library.
6.
"
(2.) A manuscript of the above work in my own
collection. It is of the same type as the
Tumour copy.
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An edition of the first two nipiltas was issued by the Pali Text Society
among the publications of 1883; but it was not weil reeeived on account of the
numerous contractions used in the text. In the present work only a few pe' B or
.. have been employed.
viii
PRELIMINARY REMARKS.
7. Com. (3.) Buddhaghosha's Commentary, prepared for
me with great care by SubMti U n n B . n s ~ . It is
a very valuable and accurate manuscript, and
contains many variations from (1.) and (2.).
8. D.=A MS. in my own collection purchased from Dr.
Rhys Davids.
9. Tr.=A transcript (unpunctuated) of the Copenhagen
MS. by Dr. Trenckner.
10. P.=Paris MS. used only in the Uddanas.
N os. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 are all in Shihalese writing.
11. Thereis a tika or sub-commentary in the British Museum
collection, but it has not afforded me any help in
settling the text of the Anguttara. It contains
the first nipata and the beginning of the second.
There is a very close agreement between the Sinhalese
andBurmeseversions of the Anguttara-NikB.ya; but
where they essentially differ, I have, in nearly every case,
given the preference to the Sinhalese readings.
The Sinhalese manuscripts, as Professor Fausblllong ago
pointed out (Te n Ja ta ka s, p. x), often retain older
forms and expressions, which the Burmese replace by more
modern, more common, and more regular ones. A few
instances of this kind occur in the Anguttara. Thus, for
bhecchati (l. v. 1), Ph. reads bhijjissati, and for pali-
gedha (II. iv. 6) cleverly substitutes baligedha, in which
ba 1 i gives some sense, thou gh not the exact meaning
required.
In one instance I have found in the Phayre MS. a reading
PRELIKIN ARY REMARKS.
ix
borrowed from the explanation in the Commentary (see III.
65, 3, footnote, 5).
In difficult or doubtful p88811ges the Burmese manuacripts
rarely render us any trustworthy assistance. Thus for
11 an ka sA. y anti (III. iv. 9), the reading of all the Sinhalese
copies, and sanctioned by the Satp.yutta-NikA.ya, Ph. reads
sa ng h A. ma y anti. I venture to think that the Sinhalese
reading is the correct one, and that it is not a mistake for
s a ii a y a n t i.
In some few cases the Commentary differs from the re-
ceived text, as in the reading at it h hu Ip for at i y hu m
(II. iv. 9), and okkA.cita for ukkA.cita (II.v.7). In
other cases it has given us a better reading than that of the
received text. See sa Ii k h epa, III. 6'.?, 3.
The Chinese are said to have a work answering to the
An gu ttara-N i kA. y a, which Professor Beal calls the
"Ad d-On e-A gam a."
1
We have, however, no means of
verifying this statement, as we have no published specimens
of a Chinese Aligottara to compare with the PA.li version.
In Professor Beal's "Catena of Buddhist Scriptures from
the Chinese," we have some quotations from a work eallad
the "Siau-chi-Kwan," written by Chi-kai, the founder
1
Bunyiu Nanjio, in his "Catalogue of the Chinese Buddhist Canon," No.
643, gives a description of a work called Ts an- y i- oh ii n- ehi n {Add-one
agama- book), which he translates E kotta r ii ga ma sutra. It wos trans-
lated into Chinese by Dhannanandin, A.D. 386. J udging from the titles of each
chapter (varga P) it is uniike the Pilli Anguttara-Nikilya. It is, however, worth
noticing that in the Milindn-Puiiha (p. 32) the Aiiguttara is alluded to as tho
Ekuttara-Nikaya.
X
PRELIMINARY REMARKS.
of the T ian-ta i sect. The extract on p. 258, entitled,
"On Chiding the E vii Desires," resembles very closely the
first ten suttas of the (pp. 1, 2) mixed up
with some commentator's remarks and illustrative stories;
but the Chinese stories are not the same as those told by
Buddhaghosha. The chapter on p. 261, "Casting Away Hin-
drances," looks much like an expansion of the N ivar a 1}. a-
pahana-vagga (I. ii. 1-10).
The Chinese may have had an Ariguttara, but it probably
bore no closer likeness to the Pali work so eallad than the
D ha mm ap ad a translated by Professor Beal resembles the
text edited by Professor Fausbll.
In the Samacitta-vagga (II. iv. 2) of the Ariguttara
there is a very interesting little sutta on filial piety, in which
it is insisted that no adequate return can be made by children
to their parents, even tbough they should perform for them
the most menial offices. The sutta also points out the
duty of children to look after the spiritual welfare of their
parents (see also III. 31). There seems to be some re-
miniscence of a northern version of this su tta in J apanese
Buddhist books. The San-kai-ri quotas the Bussetsu
Ko-ko-kio as the authority for the following piece of advice
to dutiful children :-" Although a son should provide for
his parents a hundred kinds of the cboicest food suited to
the palate, and though he caused their bodies to be arrayed
in magnificent garments, and though he bear them on his
sboulders from place to place, and furnish them with every
sort of amusement and happiness, . . . beyond all this they
should ever seek to induce them to render due bornage to the
BE:MARKB.
xi
three precious thinge-Buddha, Buddhist rites, and the
also to realize clearly their future destination."
In regard to this subject, the F u b o- o n J i u-k i 6 has a
remark that I have met with somewhere in PAli, "that if one
were to estimate the value of one sho (about a quart and
a half) of the mother's milk, it would be more than ten
thousand eight hundred and fifty k ok u 8 of ricc j and if
estimated in rice stalks, it would make twenty-thrce thousand
bundles j and if ealeulatad in linen cloth, it would be moro
than three thousand three h undred and seventy stepa or
measure" (The CH RY 8 AN TH E ltf U M, a mon th ly roagazinc
for Japan and the Far East, April1882, pp. 172, 173).
In the PAli Text Society's Journal for 1885 I have
discussed the modern versions of the interesting story of
"Death's Messengers" in .the Devad.ta-vagga, III. 35, 1-4.
But of these and other interesting mattera I shall have
more to say when theA li gu tta ra-N i kAy a is completed;
the present instalment, however, will show the necessity of
publishing the whole as soon as possible.
The Sinhalese MSS. contain, at the end of the Tika-nipAta,
U d d ana 8 for the first three ni pa tas. The Phayre MS.
has an U d d Ana only for the Tika-nipAta.
The text of these U d d An as is corrupt in many places, and
though it ha8 been compared with the vaggas themselves, it
is stiil not free from error.
The Tika-nipata UddS.na does not go beyond the Mangala-
vagga.
The Acelaka-vagga probably included only sutta8 151,
152; so that the ten sultas 153-162 made a second vagga,
xii
PBELIMINARY REMARKB.
while No. 163 constituted a third vagga, a mere "tag," as at
the end of the Atthavasa-vagga, Il. xvii. 3, 4, 5, p. 100.
In conclusion, I take the opportunity of thanking my
friend Dr. Rhys Davids for valuable assistance while the
work was going through the press. My best thanks are
also due to M. L. Feer for collating the U ddana with
the Paris MS., to SubhO.ti Unni\nse for reading the Eka
and Duka nipatas with his own manuscript, and to Dr.
Trenckner, of Copenhagen, for the loan of his ~ a l u a b l e
transcript of the Anguttara. Though difficult to read, it
has been of very great service.
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PRELIJWU.RY R.EluB.J:8
CoB.B.BCI'IONS
I. EKA-NIPATA
I. Rt-PA VAGGA
II. VAGGA
III. AIAliKANiYA VAGGA
IV. AllANTA VAGGA
V. VAGGA
VI. Acca.uu.s.&.NoHiTA uoo.&.
VII. VDUY.iB.A.liBHA VAGGA
VIII. VAGGA
IX. PAKiD.&. VAGGA
X. XI. AllHAJOlA. VAGGA .
XII. ANiPArri VAGGA .
XIII. EKA.PUGGALA VAGGA
XIV. ETADAGGA VAGGA
xv. AnHiN.&. uoo.&.
XVI. EIADHAKKA VAGGA
XVII. :Bi.rA VAGGA
XVIII. MAxxliALI VAGGA .
XIX. APPAKA.TrAJ:A VAGGA
xx. XXI. JHANA VAGGA
II. DUKA-NIPATA.
I. KAKKAI.iB.A.,A VAGGA
II. ADH.IJ:AB.A,A VAGGA
III. :SALA V AGGA
IV. SAKACITrA VAGGA
P.&OR
vii
xv
1-40
1
3
5
6
8
10
12
14
15
16
20
22
23
24
30
30
33
35
38
47-100
47
52
59
61
X lV
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
V. PArusi VAOOA.
VI. PuooALA VAOOA
VII. Smnu VAOOA
VIII. NnrrrrA VAOOA
IX. DHiliiiA. VAOOA
X. BiLA VAOGA
XI. Asi VAOOA
XII. AYiCANA VAOOA
XIII. DiNA VAOOA
XIV. SANTHiRA VAOOA
XV. KoDHA VAOOA.
XVI. ATTHAVABA VAOOA
III. TIKA-NIPATA o
I. BiLA VAGOA
II. RATIIArlu VAOOA
III. PuooALA vAooA
IV. DEVADfl'rA VAOOA
V. CtljA VAOOA
VI. VAOOA
VII. MARi VAOOA 0
VIII. ANANDA VAOOA
IX. nooAo
X. nooA
XI. SurnoDm vAooA
XII ... h.inJIA nooA
XIII. KusiNAR.A nooA
XIV. YonH.iJin VA.GOA
xv. MAl!lOALA VAOOA
XVI. ACELAKA VAGOA
UDDANA.
INDEX OP SUJIJECTB.
INDEX OP P:&OPER N iliEB
INDEX OP GlTHAS
PAOS
71
76
81
82
83
84
86
89
91
93
95
98
101-300
101
106
118
132
150
155
173
215
229
239
258
265
274
284
292
295
300
305
331
334
CORRECTIONS.
Page11, 1. 10 riiMI kusala. Page 164, 1. 6 ,-,ad rijamahimatta.
"
u, 1. 32
"
bojjhaitg:l.
..
154, 1. 16
..
hahuft.
..
24, 1. H
..
'Wbhinal)l.
..
166, 1. 24
..
jhitol)l.
"
41, 1. 6
..
somatikammo.
..
166, 1. 25
..
aiiiio.taro.
" 44,
1. 28
..
patisambhicLl.
..
162, 1. 28
..
kule.
..
68, 1. 21
..
dukkhii.yo.
"
163, 1. 2
..
brnhmal}o.
"
64, 1. U-15" 1obhakkhoy:lyo.
..
166, 1. 18
..
jil.tiv:ldcno.
..
82, 1. 28
..

..
176, 1. 1
"
ilpodhiltu.
"
87, 11. 19,32 .. uppiicLlyo.
..
184, 1. 13
"
nisid:lmi.
"
96, 1. 19
..
mliy:l.
"
184, 1. 20
"
cankamilni.
"
98, 1. 28
"

..
187, 1. 36
..
aegalakol)l.
..
100, 1. 16
..
thambh11880.
..
199, 1. 11
..
up:lrambhoq1.
..
113, 1. 17
..
mattoiiiill.
..
210, 1. 33
..
jiltar0.p11880.
..
122, 1. 8
..
pngga1:l.
..
228,1. 24
..
mahiddhiko.
..
123, 1. 32
..
-uppadiinen:l.
..
236,11.10, 11" toth:l .
"
124, 1. 6
..
kopaii.
..
266, 1.
7
"
piitubh:lvo.
..
128, 1. 17
..
apassarp
..
286, 1. 29
..
duggandho.
..
136, 1. 30
..

..
165, 11. 28, 29 ; p. 156, 11. 22, 23
..
U6,1. 4
..
assutavil. are to be read as verae :-
..
147,1 9
"
jaridhammd.
Yo' dha kilyenoaaiiiiamo vD.cilya uda
"
161, l 8
..
1111mpassomiinena
ee tasa
..
162, 1. 18
..
vaq!Jbanti.
tasaa petasaa, etc
"
162, 1. 31
..
fultil!llilghil.
.
ANGUTrARA NIKA YA.
Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammA sambuddhassa.
EKA-NIP 1 TA.
I.
1. E vaip me sutaip. Ekatp. samayarp. Bho.gavA SA.vatthiyatp.
viharati Jetavane AnathapiiJ9-ikassa ArArne.
Tatra kho BhagavA bhikkhU rnantesi : Bhikkhavo ti.
Bhadante ti te bhikkhu Bho.gavato paccassosum. Bhago.vA
etad avoca :-
Naharp. bhikkhave afifiatp. ekarupam pi sarnanupassArni
yarp. evaiJl purisassa cittarp. pariydaya tiHhati yathayidatp.
bhikhhave itthirupatp..
ltthiruparp. bhikkho.ve purisassa cittatp. pariydaya
ti.
2. Nahatp. bhikkhave afifiatp. ekasaddam pi samanu-
passarni yatp. evatp. purisassa cittarp. pariyAdAya tiHhati
yathayidatp. bhikkhave itthiso.ddo.
ltthisaddo bhikkhave purisassa cittarp. pariydaya tighat1 ti.
3. Naha1p. bhikkhave ekagandham pi samanu-
passarni yarp. evo.rp. purisassa cittatp. pariydaya
yathayidatp. bhikkhave itthigandho.
ltthigandho bhikkhave purisassa cittatp. pariyadAya
ti.
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