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Instrument Air

A BeaconMeds Continuing Education Publication

A company within the Atlas Copco Group

Notes Notes on Using this Pamphlet: This pamphlet is presented to assist an engineer or medical facility contemplating the installation of an Instrument Air system as countenanced under the NFPA 99 Healthcare Facilities standard, 2005 version. Users are cautioned that this pamphlet is intended to be used in conjuction with the standard, which should be obtained from: National Fire Protection Association 1 Batterymarch Park Quincy, MA 02269-9101 Phone 1-800-344-3555 Internet www.NFPA.org

Users are cautioned to read the pamphlet and the standard carefully, and are encouraged to use the information herein as suited to the conditions of their project, where such modification does not conflict with applicable local standards. This pamphlet only encompasses the requirements of the NFPA 99 through the 2005 version. Please contact BeaconMedaes to ensure you are using the most recent version of this pamphlet. Any opinions expressed and/or interpretations given or implied are the sole responsibility of BeaconMedaes, and should not be relied upon without reference to the NFPA 99 standard and Local Authorities Having Jurisdiction. This edition August 2006 No Previous Editions

Comments on this booklet or on any aspect of medical gases are welcome and encouraged. Please send to mallen@ beaconmedaes.com

This Pamphlet in both print and electronic versions is Copyright 2006 BeaconMeds. All Rights are Reserved, and no reproduction may be made of the whole or any part without permission in writing. Distribution of the Electronic version is permitted only where the whole is transmitted without alteration, including this notice. Instrument Air Page 

Table of Contents Pneumatic power and medicine . 2 The purpose and the history of Medical Support gases. Why Change . 3 Why consider instrument air in lieu of Nitrogen? Dollars and Cents . 4 How to estimate the economics of an instrument air system. NFPA Rules for Instrument Air . 4 What is an instrument air system and what are the requirements as found in the standard. Design and installation . 8 Design issues with instrument air pipelines. Change of Use . 11 Converting nitrogen pipelines to run instrument air.

Abstract The paper reviews the background of the most recent addition to NFPAs piped gas systems and discusses when the use of Instrument Air might be appropriate. Also reviewed are the rules for the application. Design guidance is provided to allow a system to be sized and implemented.

Pneumatic power and Medicine Medical facilities are very familiar with compressed air. A typical facility uses any number of individual air systems for power and control. These are as diverse as the laundry compressor for running the washers and dryers, a sterilizer compressor for the autoclaves and decontamination systems in central sterile supply and the HVAC compressor for the pneumatic controls in the air conditioning system. Given how familiar hospitals are with compressed air, it seems odd that most North American hospitals of any size supply nitrogen into the operating rooms to run surgical tools - a task easily within the capabilities of an appropriate compressed air system. Compressed air systems require only occasional maintenance, the air is of course free, and there is no management required. By comparison, the nitrogen system is an unending hassle. The nitrogen is in cylinders or containers which must be purchased, inventoried, and changed. Since hustling the cylinders or containers is labor intensive, there is always an overhead in costs and labor associated with its use. Although the nitrogen system could be used for many purposes per the NFPA standard, the nitrogen gas is relatively expensive so it is not wise to use it for all the applications for which it might otherwise be appropriate. This leaves a quandary when the facility wants pneumatic power in places like the morgue or central sterile supply. Often the unsatisfactory solution is to install separate local systems, which is expensive and increases the maintenance burden. Compressed air was in fact the original choice when gas - powered tools first came into the operating room, and only in North America was compressed air supplanted by Nitrogen. The reason for this decision is obscured by time, but most likely derives from difficulties with the quality of the air available at the time. Piped air was typically wet, often oily and sometimes dirty, none of which is good for high speed turbine tools. Nitrogen was the driest, cleanest gas they could easily substitute, so it became the gas of choice. Over time, primarily through received knowledge, it acquired the patina of a de facto standard. In fact, Nitrogen for tools has never been required by any

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Instrument Air

published standard. Nevertheless, Engineers continue even today to design, and facilities continue to install, nitrogen systems for the driving of surgical tools. In most of the world, compressed air never left the O.R. In the United Kingdom for instance, it is common to install a 7 bar or 13 bar surgical air system specifically for driving tools alongside the 4 bar medical air for treating patients. There is a vestigial holdover from the use of compressed air for surgical tools in use in North America even today. Surgical tool hoses are still often fitted with a quick connect fitting on the end called a Schrder connector - originally manufactured by the Schrder Automotive Division, and used in garages to run their air-powered tools (the historic origin of our elegant surgical tools is not medical, but industrial). Oddly, although the pipelines changed from air to nitrogen, Schraeder never did make the change. Even today the version of that connector in most common use is stamped Air - Schrder itself never made a nitrogen-specific connector, and only very recently have their successor companies created one. Although Nitrogen systems have become the general standard, there have always been a small number of North American facilities willing to question this. These facilities have installed air systems to drive tools, following their own instincts in light of an absence of guidance in the NFPA or CSA standards. The trend has accelerated somewhat in the last decade, and in the 2002 edition NFPA for the first time included guidance on these systems. Although that might make it seem to be something new, in truth it is actually a return to something very old. When the Instrument Air system first appeared in the 2002 NFPA 99, there was no Instrument Air terminal unit, and thus no outlets, controls or hoses were available. This was a problem which prevented many facilities from seriously looking at the Instrument Air option. In 2005, the Compressed Gas Association resolved this with the assignment of the CGA 2080 connection to Instrument Air. The only remaining hurdle therefore is the lack of design guidance, which this publication should help address. Why Change? There are two reasons to consider an Instrument Air system, and it is important to note that neither is specifically medical. In fact, from the medical standpoint, there is very little to choose between Instrument Air and nitrogen. Both will drive the tools, both (as contemplated by NFPA 99) have similar dryness, cleanliness, and operating pressures. Except for the costs involved, there is no reason a facility could not simply continue to use nitrogen. Instrument Air

So the most compelling reason to consider an Instrument Air system over a Nitrogen system is dollars and cents. The cost of operating a nitrogen system can be surprisingly high, depending on the amount of nitrogen used. Nitrogen sources imply three particular costs: 1. The cost of the gas itself. 2. The cost of the demurrage (rental of the cylinders). 3. The management cost, including the labor involved in hustling the cylinders from the dock to the manifold, attaching and detaching them, and moving the empties back to the dock, plus the management involved in keeping track of cylinder inventories and reordering). While it is possible to reduce these costs in many cases by using cryogenic liquid in place of gas cylinders, the costs are never completely eliminated, and the installation of a large cryogenic source system may be problematic in other ways. Generally speaking, an Instrument Air system is going to be more expensive to purchase than a similar capacity manifold or bulk liquid system. However, the Instrument Air itself is less costly on a volume to volume basis, so the Instrument Air system will pay for itself over time. Exactly when the crossover will occur will vary. In some cases, the crossover may be so far out that an Instrument Air system would be a questionable investment. In other cases the payback is so quick that Instrument Air would be worth retrofitting even where a nitrogen system is already in place. In the next chapter entitled Dollars and Cents, we give some guidance on how to calculate the crossover point for your facility. The other reason for considering Instrument Air is the variety of applications for which it can be used. NFPA has continuously sought to keep medical gas systems separate from all other systems and to ensure that the medical gases are not compromised by use for other purposes. NFPA 99 2005 5.1.3.4.2 states Central supply systems for oxygen, medical air, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and all other patient medical gases shall not be piped to, or used for, any purpose except patient care application. The practical effect of this prohibition is found in the Annex A.5.1.3.4.2 Prohibited uses of medical gases include fueling torches, blowing down or drying any equipment such as lab equipment endoscopy or scopes, or any other purposes. Also prohibited is using the oxygen or medical air to raise, lower or otherwise operate booms or other devices. Certain of these prohibitions are controversial, but the difficulty they cause can be illustrated. Consider endosurgical areas or central sterile supply. Here, a gas source is desirable to blow out or dry instruments during Page 

cleaning and sterilization. Medical Air cannot be used for this purpose, so the only acceptable alternative has been to install nitrogen. Aside from the cost of nitrogen, this use implies releasing quantities of Nitrogen into the room. Although Nitrogen is itself non-toxic, the release of too much nitrogen will dilute or displace the oxygen in the air and can cause asphyxiation. Nitrogen is therefore not ideal for use in workspace applications such as this, whereas Instrument Air is very suitable. Applications for Instrument Air are discussed in NFPA 99 5.1.3.8.2.1: Instrument Air shall be permitted to be used for any medical support purpose (e.g. to operate tools, air driven booms, pendants or similar applications) and (if appropriate to the procedures) to be used in laboratories. Whereas Medical Air is and Nitrogen may be prohibited from or undesirable in certain applications, Instrument Air may be used for any of them. The simple conclusion is that Instrument Air offers a very worthwhile design option. It is not for every facility, because in some it will not offer benefits sufficient to justify the additional up-front costs. But in our studies to date, we are surprised how often and at how low a nitrogen usage we can justify these systems purely on the money saved. Our experience suggests it is an option every facility (including facilities already using nitrogen) should at least examine.

Dollars and Cents A decision to use an Instrument Air system will hinge on the payback for most facilities. This can be calculated with reasonable accuracy if a few questions can be answered. Clearly, a facility which has some history with an existing nitrogen system will be at an advantage when collecting many of these answers, but even while a project is only in planning one can make a satisfactory estimate. Detail 4 is a listing of the data required. Once you have obtained this data, your BeaconMedaes Sales Consultant has a pre configured spreadsheet which they can use to help you calculate the relative costs and system payback. NFPA Rules for Instrument Air The requirements for Instrument Air sources are found in the NFPA 99 under 5.1.3.8, and a few other requirements are found throughout the document. Instrument Air and nitrogen under the standard are meant to be opposite sides of the same coin. Indeed, a simple guiding principle for working with these systems is that if in doubt, do what you would have done for Nitrogen, and you will probably have done the right thing. The one place where an Instrument Air system is unique is in the design of the source. Instrument Air source equipment is unique in its form, permitted options and operating requirements. An overall view of the components of an Instrument Air source under NFPA 99 are shown in Detail 5 & 6.

Detail 4 Calculating Comparitive Costs for Nitrogen vs. Instrument Air A B C D E F G H I J K L Page  Number of cylinders or containers used per Month (if you are evaluating a facility which is not yet in operation, see Detail 12) Cost of each cylinder Cost of each Container (if used) Cost of cylinder rental (demurrage) per month Cost of container rental (demurrage) per month Labor rate / Hour for the person changing the cylinders or containers (include benefits and overhead costs if appropriate) Estimated time required to complete a standard cylinder or container change to ONE side of the manifold, including time to travel to and from the manifold location. (If your estimate is in minutes, 60 for hours) Labor cost per change Number of cylinders or containers on ONE side of the manifold. (if you are evaluating a facility which is not yet in operation, see Detail X) Other known costs (delivery charges, supplier labor charges, manifold maintenance or repair, etc.) Ensure these charges are per month. (if you only know overall charges per year, 12 for monthly average) Cost of Power per kWh Years for amortization of capital # $ $ $ $ $

Hours $ #

$ yrs. Instrument Air

Primary Supply Cylinder Header (manifold)

Secondary Supply Cylinder Header

Quality Control

Monitoring

Medical Air in Cylinders, purchased per USP. Medical Air in Cylinders, purchased per USP. Reserve Supply in Use Reserve Low Pressure Low Pressure High Oil indicators on Filter. Dew point Monitoring, alarm at -30C (-22F)

200 psi+ Compressor(s)

200 psi+ Compressor(s)

Oil Separation Dryer for -40 Filtration to 0.01 Charcoal Odor/Taste Removal

Lag Alarm

Detail 5 : Instrument Air Source System configurations (Per NFPA 99 ) The particular aspects unique to Instrument Air can be summarized: 1. Compressor Type: A compressor used for Instrument Air may be of any type which can produce a pressure greater than 200 psig. Instrument Air compressors do not have to be oilless or oilfree (unlike compressors for Medical Air) but may include lubricated types. This is because the high pressure required makes lubrication inescapable, and since Instrument Air is not breathed by the patient or mixed with oxygen, any oil (should it enter the system) is less hazardous. The extraordinary pressure requirement comes from the need to ensure that the system can emulate the traditional nitrogen system, which may operate as high as 185 psig. 185 psig is the pressure at which the Instrument Air pipeline system is designed to operate. Clearly, a compressor with a top pressure of 175 psig will not be able to achieve this requirement. 2. Specific Filtration and Purification: Although a lubricated compressor is permitted, oil is not permitted in the system. Instrument Air sources must have coalescing filters to remove liquid oil and activated carbon absorbers to eliminate vapor and gaseous oil. A particulate filter is also required with a nominal pore size of 0.01. 3. Dry to -40: Recall that a major reason for the historic Instrument Air transition to nitrogen was wet air. In applications like tool drive, the dryness of the air is particularly significant, as the rapid expansion of air in the tools can produce adiabatic cooling which can condense moisture where it would otherwise never appear. Therefore, unlike medical air, Instrument Air must be dried to a nominal -40dew point. This will necessitate desiccant dryers in virtually all cases. This combination of filters and dryers is intended to produce air which will comply with or exceed the specifications of the Instrument Society of America standard S-7.0.01 Quality Standard for Instrument Air. 4. A secondary or backup system. Unlike other medical gas systems, failure of an Instrument Air system is unlikely to be fatal. Nevertheless, the system is critical to any number of procedures, and if the procedure was suddenly terminated the patient(s) could be at risk. Thus a backup, just like any other medical gas system, is required. Unlike other systems however, the requirement for that backup is much less stringent. Uniquely, an Instrument Air compressor may include a redundant compressor(s) (similar to that required for Medical air) or it may be seconded by a bank of cylinders sufficient for one hours operation (a hybrid configuration). The allowance for a cylinder secondary offers a much less Page 

Pressure Relief Valve Guage ASME Sight Glass Automatic Drain Manual Drain Intake(s) Relief Valve Compressor(s) Receiver Check Valve Aftercooler/ air dryer Isolation Valve Air Treatment & Control Monitoring Source Valve Relief Valve Reserve Source Inlet Isolation Valves Cylinder Reserve Header 5.1.3.4.8

Change Indicators Charcoal Adsorbers Regulator

Filter

Outlet Isolation Valve or Check

Pressure Indicator

System Pressure Switch/Sensor

Inlet Isolation means (valve shown) Compressor

Demand Check Source Valve

Inlet Isolation Valve(s) Aftercoolers Inlet Isolation Valve(s) Outlet Isolation Valve(s)

Outlet Isolation Valve(s) D.P. Dryer(s) Dew Point Monitor Demand Check

Legend

Ball Valve

Automatic Trap & Drain

Check Valve

Pressure Indicator

Pressure Relief Valve

Automatic Trap & Drain

Demand Check

Pressure Regulator

Detail 6 : Instrument Air Source Systems (Per NFPA 99 A.5.1.3.8 )

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Elements of an Instrument Air Source After NFPA 99 2002 Figure A-5.1.3.8

Filter with Change Indicator

Instrument Air

Note (3)

Thermal High ShutWater in down Separator

Note (1)

Note (1) Recommended when the compressor is water cooled or a water cooled aftercooler is used.

2ndry ChangeHeader over Low

Dew point High

Cylinder x Cylinder manifold

Detail 7.1 : A pipeline label for Instrument Air Instrument Air

Instrument Air, Hybrid

These requirements taken together mean that the ideal Instrument Air outlet is the CGA DISS outlet, and this is the outlet BeaconMeds recommends for all Instrument Air terminals, hoses and accessories.

Instrument Air, duplex/multiplex compressor

Cylinder x Cylinder x Cylinder Manifold

c. That when an outlet is operated at pressures greater than 80 psig, that the outlet be of the DISS (threaded) type, or include a pressure interlock to prevent the hose from flying out of the outlet when disengaged.

Source Type

Source

High Press or Vac

High Press

b. That when a single gas is operated at multiple pressures, the outlet for each pressure be non interchangeable with the outlet for another pressure.

Low Press

Low Press or Vac

a. Each outlet for a specific gas must be provided with an outlet not interchangeable with any outlet for another gas.

Note (2) Recommended when appropriate for the compressor or pump.

6. Outlets for Instrument Air must be non interchangeable with other medical gases. It is not appropriate to use medical air outlets or nitrogen outlets in an Instrument Air system, even if they are relabelled. NFPA has three requirements for any outlet:

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Detail 7.2 : Instrument Air Source Alarms

Reserve in Use

5. The distribution system for Instrument Air will typically be similar to that for Nitrogen, but given its many potential uses, it may also be significantly more complex. The actual design will of course depend on the facilitys convenience and preferences. Some options are illustrated in Details 8-10.

Reserve Low

Note (2)

Lag in Use

Note (2)

Note (1)

Although Instrument Air systems are clearly intended to be compressor driven (otherwise the operating economies will be lost) it is possible to use a standard medical gas style manifold to source an Instrument Air system as well.

Note (3) Single signal alternate to having each signal on the master. Must activate when any signal within the double lines in that row activates.

Where this cylinder secondary is applied, there is a special allowance in the standard for placing the cylinder header with the Instrument Air compressor itself. This is an exception to the general rule that cylinders are not permitted to be in the same room with compressors or pumps. It applies only to the active header used to back up an Instrument Air compressor. There is no exception for loose cylinders, even if those are intended for the Instrument Air system, so these must be stored in an appropriate room just like all other medical gas cylinders.

High Water in Receiver

2ndry Header In Use Note (1) Note (1)

2ndry Header Low

Note (3)

System Fault

expensive option for installing smaller systems, and yet does not greatly reduce the operational safety of the system overall if properly alarmed.

7. Instrument Air has its own color coding and labelling (see Detail 7.1). The color for Instrument Air is a red ground with white lettering, and the abbreviation is Instrument Air. Standard pressure is 160-185 psig through the pipeline, and the nonstandard pressure rules will apply for Instrument Air systems operated at different pressures (see NFPA 99 5.1.5.15, 5.1.11.1, 5.1.11.2.2, 5.1.11.3.2). 8. Alarm requirements for Instrument Air are similar in most respects to those for any medical gas system (local, master and area alarms are all required). However, the unique configurations permitted for the source do imply

some specific alarm signals (see Detail 7.2). Design and Installation Instrument Air systems are designed in the same manner as any medical gas system (please refer to the BeaconMeds Medical Gas Design Guide, Chapter 9 for Medical Support Gases for detailed instructions). The design of an Instrument Air system and the selection of the source requires knowing all the many applications which it is intended to serve. The first step in the design
Line Pressure Indicator

Dew Point Monitor C D.C. Isolating Valve Pressure Indicator Line Pressure Regulators Instrument Air Source Isolation Valve

Source Valve

D.C. D.C.

To High Pressure Terminals

Line Pressure Alarm Switch/Sensor Pressure Relief Valves,

High Pressure Line Pressure Indicator Dew Point Monitor C D.C. Isolating Valve Pressure Indicator Line Pressure Regulators Isolation Valve Pressure Relief Valves, Line Pressure Alarm Switch/Sensor Source Valve D.C. D.C. To Low Pressure Terminals

Low Pressure Detail 8 A Dual Pressure Arrangement per NFPA 99 5.1.3.4.6

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Instrument Air

Area Alarm Switch/Sensor Future Valve D.C. D.C.

Service Valve

Remote, pressure controlled Outlet(s)

Zone Valve IAir Control Panel Pressure controlled outlet on the Control Panel Line Pressure Indicator

Dew Point Monitor C D.C. Isolating Valve Pressure Indicator Line Pressure Regulators Instrument Air Source Isolation Valve

Source Valve

D.C. D.C.

Line Pressure Alarm Switch/Sensor Pressure Relief Valves,

High Pressure Detail 9 Local Pressure Control

must be to determine what all the applications demand in terms of pressure and flow, and then to determine the size of compressor required. An Instrument Air system will fall into either (and in some cases both) of two types. Systems for use at high pressures (e.g. to substitute for Nitrogen) will be designed as would Nitrogen systems. Systems for exclusively lower pressure applications (e.g. for labs, central sterile supply, etc.) can be laid out like any other pressure gas system. If it is the desire of the facility to supply both high and Instrument Air

low pressure applications from the same source of supply, there are some considerations which will affect the design. NFPA 99 5.1.3.4.6 discourages the construction of what is termed a distributed pressure system in favor of two distinct pipeline systems divided at the source and separately provided with all the necessary controls (see Detail 8). Nevertheless, the language is sufficiently open, and the application sufficiently unique that some degree of local pressure control may be permissible. If local pressure control is desired, the design of the system would roughly follow the current practice in the Page 

Area Alarm Switch/Sensor Future Valve D.C. D.C.

Service Valve

Secondary Regulator (Provide one for each device)

Device Regulator (Fixed or adjustable output) Uncontrolled Outlet(s) Adapter fitting Outlet

Zone Valve

To Device(s)

Line Pressure Indicator Dew Point Monitor C D.C. Isolating Valve Pressure Indicator Line Pressure Regulators Instrument Air Source Isolation Valve High Pressure Pressure Relief Valves, Line Pressure Alarm Switch/Sensor Source Valve D.C. D.C.

Detail 10 Secondary Pressure Control


O.R. There, the pipeline delivers the maximum pressure to ensure the best possible flow rate, and Instrument Air control panels are placed where necessary for control of the pressure to the tools. Similar local pressure control can be provided for other devices (see Detail 9). A third option does exist but is rarely the preferred implementation. This is illustrated in Detail 10, and simply involves the piping of the Instrument Air to uniform outlets operated at the standard 185 psig, and then regulating each device with its own portable regulator fitted to the device or the permanent outlet. Page 10 It is also possible to blend the elements of the systems shown in these three figures to create a hybrid system appropriate to the facilitys needs. If a multiple pressure system is contemplated, be sure to size each of the branches at the appropriate pressure. Only for the purpose of sizing the source should they be considered as one system. In the layout process, outlets are placed first. In O.R. settings where tool drive is required, a pressure control box is placed on a convenient wall, and includes one outlet. A second and occasionally a third outlet are placed in the closest possible proximity to the O.R. table. These Instrument Air

are often found on the ceiling columns or booms. These outlets may be slaved from the wall mounted control or they may employ a scaled down version of the control itself in the ceiling column or boom. Mounting the controller on the column or boom is generally superior when flow is considered, but less desirable from the viewpoint of staff access and ease of use. After outlets are placed, the actual piping can be run and pipe sizing determined. This aspect of design is covered in detail in Chapter 9 of the BeaconMeds Design Guide for Medical Gases. Change of Use The economic benefits of Instrument Air can be surprising, and of course it is the facility which is already struggling with the costs of a nitrogen system who is likely to see them most clearly. NFPA does provide for a system to be converted from one gas to another in a process termed Change of Use. Change of Use requires that a system originally intended for one gas and therefore made non-interchangeable for that gas be converted so that it is equally non-interchangeable for the new gas. This means changing the source, changing the outlets, changing the demand checks on alarm components, relabelling and retesting as if the system was new. A conversion from nitrogen to Instrument Air is very feasible under these rules. Since the pipeline itself need not be disturbed, the cost of such a conversion is not excessive. Sizing and Selecting an Instrument Air Source Any Instrument Air source will consist of a primary source (usually a compressor) and a reserve source (a second compressor or a manifold header). Each element is sized separately and by its own rules. To size the primary compressor, there are two considerations: first, the compressor must be large enough to drive all the tools, and second we dont want to make the compressor any larger than is absolutely necessary. This is particularly true since there is a very large diversity in Instrument Air usage and in fact the average Instrument Air compressor will not run very much. To express this another way, when the Instrument Air is needed, there must be enough of it, but it is only typically needed in short bursts, so the system may sit idle for long periods. The picture can be further complicated if the Instrument Air is being used for purposes in addition to driving surgical tools. Naturally, some of the other applications may place more steady demand on the system and change the diversity required. Instrument Air

The first consideration in sizing is to ensure that the tools which are likely to be in simultaneous use are covered. These tools can be very demanding, with typical usages ranging from 225-425 lpm (8-15 scfm). At least this quantity of air must be available, so this is the minimum size for a system. More than one location will involve some degree of simultaneous use, and the calculation we recommend is that used by the HTM 2022 standard from the U.K., which allows for one tool at 100% and all remaining tools at 25%. The formula used is : 350 + ((n-1) x 87.5) Where n is the number of locations using the system. Where 350 lpm is taken as the base load for a tool, and n is the number of locations piped with Instrument Air or the number of tools. If other applications are intended to use Instrument Air, they must be added to the tool demand based on a knowledge of the actual demand from that application. Some examples might include: operating pneumatic brakes for booms, which use negligible amounts of air and can be ignored as a capacity requirement; operating tools in the morgue, which might be treated like another tool-using location; operating a pneumatic O.R. table, which would have to be assessed based on a knowledge of the table itself; general lab uses, which might easily be greater than the use of air for tools when totalled. The sizing of the reserve is identical if a duplex compressor is used as the source configuration. If the source configuration is a compressor with a cylinder header as reserve (a hybrid configuration), then the secondary must contain one hours supply. This is most easily assessed by taking the total demand calculated for the primary source and multiplying it by 60 (minutes to hours), then dividing by 6,200 l (220 scfm) to determine the number of cylinders required in the secondary (Detail 12 allows you to determine this with minimal calculations). In the rare event that a manifold source will be used, this will be sized using a simple calculation of one cylinder for each ordinary O.R., and two for each O.R. intended for orthopedic or neurological surgery. Both sides of the manifold will be identically sized. If other applications are also going to be served form the manifold, they must be assessed individually. The selection of the Instrument Air source may be made from Detail 13, which also will link you to the necessary information for system dimensions. Conclusions and Cautions We believe that ultimately Instrument Air, especially when Page 11

(Locations scale reflects Tool use only, HTM 2022 Sizing Method)

Source Ranges Instrument Air

(3) 7.5 Hp.

(3) 10 Hp. Quadruplex

Triplex Duplex 10 Hp. (2) 10 Hp.* Compressor(s) 16 Secondary Cylinder Counts 7.5 Hp. (2) 7.5 Hp.* 5 7 11

Note: Larger I. Air systems are possible. Please contact BeaconMeds for information.

Hybrid Systems

7-14 14x14 6-13 13x13 6-12 12x12 5-11 11x11 5-10 10x10 4-9 9x9 Cylinder 4-8 8x8 Manifolds 3-7 7x7 6x6 3-6 5x5 2-5 4x4 2-4 3x3 1-3 2x2 1-2

Source Type Legend

10

20

Number of Locations piped with Instrument Air


Notes: The ranges given for manifolds reflect a low (dark blue) and a high (white) estimate. The low estimate applies only if all locations are of the general O.R. type, the high estimate applies if all are of the specialty O.R. type. Factor your selection based on the proportion of each in the project. * Hybrid configurations marked with a * are systems with two compressors of this size as the primary source. They are not duplex systems in the usual meaning of one compressor in service, one on standby, but have two compressors available in the primary role with cylinders as the secondary.
Detail 12 : Instrument Air Source Selector compared to Nitrogen, is a superior choice for any facility which needs high pressure gas for any reason. In the long run, the benefits are so compelling that we can anticipate nitrogen systems disappearing from the scene, entirely replaced by Instrument Air. However, that is some time in the future, and any facility built since at least the 1970s probably has a nitrogen system already in place. Although the economics of Instrument Air are compelling, they are far more complex when a legacy system must also be considered. Instrument Air systems are more costly initially, but the gas is far less expensive per liter. This means that there is a payback for virtually any Instrument Air installation, whether new or a change of use. The question is the time Page 12 frame for that payback. Naturally, the general rule will be the more gas used, the faster the payback. Small facilities using very little gas may find the payback too far in the future to justify the initial outlay, large facilities with heavy usage may find the savings grand enough to justify even a complicated change of use program. The only way to know is to do the math. We highly recommend that every medical gas design engineer add Instrument Air to their repertoire, and in future evaluate every facility as a potential candidate. They will find in most cases Instrument Air is a money saver for their client. Facilities who have to work to keep their nitrogen Instrument Air

systems from going empty should also look closely at the possibilities of performing a change of use conversion. They are likely to find the economics more favorable than they expected. That middle range of facilities whose nitrogen usage is a nuisance but not high enough to justify the costs of conversion will be the ones who will have to refuse change of use. Should they ever be fortunate enough to renovate their O.R. or build new, they will certainly find Instrument Air very attractive, but they may be best advised to leave

well enough alone in the interim. There are other possibilities for reducing the cost and labor involved with nitrogen which may be a half-way solution for such facilities. These involve conversion from cylinder (gaseous) sources to container (liquid) sources. While nitrogen will always be more expensive than compressed air, the reduction in cost can be significant, and the reduction in labor can be greater yet. More details on these systems can be obtained in the BeaconMedaes Applications Guide to Cryogenic Liquid Manifolds available through your BeaconMedaes representative.

Detail 13 System Selection Table, Instrument Air Compressors Capacity @ 200 psig SCFM 16.5 24 33 48 49.5 72 16.5 24 33 48 LPM 467 679 934 1,359 1,401 2,038 467 679 934 1,359 Format Duplex1 Duplex1 Triplex1 Triplex1 Quadruplex1 Quadruplex1 Simplex2 Simplex2 Duplex2 Duplex2 HP 7.5 10 7.5 10 7.5 10 7.5 10 7.5 10 NFPA Complete System Envelope Dimensions (inches) Cyl. Count NA NA NA NA NA NA 5 7 Width 103.5 103.5 138 138 172.5 172.5 89.5 89.5 Height 84.5 84.5 84.5 84.5 84.5 84.5 85 85 Depth 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 Information Sheet SSB-120-10 SSB-120-10 SSB-120-11 SSB-120-11 SSB-120-12 SSB-120-12 SSB-120-10 SSB-120-10 Page 15 15 17 17 19 19 21 21

Hybrid Systems

Call for information

Notes 1. Capacites are shown as NFPA capacities with one compressor running and one in standby. Capacity shown is net system capacity, not simple compressor capacity (systems losses are already deducted). 2. Capacites are shown as NFPA capacities with compressor(s) running and cylinder header in standby. Capacity shown is net system capacity, not simple compressor(s) capacity (systems losses are already deducted).

Instrument Air

Page 13

This product has been designed to meet U.S. NFPA 99, latest edition. Modifications made to meet current CSA Standards may result in changes to the product's weight and physical dimensions. Please contact BeaconMeds at (704) 588-0854 or (704) 588-4949 (fax) for further information.

SSB-120-10
Page 1 of 2 10/01/06

Instrument Air Duplex Single Point Connection (SPC) Base Mount Systems (7 - 10 HP)
SPECIFICATION
SPC (Single Point Connection) System Design The instrument air system shall be of a single point connection base mounted design consisting of two compressor modules with dryers, and a single control module with control panel, air receiver, filtration system and oil/water condensate separator. Each module has a maximum base width of 34.50" (88 cm), and be fully compliant with the latest edition of NFPA 99. The modules shall be assembled as one unit with single point connections for air discharge, electrical and condensate drain. Compressor/Dryer Module (Compressor, Drive, Motor, Piping, Dryer) The compressor shall be a high pressure "oil-lubricated" continuous duty rated type. The design shall be two staged, air-cooled, reciprocating type with corrosion resistant reed type valves with stainless steel reeds. Both oil scrapper ring and piston rings shall be made from long lasting special cast iron and designed for continuous duty operation. The crankshaft shall be constructed of forged steel and fully supported on both ends by heavy duty ball bearings and seals. The crankcase shall be constructed of gray cast iron. Maximum heat dissipation shall be achieved through cast iron cylinders with external cooling vanes. Cylinder sleeves are not required. Both low and high pressure pistons are made from cast aluminum with chrome-moly piston pins. Second stage cylinder head shall be equipped with a wired shutdown switch for high discharge air temperature. The connecting rod shall be of a one-piece design. The compressor shall be v-belt driven through a combination flywheel/sheave and steel motor sheave with tapered bushing and protected by an OSHA approved totally enclosed belt guard. A sliding motor mounting base that is fully adjustable through twin adjusting screws shall achieve belt tensioning. The motor shall be a NEMA rated, open drip proof, 1800 RPM, with 1.15 service factor suitable for 208 or 230/460V electrical service. Each compressor shall have its own inlet air filter mounted on the first stage compressor heads. Discharge air from the first stage compressor cylinder passes through an air-cooled intercooler prior to entering the second stage. The second stage discharge air then passes through an air-cooled aftercooler designed for a maximum approach temperature of 12 F complete with moisture separator and zero loss automatic drain valve prior to entering the dryer. The compressor discharge line shall include a flex connector, safety relief valve, isolation valve, and check valve. The discharge air piping shall be of ASTM B-819 copper tubing, brass, and/or stainless steel. The discharge flex connector shall be braided 304 stainless steel, brass, or bronze. Each compressor has its own dedicated dryer. Each dryer is individually sized for peak calculated demand and capable of producing a -40 F (-40 C) pressure dew point. Dryer purge only occurs when its respective compressor is running. Upstream of the dryer will be a separator with a zero loss drain valve followed by a 0.01 micron coalescing filter. Both filters shall have element change indicators. Isolation System Each compressor and motor assembly shall be fully isolated from the main compressor module base by means of a four point, heavy duty, spring isolation system for a minimum of 95% isolation efficiency. Where required by local or state regulation, optional seismically restrained isolators can be provided at an additional cost. Each main compressor module base frame shall not exceed 34.50" in width. Control Module with Air Receiver/Filter/Regulator System The control module shall include a NEMA 12, U.L. labeled control system, duplexed final line filters, regulators, oil indicators, and a condensate oil/water separator and dew point monitor. All of the above shall be factory piped and wired in accordance with NFPA 99 and include valving to allow complete air receiver bypass and an air sampling port. The vertical air receiver shall be ASME Coded, National Board Certified, galvanized, rated for a minimum 250 PSIG design pressure and includes a liquid level gauge glass, safety relief valve, manual drain valve, and automatic solenoid drain valve. Control System The control system shall have an HMI touch screen control, automatic lead/lag sequencing with circuit breaker disconnects for each motor with external operators, full voltage motor starters, overload protection, 24V control circuit and hand-offauto selector switch for each compressor. Automatic alternation of both compressors based on first-on/first-off principle with provisions for simultaneous operation if required. Automatic activation of reserve unit, if required, will activate an audible alarm as well as a visual alarm on the HMI. The HMI displays service due, run hours for each compressor, system status, operating pressure, dew point and high discharge air temperature shutdown. A complete alarm and service history is available on the HMI. Dew Point Transmitter The control module shall incorporate a dew point transmitter that is mounted, pre-piped, wired to the control panel and displayed on the HMI touch screen. The transmitter probe shall be 316L SS with sintered stainless steel filter and thin film polymer sensor. The system accuracy shall be 2 C. Dew point alarm shall be factory set at -22 F (-30 C) per NFPA 99 with remote alarm contacts in the control panel. Statement of Warranty BeaconMeds warrants all Instrument Air Systems, to be free of defects in material and workmanship under normal use for a period not to exceed thirty (30) months from date of shipment, or twenty four (24) months from date of start-up.

BeaconMeds P. O. Box 7064

Charlotte, N. C. 28241 Phone: (704) 588-0854

Fax: (704) 588-4949

DUPLEX 7.5-10 BASE MOUNT

Page 15

This product has been designed to meet U.S. NFPA 99, latest edition. Modifications made to meet current CSA Standards may result in changes to the product's weight and physical dimensions. Please contact BeaconMeds at (704) 588-0854 or (704) 588-4949 (fax) for further information.

SSB-120-10
Page 2 of 2 10/01/06

Instrument Air System Specifications1


Complete System Model No. HPA-7D-D200 HPA-10D-D200
Notes:

HP 7 10

System Capacity2 200 psig 16.5 24

System3 BTU/HR 17,062 23,014

Receiver4 (Gallons) 200* 200*

Noise5 Level 76 79

System FLA 208V 46 60 230V 41 52 460V 20 26

1 Normal operating conditions at a maximum ambient of 105 F. Consult factory for higher ambient conditions. 2 All capacities are shown as NFPA system capacities (reserve compressor on standby) and are shown in Inlet Cubic Feet per Minute (ICFM). System losses subtracted from pump capacity. 3 All system BTU/HR is shown with reserve compressor on standby. 4 * Indicates standard receiver 5 All noise levels are shown in dB(A) and reflect one pump running.

Page 16

BeaconMeds P. O. Box 7064

Charlotte, N. C. 28241 Phone: (704) 588-0854

Fax: (704) 588-4949

This product has been designed to meet U.S. NFPA 99, latest edition. Modifications made to meet current CSA Standards may result in changes to the product's weight and physical dimensions. Please contact BeaconMeds at (704) 588-0854 or (704) 588-4949 (fax) for further information.

SSB-120-11
Page 1 of 2 10/01/06

Instrument Air Triplex Single Point Connection (SPC) Base Mount Systems (7 - 10 HP)
SPECIFICATION
SPC (Single Point Connection) System Design The instrument air system shall be of a single point connection base mounted design consisting of three compressor modules with dryers, and a single control module with control panel, air receiver, filtration system and oil/water condensate separator. Each module has a maximum base width of 34.50" (88 cm), and be fully compliant with the latest edition of NFPA 99. The modules shall be assembled as one unit with single point connections for air discharge, electrical and condensate drain. Compressor/Dryer Module (Compressor, Drive, Motor, Piping, Dryer) The compressor shall be a high pressure "oil-lubricated" continuous duty rated type. The design shall be two staged, air-cooled, reciprocating type with corrosion resistant reed type valves with stainless steel reeds. Both oil scrapper ring and piston rings shall be made from long lasting special cast iron and designed for continuous duty operation. The crankshaft shall be constructed of forged steel and fully supported on both ends by heavy duty ball bearings and seals. The crankcase shall be constructed of gray cast iron. Maximum heat dissipation shall be achieved through cast iron cylinders with external cooling vanes. Cylinder sleeves are not required. Both low and high pressure pistons are made from cast aluminum with chrome-moly piston pins. Second stage cylinder head shall be equipped with a wired shutdown switch for high discharge air temperature. The connecting rod shall be of a one-piece design. The compressor shall be v-belt driven through a combination flywheel/sheave and steel motor sheave with tapered bushing and protected by an OSHA approved totally enclosed belt guard. A sliding motor mounting base that is fully adjustable through twin adjusting screws shall achieve belt tensioning. The motor shall be a NEMA rated, open drip proof, 1800 RPM, with 1.15 service factor suitable for 208 or 230/460V electrical service. Each compressor shall have its own inlet air filter mounted on the first stage compressor heads. Discharge air from the first stage compressor cylinder passes through an air-cooled intercooler prior to entering the second stage. The second stage discharge air then passes through an air-cooled aftercooler designed for a maximum approach temperature of 12 F complete with moisture separator and zero loss automatic drain valve prior to entering the dryer. The compressor discharge line shall include a flex connector, safety relief valve, isolation valve, and check valve. The discharge air piping shall be of ASTM B-819 copper tubing, brass, and/or stainless steel. The discharge flex connector shall be braided 304 stainless steel, brass, or bronze. Each compressor has its own dedicated dryer. Each dryer is individually sized for peak calculated demand and capable of producing a -40 F (-40 C) pressure dew point. Dryer purge only occurs when its respective compressor is running. Upstream of the dryer will be a separator with a zero loss drain valve followed by a 0.01 micron coalescing filter. Both filters shall have element change indicators. Isolation System Each compressor and motor assembly shall be fully isolated from the main compressor module base by means of a four point, heavy duty, spring isolation system for a minimum of 95% isolation efficiency. Where required by local or state regulation, optional seismically restrained isolators can be provided at an additional cost. Each main compressor module base frame shall not exceed 34.50" in width. Control Module with Air Receiver/Filter/Regulator System The control module shall include a NEMA 12, U.L. labeled control system, duplexed final line filters, regulators, oil indicators, and a condensate oil/water separator and dew point monitor. All of the above shall be factory piped and wired in accordance with NFPA 99 and include valving to allow complete air receiver bypass and an air sampling port. The vertical air receiver shall be ASME Coded, National Board Certified, galvanized, rated for a minimum 250 PSIG design pressure and includes a liquid level gauge glass, safety relief valve, manual drain valve, and automatic solenoid drain valve. Control System The control system shall have an HMI touch screen control, automatic lead/lag sequencing with circuit breaker disconnects for each motor with external operators, full voltage motor starters, overload protection, 24V control circuit and hand-offauto selector switch for each compressor. Automatic alternation of all compressors based on first-on/first-off principle with provisions for simultaneous operation if required. Automatic activation of reserve unit, if required, will activate an audible alarm as well as a visual alarm on the HMI. The HMI displays service due, run hours for each compressor, system status, operating pressure, dew point and high discharge air temperature shutdown. A complete alarm and service history is available on the HMI. Dew Point Transmitter The control module shall incorporate a dew point transmitter that is mounted, pre-piped, wired to the control panel and displayed on the HMI touch screen. The transmitter probe shall be 316L SS with sintered stainless steel filter and thin film polymer sensor. The system accuracy shall be 2 C. Dew point alarm shall be factory set at -22 F (-30 C) per NFPA 99 with remote alarm contacts in the control panel. Statement of Warranty BeaconMeds warrants all Instrument Air Systems, to be free of defects in material and workmanship under normal use for a period not to exceed thirty (30) months from date of shipment, or twenty four (24) months from date of start-up.

BeaconMeds P. O. Box 7064

Charlotte, N. C. 28241 Phone: (704) 588-0854

Fax: (704) 588-4949

Page 17

TRIPLEX 7.5-10 BASE MOUNT

This product has been designed to meet U.S. NFPA 99, latest edition. Modifications made to meet current CSA Standards may result in changes to the product's weight and physical dimensions. Please contact BeaconMeds at (704) 588-0854 or (704) 588-4949 (fax) for further information.

SSB-120-11
Page 2 of 2 10/01/06

Instrument Air System Specifications1


Complete System Model No. HPA-7T-D200 HPA-10T-D200
Notes:

HP 7 10

System Capacity2 200 psig 33 48

System3 BTU/HR 34,124 46,028

Receiver4 (Gallons) 200* 200*

Noise5 Level 76 79

System FLA 208V 69 90 230V 60 78 460V 30 39

1 Normal operating conditions at a maximum ambient of 105 F. Consult factory for higher ambient conditions. 2 All capacities are shown as NFPA system capacities (reserve compressor on standby) and are shown in Inlet Cubic Feet per Minute (ICFM). System losses subtracted from pump capacity. 3 All system BTU/HR is shown with reserve compressor on standby. 4 * Indicates standard receiver 5 All noise levels are shown in dB(A) and reflect one pump running.

Page 18

BeaconMeds P. O. Box 7064

Charlotte, N. C. 28241 Phone: (704) 588-0854

Fax: (704) 588-4949

This product has been designed to meet U.S. NFPA 99, latest edition. Modifications made to meet current CSA Standards may result in changes to the product's weight and physical dimensions. Please contact BeaconMeds at (704) 588-0854 or (704) 588-4949 (fax) for further information.

SSB-120-12
Page 1 of 2 10/01/06

Instrument Air Quadruplex Single Point Connection (SPC) Base Mount Systems (7 - 10 HP)
SPECIFICATION
SPC (Single Point Connection) System Design The instrument air system shall be of a single point connection base mounted design consisting of four compressor modules with dryers, and a single control module with control panel, air receiver, filtration system and oil/water condensate separator. Each module has a maximum base width of 34.50" (88 cm), and be fully compliant with the latest edition of NFPA 99. The modules shall be assembled as one unit with single point connections for air discharge, electrical and condensate drain. Compressor/Dryer Module (Compressor, Drive, Motor, Piping, Dryer) The compressor shall be a high pressure "oil-lubricated" continuous duty rated type. The design shall be two staged, air-cooled, reciprocating type with corrosion resistant reed type valves with stainless steel reeds. Both oil scrapper ring and piston rings shall be made from long lasting special cast iron and designed for continuous duty operation. The crankshaft shall be constructed of forged steel and fully supported on both ends by heavy duty ball bearings and seals. The crankcase shall be constructed of gray cast iron. Maximum heat dissipation shall be achieved through cast iron cylinders with external cooling vanes. Cylinder sleeves are not required. Both low and high pressure pistons are made from cast aluminum with chrome-moly piston pins. Second stage cylinder head shall be equipped with a wired shutdown switch for high discharge air temperature. The connecting rod shall be of a one-piece design. The compressor shall be v-belt driven through a combination flywheel/sheave and steel motor sheave with tapered bushing and protected by an OSHA approved totally enclosed belt guard. A sliding motor mounting base that is fully adjustable through twin adjusting screws shall achieve belt tensioning. The motor shall be a NEMA rated, open drip proof, 1800 RPM, with 1.15 service factor suitable for 208 or 230/460V electrical service. Each compressor shall have its own inlet air filter mounted on the first stage compressor heads. Discharge air from the first stage compressor cylinder passes through an air-cooled intercooler prior to entering the second stage. The second stage discharge air then passes through an air-cooled aftercooler designed for a maximum approach temperature of 12 F complete with moisture separator and zero loss automatic drain valve prior to entering the dryer. The compressor discharge line shall include a flex connector, safety relief valve, isolation valve, and check valve. The discharge air piping shall be of ASTM B-819 copper tubing, brass, and/or stainless steel. The discharge flex connector shall be braided 304 stainless steel, brass, or bronze. Each compressor has its own dedicated dryer. Each dryer is individually sized for peak calculated demand and capable of producing a -40 F (-40 C) pressure dew point. Dryer purge only occurs when its respective compressor is running. Upstream of the dryer will be a separator with a zero loss drain valve followed by a 0.01 micron coalescing filter. Both filters shall have element change indicators. Isolation System Each compressor and motor assembly shall be fully isolated from the main compressor module base by means of a four point, heavy duty, spring isolation system for a minimum of 95% isolation efficiency. Where required by local or state regulation, optional seismically restrained isolators can be provided at an additional cost. Each main compressor module base frame shall not exceed 34.50" in width. Control Module with Air Receiver/Filter/Regulator System The control module shall include a NEMA 12, U.L. labeled control system, duplexed final line filters, regulators, oil indicators, and a condensate oil/water separator and dew point monitor. All of the above shall be factory piped and wired in accordance with NFPA 99 and include valving to allow complete air receiver bypass and an air sampling port. The vertical air receiver shall be ASME Coded, National Board Certified, galvanized, rated for a minimum 250 PSIG design pressure and includes a liquid level gauge glass, safety relief valve, manual drain valve, and automatic solenoid drain valve. Control System The control system shall have an HMI touch screen control, automatic lead/lag sequencing with circuit breaker disconnects for each motor with external operators, full voltage motor starters, overload protection, 24V control circuit and hand-offauto selector switch for each compressor. Automatic alternation of all compressors based on first-on/first-off principle with provisions for simultaneous operation if required. Automatic activation of reserve unit, if required, will activate an audible alarms as well as a visual alarm on the HMI. The HMI displays service due, run hours for each compressor, system status, operating pressure, dew point and high discharge air temperature shutdown. A complete alarm and service history is available on the HMI. Dew Point Transmitter The control module shall incorporate a dew point transmitter that is mounted, pre-piped, wired to the control panel and displayed on the HMI touch screen. The transmitter probe shall be 316L SS with sintered stainless steel filter and thin film polymer sensor. The system accuracy shall be 2 C. Dew point alarm shall be factory set at -22 F (-30 C) per NFPA 99 with remote alarm contacts in the control panel. Statement of Warranty BeaconMeds warrants all Instrument Air Systems, to be free of defects in material and workmanship under normal use for a period not to exceed thirty (30) months from date of shipment, or twenty four (24) months from date of start-up.

BeaconMeds P. O. Box 7064

Charlotte, N. C. 28241 Phone: (704) 588-0854

Fax: (704) 588-4949

Page 19

QUAD 7.5-10 BASE MOUNT

This product has been designed to meet U.S. NFPA 99, latest edition. Modifications made to meet current CSA Standards may result in changes to the product's weight and physical dimensions. Please contact BeaconMeds at (704) 588-0854 or (704) 588-4949 (fax) for further information.

SSB-120-12
Page 2 of 2 10/01/06

Instrument Air System Specifications1


Complete System Model No. HPA-7Q-D200 HPA-10Q-D200
Notes:

HP 7 10

System Capacity2 200 psig 49.5 72

System3 BTU/HR 51,186 69,042

Receiver4 (Gallons) 200* 200*

Noise5 Level 76 79

System FLA 208V 92 119 230V 80 104 460V 40 52

1 Normal operating conditions at a maximum ambient of 105 F. Consult factory for higher ambient conditions. 2 All capacities are shown as NFPA system capacities (reserve compressor on standby) and are shown in Inlet Cubic Feet per Minute (ICFM). System losses subtracted from pump capacity. 3 All system BTU/HR is shown with reserve compressor on standby. 4 * Indicates standard receiver 5 All noise levels are shown in dB(A) and reflect one pump running.

Page 20

BeaconMeds P. O. Box 7064

Charlotte, N. C. 28241 Phone: (704) 588-0854

Fax: (704) 588-4949

This product has been designed to meet U.S. NFPA 99, latest edition. Modifications made to meet current CSA Standards may result in changes to the product's weight and physical dimensions. Please contact BeaconMeds at (704) 588-0854 or (704) 588-4949 (fax) for further information.

SSB-120-13
Page 1 of 2 10/01/06

Instrument Air Simplex Single Point Connection (SPC) Base Mount Systems with Cylinder Air Back-up Header (7 - 10 HP)
SPECIFICATION
SPC (Single Point Connection) System Design The instrument air system shall be of a single point connection base mounted design consisting of one compressor module with dryer, and a single control module with control panel, air receiver, filtration system, oil/water condensate separator and backup cylinder header for cylinder air. Each module has a maximum base width of 34.50" (88 cm), and be fully compliant with the latest edition of NFPA 99. The modules shall be assembled as one unit with single point connections for air discharge, electrical and condensate drain. Compressor/Dryer Module (Compressor, Drive, Motor, Piping, Dryer) The compressor shall be a high pressure "oil-lubricated" continuous duty rated type. The design shall be two staged, air-cooled, reciprocating type with corrosion resistant reed type valves with stainless steel reeds. Both oil scraper ring and piston rings shall be made from long lasting special cast iron and designed for continuous duty operation. The crankshaft shall be constructed of forged steel and fully supported on both ends by heavy duty ball bearings and seals. The crankcase shall be constructed of gray cast iron. Maximum heat dissipation shall be achieved through cast iron cylinders with external cooling vanes. Cylinder sleeves are not required. Both low and high pressure pistons are made from cast aluminum with chrome-moly piston pins. Second stage cylinder head shall be equipped with a wired shutdown switch for high discharge air temperature. The connecting rod shall be of a one-piece design. The compressor shall be v-belt driven through a combination flywheel/sheave and steel motor sheave with tapered bushing and protected by an OSHA approved totally enclosed belt guard. A sliding motor mounting base that is fully adjustable through twin adjusting screws shall achieve belt tensioning. The motor shall be a NEMA rated, open drip proof, 1800 RPM, with 1.15 service factor suitable for 208 or 230/460V electrical service. Each compressor shall have its own inlet air filter mounted on the first stage compressor heads. Discharge air from the first stage compressor cylinder passes through an air-cooled intercooler prior to entering the second stage. The second stage discharge air then passes through an air-cooled aftercooler designed for a maximum approach temperature of 12 F complete with moisture separator and zero loss automatic drain valve prior to entering the dryer. The compressor discharge line shall include a flex connector, safety relief valve, isolation valve, and check valve. The discharge air piping shall be of ASTM B-819 copper tubing, brass, and/or stainless steel. The discharge flex connector shall be braided 304 stainless steel, brass, or bronze. The dryer is individually sized for peak calculated demand and capable of producing a -40 F (-40 C) pressure dew point. Dryer purge only occurs when the compressor is running. Upstream of the dryer will be a separator with a zero loss drain valve followed by a 0.01 micron coalescing filter. Both filters shall have element change indicators. Isolation System The compressor and motor assembly shall be fully isolated from the main compressor module base by means of a four point, heavy duty, spring isolation system for a minimum of 95% isolation efficiency. Where required by local or state regulation, optional seismically restrained isolators can be provided at an additional cost. Control Module with Air Receiver/Filter/Regulator System The control module shall include a NEMA 12, U.L. labeled control system, duplexed final line filters, regulators, oil indicators, condensate oil/water separator, dew point monitor and an air sample port, backup cylinder header and cylinder restraint system. All of the above shall be factory piped and wired in accordance with NFPA 99. The vertical air receiver shall be ASME Coded, National Board Certified, galvanized, rated for a minimum 250 PSIG design pressure and includes a liquid level gauge glass, safety relief valve, manual drain valve, and automatic solenoid drain valve. Backup Air Cylinder Header A high-pressure header shall be provided to accommodate multiple air cylinders with staggered cylinder connections on 5" centers. The header shall be designed for inlet pressures up to 3000 psig and shall be provided with a flexible pigtail with check valve for each cylinder connection. Pigtail connections shall be CGAV-1 #346 cylinder connections. A pressure regulator (field adjustable; 40 to 300 psig) shall be provided on the backup header to regulate the cylinder pressure. The regulator shall utilize high-pressure brass unions at the inlet and outlet connections for attachment to the header assembly and supply line. The simplex header shall be provided with a backup low pressure switch and a low flow adapter. The header shall be provided with a high-pressure master shut-off valve to isolate the header from the system, during service and repairs, without affecting the remainder of the system. The header shall be factory piped to the inlet side of the duplexed final line filters. Control System The duplex mounted and wired control system shall be NEMA 12 and U.L. labeled. The control system shall have an HMI touch screen control, automatic lead/lag sequencing with circuit breaker disconnects for each motor with external operators, full voltage motor starters, overload protection, 24V control circuit and hand-off-auto selector switch for each compressor. Automatic alternation of both compressors based on first-on/first-off principle with provisions for simultaneous operation if required. Automatic activation of reserve unit, if required, will activate an audible alarm as well as a visual alarm on the HMI. The HMI displays service due, run hours, system status, operating pressure, dew point and high discharge air temperature shutdown. A complete alarm and service history is available on the HMI. Dew Point Transmitter The control module shall incorporate a dew point transmitter that is mounted, pre-piped, wired to the control panel and displayed on the HMI touch screen. The transmitter probe shall be 316L SS with sintered stainless steel filter and thin film polymer sensor. The system accuracy shall be 2 C. Dew point alarm shall be factory set at -22 F (-30 C) per NFPA 99 with remote alarm contacts in the control panel. Statement of Warranty BeaconMeds warrants all Instrument Air Systems, to be free of defects in material and workmanship under normal use for a period not to exceed thirty (30) months from date of shipment, or twenty four (24) months from date of start-up.

BeaconMeds P. O. Box 7064

Charlotte, N. C. 28241 Phone: (704) 588-0854

Fax: (704) 588-4949

SIMLEX 7.5-10 BASE MOUNT

This product has been designed to meet U.S. NFPA 99, latest edition. Modifications made to meet current CSA Standards may result in changes to the product's weight and physical dimensions. Please contact BeaconMeds at (704) 588-0854 or (704) 588-4949 (fax) for further information.

SSB-120-13
Page 2 of 2 10/01/06

Instrument Air System Specifications1 Complete System Model No. HPA-7S-D200 HPA-10S-D200
Notes:

HP 7 10

System Capacity2 200 psig 16.5 24

System3 BTU/HR 17,062 23,014

Receiver4 (Gallons) 200* 200*

Noise Level5 76 79

No. of Cylinders6 5 7

System FLA 208V 23 30 230V 20 26 460V 10 13

1 Normal operating conditions at a maximum ambient of 105 F. Consult factory for higher ambient conditions. 2 All capacities are shown as NFPA system capacities (reserve compressor on standby) and are shown in Inlet Cubic Feet per Minute (ICFM). System losses subtracted from pump capacity. 3 All system BTU/HR is shown with reserve compressor on standby. 4 * Indicates standard receiver 5 All noise levels are shown in dB(A) and reflect one pump running. 6 Number of air cylinders for 1-hour of backup. All cylinders are supplied by others.

Page 22

BeaconMeds P. O. Box 7064

Charlotte, N. C. 28241 Phone: (704) 588-0854

Fax: (704) 588-4949

SSB-840-03
Page 1 of 2

2/01/2006

Series B Recessed Medical Gas Wall Outlet DISS Key Style


SPECIFICATION
DISS Medical Gas Wall Outlet The DISS Medical Gas wall outlets shall be gas specific for the services indicated and accept only corresponding DISS nuts and nipples. The outlets shall be UL listed, CSA certified, and be fully compliant with the latest edition of NFPA 99. All outlets shall be 100% tested for flow, leaks and connector attachment. The outlets shall be cleaned for oxygen service prior to shipping. The outlets shall be made in the U.S.A. A die cast, light gray, epoxy powder coated trim plate can be provided to trim each wall outlet and to fill the space between adjacent outlets. The trim plate shall allow latch valves to be individually removed for servicing. Outlet Design A complete medical gas outlet shall consist of a gas-specific rough-in assembly for installation before the wall is finished and a matching gas-specific latch-valve assembly and cover plate for installation after the wall is finished. identification shall be affixed to the inlet tube and the face of the mounting plate. A secondary valve shall be installed in the outlet block of the rough-in assembly for both pressure testing and preventing gas flow (except vacuum and WAGD) when the latch-valve assembly is removed for service. A 3/8" high metal flange around the outlet opening shall provide a plaster barrier. A temporary cover shall be provided to keep debris out of the outlet during installation. The rough-in assembly shall contain a double seal to prevent gas leakage between the rough-in and latch-valve assemblies after the wall is finished. A single o-ring seal shall not be acceptable. Latch Valve Assembly The latch-valve assembly shall include an o-ring seal primary valve, be gas specific for the labeled service, and accept only corresponding hose and apparatus with DISS nut and nipple adapters. The latch-valve assembly shall be indexed to the corresponding rough-in assembly to avoid accidental cross-connection and shall telescope up to 3/4" to allow for variation in finished wall thickness from 1/2" up to 1-1/4". A metal cover plate insert with permanent, color-coded marking of service identification shall be included as part of the latch-valve assembly.

Rough-in Assembly The rough-in assembly shall be of modular design and include a gas-specific 16-gauge steel mounting plate designed to permit on-site ganging of multiple outlets, in any order, on 5" centerline spacing. A machined brass outlet block shall be permanently attached to the mounting bracket to permit the 1/2" OD (3/8" nominal),type-K copper inlet tube to swivel 360 for attachment to the piping system. Gas service Item Concealed Wall Outlet Gas Service Color Code Complete Assembly Rough-in Assembly O2 White F 6-121100-00 F 6-233110-00 Series B DISS N2O Blue F 6-121101-00 F 6-233111-00 (U.S.) AIR Yellow F 6-121102-00 F 6-233112-00 VAC White F 6-121103-00 F 6-233113-00 N2 Black F 6-121104-00 F 6-233114-00 Instrument Air Red F 6-121108-00 F 6-233118-00 WAGD Purple F 6-121109-00 F 6-233119-00 CO2 Gray F 6-121110-00 F 6-233120-00 CO2-O2 (CO2 >7%) Gray/Green F 6-121111-00 F 6-233121-00 O2 -CO2 (CO2<7%) Green/Gray F 6-121112-00 F 6-233122-00 He-O2 (He > 80%) Brown/Green F 6-121113-00 F 6-233123-00 O2 -He (He < 80%) Green/Brown F 6-121114-00 F 6-233124-00 O2 White F 6-121100-00 F 6-233110-00 Series B DISS N2O Blue F 6-121101-00 F 6-233111-00 (International) AIR Black/White F 6-151012-00 F 6-233116-00 VAC Yellow F 6-151013-00 F 6-233117-00 N2 Black F 6-121104-00 F 6-233114-00 Instrument Air Red F 6-121108-00 F 6-233118-00 WAGD Purple F 6-121109-00 F 6-233119-00 CO2 Gray F 6-121110-00 F 6-233120-00 F 6-120978-00 Miscellaneous Slide* Blank, Gas F 6-120979-00 Duplex Electrical Receptacle (Gray) F 6-120972-00 Trim Plate (5") F 6-325161-00
*Good design practice should include a slide for each vacuum outlet.

Latch-Valve Assembly F 6-230910-00 F 6-230911-00 F 6-230912-00 F 6-230913-00 F 6-230914-00 F 6-230916-00 F 6-230919-00 F 6-230920-00 F 6-230921-00 F 6-230922-00 F 6-230923-00 F 6-230924-00 F 6-230910-00 F 6-230911-00 F 6-230917-00 F 6-230918-00 F 6-230914-00 F 6-230916-00 F 6-230919-00 F 6-230920-00

BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street

Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

Fax: (913) 894-6088

SERIES B DISS WALL OUTLET

SSB-840-03
Page 2 of 2

2/01/2006

Series B DISS Wall Assembly

DISS Outlet

Optional Assemblies

Page 24 BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058 Fax: (913) 894-6088

SSB-840-04
Page 1 of 2 2/01/06

Series B Console and Modular Headwall Medical Gas Outlet DISS Key Style
SPECIFICATION
DISS Medical Gas Outlet The DISS Medical Gas outlets for consoles and modular walls shall be gas specific for the services indicated and accept only corresponding DISS nuts and nipples. The outlets shall be UL listed, CSA certified, and be fully compliant with the latest edition of NFPA 99. All outlets shall be 100% tested for flow, leaks and connector attachment. The outlets shall be cleaned for oxygen service prior to shipping. The outlets shall be made in the U.S.A. A die cast, light gray, epoxy powder coated or plastic trim plate (optional) can be provided to trim each outlet assembly. Outlet Design A complete medical gas outlet shall consist of a gas-specific rough-in assembly and a matching gas-specific latch-valve assembly. Rough-in Assembly The rough-in assembly shall be of modular design and include a gas-specific 16-gauge steel mounting plate designed to permit on-site installation. A machined brass outlet block shall be permanently attached to the mounting bracket to permit the 1/2" OD (3/8" nominal), type-K copper inlet tube to swivel 360 for attachment to the piping system. Gas service identification shall be affixed to the inlet tube and the face of the mounting plate. A secondary valve shall be installed in the outlet block of the rough-in assembly for both pressure testing and preventing gas flow (except vacuum and WAGD) when the latch-valve assembly is removed for service. The rough-in assembly shall contain a double seal to prevent gas leakage between the rough-in and latch-valve assemblies after the wall is finished. A single o-ring seal shall not be acceptable. Latch Valve Assembly The latch-valve assembly shall include an o-ring seal primary valve and shall be indexed to the corresponding gas service rough-in assembly to avoid accidental cross-connection. Latch valves shall telescope up to 3/4" to allow for variation in wall thickness. A metal cover plate insert with permanent color-coded gas service identification shall be included as part of the latch valve assembly.

Item Gas Service O2 N2O Series B DISS (U.S.) AIR VAC Inst Air WAGD N2 CO2 Series B DISS (International) Miscellaneous O2 AIR VAC Slide Blank, Gas Color Code White Blue Yellow White Red Purple Black Gray White Black/White Yellow

Standard Console Complete Assembly* F 6-121050-00 N/A F 6-121052-00 F 6-121053-00 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A F 6-135012-00 F 6-415169-00 Latch-Valve Assembly F F 6-230910-00 6-230911-00 Rough-in Assembly F 6-233010-00 F 6-233011-00 F F F F F F F F 6-233012-00 6-233013-00 6-233018-00 6-233019-00 6-233014-00 6-233020-00 6-233016-00 6-233017-00

F 6-230912-00 F 6-230913-00 F 6-230916-00 F 6-230919-00 F 6-230914-00 F 6-230920-00 F 6-230910-00 F 6-230917-00 F 6-230918-00

F 6-233010-00

*Complete assembly consists of a rough-in assembly and latch-valve assembly. Optional trim plate must be ordered separately.

BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street

Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

Fax: (913) 894-6088

Page 25

SERIES B DISS CONSOLES

SSB-840-04
Page 2 of 2 2/01/06

Series B DISS Console Assembly

Optional assemblies shown with optional 5 trim plate

Page 26 BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058 Fax: (913) 894-6088

SSB-850-01
Page 2 of 2 2/01/06

Gas Control Panels

HORIZONTAL CONTROL PANEL

VERTICAL CONTROL PANEL

BeaconMeds 14408 105th Street

Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

Fax: (913) 894-6088

Page 27

Page 28

Page 1 of 7 8/1/06

Hose Assemblies, Valves, Fittings, and Components


SPECIFICATIONS AND ORDERING INFORMATION
Fittings and Components All BeaconMedaes DISS valves, bodies, nuts and nipples are manufactured to comply with the latest edition of CGA V-5, Diameter Index Safety System (Non-interchangeable low pressure connections for medical gas applications) Gas Specific DISS Valve or DISS Body DISS BODY: When the DISS nut and nipple are disconnected gas will continue to flow. DISS VALVE: Contains a valve mechanism and begins to flow gas when the DISS nut and nipple are connected and stops flow when the DISS nut and nipple are disconnected. DISS valves and valve bodies are available with 1/4 -18 NPT male threads, 1/8 -27 NPT male threads or barbed ends for installation in hose assemblies Gas Specific DISS Nipples The gas specific DISS nipple mates with the gas specific DISS valve or valve body. They are supplied with O-rings where required and are available with 1/4 -18 NPT male threads, 1/8 -27 NPT male threads or barbed ends for installation in hose assemblies DISS Nut The DISS nut is used to secure the DISS nipple to the valve or valve body. Often times the DISS nut may be used on several different gases. The valve or body and the nipple are the components to make the system gas specific. For assistance in determining the components you may require, please call 1-888-4MEDGAS to speak with one of our specialists.

HOSE ASSEMBLIES To order hose assemblies: 1. Select the fitting for each end of the hose assembly-one from (A) and one from (C) using the matrix shown. 2. Choose the appropriate part number according to the gas service required (B). 3. Replace the XX with a two-digit number from the chart (D). This two-digit number corresponds with the length of the hose required. Example: A hose assembly for oxygen that is five feet long and uses a Geometric valve on one end and a Diameter-Index Safety System (DISS) nut and nipple on the other end would carry a part number of 6-139103-05 NOTE: Maximum length is thirty feet. Unless otherwise specified, all assemblies utilize 1/4 ID hose.

BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

Fax: (913) 894-6088

HOSE ASSEMBLIES

SSB-890-01

Page 29

Page 2 of 7 8/1/06

Hose Assemblies, Valves, Fittings, and Components


SPECIFICATIONS AND ORDERING INFORMATION (continued)
HOSE ASSEMBLIES

A
Schrader quick-connect N2

DISS nut and nipple

Geometric adapter

Latch Key adapter

Pin Index adapter

6-132184-XX 6-132106-XX 6-132107-XX 6-132110-XX 6-132111-XX 6-132112-XX 6-132118-XX 6-132364-XX 6-139103-XX 6-139105-XX 6-139109-XX 6-139108-XX 6-139500-XX 6-139366-XX 6-139380-XX 6-139381-XX 6-139382-XX 6-139383-XX 6-139502-XX 6-139384-XX 6-139370-XX 6-139371-XX 6-139372-XX 6-139373-XX 6-139504-XX 6-139374-XX 6-139140-XX 6-139141-XX 6-139142-XX 6-139143-XX 6-139506-XX 6-139144-XX 6-139149-XX 6-139385-XX 6-132026-XX 6-132027-XX 6-132028-XX 6-132029-XX 6-132500-XX 6-132501-XX 6-132502-XX 6-123503-XX

DISS nut and nipple

Geometric valve

Pin Index valve

Latch Key valve

DISS male valve

O2 N2O AIR VAC N2 CO2 WAGD O2 N2O AIR VAC VAC 5/16 ID WAGD O2 N2O AIR VAC VAC 5/16 ID WAGD O2 N2O AIR VAC VAC 5/16 ID WAGD O2 N2O AIR VAC VAC 5/16 ID N2 WAGD CO2

6-132401-XX 6-139012-XX 6-139013-XX 6-139014-XX 6-139015-XX 6-139501-XX 6-139340-XX

6-132504-XX

6-139391-XX 6-139392-XX 6-139393-XX 6-139394-XX 6-139503-XX 6-139395-XX 6-139396-XX 6-139397-XX 6-139398-XX 6-139399-XX 6-139505-XX 6-139400-XX 6-139016-XX 6-139017-XX 6-139018-XX 6-139019-XX 6-139507-XX 6-139390-XX

D
XX
01 02 03 04 05 06 08

Refer to the table below for overall length of hose assembly. Use the numbers in the XX column to denote hose length. HOSE LENGTH1 (ft)
1 2 3 4 5 6 8

XX
09 10 11 12 15 22 30

HOSE LENGTH1 (ft)


9 10 11 12 15 22 30

XX
31 32 33 34 35 36

HOSE LENGTH2 (in)


32 38 44 50 56 68

NOTE

XX numbers 01 through 30 represent hose length in feet. DOES NOT INCLUDE END FITTINGS. 2 XX numbers 31 through 36 represent special application sizes (ceiling drop hoses) in inches. INCLUDES END FITTINGS.

Page 30

BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

Fax: (913) 894-6088

HOSE ASSEMBLIES

SSB-890-01

Page 3 of 7 8/1/06

Hose Assemblies, Valves, Fittings, and Components


SPECIFICATIONS AND ORDERING INFORMATION (continued)
VALVES The check valves below operate smoothly and are available with U.S. or international color coding. Gas-specific components are permanently indexed to prevent accidental incorrect assembly. NOTE: Unless otherwise specified, hose barb check valves are for 1/4 ID hose

Geometric Gas Oxygen Nitrous Oxide Air Vacuum Vacuum 5/16 ID hose Nitrogen Instrument Air WAGD Carbon Dioxide Oxygen Air Vacuum Vacuum 5/16 ID hose Geometric 6-121200-10 6-121200-11 6-121200-12 6-121200-13 6-121200-53 6-121200-19

DISS Valve HOSE BARB CONNECTION DISS 6-121201-10 6-121201-11 6-121201-12 6-121201-13 6-121201-53 6-121201-14 6-121201-18 6-121201-19 6-121201-20

Pin Index Pin Index 6-121202-10 6-121202-11 6-121202-12 6-121202-13 6-121202-53 6-121202-19

Latch Key Latch Key 6-121203-10 6-121203-11 6-121203-12 6-121203-13 6-121203-53 6-121203-19

INTERNATIONAL COLOR CODING 6-121200-15 6-121201-15 6-121200-16 6-121201-16 6-121200-17 6-121201-17 6-121200-57 6-121201-57

6-121202-15 6-121202-16 6-121202-17 6-121202-57

6-121203-15 6-121203-16 6-121203-17 6-121203-57

Geometric

DISS Valve 1/4 - 18 NPT CONNECTION DISS 6-121211-10 6-121211-11 6-121211-12 6-121211-13 6-121211-14 6-121211-18 6-121211-19 6-121211-20 6-121211-22 6-121211-23 6-121211-24

Pin Index

Latch Key Latch Key 6-121213-10 6-121213-11 6-121213-12 6-121213-13 6-121213-19

Gas Oxygen Nitrous Oxide Air Vacuum Nitrogen Instrument Air WAGD Carbon Dioxide, CO2-O2 O2-CO2 Helium, He-O2 O2-He Oxygen Air Vacuum

Geometric 6-121210-10 6-121210-11 6-121210-12 6-121210-13 6-121210-19

Pin Index 6-121212-10 6-121212-11 6-121212-12 6-121212-13 6-121212-19

INTERNATIONAL COLOR CODING 6-121210-10 6-121211-10 6-121212-15 6-121210-16 6-121211-12 6-121212-16 6-121210-17 6-121211-13 6-121212-17 BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

6-121213-15 6-121213-16 6-121213-17 Fax: (913) 894-6088

HOSE ASSEMBLIES

SSB-890-01

Page 31

Page 4 of 7 8/1/06

Hose Assemblies, Valves, Fittings, and Components


SPECIFICATIONS AND ORDERING INFORMATION (continued)
VALVES (continued)

Geometric Gas Oxygen Nitrous Oxide Air Nitrogen DISS FITTINGS Geometric

DISS Valve 1/8 - 27 NPT CONNECTION DISS 6-121208-10 6-121208-11 6-121208-12 6-121208-14

Pin Index Pin Index

Latch Key Latch Key

DISS NIPPLES WITH O-RINGS TO MALE PIPE THREAD PART NUMBER DESCRIPTION NUT NIPPLE 6-825000-00 6-510016-00 Nipple, oxygen with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT male 6-511511-00 6-511605-00 Nipple, nitrous oxide with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male 6-511511-00 6-511604-00 Nipple, air nipple with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male 6-511511-00 6-512070-01 Nipple, vacuum with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male 6-511511-00 6-511603-00 Nipple, nitrogen with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male 6-511518-00 6-511620-00 Nipple, instrument air with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male 6-511510-00 6-510079-00 Nipple, WAGD with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT male 6-511511-00 6-511612-00 Nipple, carbon dioxide, CO2-O2 mixture with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male 6-511511-00 6-511614-00 Nipple, O2-CO2 mixture with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male 6-511511-00 6-511616-00 Nipple, helium, He-O2 mixture with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male 6-511511-00 6-511617-00 Nipple, O2-He with o-ring to 1/4 -18 NPT male DISS NUT AND NIPPLE ASSEMBLIES WITH O-RINGS TO 1/8 -27 NPT MALE THREADS PART NUMBER DESCRIPTION 6-121209-10 6-121209-11 6-121209-12 6-121209-13 6-121209-14 6-121209-19 6-121209-20 Assembly, oxygen nut and nipple with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT Assembly, nitrous oxide nut and nipple with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT Assembly, air nut and nipple with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT Assembly, vacuum nut and nipple with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT Assembly, nitrogen nut and nipple with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT Assembly, WAGD nut and nipple with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT Assembly, carbon dioxide nut and nipple with o-ring to 1/8 -27 NPT

Page 32 BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058 Fax: (913) 894-6088

HOSE ASSEMBLIES

SSB-890-01

SSB-890-01
Page 5 of 7 8/1/06

Hose Assemblies, Valves, Fittings, and Components


SPECIFICATIONS AND ORDERING INFORMATION (continued)
QUICK-CONNECT FITTINGS GEOMETRIC QUICK-CONNECT ADAPTERS WITH PIPE THREADS PART NUMBER DESCRIPTION 6-512013-00 Adapter, oxygen, 1-3/4 long, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread 6-512001-00 Adapter, nitrous oxide, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread 6-210636-00 Adapter, air, 1-3/4 long, non-swivel, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread 6-512003-00 Adapter, vacuum, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread 6-512092-00 6-512094-00 6-512542-00 6-230338-00 6-230348-00 Adapter, oxygen, with 1/8 27 NPT male thread Adapter, vacuum, with 1/8 27 NPT male thread Adapter, oxygen, 2-15/16 long, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, air, 2-15/16 long, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, WAGD, 2-15/16 long, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread

GEOMETRIC QUICK-CONNECT ADAPTER WITH DISS THREAD 6-512019-00 Adapter, oxygen, with 9/16 18 DISS male thread

PIN INDEX QUICK-CONNECT ADAPTERS 6-230625-00 Adapter, oxygen, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread 6-230624-00 Adapter, oxygen, International, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread 6-230627-00 Adapter, air, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread 6-230628-00 Adapter, vacuum, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread 6-231025-00 6-231027-00 6-231029-00 Adapter, oxygen, with 1/8 27 NPT male thread Adapter, air, with 1/8 27 NPT male thread Adapter, vacuum, with 1/8 27 NPT male thread

LATCH KEY QUICK-CONNECT ADAPTERS 6-231030-00 6-231032-00 6-231034-00 Adapter, oxygen, round striker, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, air, rectangular striker, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, vacuum, rectangular striker, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread DISS BODY ADAPTERS PART NUMBER 6-513001-00 6-511554-00 6-520287-00 6-520395-00 6-520396-00 6-515606-00 6-511558-00 6-520288-00 DESCRIPTION Adapter, oxygen, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, nitrogen, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, vacuum, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, nitrous oxide, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, air, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, WAGD, with 1/4 18 NPT male thread Adapter, instrument air with 1/4-18 NPT male thread Adapter, CO2 and CO2-O2 mixtures with 1/4 -18 NPT male threads

BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

Fax: (913) 894-6088

Page 33

SSB-890-01
Page 6 of 7 8/1/06

Hose Assemblies, Valves, Fittings, and Components


SPECIFICATIONS AND ORDERING INFORMATION (continued)
HOSE BARB ADAPTERS, HOSE RETRACTORS, BULK HOSES, AND FERRULES

Geometric Geometric With Ferrule 6-210221-00 6-210220-00 6-210222-00 6-210223-00

DISS

Pin Index

Latch Key

Gas Oxygen Nitrous Oxide Air Vacuum Nitrogen Instrument Air WAGD Carbon Dioxide

HOSE BARB ADAPTERS FOR 1/4 ID HOSE DISS Geometric Nipple w/O-ring Nut 6-512007-00 6-512076-00 6-825000-00 6-512018-00 6-511611-00 6-511511-00 6-230339-00 6-511609-00 6-511511-00 6-512009-00 6-512077-00 6-511511-00 6-511610-00 6-511511-00 6-511621-00 6-511518-00 6-230350-00 6-511515-00 6-511510-00 6-511607-00 6-511511-00

Pin Index 6-231016-00 6-232129-00 6-231018-00 6-231017-00

Latch Key 6-232114-00 6-232115-00 6-232116-00 6-232117-00

6-232139-00

6-232118-00

HOSE BARB ADAPTERS FOR 5/16 ID HOSE DISS Gas Geometric Nipple w/O-ring Nut Vacuum 6-512115-00 6-134157-00 6-511511-00 6-230349-00 6-511606-00 6-511510-00 WAGD HOSE RETRACTOR

Fittings and Components Unless otherwise indicated, the fittings and components listed in this catalog are designed for low pressure medical gas systems where pressure does not exceed 200 psig. In addition to fittings and components that utilize geometric shape indexing and DISS connections, a complete offering of general purpose fittings is also available.

Heavy Duty, Double Retractor for all Pressure and Vacuum Service

6-132002-00

Caution:

BULK HOSE 1/4 ID (Length sold per foot) Gas Service Color Code Part Number Oxygen Green 6-611044-02 Nitrous Oxide Blue 6-611044-01 Air Yellow 6-611044-03 Vacuum White 6-611044-04 Purple 6-611044-05 WAGD Nitrogen Black 6-611044-00 All Others Black 6-611044-00 5/16 ID Vacuum White 6-656010-06

Common threads, crimp or slip-fit connections permit the assembly of components which may permit the cross-indexing of services, unanticipated performance, poor flow, and excessive pressure drops. The user is cautioned to consider such factors when using these components. BeaconMeds fittings and components are medicalgrade fittings, carefully machined to precise dimensions, and offer outstanding durability.

For 1/4 ID Hose (pressure) For 5/16 ID Hose (vacuum) Ferrule Hand Crimping Tool

FERRULES 6-355021-00 6-405000-00 6-995508-00

Page 34

BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

Fax: (913) 894-6088

Page 7 of 7 8/1/06

Hose Assemblies, Valves, Fittings, and Components


SPECIFICATIONS AND ORDERING INFORMATION (continued)
FITTINGS AND COUPLINGS HOSE/TUBING FITTINGS 6-512012-00 6-512506-00 6-512508-00 6-515002-00 Connector, hose barb for 1/4 ID hose, to 1/4 18 NPT female thread Connector, hose barb for 5/16 ID hose, to 1/4 18 NPT female thread Connector, hose barb for 5/16 ID hose, to 1/4 18 NPT male thread Connector, hose barb for 1/4 ID hose, to 1/4 18 NPT male thread DISS BODY WITH HOSE BARB 6-520174-00 6-525300-53 6-525298-00 6-525299-00 6-525300-00 6-525302-00 6-525303-00 6-525301-00 Adapter, oxygen, for 1/4 ID hose Adapter, vacuum, large bore, for 5/16 ID hose Adapter, nitrous oxide, for 1/4 ID hose Adapter, air, for 1/4 ID hose Adapter, vacuum, for 1/4 ID hose Adapter, nitrogen, for 1/4 ID hose Adapter, WAGD, for 1/4 ID hose Adapter, carbon dioxide, for 1/4 ID hose COUPLINGS AND BUSHINGS 6-835020-00 6-513011-00 6-513003-00 6-835000-00 6-835001-00 Coupling, 1/4 18 NPT female each end Coupling, 1/4 18 NPT female to 1/8 27 NPT female Coupling, 1/4 18 NPT male thread x 1/8 -27 NPT male thread Bushing, 1/4 18 NPT male to 1/8 27 NPT female Coupling, 1/4 18 NPT female thread x 1/8 -27 NPT male

BeaconMeds 14408 W. 105th Street Lenexa, KS 66215 Phone: (913) 894-6058

Fax: (913) 894-6088

HOSE ASSEMBLIES

SSB-890-01

Page 35

Page 36

A company within the Atlas Copco Group

13325 Carowinds Blvd Charlotte, NC 28273 Phone 1 888 4 MED GAS Fax 704 588 4949 www.beaconmedaes.com Page 37