You are on page 1of 135

Norman Fraser

About Me

The WorldWideWeb (WWW) project aims to allow links to be made to any information anywhere. The address format includes an access method (=namespace), and for most name spaces a hostname and some sort of path. We have a prototype hypertext editor for the NeXT, and a browser for line mode terminals which runs on almost anything. These can access files either locally, NFS mounted, or via anonymous FTP. They can also go out using a simple protocol (HTTP) to a server which interprets some other data and returns equivalent hypertext files. For example, we have a server running on our mainframe (http://cernvm.cern.ch/FIND in WWW syntax) which makes all the CERN computer center documentation available. The HTTP protocol allows for a keyword search on an index, which generates a list of matching documents as annother virtual hypertext document. If you're interested in using the code, mail me. It's very prototype, but available by anonymous FTP from info.cern.ch. It's copyright CERN but free distribution and use is not normally a problem. The NeXTstep editor can also browse news. If you are using it to read this, then click on this: <http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html> to find out more about the project. We haven't put the news access into the line mode browser yet.

We also have code for a hypertext server. You can use this to make files available (like anonymous FTP but faster because it only uses one connection). You can also hack it to take a hypertext address and generate a virtual hypertext document from any other data you have - database, live data etc. It's just a question of generating plain text or SGML (ugh! but standard) mark-up on the fly. The browsers then parse it on the fly.
The WWW project was started to allow high energy physicists to share data, news, and documentation. We are very interested in spreading the web to other areas, and having gateway servers for other data. Collaborators welcome! I'll post a short summary as a separate article.

Tim Berners-Lee 3755 CERN disclaimer)

ti...@info.cern.ch World Wide Web project Tel: +41(22)767 Fax: +41(22)767 7155 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland (usual

6 August 1991

Online Business
Business Concept
What does the business do?

Business Marketing
How does the business attract customers?

Business Model
How does the business make money?

Business Concept
What does the business do?

Source of Business Concept


1. Transfer a real-world idea to cyberspace 2. Copy and existing online idea

3. Develop a completely new idea

Transfer a real-world idea to cyberspace

Transfer a real-world idea to cyberspace

Why will people choose your online service instead of a real world service?

Transfer a real-world idea to cyberspace

Copy an existing online idea

1994

1995

1995

1998

1998

2000

Copy an existing online idea

Why will people choose your online service instead of a competitors?

Copy an existing online idea

1994

1995

1995

1998

1998

2000

Develop a completely new idea

Develop a completely new idea

Why will this untested idea work?

Source of Business Concept


1. Transfer a real-world idea to cyberspace 2. Copy and existing online idea

3. Develop a completely new idea

Business Concept: What to Sell


1. Product 2. Service

Business Concept: What to Sell


1. Product
- Physical product - Digital product

2. Service
- Real world service - Online service

Case Study: Moonpig.com

Nick Jenkins

Moonpig idea selection


1. Avoid advertising
I realised I would spend more money attracting people to my website than I was going to make from the advertising

2. Avoid selling digital products


Everybody was giving stuff away so it was very difficult to charge for anything

3. Avoid price comparison


Theres a price comparison issue where people would only buy online if it was cheaper, and would compare prices to find the cheapest place to buy. In that case your margins get squeezed, so that wasnt terribly attractive either

I thought about doing something physical which I could change and adapt using the Internet, to make it into a better product than the high street. The idea of a personalised card a Moonpig card is much better than a card youll get on the high street where it is unavailable. So you can charge more for it, break away from the price comparison issue and give people a reason to go online to buy a product. Whats more, the economics of producing a single, personalised card simply do not work outside of the Internet.

Founded 2000 90% share of UK online card market 6 million cards per year (40,000 in 1st year) Revenue = 32m Profit = 11m Sold in 2011 for 120m

International Business : What to Sell


1. Product
- Physical product - Digital product

2. Service
- Real world service - Online service

Business Marketing
How does the business attract customers?

If you build it, they will come

Marketing
Market TO the site
Drive traffic to visit the site

Market ON the site


Make the site one that people want to use And keep on using

Branded fashion retailer Founded 1999, UK Spent $188m in 18 months Company collapsed 2000 Main reason for failure: user experience
Restricted page size Complex navigation Huge page downloads

Business Marketing
Issues for International Business?

Business Model
How does the business make money?

How does the business make money


The Freemium Model The E-commerce Model The Advertising Model The Affiliate Model The Revenue Share Model The Subscription Model The Appstore Model

The Freemium Model


Idea Make a basic service available free to all users. Charge Premium Users a fee for enhanced service Reduces obstacles to user adoption. Try before you buy Requires a lot of up-front capital. Most users never pay. Possibly undermines own market.

Positive

Negative

Founded 2003 Offers free 1:1 voice/video calls Hundreds of millions of registered users Record 36m+ simultaneous users Growth in scale is weightless to Skype
Software download has to be supported Infrastructure is borrowed peer-to-peer technology

12% of customers pay for premium service Sold to eBay in 2005 for $2.6 billion

The E-Commerce Model


Idea Market and sell products and/or services Straightforward business model Physical goods need to be warehoused and fulfilled

Positive Negative

The Advertising Model


Idea Attract a large number of eyeballs to view the site by providing free content; charge advertisers to place their content in front of the eyeballs Even visitors who spend no money are valuable (influencers as well as spenders) Monetize unsellable content

Positive

Negative

Most services do not make money.

Measuring Impact: terminology


Page impressions Visits Unique visitors Clickthrough

The Affiliate Model


Idea Sell leads, products or services for which you receive a commission Monetize other peoples investment relatively low capital requirement You are only as good as your partner offerings

Positive

Negative

Affiliate Income
Per click Per lead

Per sale

The Subscription Model


Idea Sell subscriptions for content or services Can result in stable, long-term income stream Many users resist long term commitment

Positive

Negative

Pay wall

Software-as-a-Service SaaS

The Appstore Model


Idea Sell software applications via a dedicated online portal with streamlined installation Provides a very convenient marketplace for developers and buyers Need scale and credibility to host an appstore

Positive

Negative

Business Models
Disruptive Business Models

Crowdsourcing

Business Models for International Business


The Freemium Model The E-commerce Model The Advertising Model The Affiliate Model The Revenue Share Model The Subscription Model The Appstore Model

International Online Business


Language
Internationalization Localization

Currency
Multi-currency support

Tax
Multiple (simultaneous) tax systems

Culture
Culturally appropriate images

Internet-Enabled Business Models


Beyond geography

Endava

Business Model
Sell custom software development to clients in Western Europe One client-facing employee for every ten remote developers Enter market competing on price Acquire niche skills opportunistically Move up the value chain

Reasons For Locating in Eastern Europe


Cultural proximity Time-zone Geographical proximity Geopolitical risk management Trading environment EU-compliant business framework Largest untapped source of IT professionals in the World Price

What we do
Application development Digital media Testing Application management Infrastructure management and hosting

Endava in Eastern Europe

Bucharest - 100 people

Chisinau - 250 people

Iasi - 230 people


IN YOUR ZONE

Cluj - 280 people


88

Headcount growth - Endava Group


950

706 584 520 417 339 512

IN YOUR ZONE

Internet Enabled
Real time collaboration for distributed teams Communications
Email, IM, Skype, screen sharing, etc

Tools
Shared filestores, project management tools, issue tracking, etc

Infrastructure
Remote hosting, management, NOC, helpdesk

Online Classics
Project Description:

Implement a system for pay-perview video access to high culture events such as opera, theatre and concerts

MSN Live Pay-Per-View


Project Description:

Implement a payments system for pay-per-view video access to a trial concert arranged by Microsoft to test the global appetite for payper-view live video events

Requirement
Test global appetite for live pay-per-view events Promote high-profile event using MSNs 36 portals around the world Test scalability of live streaming (multicasting) infrastructure

Challenge
Need to collect payment from an unknown number of visitors in a very short period of time at the start of the event No existing online payments provider would risk their reputation We had nothing to lose!

Sizing infrastructure: terminology


Busy hour Throughput Peak load Transactions per X

Example
1,000,000 visitors enrolling in 20 minutes 500,000 in last 5 minutes Payments processed/second = _______

Example
1,000,000 visitors enrolling in 20 minutes 500,000 in last 5 minutes Payments processed/second = 1,667

MediaWave
Project Description:

Implement a system for managing online media content, especially streaming media

Ede & Ravenscroft


(www.edeandravenscroft.com) Project Description:

Implement a self-service portal for students and professors to hire academic gowns. This provider has a virtual monopoly of the sector in the UK.

BlueSpace
(www.bluespace.com)

Project Description:

Implement a web-based enterprise messaging system for information security and regulatory compliance

Cision
(www.cision.com) Project Description:

Implement a system for managing targeted PR campaigns, including media tracking.

Tricerion SafeLogin - user experience


Out with unsafe passwords, in with picture passwords:
picture passwords work just like conventional passwords - a sequence of symbols known only to the user, to be reproduced at login time

Step 1: type in username

Step 2: select picture password


by clicking symbols in sequence

Step 3: its as simple as that

125

SafeLogin - what makes it safe?


Personalized input keypad
every users keypad is unique so mass phishing attacks based on fake generic login pages are ruled out this is mutual authentication: it is only possible to disclose a password if the service already knows which symbols you need in order to enter your password

Password is not typed


no typing means no susceptibility to keystroke logging Trojan viruses. The password never exists in digital form outside the service providers firewall

One-time keypad
key positions are shuffled for each presentation, making this a onetime keypad, so even sophisticated cursor-tracking Trojans are defeated

Difficult to write down


First login instance. Each user always sees their own personal subset of symbols. These are drawn from a much larger set of available symbols at setup time. Nth login instance. The user sees the same personal symbol set, but arranged in a different order. When the user clicks a symbol to select it, what gets sent back is not the symbols value, but only the clicked co-ordinates on this one time keypad.

picture passwords are much harder to write down, so users are less likely to self-disclose

Easy to recall
experiments show that picture passwords use a different part of the brain, and are harder to forget than text passwords

126

SafeLogin - look and feel


Keypads can be skinned to reflect and reinforce corporate branding

Hardware store

Online teen community

Coca Cola

Ferrari
127

Online gaming

Neutral

128

SafeLogin - out-performs alternatives


Password-Generating Token Conventional Login Simple interaction
Nothing special for user to do at login

Tricerion SafeLogin

PKI/Certificates

Simple logistics Easy account setup Zero-footprint Nothing for user to carry or install Low cost

Security and usability aligned

Mutual authentication

Protects against dictionary attacks

Protects against pharming attacks

Protects against phishing attacks

Protects against keystroke logging Trojan virus attacks Protects against registration robots No need for CAPTCHA images

129

Integrated with UAG


Full integration support Microsoft Forefront Universal Access Gateway Deploy as an authentication option Embedded on UAG appliances

131