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June 25 July 6 Stage 1 Desired Results Established Goal(s): II.1 Understand the principles behind different optical instruments.

s. Understanding(s): Students will understand that...


Characteristics of Light Light is electromagnetic radiation that consists of oscillating electric and magnetic fields with different wavelengths. The relationship between the frequency, wavelength, and speed of electromagnetic radiation is given by the equation, . The brightness of light is inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the light source. Flat mirrors Light obeys the law of reflection, which states that the incident and reflected angles of light are equal. Flat mirrors form virtual images that are the same distance from the mirrors surface as the object is. Curved mirrors The mirror equation, , relates object distance, image distance, and focal length of a spherical mirror. The magnification equation, , relates image height or distance to object height or distance, respectively.

Color and Polarization Light of different colors can be produced by adding light consisting of the primary additive colors (red, green, and blue). Pigments can be produced by combining subtractive colors (magenta, yellow, and cyan). Light can be linearly polarized by transmission, reflection, or scattering.

Deped Competencies Students will be able to... 1. Identify the components of the electromagnetic 1.1 Investigate the reflection and refraction spectrum. properties of light using simple optical devices (e.g. 2. Calculate the frequency or wavelength of mirror and pinhole camera). electromagnetic radiation. 1.2 Compare the similarities and differences of the 3. Recognize that light has a finite speed. principle of the camera and the human eye. 4. Describe how the brightness of a light source is 1.3 Explain the different kinds of eyesight defects and affected by distance. how lenses correct these defects. 5. Distinguish between specular and diffuse 1.4 Demonstrate total internal reflection, diffraction, reflection of light. interference, and polarization properties of light. 6. Apply the law of reflection for flat mirrors. 1.5 Explain and cite applications of internal 7. Describe the nature of images formed by flat reflection, diffraction, interference, and polarization mirrors. 8. Calculate distances and focal lengths using the properties. mirror equation for concave and convex spherical 1.6 Setup a simple telescope and microscope. mirrors. 1.7 Explain using ray diagrams how image is formed 9. Draw ray diagrams to find the image distance and in a telescope and a microscope.
10. 11. 12. 13. 14. magnification for concave and convex spherical mirrors. Distinguish between real and virtual images. Describe how parabolic mirrors differ from spherical mirrors. Recognize how additive colors affect the color of light. Recognize how pigments affect the color of reflected light. Explain how linearly polarized light is formed and detected.

Unit/Topic/Lesson Light and Reflection Teacher Resources Holt Physics TWE Chapter 13 ppt Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Homework Reflection in Flat Mirrors Reflection incurved Mirrors Color Addition Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence: Chapter Test

Performance Task(s): Problem solving Laboratory

Stage 3 Learning Plan TOPICS Discussion: Characteristics of Light Discussion: Reflection of Light Lab: Reflection of Light Discussion: Curved Mirrors Seatwork: Mirror Equation Lab: Physlet Mirror Discussion: Color and Polarization Lab: Color Vision Chapter Recap Chapter Test Comments: REMARKS

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #2 Stage 1 Desired Results Established Goal(s): II.1 Understand the principles behind different optical instruments. Understanding(s): Students will understand that...
Refraction According to Snells law, as a light ray travels from one medium into another medium where its speed is different, the light ray will change its direction unless it travels along the normal. When light passes from a medium with a smaller index of refraction to one with a larger index of refraction, the ray bends towards the normal. For the opposite situation, the ray bends away from the normal. Thin lenses The image produced by a converging lens is real and inverted when the object is outside the focal point and virtual and upright when the object is inside the focal point. Diverging lenses always produce upright, virtual images. The location of an image created by a lens can be found using either a ray diagram or the thin-lens equation. Optical phenomena Total internal reflection can occur when light attempts to move from a material with a higher index of refraction to one with a lower index of refraction. If the angle of incidence of a ray is greater than the critical angle, the ray is totally reflected at the boundary. Mirages and the visibility of the sun after it has physically set are natural phenomena that can be attributed to refraction of light in Earths atmosphere.

Deped Competencies Students will be able to... 1. Recognize situations in which refraction will occur. 1.1 Investigate the reflection and refraction 2. Identify which direction light will bend when it properties of light using simple optical devices (e.g. passes from one medium to another. mirror and pinhole camera). 3. Solve problems using Snells Law. 1.2 Compare the similarities and differences of the 4. Use ray diagrams to find the position of an image principle of the camera and the human eye. produced 1.3 Explain the different kinds of eyesight defects and 5. By a converging or diverging lens, and identify the how lenses correct these defects. image as real or virtual. 1.4 Demonstrate total internal reflection, diffraction, 6. Solve problems using the thin-lens equation. interference, and polarization properties of light. 7. Calculate the magnification of lenses. 1.5 Explain and cite applications of internal 8. Describe the positioning of lenses in compound reflection, diffraction, interference, and polarization microscopes and refracting telescopes. 9. Predict whether light will be refracted or undergo properties. total internal reflection. 1.6 Setup a simple telescope and microscope. 10. Recognize atmospheric conditions that cause 1.7 Explain using ray diagrams how image is formed refraction. in a telescope and a microscope.
11. Explain dispersion and phenomena such as rainbows in terms of the relationship between the index of refraction and the wavelength.

Unit/Topic/Lesson Refraction Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #3 Stage 1 Desired Results Established Goal(s): II.1 Understand the principles behind different optical instruments. Understanding(s): Students will understand that...
Interference Light waves with the same wavelength and constant phase differences interfere with each other to produce light and dark interference patterns. In double-slit interference, the position of a bright fringe requires that the path difference between two interfering point sources be equal to a whole number of wavelengths.

In double-slit interference, the position of a dark fringe requires that the path difference between two interfering point sources be equal to an odd number of half-wavelengths. Diffraction Light waves form a diffraction pattern by passing around an obstacle or bending through a slit and interfering with each other. The position of a maximum in a pattern created by a diffraction grating depends on the separation of the slits in the grating, the order of the maximum, and the wavelength of the light. Coherence A laser is a device that transforms energy into a beam of coherent monochromatic light.

Deped Competencies Students will be able to... 1. Describe how light waves interfere with each 1.1 Investigate the reflection and refraction other to produce bright and dark fringes. properties of light using simple optical devices (e.g. 2. Identify the conditions required for interference mirror and pinhole camera). to occur. 1.2 Compare the similarities and differences of the 3. Predict the location of interference fringes using principle of the camera and the human eye. the equation 1.3 Explain the different kinds of eyesight defects and 4. For double-slit interference. Describe how light how lenses correct these defects. waves diffract around obstacles and produce 1.4 Demonstrate total internal reflection, diffraction, bright and dark fringes. interference, and polarization properties of light. 5. Calculate the positions of fringes for a diffraction 1.5 Explain and cite applications of internal grating. reflection, diffraction, interference, and polarization 6. Describe how diffraction determines an optical instruments ability to resolve images. properties. 7. Describe the properties of laser light. 1.6 Setup a simple telescope and microscope. 8. Explain how laser light has particular advantages 1.7 Explain using ray diagrams how image is formed in certain applications. in a telescope and a microscope. Unit/Topic/Lesson Interference and Diffraction Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #4 Stage 1 Desired Results Established Goal(s): II. 2. Appreciate the contribution of scientists in the development of the atomic theory and in understanding nuclear radiation Understanding(s): Students will understand that...
Quantization of energy Blackbody radiation and the photoelectric effect contradict classical physics, but they can be explained with the assumption that energy comes in discrete units, or is quantized. The energy of a light quantum, or photon, depends on the frequency of the light, as follows: The minimum energy required for an electron to escape from a metal depends on the threshold frequency of the metal, as follows: The maximum kinetic energy of photoelectrons depends on the work function and the frequency of the light shining on the metal, as follows: Models of the atom Rutherfords scattering experiment revealed that all of an atoms positive charge and most of an atoms mass are concentrated at its center. Each gas has a unique emission and absorption spectrum. Atomic spectra are explained by Bohrs model of the atom, in which electrons move from one energy level to another when they absorb or emit photons. Quantum mechanics Light has both wave and particle characteristics. De Broglie proposed that matter has both wave and particle characteristics. The frequency and wavelength of de Broglie waves are found with the following expressions: Simultaneous measurements of position and momentum cannot be completely certain.

Deped Competencies
2.1 Describe Rutherfords experiment to prove the existence of nucleus in an atom. 2.2 Discuss the contributions of Becquerel, Pierre and Marie Curie on radioactivity. 2.3 Explain Einsteins matter-energy equivalence.

Students will be able to... 1. Explain how Planck resolved the ultraviolet catastrophe in blackbody radiation. 2. Calculate energy of quanta using Plancks equation. 3. Solve problems involving maximum kinetic energy, work function, and threshold frequency in the photoelectric effect. 4. Explain the strengths and weaknesses of Rutherfords model of the atom. 5. Recognize that each element has a unique emission and absorption spectrum. 6. Explain atomic spectra using Bohrs model of the atom. 7. Recognize the dual nature of light. 8. Calculate the de Broglie wavelength of matter waves. 9. Distinguish between classical ideas of measurement and Heisenbergs uncertainty principle. 10. Describe the quantummechanical picture of the atom, including the electron cloud and probability waves.

Unit/Topic/Lesson Atomic Physics

Teacher Resources

Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Performance Task(s):

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #5 Stage 1 Desired Results Established Goal(s): II.3. Understand basic concepts of atomic structure and nuclear radiation Understanding(s): Students will understand that...
The nucleus The nucleus, which consists of protons and neutrons, is the small, dense core of an atom. A nucleus can be characterized by a mass number, A, an atomic number, Z, and a neutron number, N. The binding energy of a nucleus is the difference in energy between its nucleons when bound and its nucleons when unbound. Nuclear decay An unstable nucleus can decay in three ways: alpha () decay, beta () decay, or gamma () decay. The decay constant, , indicates the rate of radioactive decay. The half-life, T1/2, is the time required for half the original nuclei of a radioactive substance to undergo radioactive decay. Nuclear reactions Nuclear reactions involve a change in the nucleus of an atom. In fission, a heavy nucleus splits into two lighter nuclei. In fusion, two light nuclei combine to form a heavier nucleus. Particle physics There are four fundamental interactions in nature: strong, weak, gravitational, and electromagnetic. The constituents of matter can be classified as leptons or hadrons, and hadrons can be further divided into mesons and baryons. Electrons and neutrinos are leptons. Protons and neutrons are baryons. Mesons consist of a quark-antiquark pair; baryons consist of three quarks.

Deped Competencies 3.1 Name and describe the sub-atomic particles. 3.2 Determine the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in an atom, given its atomic number and atomic mass. 3.3 Discuss and compare the types and properties of ionizing radiation. 3.4 Interpret equations on nuclear reactions. 3.5 Calculate the mass defect and nuclear binding energy of an atom using the Einsteins matter-energy equivalence.

Students will be able to...


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Identify the properties of the nucleus of an atom. Explain why some nuclei are unstable. Calculate the binding energy of various nuclei. Describe the three modes of nuclear decay. Predict the products of nuclear decay. Calculate the decay constant and the half-life of a radioactive substance. Distinguish between nuclear fission and nuclear fusion. Explain how a chain reaction is utilized by nuclear reactors. Compare fission and fusion reactors. Define the four fundamental interactions of nature. Identify the elementary particles that make up matter. Describe the standard model of the universe.

Unit/Topic/Lesson Subatomic Physics Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #6 Stage 1 Desired Results Established Goal(s): II. 4. Appreciate the uses of nuclear radiation in society Understanding(s): Students will understand that... Deped Competencies 4.1 Explain the effects of these applications on living things and the environment. 4.2 Evaluate the risks and benefits derived from the applications of nuclear radiation. 4.3 Explain the principle of radiation safety and its importance in society. Students will be able to...

Unit/Topic/Lesson Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Performance Task(s):

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #7 Stage 1 Desired Results


Established Goal(s): III. Energy in the Home 1. Appreciate the contributions of Franklin, Coulomb, Volta, and Ohm in the understanding of electricity. 2. Understand the basic concepts and principles of electricity as used in home circuit connections. Understanding(s): Students will understand that... Electric charge There are two kinds of electric charge; likes repel, and unlikes attract. Electric charge is conserved. The fundamental unit of charge, e, is the charge of a single electron or proton. Conductors and insulators can be charged by contact. Conductors can also be charged by induction. A surface charge can be induced on an insulator by polarization. Electric force According to Coulombs law, the electric force between two charges is proportional to the magnitude of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. The electric force is a field force. The resultant electric force on any charge is the vector sum of the individual electric forces on that charge. The electric field An electric field exists in the region around a charged object. Electric field strength depends on the magnitude of the charge producing the field and the distance between that charge and a point in the field. The direction of the electric field vector, E, is the direction in which an electric force would act on a positive test charge. Field lines are tangent to the electric field vector at any point, and the number of lines is proportional to the magnitude of the field strength. Deped Competencies Students will be able to... 1.1 Cite the contributions of Franklin, Coulomb, Volta, 1. Understand the basic properties of electric Ohm and other Filipino inventors. charge. 2.1 Trace the electrical connections from the meter to the 2. Differentiate between conductors and insulators. appliances in the different parts of the home 3. Distinguish between charging by contact, charging 2.2 Translate circuit diagrams into actual circuits and vice by induction, and charging by polarization. versa. 4. Calculate electric force using Coulombs law. 2.3 Measure electric current through a conductor, voltage 5. Compare electric force with gravitational force. across it and its resistance. 6. Apply the superposition principle to find the 2.4 Determine experimentally interrelationships among resultant force on a charge and to find the current, voltage and its resistance. position at which the net force on a charge is zero. 2.5 Apply Ohms Law to series and parallel circuits. 7. Calculate electric field strength. 2.6 Relate power to voltage and current. 8. Draw and interpret electric field lines. 2.7 Discuss and practice safety measures in dealing with 9. Identify the four properties associated with a electricity. conductor in electrostatic equilibrium. 2.8 Compute electrical energy consumption. 2.9 Suggest ways of using electrical energy wisely. Unit/Topic/Lesson Electric Forces and Fields Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #8 Stage 1 Desired Results


Established Goal(s): III. Energy in the Home 1. Appreciate the contributions of Franklin, Coulomb, Volta, and Ohm in the understanding of electricity. 2. Understand the basic concepts and principles of electricity as used in home circuit connections. Understanding(s): Students will understand that... Electrical potential energy Electrical potential energy is energy associated with a charged object due to its position relative to a source of electric force. Electrical potential energy is a form of mechanical energy. Potential difference Electric potential is electrical potential energy divided by charge. The electric potential at a given point in an electric field is independent of the charge at that point. Only differences in electric potential (potential differences) from one position to another are useful in calculations. Capacitance The capacitance, C, of an object is the amount of charge, Q, the object can store for a given potential difference, V, as shown by the equation at right: Capacitance depends on the shape of the capacitor, the distance between the plates, and the dielectric between the plates. A capacitor is a device that is used to store electrical potential energy. Capacitors will charge if a potential difference is applied. Once charged, a capacitor can discharge if its plates are connected by a conducting path. The potential energy stored in a charged capacitor depends on the charge and the final potential difference between the capacitors two plates: Deped Competencies 1.1 Cite the contributions of Franklin, Coulomb, Volta, Ohm and other Filipino inventors. 2.1 Trace the electrical connections from the meter to the appliances in the different parts of the home 2.2 Translate circuit diagrams into actual circuits and vice versa. 2.3 Measure electric current through a conductor, voltage across it and its resistance. 2.4 Determine experimentally interrelationships among current, voltage and its resistance. 2.5 Apply Ohms Law to series and parallel circuits. 2.6 Relate power to voltage and current. 2.7 Discuss and practice safety measures in dealing with electricity. 2.8 Compute electrical energy consumption. 2.9 Suggest ways of using electrical energy wisely. Students will be able to... 1. Define electrical potential energy. 2. Compute the electrical potential energy for various charge distributions. 3. Distinguish between electrical potential energy, electric potential, and potential difference. 4. Compute the electric potential for various charge distributions. 5. Relate capacitance to the storage of electrical potential energy in the form of separated charges. 6. Calculate the capacitance of various devices. 7. Calculate the energy stored in a capacitor.

Unit/Topic/Lesson Electrical Energy and Capacitance Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #9 Stage 1 Desired Results


Established Goal(s): III. Energy in the Home 1. Appreciate the contributions of Franklin, Coulomb, Volta, and Ohm in the understanding of electricity. 2. Understand the basic concepts and principles of electricity as used in home circuit connections. Understanding(s): Students will understand that...

Electric current Current is the rate of charge movement. Conventional current is defined in terms of positive charge movement. Drift velocity is the net velocity of charge carriers; its magnitude is much less than the average speed between collisions. Batteries and generators supply energy to charge carriers. In direct current, charges move in a single direction; in alternating current, the direction of charge movement continually alternates. Resistance According to the definition of resistance, potential difference equals current times resistance, as follows: Resistance depends on length, cross-sectional area, temperature, and material. Superconductors are materials that have resistances of zero below a critical temperature, which varies with each metal. Electric power Electric power is the rate of conversion of electrical energy: The power dissipated by a resistor can be calculated with the following equations: Electric companies measure energy consumed in kilowatt-hours.
Deped Competencies 1.1 Cite the contributions of Franklin, Coulomb, Volta, Ohm and other Filipino inventors. 2.1 Trace the electrical connections from the meter to the appliances in the different parts of the home 2.2 Translate circuit diagrams into actual circuits and vice versa. 2.3 Measure electric current through a conductor, voltage across it and its resistance. 2.4 Determine experimentally interrelationships among current, voltage and its resistance. 2.5 Apply Ohms Law to series and parallel circuits. 2.6 Relate power to voltage and current. 2.7 Discuss and practice safety measures in dealing with electricity. 2.8 Compute electrical energy consumption. 2.9 Suggest ways of using electrical energy wisely. Students will be able to... 1. Describe the basic properties of electric current. 2. Solve problems relating current, charge, and time. 3. Distinguish between the drift speed of a charge carrier and the average speed of the charge carrier between collisions. 4. Differentiate between direct current and alternating current. 5. Calculate resistance, current, and potential difference using the definition of resistance. 6. Distinguish between ohmic and non-ohmic materials. 7. Know what factors affect resistance. 8. Describe what is unique about superconductors. 9. Relate electric power to the rate at which electrical energy is converted to other forms of energy. 10. Calculate electric power. 11. Calculate the cost of running electrical appliances. Unit/Topic/Lesson Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental

Current and Resistance Teacher Resources

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #10 Stage 1 Desired Results


Established Goal(s): III. Energy in the Home 1. Appreciate the contributions of Franklin, Coulomb, Volta, and Ohm in the understanding of electricity. 2. Understand the basic concepts and principles of electricity as used in home circuit connections. Understanding(s): Students will understand that...

Schematic diagrams and circuits Schematic diagrams use standardized symbols to summarize the contents of electric circuits. A circuit is a set of electrical components connected so that they provide one or more complete paths for the movement of charges. Any device that transforms nonelectrical energy into electrical energy, such as a battery or a generator, is a source of emf. If the internal resistance of a battery is neglected, the emf can be considered equal to the terminal voltage, the potential difference across the sources two terminals. Resistors in series or in parallel The equivalent resistance of a set of resistors connected in series is the sum of the individual resistances.

The equivalent resistance of a set of resistors connected in parallel is calculated using an invers e relationship. Complex resistor combinations Complex circuits can be understood by isolating segments that are in series or in parallel and simplifying them to their equivalent resistances.
Deped Competencies 1.1 Cite the contributions of Franklin, Coulomb, Volta, Ohm and other Filipino inventors. 2.1 Trace the electrical connections from the meter to the appliances in the different parts of the home 2.2 Translate circuit diagrams into actual circuits and vice versa. 2.3 Measure electric current through a conductor, voltage across it and its resistance. 2.4 Determine experimentally interrelationships among current, voltage and its resistance. 2.5 Apply Ohms Law to series and parallel circuits. 2.6 Relate power to voltage and current. 2.7 Discuss and practice safety measures in dealing with electricity. 2.8 Compute electrical energy consumption. 2.9 Suggest ways of using electrical energy wisely. Students will be able to... 1. Interpret and construct circuit diagrams. 2. Identify circuits as open or closed. 3. Deduce the potential difference across the circuit load, given the potential difference across the batterys terminals. 4. Calculate the equivalent resistance for a circuit of resistors in series, and find the current in and potential difference across each resistor in the circuit. 5. Calculate the equivalent resistance for a circuit of resistors in parallel, and find the current in and potential difference across each resistor in the circuit. 6. Calculate the equivalent resistance for a complex circuit involving both series and parallel portions. 7. Calculate the current in and potential difference across individual elements within a complex circuit. Unit/Topic/Lesson Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental

Circuits and Circuit Elements Teacher Resources

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #11 Stage 1 Desired Results


Established Goal(s):

IV. Energy and the Economy 1. Appreciate the role of energy generation, utilization and management and conservation in economic development. 2. Recognize the contributions of Oersted, Ampere and Faraday to electromagnetic theory. 3. Demonstrate understanding of the technology of electrical energy generation and transmission, and use.
Understanding(s): Students will understand that... Magnets and magnetic fields Like magnetic poles repel, and unlike poles attract. The direction of any magnetic field is defined as the direction the north pole of a magnet would point if placed in the field. The magnetic field of a magnet points from the north pole of the magnet to the south pole. The magnetic north pole of Earth corresponds to the geographic South Pole, and the magnetic south pole corresponds to the geographic North Pole. Electromagnetism and magnetic domains A magnetic field exists around any current-carrying wire; the direction of the magnetic field follows a circular path around the wire. The magnetic field created by a solenoid or coil is similar to the magnetic field of a permanent magnet. A domain is a group of atoms whose magnetic fields are aligned. Magnetic force The direction of the force on a positive charge moving through a magnetic field can be found using the right -hand rule. The magnitude of a magnetic field is given by the relation A length of wire, l , in an external magnetic field undergoes a magnetic force with a magnitude of . The direction of the magnetic force on the wire can be found using the right-hand rule. Two parallel current-carrying wires exert on one another forces that are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction. If the currents are in the same direction, the two wires attract one another. If the currents are in opposite directions, the wires repel one another. Deped Competencies Students will be able to... 1.1 Describe the development of various energy resources 1. For given situations, predict whether magnets will in the country. repel or attract each other. 1.2 Evaluate the risks and benefits associated with energy 2. Describe the magnetic field around a permanent development. magnet. 2.1 Demonstrate Oersteds discovery. 3. Describe the orientation of Earths magnetic field. 2.2 Compare the contributions of Faraday and Oersted to 4. Describe the magnetic field produced by the electromagnetic theory. current in a straight conductor and in a solenoid. 2.3 Cite the significance of Faradays contribution to the 5. Explain magnetism in terms of the domain theory development of human society. of magnetism. 3.1 Explain electromagnetic induction. 6. Given the force on a charge in a magnetic field, 3.2 Discuss how electromagnetic induction is applied to determine the strength of the magnetic field. generators and transformers 7. Use the right-hand rule to find the direction of the 3.3 Differentiate a step-up from a step-down transformer force on a charge moving through a magnetic 3.4 Describe the energy transformation in electrical power field. plants. 8. Determine the magnitude and direction of the 3.5 Describe the transmission of electric energy from a force on a wire carrying current in a magnetic power station to the community field. 3.6 Discuss the working principle of an electric motor 3.7 Differentiate a motor from a generator. 3.8 Discuss the transformation of electrical energy to different forms

Unit/Topic/Lesson Magnetism Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control Experimental

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL 14-1 (2days) 14-2 (2days) 14-3 (2days) 14-4 (2days) Day 5 Comments: EXPERIMENTAL

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #12 Stage 1 Desired Results


Established Goal(s):

IV. Energy and the Economy 1. Appreciate the role of energy generation, utilization and management and conservation in economic development. 2. Recognize the contributions of Oersted, Ampere and Faraday to electromagnetic theory. 3. Demonstrate understanding of the technology of electrical energy generation and transmission, and use.
Understanding(s): Students will understand that... Induced current Changing the magnetic field strength near a conductor induces an emf. The direction of an induced current in a circuit is such that its magnetic field opposes the change in the applied magnetic field. Induced emf can be calculated using Faradays law of magnetic induction. Alternating current, generators, and motors Generators use induction to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy. Alternating current is measured in terms of rms current. Motors use an arrangement similar to that of generators to convert electrical energy into mechanical energy. Inductance Mutual inductance involves the induction of a current in one circuit by means of a changing current in a nearby circuit. Transformers change the potential difference of an alternating current. Self-induction occurs when the changing current in a circuit induces an emf in the same circuit. Deped Competencies Students will be able to... 1.1 Describe the development of various energy resources 1. Describe how the change in the number of in the country. magnetic field lines through a circuit loop affects 1.2 Evaluate the risks and benefits associated with energy the magnitude and direction of the induced development. current. 2.1 Demonstrate Oersteds discovery. 2. Apply Lenzs law to determine the direction of an 2.2 Compare the contributions of Faraday and Oersted to induced current. electromagnetic theory. 3. Calculate the induced emf and current using 2.3 Cite the significance of Faradays contribution to the Faradays law of induction. development of human society. 4. Calculate the maximum emf for an electric 3.1 Explain electromagnetic induction. generator. 3.2 Discuss how electromagnetic induction is applied to 5. Calculate rms current and potential difference for generators and transformers ac circuits. 3.3 Differentiate a step-up from a step-down transformer 6. Describe how an electric motor relates to an 3.4 Describe the energy transformation in electrical power electric generator. plants. 7. Describe how mutual induction occurs in circuits. 3.5 Describe the transmission of electric energy from a 8. Calculate the potential difference from a step-up power station to the community or step-down transformer. 3.6 Discuss the working principle of an electric motor 9. Describe how self-induction occurs in an electric 3.7 Differentiate a motor from a generator. circuit. 3.8 Discuss the transformation of electrical energy to different forms

Unit/Topic/Lesson Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control

Experimental

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL EXPERIMENTAL

Comments:

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ

Week #_____ Stage 1 Desired Results


Established Goal(s):

I. Energy in Society 1. Appreciate the importance of energy resources and energy use in development.
Understanding(s): Students will understand that... What is physics? Physics is the study of the physical world, from motion and energy to light and electricity. Physics uses the scientific method to discover general laws that can be used to make predictions about a variety of situations. A common technique in physics for analyzing a complex situation is to disregard irrelevant factors and create a model that describes the essence of a system or situation. Measurements in experiments Physics measurements are typically made and expressed in SI, a system that uses a set of base units and prefixes to describe measurements of physical quantities. Accuracy describes how close a measurement is to reality. Precision results from the limitations of the measuring device used. Significant figures are used to indicate which digits in a measurement are actual measurements and which are estimates. Significant-figure rules provide a means to ensure that calculations do not report results that are more precise than the data used to make them. The language of physics Physicists make their work easier by summarizing data in tables and graphs and by abbreviating quantities in equations. Dimensional analysis can help identify whether a physics expression is a valid one. Order-of-magnitude calculations provide a quick way to evaluate the appropriateness of an answer. Deped Competencies Students will be able to... 1. Demonstrate problem solving skills in science. 2. Describe applications / uses of Physics and 1.1 Explain the role of energy in the development of Technology in their daily life. human society from the industrial age to the 3. Cite the contributions of physics to society knowledge-based society. 4. Describe how physicists contributed to the body 1.2 Discuss examples of the interaction among of knowledge called science and to technology energy, technology and society [e.g. effects of energy 5. Identify activities and fields that involve the major in the environment, economic growth and energy areas within physics. demand; energy resources and energy crisis, etc.] 6. Describe the processes of the scientific method. 1.3 Infer that the total mass-energy in the universe is 7. Describe the role of models and diagrams in constant. physics. 8. List basic SI units and the quantities they describe. 9. Convert measurements into scientific notation. 10. Distinguish between accuracy and precision. 11. Use significant figures in measurement and calculations. 12. Interpret data in tables and graphs, and recognize equations that summarize data. 13. Distinguish between conventions for abbreviating units and quantities. 14. Use dimensional analysis to check the validity of expressions. 15. Perform order-of-magnitude calculations.

Unit/Topic/Lesson Teacher Resources Labs/Demonstrations/Handouts Control

Experimental

Performance Task(s):

Stage 2 Assessment Evidence Other Evidence:

Stage 3 Learning Plan CONTROL EXPERIMENTAL

Comments:

Completion date: Completed by: JOSE PAULO DELA CRUZ