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~ Kim Nahinu EDRL 433

Title of Article/Text: Money, Money, Money Introduction: If you have ever wondered where money comes from, how it is made, and who decides its value, this is the book for you. Today, boys and girls, were going to learn about the development of money through bartering, natural currency, coins, paper money, and todays invisible money-checks and credit cards. We will be able to do this by asking and answering questions that we might have during reading. Pre-Reading Strategy: 1. Ask Lets begin by thinking about what we already know, or believe about the money system. (Talk about types or forms of money, the value of money, and how money was created.) 2. Give the students their copy of their book. Guide them to the front and back covers and read the title. Have students discuss what they see on the covers. Encourage them to offer ideas as to what type of book it is (genre, text type, fiction/nonfiction) and what it might be about. 3. Discuss-Asking and answering questions while reading can help us to better understand what we are reading. 4. Direct- students back to the table of contents. Use the table of contents to model asking questions. Think-aloud: I can use the table of contents to help me think of questions Id like to have answered about this book. For example, I see sections titled BARTERING, CURRENCY, and COINS. I wonder what the difference is between currency and coins. I also wonder what exactly bartering is. I am also curious about where and how money is printed and what the author means by invisible money. As I read, I enjoy looking for answers to my questions to answer as I continue to read. 5. Have students look at other the other section titles. Go ahead and take a look at the other titles. Do you have any questions in your mind, before we begin reading, that spark a curiosity based on the table of contents or covers of the book? 6. Model- Write these questions down on the board or a piece of chart paper. During Reading Strategy: 1. Introduce- As a group begin by reading page 4- (Introduction) 2. Next, introduce the worksheet (Questions/Answers). 3. Explain- While you are reading Money, Money, Money, I want you to think of questions you might have that relate to this topic. Use your Ask-Answer-Questions worksheet to write down at least one question that you have before reading that section. If the text answers your question, please circle it.

~ Kim Nahinu EDRL 433


4. Have students read to the end of page 10. Remind them to read for information about money. 5. Model-answering and asking questions. Before reading, I had many questions that I wanted answered about the topics in the book. One question I had was about the difference between currency and coins. I found out that currency refers to an object that represents value, for example, a large fish might be worth two shells. Other example of currency given on page 7 of the book are tea and tobacco leaves, lumps of silver or gold, salt, and other spices. On page 8, I learned that 2,600 years ago, people started making precious metals to represent value. Precious metals are rare and valued across cultures, and they were easily shaped and weighed. If I think of any more questions while reading, I will write them on my ask-and-answer worksheet. 6. Independent- I would like each of you to look at your worksheet, and write down the answers to the questions you have circled. You may also write down additional questions that you might have. 7. Invite-students to share information they learned and the questions they thought of as they read. 8. Continue-have students read the remainder of the book. Remind then to write down questions for each section, and find answers to their questions. 9. Have students make a question mark (?) in their book beside any word they do not understand or cannot pronounce. After Reading Strategy: 1. Ask students, What words, if any, did you mark in your books. Take the opportunity to model how they can read these words using decoding strategies and context clues. 2. Reinforce that before, and during reading, and looking for answers while reading, keeps readers interested in the topic. It also encourages them to keep reading to find answers to their questions and helps them understand and remember what they have read. 3. Think-aloud: I wanted to know what was meant by invisible money. I learned that this phrase refers to credit and debit cards, which represent money that is in ones checking or savings account, or that the bank lends you-(thus its invisible). 4. Remind students-Not all of your questions might have been answered in this text. Lets look at page 21 Explore More. Here are other resources that we can use to answer additional questions that we might have about money. 5. Independent Practice- Have students fill in the remainder of their Ask-and-Answer Questions worksheet. Invite them to share any additional information that they have learned and any questions they still might have.

~ Kim Nahinu EDRL 433


Closure: 1. Reflect- Discuss with the students It is very important to pay attention to the details that are in a text. We did this by asking and answering questions before, during, and after reading. How did this help you to understand the main idea of the story. 2. Conclusion- Today, you learned about the history of money across cultures. You also read about how money, trading, and bartering have changed over time.