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DALLAS POST

Vol. 122 No. 9


THE BACK MOUNTAINS NEWSPAPER SINCE 1889
SUNDAY MAY 5-11, 2013
The
50
ANEDITIONOF THE TIMES LEADER www.mydallaspost.com WILKES-BARRE, PA.
Sir Isaac Newton said that a falling
apple taught him the law of gravity.
And today, Apple iPads are helping Dal-
las Middle School students learn about
Newtons laws of motion.
Sam Barboses sixth-grade science
class at the Dallas Middle School re-
cently used a class set of iPads to create
impressive multimedia presentations
about Newtons three laws of motion.
Although the topic may seem dif-
cult for sixth-graders to grasp, Barbo-
ses students used graphics and created
videos to illustrate a law of motion.
Barbose explained that the students
used the iPads to make the videos and
then used an application called Key-
note to create their slideshows.
The iPads connect with the Internet
via the schools Wi-Fi network. The
classroom uses Airplay, a go-between
device which allows students to stream
their presentations to the large digital
whiteboard in the room.
While the presentations were being
given, students were expected to take
notes on the presentations of other stu-
dents and most chose to use their iPads
for note-taking. Barbose said students
could then email their notes to them-
selves. Students also liked making their
own ashcards on the devices.
Sammy Dixon, 12, of Dallas, chose
Newtons rst law to present. I learned
a lot about Newton, she said. I learned
that if you roll a ball, eventually it will
stop. The friction against the oor or
the wall will stop it.
Of the iPads, she added, Theyre re-
ally fun. It makes class more fun and
not boring like reading from a book.
Ryan Schmid, 12, of Dallas, chose
Newtons second law. It seemed the
easiest at the time, he said. He, too,
likes using the iPads. We use them
a lot in science. We have a lot of apps
that help us with everyday stuff we do.
Instead of writing things, we use the
notes app.
Barbose showed off the specialized
cart which contains the iPads and a
MacBook Pro computer. All the units
can be recharged and downloaded with
new applications at the same time. He
said the iPads have been in place since
October and there hasnt been a single
incident of damage to the devices.
About 100 students use the iPads,
including science and reading classes.
Barboses dream of using iPads in
his classroom came true because of the
Dallas Foundation for Excellence in
Education, Inc.
The foundation is a non-prot orga-
nization which was created in 2011. It
is a 501 (c) 3 organization which can
provide tax credit benets to business
contributors.
According to Kristin Gattuso, the
foundations treasurer, the iPad cart
with MacBook Pro computer and 30
iPads cost $16,448. The money was
donated by local businesses who took
advantage of the states tax credit pro-
gram.
By SUSAN DENNEY
Dallas Post Correspondent
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Lindsey Jorda, a student in the
Dallas Middle School, holds up the
Ipad she uses to present her science
project.
A new kind
of apple for
the teacher
Dallas Middle School science
students use iPads to learn.
See IPADS, Page 7
Tying together
bracelets and friendship
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/ THE TIMES LEADER
Ross Elementary school art teacher Jill Vonderhook takes a lap after nishing measuring a chain of friendship bracelets over 2,000 feet long.
Ross Elementary students attempt to make worlds longest friendship bracelet
STORIES By DOTTY MARTIN / dmartin@mydallaspost.com
If you think getting into the Guin-
ness Book of World Records is easy,
think again.
As the ofcial witness to the Ross
Elementary School students attempt
to get into the book for the worlds
longest friendship bracelet, I learned
rsthand that having your name
entered into the ofcial world record
book for anything is no easy task and
Im now even more impressed with
anyone who does get their name in
the book.
After intense research as to the kind
of project to be attempted, theres all
kinds of documentation to be com-
pleted before your record-breaking
attempt even begins. Ross Elementary
School Principal Donny James can
attest to that.
Everything - and I mean everything
- has to be done exactly as Guinness
requires it to be done.
In the Ross Elementary case, the
measurement of the length of the
bracelets needed to be recorded by
professional land surveyors. Don
Bolton and Jess Kronenwetter of the
Borton Lawson Engineering Firm did
just that. Their boss, Don Spencer, is
the father of Ross fourth-grader Jes-
sica Spencer. Because of his relation-
ship to the school, Spencer could not
participate in the ofcial measure-
ment so he volunteered the services
of Bolton and Kronenwetter, who not
only offered their expertise but their
Breaking a world record is
fun, but not easy to do
Bracelets chained together.
P
rincipal Donny James held the stick wound tight
with brightly-colored string high above his head
and the Ross Elementary School students cheered.
Art teacher Jill Vanderhook took a victory lap, hold-
ing the stick like an Olympic torch, and students
roared while We Are The Champions blared through
disc jockey Frank Prests speakers.
Although still unofcial, the record of the worlds
longest friendship bracelet belongs to the Ross Ele-
mentary students with a measurement of 2,678.02 feet
(816.262 meters) measured by professional land sur-
veyors Jess Kronenwetter and Bill Bolton fromBorton
Lawson Engineering Firm.
For seven months, students at the school have been
tying friendship bracelets, using colored embroidery
string. They tied in homeroom. They tied at lunch.
They tied at recess. They tied at home.
They tied and tied and tied.
See BRACELETS, Page 7
See RECORD, Page 7
What do James Bond, mirrors and
a GPS have in common? They are the
themes of three award-winning shows
by Lake-Lehman musical groups. And
Lake-Lehman students are aiming for
bigger wins at the regional champion-
ships in Wildwood, New Jersey this
weekend.
The student musicians performed
their programs for the public on May 1
in the high school gym before packing
up to go to the Tournament of Bands
competition this weekend. The Tour-
nament of Bands (TOB) is one of the
largest competitive band organizations
in the United States.
James Bond is the theme of the El-
ementary Percussion program. The in-
door percussion group just won a silver
medal at the Chapter 7 regional com-
petition in the Tournament of Bands
program.
Fifth and sixth-graders dressed in
tuxedo-print T-shirts played a variety
of percussion instruments, including a
wide range of drums. The melody was
provided by marimba, xylophone, vi-
braphone and synthesizer and included
jazz elements, tricky rhythms and even
a voice clip of the famous Mr. Bond
himself.
The group is directed by Patrick
LL music students head
to regional competition
By TOMROBINSON
For The Dallas Post
Dallas, Lake-Lehman girls square
off in annual benet game.
See COMPETITION, Page 7
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE DALLAS POST
Lehman-Jackson Elementary fth-grader Sarah Salus performs James
Bond, 007 with the Elementary Percussion Ensemble during a preview
show at the high school gymnsaium.
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 2 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013
The Dallas Post
15 NORTH MAIN STREET, WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
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Coverage Area: The Dallas Post covers the
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Dallas and Lake-Lehman School Districts. We
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ADVERTISING
NEWS
WANT A PHOTO?
CIRCULATION
A
NEWSPAPER
The following Back Mountain real
estate transactions have been re-
corded in the Luzerne County Ofce
of Recorder of Deeds for the week of
April 22, 2013:
Theodore J. Jr. and Patricia A.
Fisher to Jared A. and Julie Marie
Vedro, Cliffside Avenue, Kingston
Township; $114,200
William H. Lewis to Candace Marie
Fenstemaker, Hunlock Township;
$120,000
Randolph H. Propos (executor),
Margaret T. Propos (estate) to
Richard and Lindsey Johnston,
Kingston Township; $442,950
David H. Coral (agent), Toni A.
Crevo (per agent) to Edward J.
Ciarimboli, Jackson Township;
$600,000
John E. Halbing III to Thomas and
Leslie Wilmes, Dallas Township;
$391,000
PROPERTY TRANSFERS
Meet eMMa
See ANSWERS, Page 5
Senior Citizens Centers sponsored
by the Area Agency on Aging for
Luzerne and Wyoming Counties offer
hot noon meals Monday through
Friday to people 60 years of age or
older. Donations from participants
are gratefully accepted and needed
in order to expand this program.
The following is the menu for the
week of May 6:
MONDAY: Pork riblet (BBQ side),
coleslaw, corn chowder, whole wheat
sandwich roll, crackers, grapes and
apricots, margarine, milk and coffee.
TUESDAY: Mothers Day luncheon -
Stuffed chicken breast, glazed baby
carrots, broccoli salad, dinner roll,
white cake, margarine, milk and cof-
fee.
WEDNESDAY: Herbed sh, broc-
coli and cauliower medley, parsley
boiled potatoes, potato cheese soup,
whole wheat dinner roll, coconut
cake, margarine, milk and coffee.
THURSDAY: Bag lunch
FRIDAY: Apple pork chop, scalloped
potatoes, brussels sprouts, whole
wheat dinner roll, peach crisp, mar-
garine, milk and coffee.
SENIOR CITIZENS MENU
Do you believe dreams come
true? Emma does and she knows
its just a matter of time before
her dream of a new home comes
true. Could you be that excep-
tionally kind, compassionate
person who can make a miracle
happen for a special cat (or two)?
Emma sure hopes so! She is
1-year-old, spayed, up-to-date on
shots and microchipped. She is a
little shy and so sweet.
You can visit Emma and her
friends at
BLUE CHIP FARMS
ANIMAL REFUGE
974 Lockville Road
Dallas, PA
VISITING HOURS
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and
Sunday: Noon to 5 p.m.
Other hours by appointment
Call: 333-5265
Email: questions@bcfanimalref-
uge.org
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 3 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013
A special meeting of the Harveys
Lake Planning Commission held
April 29 ended with plans to build a
195 foot cellphone tower in the bor-
ough being put on hold.
Attorney Eric Goldman, who rep-
resents X Cell, the towers company,
and Mario Calabretta, X Cells engi-
neer, were in disagreement with bor-
ough planning commission member
Michael Dziak on the status of the
area where the tower is to be built.
Dziak, along with Penn Eastern
engineer Daryl Pawlush, challenged
X Cells representatives, who said
the area is not required to be la-
beled as a subdivision. Dziak was
also concerned about the property
owners Clean and Green status
if the tower is to be placed on the
property. Dziak said the county will
not issue a separate number for tax
purposes if the area is not a subdi-
vision, leaving the property owner
responsible for the taxes.
X Cell wants to lease a 100 x 100
foot area of property off Cliff Street
in Harveys Lake Borough. The ac-
tual area to be used for the tower is
50 x 50 feet, with room to expand
if other providers decide to join in
with the anchor provider, AT&T.
Attorney Mark McNealis has said
he will research the issue of whether
or not the area is legally considered
a subdivision. After McNealis deter-
mines the lands status, the commis-
sion will meet again with Goldman
and Calabretta in order to grant the
application to work on the property.
Lakeside Drive resident Andrea
Payne was concerned about truck
trafc during the construction pro-
cess. Calabretta responded by say-
ing the type of trucks that would
pass through the area would be
drilling rig and concrete trucks,
not very large trucks, and the work
would take about 4-6 weeks, de-
pending on the weather.
Mary Jean Tarantini, another
Lakeside Drive resident, is not
pleased with the potential plans.
This is a beautiful area and we
dont want to see these things (the
cell phone tower) around, Taran-
tini said. She added, the neighbors
want to keep the beautythis is
why we live here.
Dave Tarantini expressed concern
about property values being reduced
as a result of the tower. He also asked
why the tower was being construct-
ed in Harveys Lake, to which Gold-
man replied that about half of the
borough does not receive adequate
cell phone reception.
Planning Commission puts cellphone tower on hold
By SUSAN BETTINGER
Dallas Post Correspondent
HARVEYS LAKE BOROUGH
Seventeen-
year-old
paralympic
skier Stepha-
nie Jallen is
shown here
on the irst
day of DSUSA
NORAM ski
racing at Cop-
per Mountain,
GS.
Paralympic skier will speak to Irregulars
The Irregulars of the Back Mountain an-
nounce that Stephanie Jallen, 17, of Hard-
ing will be presenter at The Irregulars
Think Tank Breakfast on Saturday, May 11
in the Natona Roomat Twin Stacks Center.
Jallen is an athlete on the U.S. Paralym-
pics Alpine Skiing National Teams. She is
ranked in the top 10 in the world in two
of the ve alpine skiing disciplines and is
slated to compete in the U.S. Paralympics
in Sochi, Russia in 2014.
She is a member of the junior class at
Wyoming Area High School.
The Natona Room at Twin Stack Cen-
ter, Hwy 415, Dallas, is the all-new home
for The Irregulars Think Tank Breakfast.
Doors open at 8:30 a.m. for socializing
ahead of the buffet-style breakfast served
at 9 a.m.. Attendee reservations are re-
quired.
For more information, call Cholly Hayes,
facilitator, at 760-1213, Bobby Zampetti at
690-2323 or email the theirregulars@fron-
tier.com.
W
hat began in 1947 as a small busi-
ness with $25,000 worth of inven-
tory housed in a 1,500 square foot
building is now a multi-million dollar busi-
ness with three locations around the state.
C.H. Waltz Sons, Inc., founded by Clark
H. Waltz and his three sons, Joseph, William
and Theodore, now includes ofces in Dal-
las, Cogen Station and Wineld.
According to the companys website,
www.chwaltz.com, In 1966 Clark retired,
turning the business over to his sons. Jo-
seph R. Waltz assumed the role of president,
William C. Waltz became the vice president
and Theodore J. Waltz took the position of
treasurer. Joe retired in 1986 and Ted be-
came president. Bill remained the vice presi-
dent until he retired in 1994 at which point
Ted became the sole owner and CEO of the
company. For many years, Teds wife, Con-
nie, helped run the business, but in more
recent years his oldest daughter, Deanna G.
Boehret, was appointed the position of vice
president while his two oldest grandsons,
Seth H. and Justin T. Boehret, work in man-
agement positions.
Seth Boehret manages the Dallas store,
which opened in 2007, and he said the busi-
ness continues to grow. He added, however,
Were getting to be a larger business, but
were still making an effort to have a small
business atmosphere.
Part of that atmosphere includes good,
friendly customer service.
One thing we strive for, Boehret said, is
developing a relationship with our custom-
ers. We try to go out of our way to make the
customers happy.
The shop offers rentals and sells both new
and used equipment.
In addition to offering a vast product line
of various brands, including Kubota, Tana-
ka, Snapper, D Woods, Hud-Son and more,
the shop is a full-service dealer and can get
parts for almost any make and model, ac-
cording to Boehret.
Anything we can t in the shop, we can
work on, he said, adding that company
employees have even worked on machinery
outdoors that was too large to t inside. It
all goes back to developing relationships
with the customers and serving them well.
Boegret describes the business as fam-
ily oriented, which means supplying the
customers with the equipment that best
suits their families needs, rather than using
pushy salesmen to pressure people into
buying things.
The store also makes an effort to step be-
yond its doors and get involved in the com-
munity. Some organizations and events it
belongs to and has helped with include The
Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce, Dal-
las Harvest Festival, various expos and fairs,
the Wilkes-Barre Farmers Market and col-
lections for victims of natural disasters.
C.H. Waltz Sons makes business personal
By ELIZABETH BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
Hobbies/interests: Anything outdoors -
sports, shooting sports, hiking, basketball,
football, running
Most used piece of equipment at home:
BX2360 Kubota sub-compact model tractor,
which is also one of the shops best sellers.
They are an excellent quality, he said, and
they sell well.
Business motto: The stores reputation is:
Youre not just buying a Kubota, a Tanaka or
a Hud-Son machine. Youre buying a C.H. Waltz
Sons, Inc. machine.
Favorite part of the job: Interacting with the
customers
Dream vacation: Backpacking and mountain
climbing
Staff members of C.H. Waltz Sons, Inc. gather on the front lawn of the business. From left, are Michelle Greim, of Sweet Valley,
administrative assistant; David Stokes, of West Wyoming, service manager; Dale Edwards, of Hunlock Creek, parts manager; and
Seth Boehret, of Cogen Station, general manager.
AT LEFT: C.H. Waltz Sons, Inc. recently
began carrying Hud-Son Forest Equipment.
Here, Hud-Son Sales Manager Mike Spad-
aro gives a demonstration with a sawmill
during C.H. Waltzs recent open house.
ABOVE: Door prizes are displayed during
C.H. Waltzs recent open house.
BACK MOUntAin BUSinESS SpOtLiGHt: C.H. WALtz SOnS, inC.
MEEt tHE MAnAGER:
SEtH BOEHREt
Mary Gulotta, of Trucksville, has seen rsthand
the enormous toll a communication disorder and
the bullying and teasing associated with it can have
on an individual. Its one of the reasons she chose
to major in speech-language pathology at Miseri-
cordia University, so she could help others like
her best friend from high school nd the voice
they all deserve.
Throughout her high school years, Gulotta saw
her best friend struggle with his communication
disorder the result of being born with a cleft
palate. Post-surgery, her friend still spoke with a
hypernasal voice and nasal emission. By the time
they reached high school, he was uneasy when he
had to speak in public. At times, he relied on others
to speak for him, including Gulotta.
He used to share with me the reactions he con-
stantly received from people about his voice and
mentioned to me that these reactions made him in-
secure, says the daughter of Steven and Linda Gu-
lotta. As a result, he limited his talking. Because of
the issues he had with speaking in public, he would
often ask me to speak for himwhen we were togeth-
er whether it was agging down a person in a store
or ordering in a restaurant.
I recognized the impact that his voice had on
himpersonally, his condence and his self-esteem,
Gulotta adds.
Tragically, Gulottas close friend lost his life dur-
ing her junior year of college in 2012.
I was left with only letters and poems he had
written in the last week of his life that depicted how
insecure he was, says Gulotta, who hopes to raise
awareness about how bullying affects people by
sharing their story. After this devastating blow of
losing my best friend, I channeled my sadness into
an even greater resolve to be able to give people a
voice and the ability to communicate.
Gulotta was recently awarded the 2013 Von
Drach Memorial Scholarship by the Pennsylvania
Speech-Language-Hearing Association (PSHA)
at the 54th annual convention in Harrisburg. The
2013 award marks the sixth straight year a Miseri-
cordia University SLP student has received the
$1,000 scholarship, awarded annually to an out-
standing student from one of Pennsylvanias 14
SLP schools in honor of Dr. Robert Von Drach. It
is given to a student who exhibits strong leader-
ship abilities, outstanding academic performance,
exceptional clinical skills and scholarship within
the profession.
At Misericordia, Gulotta has been a member of
the departments National Student Speech-Lan-
guage-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) since 2009
and the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing As-
sociation NSSLHA Chapter since 2009.
She has also maintained a 4.0 grade point average
in her academic studies, while also gaining clinical
experience at the Misericordia University Speech-
Language and Hearing Center on campus and at the
Wyoming Valley Childrens Association in Forty Fort
where she received real-world clinical experience
working with children with special needs, develop-
mental delays, hearing impairment, autism spec-
trum disorders and multiple disabilities.
In my graduate uency class, Mary developed a
stuttering treatment game that incorporated vari-
ous aspects of stuttering. We plan to test this game
in our clinic (the Speech-Language and Hearing
Center) with children who stutter. Mary once men-
tioned to me, I was not satised with the games
that were available for young children so I decided
to design one myself, said Glen Tellis, Ph.D., chair
of the Department of Speech-Language Pathology
at Misericordia University.
The more I become emerged in the eld of
speech-language pathology, the more my interest
for it grows, says Gulotta. I have come to value
clinical treatment as an art form, but realize that I
need to merge science into the art form to achieve
appropriate clinical results. Each client I receive
is a new challenge where individualistic plans are
created and implemented to t both the needs and
motivational factors of each client.
No other experience gives me the joy of know-
ing that I played a role in helping individuals learn
how to communicate effectively, she adds.
Gulotta also was accepted recently to Penn State
Milton S. Hershey Medical Center for an adult
eldwork placement for the fall semester.
MU student
helps those with
speech disorders
Mary Gulotta watched a friend struggle and
wants to assist others.
Mary Gulotta, a speech-language pathology
major at Misericordia University, was recently
awarded the 2013 Von Drach Memorial Schol-
arship by the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-
Hearing Association at the 54th annual
convention in Harrisburg.
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 4 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013
C
ross Creek Community Church in Trucks-
ville hosted a sold-out concert featuring three
contemporary Christian music bands April 5. Citi-
zen Way and MIKESCHAIR opened for Big Daddy
Weave, which led the crowd in worship and song. All
three bands visited with fans and signed autographs
after the show.
Big Daddy Weave concert
sells out in Trucksville
ABOVE: Guests enoy
a sold-out concert,
worshipping God along
with contemporary
Christian music band
Big Daddy Weave
April 5 at Cross Creek
Community Church,
Trucksville.
ElizabEth baumEistEr
Photos/thE dallas Post
BELOW: Mike Weaver, lead
singer of Big Daddy Weave,
hangs out with fans after
the show. From left, are
Leslie Bowden, Trucksville;
Weaver; Jessica Bowden,
Trucksville; and Heather
Harvey, Dallas.
AT LEFT: Mike Weaver, lead
singer of Big Daddy Weave
poses for a picture with a fan,
Ayden Hooke, of Monroe Twp.
AT LEFT: Guests at
Cross Creek Com-
munity Church,
Trucksville enjoy the
Redeemed Tour con-
cert April 5.
FAMILY EVENT SET
Family Action Agents, an
event for the entire family,
will be held at 6:30 p.m. today,
May 5 and Monday, May 6 in
the main sanctuary of Back
Mountain Harvest Assembly,
Carverton Road, Trucksville.
Family Action Agents is an
hour and a half of fun, interac-
tive group experiences, family
life lessons and worship time.
TURKEY DINNER SET
A roast turkey dinner and
bake sale will be held from
4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on Saturday,
May 11 at the Loyalville United
Methodist Church.
Tickets are $9 for adults and
$3.50 for children under 12
years of age. Takeouts are avail-
able by calling 477-3521 and
leaving a message with a name,
phone number, number of din-
ners requested and pickup time.
MEATLOAF DINNER
A meatloaf dinner will be
held from 4 to 7 p.m. on May
18 at the Alderson United
Methodist Church, Pole 108,
Harveys Lake.
Menu includes meatloaf,
baked potato, green bean casse-
role, cole slaw, roll and butter,
pie and beverage.
Tickets are $8 for adults and
$4 for children under 12 years
of age and are available at the
door. Takeouts will be avail-
able. For more information, call
639-5688.
MASS/ FLEA MARKET
St. Frances Cabrini Church,
585 Mt. Olivet Road, Carver-
ton, will celebrate a Memorial
Mass at 10 a.m. on Monday,
May 27. This mass is in honor
and memory of all the deceased
loved ones laid to rest at the
Mount Olivet Cemetery. Father
Vincent Dang will be the cel-
ebrant for this special mass.
Following the mass, the
parish Social Committee will
sponsor its annual ea market
and bake sale from 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. on the church grounds,
rain or shine. This years ea
market will include a variety
of household items, pictures,
dishware, knickknacks, toys,
DVDs, games and books.
Picnic foods for purchase
include clam chowder, haluski,
pork barbeque, wimpies, hot-
dogs with sauerkraut or chilli
and beverages. The bake sale
will feature fresh baked breads,
cakes, pies, cookies and pastries.
A special early bird ea mar-
ket will held from 7:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. on Sunday, May 26.
RUMMAGE SALE
The deacons of Trinity Pres-
byterian Church in Dallas have
set May 31 and June 1 for their
gigantic rummage sale in the
fellowship hall of the church,
105 Irem Road, Dallas, across
from the Country Club Shop-
ping Center.
The sale will be held from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, May
31 and from 9 a.m. to noon on
Saturday, June 1. Saturday will
be Bag Day - all you can stuff
into a large brown grocery bag
for only $2. Items available are
clothing in good condition for
men, women and children, cos-
tume jewelry, household items,
knickknacks, collectibles, toys,
books, holiday items and more.
CHURCH BRIEFS
N
O
W
O
P
E
N
!
Back in the Back Mountain
SPORTS PAGE SPORTS PAGE
Great Haircuts for Men & Boys
SUNDAY MAY 19 - 11-4
BENEFIT FUNDRAISER
FOR BLUE CHIP FARMS
ANIMAL REFUGE
Twin Stacks Center 1100 Memorial Hwy, Dallas
No Appointment Necessary Open Mon - Sat 675-2466
Specializing in Mens and Boys Haircuts
from Modern to Classic Styles
Plenty of Parking Easy In and Out
Fun For All Sports Fans
Professional & Experienced Stylists
GET A HAIRCUT &
HELP RAISE MONEY
TO HELP THE ANIMALS
AT BLUE CHIP
100% OF
ALL PROCEEDS
TO BENEFIT
BLUE CHIP FARMS
RAFFLES
REFRESHMENTS
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 5 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013
ANSILIO- Joan, 82, of Dallas,
died April 23, 2013, at Hospice
Community Care in Geisinger
South Wilkes-Barre.
She was born in Newark on
Oct. 1, 1930, grewup in Wilkes-
Barre and graduated fromCough-
lin High School, Class of 1948.
After graduation, she worked at
Pomeroys for a brief time.
She was an active member of
Gate of Heaven Church and its
Altar and Rosary Society and
served as Eucharistic minister
for many years. She volun-
teered at the Mercy Center,
Dallas, and the Mercy Hospital
Auxiliary, Wilkes-Barre.
Surviving are her daughter,
Terry Clemente; two grand-
sons; sister, Beverly Williams;
nieces, nephews and cousins.
Memorial donations to
Sisters of Mercy, P.O. Box 370,
Dallas, PA 18612
DENMON - Florence Mae, of
Beaumont, died Monday, April
22, 2013, at the Meadows Nurs-
ing Home in Dallas.
She was born in Alderson,
Pa., on Oct. 30, 1913.
Surviving are a son, Glenn,
Beaumont; four grandchildren;
six great-grandchildren; ve
great-great grandchildren.
DONOWSKI - Violet, 90, of
Tunkhannock and formerly of
Warrior Run, died Thursday,
April 25, 2013, in the Golden
Living Center, Tunkhannock.
She was born in Hanover on
Dec. 9, 1922 and was a member
of the Church of Nativity BVM
in Tunkhannock.
Surviving are sons, Stanley
Hope, Mill, N.C.; and David,
Tunkhannock; daughter, JoAnn
Charles, Tunkhannock; eight
grandchildren.
FIELDING - Edward, Uncle
Ed, formerly of the Back
Mountain, died Saturday, April
27, 2013.
He was born in Hollybush,
South Wales, and immigrated
to the United States with his
mother and family in 1930.
He served in the U. S. Army
during World War II and later
became a hairdresser, operating
his own salon in Trucksville
and then in Shavertown until
his retirement.
He was a member of the
Green Street Baptist Chapel,
Edwardsville, where he had
served many positions, mainly
as a deacon, but also as Sunday
school teacher, youth director,
choir member and organist.
Surviving are nieces and
nephews.
FOX- Ann C., 77, of Nanticoke,
died Sunday, April 28, 2013.
She was born Oct. 9, 1935,
in Harveys Lake, was a gradu-
ate of Pringle High School and
Wilkes-Barre Business College.
She previously worked at
Jimeals in Plymouth and
Miracle Mart in Kingston.
A member of the Parish of
Saint Robert Bellarmine, she
was a communicant at the
Church of Saint Aloysius for
more that 42 years. She was a
member of the Altar & Ro-
sary Society and leader of the
weekly rosary service, served as
a Eucharistic Minister, taught
CCD and coordinated the Pro-
Life Baby Shower at the church
for more than 20 years.
She was a volunteer for
auctions and member drives of
WVIA radio and television for
nearly 30 years.
Surviving are her husband,
Richard H. Fox; children, Briget
Ford, of Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship; the Reverend Richard
E., pastor of the Parish of Our
Lady of Mount Carmel in Lake
Silkworth; and Christopher R.,
of Nanticoke; two grandchil-
dren; sisters, Patricia Uzdella,
of Dallas; Julia Raineri, of Wil-
kes-Barre; Therese Androckitis,
of Ashley; and Marion Madden,
of Ashley; nieces and nephews.
HOLTON - Richard H., of
Tunkhannock, died Sunday,
April 21, 2013, in Geisinger
Community Medical Center
Hospice Unit.
He was born in Tunkhannock
on May 31, 1921.
He was a 1939 graduate of
Tunkhannock High School and
a U.S. Navy veteran of World
War II. Prior to his retirement
in 1983, had been employed for
42 years as a communications
installer for Western Electric/
Bell Telephone.
He was a member of the
Triton Hose Company, a former
member of the Tunkhannock
Moose Lodge, a charter mem-
ber of the Fraternal Order of
the Eagles, Tunkhannock, VFW
Post 769, the Dennis Strong
American Legion Post 457 and
the Communications Workers
of America. He attended the
Tunkhannock United Method-
ist Church.
Surviving are a son, Charles,
Tunkhannock; daughters, Linda
Evans, Wilkes-Barre; Beverly
James, Dallas; Mary Alice
Osterhout, Tunkhannock; and
Jennifer Very, Nicholson; 10
grandchildren; 13 great-grand-
children; cousins.
HOOVER - Joyce E. , 82,
of the Outlet section of Lake
Township, died Saturday, April
27, 2013, at the Meadows Nurs-
ing Center, Dallas.
She was born in Lake Township
on Oct. 28, 1930, graduated from
the former Laketon High School
in 1947 as valedictorian of her
class and received her bachelors
degree fromRoberts Wesleyan
College in NewYork.
She taught high school in
New York and Pennsylvania.
She was a lifetime member of
the Outlet Free Methodist Church.
Surviving are her sister, Faith
Dinger, of Lake Township;
nieces and nephews.
HOOVER - Lester H., of
Idetown, died Sunday, April 28,
2013, at the Hospice Commu-
nity Care, Wilkes-Barre.
He was borninIdetownon
Nov. 27, 1924, andgraduatedfrom
LehmanHighSchool in1942.
After serving in the U.S.
Army during World War II
under General Patton as a T-5
in the 301st Signal Operation
Battalion, 3rd Army E.T.O, he
was employed by Linear Corp.,
Dallas, Blue Ribbon Bakery,
Kingston, and retired from Off-
set Paperback, Dallas. He also
worked as a certied electrician
in the Wilkes-Barre area.
Surviving are his wife of
61 years, the former Vir-
ginia Wolfe; daughters, Cheryl
Summa, of Lehman; and Joann
Hoover, of Chugiak, Ark.; son,
Curtis J., of Reading; sister,
Roxie Haines, of Quakertown;
three grandchildren; a great-
granddaughter.
Memorial donations to
Hospice Community Care, 25
Church St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18765 or the Lehman-Idetown
United Methodist Church, PO
Box 1, Lehman, PA 18627.
KUNDA - Helen, 89, of
Sweet Valley, died Tuesday,
April 23, 2013, at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
She was born in Philadelphia.
Surviving are a son, Edward
Olearnick; a daughter, Helene
DePiero Kowalski; one grand-
son; three great-grandchildren.
MOLINA - Pedro Jose, 68, of
Hunlock Creek, died Monday,
April 22, 2013, at Hospice Com-
munity Care, Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
He was born in Mayaguez,
Puerto Rico.
Before his retirement, he was
employed as a CNC operator at
Modern Plastics, Wilkes-Barre,
and previously worked in the
garment industry in the Wyo-
ming Valley area as well as in
New York City. After his retire-
ment, he was also employed at
the Mohegan Sun Arena.
He was a member of the
Muhlenberg Congregation of
Jehovahs Witnesses.
Surviving are his wife of 38
years, Eleanor; sisters, Maria
E. Torres, Sinking Springs; and
Aida Molina Torres; 12 nieces
and nephews.
MOSES - Kathleen C. , 53, of
Kingston Township, died Tues-
day, April 23, 2013, at Manor
Care, Kingston, after a two-year
battle with brain cancer.
She was borninAshley and
was a graduate of Hanover Area.
Prior to her retirement, she
was employedby FranklinFirst
Federal andlater by M&TBank
inthe loandepartment. She was
a member of Holy Family Parish,
Luzerne.
Surviving are her husband,
Thomas Moses; and a brother,
Gordon Carey, Huntsville, Ala.
PARDUSKI - Jennifer Lynn,
44, of Perkasie, died Monday,
April 22, 2013, at her parents
home in Shavertown.
She was born in Wilkes-
Barre, was a graduate of Dallas
High School and a 1991 gradu-
ate of East Stroudsburg Univer-
sity, earning a bachelors degree
in medical technology. She was
a member of Delta Phi Epsilon,
Epsilon Beta chapter.
She formerly worked as a
medical technologist for CMC
Hospital, Scranton, and in vari-
ous hospitals in Allentown and
Maryland. She was most recently
employed by Merck &Co. Inc., as
a bio technician, level II, in hepati-
tis Avaccine manufacturing.
Surviving are her parents,
Stanley J. and Charlene A. Gro-
chowski Parduski, Shavertown;
brother, David; nephews, aunts,
uncles and cousins.
Memorial donations to the
American Cancer Society , 190
Welles St., Suite 118, Forty
Fort, PA 18704, or to the Hos-
pice of the Sacred Heart, 600
Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-Barre,
PA 18702.
PENDLETON- Maria R., 95, of
Dallas, diedApril 22, 2013, at Key-
stone GardenEstates inLarksville.
She was born March 9, 1918,
and was a graduate of St. Anns
Academy in Wilkes-Barre and
Bloomsburg College.
She taught school in Con-
necticut for several years. She
then joined the Red Cross and
lived in Japan for three years.
Upon her return, she moved to
Washington, D.C., and worked
for the U.S. Post Ofce Civil
Service Committee for more
than 30 years. After retirement,
she moved to Dallas.
Surviving are a nephew,
Michael C. Raklewicz, M.D.,
Harveys Lake; nieces, Suzanne
Cogswell, Dallas; and Pamela
Story, Hope, Idaho; a great-
niece and a great-nephew.
Memorial donations to Hos-
pice of the Sacred Heart.
SPRAU - Howard F., 86, of
Shavertown, died Thursday,
April 25, 2013, at The Meadows
Nursing Center, Dallas.
He was born in Kingston and
was a graduate of Coughlin
High School. He was a U.S.
Navy veteran of World War II.
He was a self-employed gen-
eral contractor for the majority
of his life.
He was a member of the
Shavertown United Methodist
Church fromthe time of the fam-
ilys relocation to the area in 1951.
He was a member of the
Caldwell Consistory, George M.
Dallas Lodge No. 531, Dallas,
and Irem Temple Shriners. He
volunteered as a Little League
coach in the Back Mountain
and a Boy Scout leader for
Troop No. 231 out of the
Shavertown Methodist Church.
Surviving are his wife of 63
years, the former Aline Blamire;
six children, Penny Lee Butler,
Plains Township; Howard,
Harveys Lake; Duane, Dallas;
Robert, N.J.; Kenny, Sweet
Valley; and Billy, Shavertown;
24 grandchildren; nine great-
grandchildren; a cousin.
Memorial donations to Blue
Chip Farms or Shavertown
Methodist Church.
WILSON - Marion E., 93, of
Dallas, died Monday, April 22,
2013, at Mercy Center, Dallas.
A graduate of Kingston High
School, she had a 27-year career
with the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, where she directed
community development,
affordable housing and farm
ownership programs in Luzerne
and Wyoming counties. One of
her outstanding accomplish-
ments was bringing to fruition
the Meadows Long-Term Care
Facility in Dallas.
She earned a bachelor of arts
degree in English fromKings Col-
lege at the age of 64 and a master
of arts degree in organizational
management fromMisericordia
Universit at the age of 72. Prior
to her illness, she was planning to
pursue her doctorate degree. She
was also a real estate broker and
appraiser for 20 years.
Surviving are her daughters,
Maryann, Dallas; Judy Patsalos,
Riverdale, N.Y.; and Michele
Rawls, Bassett, Va.; sons, Harry
W. Jr., Tunkhannock; Joseph,
Buffalo, N.Y.; James, Kennesaw,
Ga.; Charles, Dallas; Richard,
Marietta, Ga.; and Stephen, Riv-
erview, Fla.; 21 grandchildren;
one great-granddaughter.
Memorial donations to the
Back Mountain Memorial
Library, 96 Huntsville Road,
Dallas, PA 18612.
OBITUARIES
See PUZZLES, Page 2
E D I T O R I A L
Page 6 Sunday, May 5, 2013
The Dallas Post
www.mydallaspost.com
C o m m u n i t y N e w s p a p e r G r o u p
THE TIMES LEADER
15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18711 - 570-675-5211
news@mydallaspost.com
Joe Butkiewicz
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
829-7249
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Dotty Martin
EDITOR
970-7440
dmartin@mydallaspost.com
Diane McGee
Advertising
970-7153
dmcgee@timesleader.com
I like the Disney Pixar
movies. My favorite
is Toy Story III. My
favorite character is
Woody.
Jevin Fluegel
Lehman
Casper the Friendly
Ghost. He was my
friend when I was
growing up.
Kahli Kotulski
Harveys Lake
The Little Mermaid
because I swim free-
style and backstroke
and used to think I was
mermaid.
Sami Sabol
Shavertown
Twilight. Its a movie
about vampires star-
ring Kristen Stuart.
Samantha Schooley
Shavertown
Overboard with
Goldie Hawn and Kurt
Russell. Its a fuzzy
warm love story.
Jan Waligorski
Dallas
Youve Got Mail with
Tom Hanks and Meg
Ryan.
Noreen Gladey
Shavertown
What Movie Can You WatCh over and over Without it ever getting old?
Memorial books honor loved ones
The following memorial/
honor books have been added
to the shelves of the Back
Mountain Memorial Library, 96
Huntsville Road, Dallas, for the
month of April 2013:
In memory of Richard
G. Evans Jr., Here, There,
Elsewhere by William Least
Moon, presented by Richard
and Linda Adams; Playing to
Win by A.G. Laey, presented
by Donald and Shirle McFad-
den; Golf: From Tee to Green,
presented by Marietta and
Frank Egenski; The Best Short
Game Instruction Book Ever!
by Golf Magazine, presented by
Friends from Changes
In memory of Ron Hine,
Motorcycle: The Denitive
Visual History, presented by
Bill, Cindy, Aaron, Matt and
Chris Katyl
In memory of Margaret
Peggy Jones, Still Points
North by Leigh Newman,
presented by The Village at
Greenbriar
In memory of Kathryn Sut-
ton, Painting Rocks by Dana
Meachen, presented by Anne
E. Gill
In memory of Walter Mur-
phy, Dr. Seusss Sleep Book
by Dr. Seuss, presented by
Patricia Conrad
In memory of June Tannen-
baum, Paris: A Love Story by
Kati Marton, presented by The
Village at Greenbriar
In memory of Jo Ann
Gaughan, Life After Life by
Kate Atkinson, presented by
The Village at Greenbriar
In memory of Joseph Pur-
cell, The World According to
Mister Rogers by Fred Rogers,
presented by Kathy McManus-
Moretti
In memory of Margaret
Moen, 36 Hours: 125 Week-
ends in Europe by the New
York Times, presented by Mr.
And Mrs. Thomas Boyle
In memory of Treva Shir-
ley Traver, Seven Miracles
that Saved America by Chris
and Ted Stewart, presented by
General Federation of Womens
Clubs, Harveys Lake
In memory of Mrs.
Daynelle Brown, Early Hu-
mans, presented by Dr. John
and Barbara Kolchin
In memory of Mary Louise
Fisher, Frances and Bernard
by Carlene Bauer, presented by
Elaine and Ron Moran
The following books are in
memory of Betty Mae Wag-
ner and are presented by The
Three Rs Book Club: Mrs.
Queen Takes the Train by Wil-
liam Kuhn, Peaches for Father
Francis by Joanne Harris
The following books are in
memory of John Ennis and
are presented by Mary and Rick
Hoyes: The Ghost Runner by
Bill Jones, New Oxford Rhym-
ing Dictionary
The following books are in
memory of Nikki Crawford
and are presented by Ryan
Crawfords friends at Trinity
Learning Center: Up! Tall!
And High! by Ethan Long,
Back to Front and Upside
Down! by Claire Alexander
The following books are in
memory of Nikki Crawfordand
are presented by Johnny Craw-
fords friends at Trinity Learning
Center: Pete the Cat and His
Four Groovy Buttons by Eric
Litwin, Jonathan and the Big
Blue Boat by Philip C. Stead
The following books are in
memory of Nikki Crawford
and are presented by The Trin-
ity Learning Center Staff: The
Moon Jumpers by Janice May
Udry, Electric Ben: The Amaz-
ing Life & Times of Benjamin
Franklin by Robert Byrd
The following books are in
memory of Doris Marinelli
and are presented by Ron and
Debbie Miller: Roses Garden
by Peter H. Reynolds, Alisons
Zinnia by Anita Lobel
The following books are in
memory of Hayden Jeter
Dorsett and are presented by
The Magistro Family: The En-
chanted World of Winnie-the-
Pooh by Anna Bowles, Peter
Rabbit: Munch!, Peter Rabbit:
Whats that Noise? Skippyjon
Jones by Judy Schachner,
Little Quacks Hide and Seek
by Lauren Thompson
The following books are in
memory of Amy Webb and
are presented by The Dan
Powers Family: The Dark
by Lemony Snicket, A Childs
Garden of Verses by Robert
Louis Stevenson, Have You
Seen My New Blue Socks? by
Eve Bunting, The Black Rab-
bit by Philippa Leathers
The following books are in
memory of Dolores Saba and
are presented by Anna Smith
and Family: Nelly May Has
Her Say by Cynthia DeFelice,
Who Says Women Cant Be
Doctors?: The Story of Eliza-
beth Blackwell by Tanya Lee
Stone
YOUR SPACE is reserved speci-
cally for Dallas Post readers who have
something theyd like to share with fellow
readers. Submitted items may include
photographs or short stories and should be
sent via e-mail to news@mydallaspost.com,
by fax to 675-3650 or by mail to The Dallas
Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711.
Information must include the submit-
ting persons name, address and telephone
number in the event we have questions.
Readers wishing to have their photos
returned should include a self-addressed/
stamped envelope. Items will be published
in the order in which they are received.
The editor of The Dallas Post reserves
the right to reject any items submitted for
publication.
YOUR SPACE
Six-year-old Nathaniel Patla sits on his dads 1979 Mustang, the ofcial pace car of the Indianapolis 500. Nathaniel is the son of Ed
and Krista Patla, of Loyalville Outlet Road in Harveys Lake.
1993 20 YEARS AGO
Mrs. Nulton, teacher of fth
grade English classes at the
Dallas Elementary School, has
been notied that poems writ-
ten by her
students and
submitted to
the Ameri-
can Acade-
my of Poetry
have been
selected for
publication
in The An-
thology of
Poetry by Young Americans.
Those whose poems will be
published are: Lisa Misson,
Matt Hoover, Candice Smith,
Heather Vodzak, Ashley Dav-
enport and Kerri Stephens.
The Back Mountain Jay-
cees recently presented their
Outstanding Young Persons
Awards. These awards signify
the outstanding contribution
made to our community by
these young people for their
hard work, noteworthy achieve-
ments, and public service. Re-
cipients are: John Plucenik,
Outstanding Young Citizen,
Edward Macosky, Outstanding
Young Law Enforcement Of-
cer, Martin Smith, Outstand-
ing Young Farmer, William
Ulichney, Outstanding Young
Fireghter, Anne Holmes, Out-
standing Young Fitness Leader
and Jack Wolensky, Outstand-
ing Young Educator.
1983 30 YEARS AGO
Trudy Cevasco, Shavertown,
was recently honored with
the Silver Award, the second-
highest given in the Girl Scout
structure. Trudy received the
award upon completion of a
demonstration speech in her
English class, on methods of
pitching a tent. Trudy, a junior
at Dallas High School, has been
a Girl Scout for 10 years. She is
presently a member of Troop
634, led by Marian Lamoreaux.
Pack 232 of Gate of Heaven
Church, Dallas, was the re-
cent setting for the Parvuli Dei
Award Ceremony. Nineteen
boys met all of the require-
ments which included: clean-
ing up around the church,
visiting St. Peters Cathedral
in Scranton, and visiting the
elderly in a nursing home.
Awardees included Thomas Fi-
narelli, Joseph Kristan, Jarrett
Rittenhouse, Paul Hosey, Eric
Williams, Michael Malak, Dan-
iel McDonald, I.J. Hosey, Chris-
topher Kuhar, John Kristan,
Jackie Jones, Anthony Fin-
arelli, Michael Farris, Matthew
Campbell, Michael Fritzen,
Gregory Stahovec, Keith Jones,
Shane Williams and Ron Fitch.
1973 40 YEARS AGO
Robert Kernag and Kevin
Ray have been named cochair-
men of this years Sweet Valley
Memorial Day parade, which
will be held during the annual
Memorial Day festivities later
this month.
Two Oak Hill senior high
school students are the recipi-
ents of $25 awards given by
the Oak Hill Civic Association.
President Jack Cleary present-
ed the second annual awards
for highest scholastic achieve-
ment to Nancy Rollman and
Theresa Derwin.
The Dallas Senior High
School Mixed Chorus and Dal-
Hi Choristers, under the direc-
tion of Florence Sherwood, will
present their annual Spring
concert this weekend in the
senior high school auditorium.
Pianists for the concert are se-
niors Marilyn Miller and Julia
Evans; juniors Susan Haddle,
Patricia McMichael, Julie
Swepston and William Cutter;
sophomores Dorothea Antho-
ny and Carol Evans.
1963 50 YEARS AGO
Happy Wanderers Patrol,
Girl Scout Troop 201, enjoyed
a hike Saturday. They visited
the re tower, which is behind
the IremTemple Country Club,
coming back to the picnic
grounds for a bag lunch, which
included roasting marshmal-
lows over the re. Participat-
ing were Jan Bittenbender, Do-
reen Daring, Nancy Thomas,
Joy Harris, Joan Farley, Elaine
Kuehn, Carol Hozempa, Carol
Shashkan, Christine Rubino,
Debbie Drake, Donna and Roxy
Sekara, Jill Carruthers, Nancy
Bergman, Debbie Hartman,
Wendy Pattison, Nancy Ziegen-
fus, Debbie Lamoreaux, Sherry
Reese, Diana Reese and Janice
Dierolf.
WSCS of Shavertown Meth-
odist Church will present a nov-
el program, Spring Tune Up
on Friday evening in the social
rooms. Mrs. Walter Shaver and
Mrs. Carl Hontz, chairman and
co-chairman, have announced
as the highlight of the affair a
humorous reading by Mrs. Wil-
liam Shewan.
1953 60 YEARS AGO
The Junior Class of Dallas-
Franklin High School will spon-
sor a one-act play competition
tonight in the school auditori-
um. The sophomores will pres-
ent, Butch, a comedy with Di-
anne Bowman playing the lead.
Others in the cast are: Janice
Apaliski, Mary Ann Emmanuel,
Marilyn Walsh, Dorothy Stash,
Thomas Schmiddle and Del-
mar Shupp. Student director is
Yvonne Schlittler.
Dr. F. Budd Schooley was
elected president of Rural
Building and Loan Association,
succeeding the late Herbert
Hill at the meeting of the as-
sociation held Tuesday night
at First National Bank. Edward
Hall was elected vice president
to ll the position formerly
held by Dr. Schooley.
Frances Stefanowicz will be
crowned Queen of the May
Wednesday morning at exer-
cises in which all students of
Lake-Noxen School District
will participate. She was elect-
ed by student body and faculty
with Shirley MacMillan the
runner-up.
1943 70 YEARS AGO
Mrs. John Hildebrant is gen-
eral chairman of the annual
Mother and Daughter Ban-
quet which will be held in the
East Dallas Methodist Church
Thursday evening. Mrs. Paul
Carlin will act as toastmis-
tress and Mrs. Freda Hughey
and Mrs. Ben Brace will be in
charge of decorations.
Dallas Borough High School
Seniors will present Lindy
Lou, a comedy in three acts
by Gene Neal, May 7, under
the direction of Mary Elizabeth
Morgan. Cast: Robert Brown,
Marguerite Mackenrow, Robert
Moore, Harold Roberts, Paul
Kocher, Edward Tutak, Jane
Joseph, Carol Shaver, Marjorie
Evans, Virginia Ferry and Janet
Garinger.
The Dallas Post has been in
existence for 122 years. Infor-
mation for Only Yesterday
is taken from back issues of the
newspaper and reprinted here
exactly as it rst appeared.
ONLY
YESTERDAY
By Samantha Weaver
* It was Founding Father
Thomas Jefferson who made
the following sage observation:
The tax which will be paid for
education is not more than the
thousandth part of what will
be paid to kings, priests and
nobles who will rise up among
us if we leave the people to
ignorance.
* Half of all the worlds
ower species can be found in
South America.
* The Hula Hoop was
introduced in the United States
in early 1958, and the craze
rapidly became one of the big-
gest in history up to that time.
Shortly thereafter, the British
Medical Journal blamed an up-
tick in back, neck and abdomi-
nal injuries on the fad.
STRANGE BUT TRUE
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 7 SUNDAY, MAY 5 , 2013
8
0
7
1
0
9
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CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Sammy Dixon, left, uses an Ipad to input her information in a science
class at the Dallas Middle School. The information is then projected
on the screen with pictures and video segments for her presentation.
IPADS
Continued from Page 7
Three and a half hours after the length of the brace-
lets was announced, the ofcial count was in.
As Kronenwetter counted off the last 10 bracelets
and Bolton echoed the numbers, anticipation mount-
ed.
When the last bracelet was counted, Ross Elemen-
tary students had made 7,507 friendship bracelets.
The crowd erupted.
But is it enough to be recorded in the Guinness
Book of World Records? Time will tell.
The current record for the longest friendship brace-
let belongs to Owingsville Elementary School in Ken-
tucky. Students there tied 3,799 friendship bracelets
that measured more than 810 feet in 2011.
Ofcials at Guinness reported to James that a
group of people in India had submitted evidence that
it had tied together 4,123 friendship bracelets but
that amount has not yet been ratied.
Even if the India count stands, the Ross students
tied 3,384 more bracelets. As long as the documen-
tation holds up, students at the Sweet Valley school
will have their names recorded in history.
The project started last October when James heard
a radio promotion attempting to gather together
enough people to put on sunblock at the same time in
an attempt to make it into the Guinness Book. That
attempt failed but it was all James needed to rally his
troops.
After meeting with Vanderhook and several other
teachers, the plan was in place and students started
tying. Every one of the schools nearly 300 students
made at least one bracelet.
Sporting t-shirts that read, Ross Elementary
School Tied Together in Friendship, students en-
joyed a Carnival Day on the grounds of the school on
May 1 while Kronenwetter and Bolton counted while
teacher Jen Welby video recorded and PTOvolunteer
Cheri Derhammer photographed the counting, both
requirements of Guinness.
The message of the project was much greater than
just brightly-colored string and tying as students
bonded together in their record-breaking attempt.
Savannah Purdy was the leader of bracelet tying
in her family, according to her mother, Jennifer, who
said the sixth-grader encouraged third-grader Chase
Marie and kindergarten student Tristan to become
involved in bracelet tying.
Theyve been excited about it all year long, Jen-
nifer said.
Cheri Horan said her daughter, Samantha, a rst-
grader, is excited about being part of a world record.
Sixth-grader Jessica Evans said, Every little bit
counts while her friend, Rebecca Bonomo, another
sixth-grader, pointed out the anti-bullying message
the project centered around.
Third-grader Lilian Raczkowski tied about 200
bracelets, 100 of them during recess while Sarayah
Smith, another third-grader, said the 100 bracelets
she tied represent friendship.
Superintendent Jim McGovern sported a t-shirt at
the event and third-grader Jeanna Pritchard reected
on the fun she had tying bracelets.
As students, teachers and parents danced to the
Hokey Pokey and the Macarena while measuring
was taking place, fourth-gradera Spencer Judge and
Christian Seprish talked about how the project made
them want to stop bullying.
BRACELETS
Continued from Page 1
good humor, as well.
A newspaper editor needed to
ofcially witness the attempt. Thats
where I came in - and was honored
to do so. Principal James asked me
to be at the school at 8:30 in the
morning. Im an early riser, so that
wasnt a problem. What he didnt tell
me was that I needed to witness the
counting of every single bracelet - all
7,507 of them - which took nearly
four hours, making for a very long
day and an experience I wouldnt
trade for all the friendship bracelets
in the world. Besides, it was a beauti-
ful day and I got a great start on my
summer tan.
The measuring and the counting
needed to be recorded, both with
still photography and videography.
Teacher Jen Welby held a video
camera during the entire count-
ing process while PTO volunteer
Cheri Derhammer photographed
the surveyors counting the bracelets
and the numbers recorded on their
surveying wheel.
Bill, Jess and I had to ll out three-
page documents about our involve-
ment when the entire process was
completed.
All of that documentation, includ-
ing the bracelets, will be sent to
Guinness and the wait begins. The
record doesnt stand until ofcials at
Guinness say it does.
Heres what I learned as an ofcial
Guinness Book of World Records
witness:
* The Ross Elementary School
students not only know how to have
a good time but are incredibly well
behaved.
* Professional land surveyors are
not always as serious as they appear
to be when theyre looking through
the lens of that odd-looking equip-
ment they use.
* The faculty and staff at Ross
Elementary School are committed to
teaching and guiding the youngsters
in their care.
* Donny James is still passionate
about being the principal at Ross
Elementary after nine years and mo-
tivates the faculty and staff in their
commitment.
* Reds makes a mean tuna hoagie.
Thanks, Principal James, for that.
* All of us who participated in
the attempt to become world record
holders are now forever bonded.
And were all still trying to get those
numbers out of our heads.
- Dotty Martin
RECORD
Continued from Page 1
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS
/THE TIMES LEADER
ABOVE: Kindergar-
ten students Nikayla
Rynkiewicz, Ella Wilson
and Nichols Joseph of
Ross Elementary clap
as the chain of brace-
lets passes by them.
AT LEFT: Savannah
Purdy looks to the
other side of the brace-
let chain while helping
measure it.
The Dallas Foundation is run
by a nine-member board of vol-
unteers which decides how the
donated money is used. Teach-
ers are welcome to make appli-
cations for projects on the foun-
dations website.
Barbose is very enthusiastic
about the learning atmosphere
in his classroom. Of the iPad
program, he said, Its high in-
terest. Its motivational. Its eas-
ily managed.
Barbose began his career in
Florida but his wish was always
to come back home which he
did nine years ago. This is my
district, he said. Im teaching
in my ninth-grade English teach-
ers classroom.
Barbose admitted that using
iPads in middle school is cutting
edge. There arent many apps
created for that age group. You
have to be creative, he said.
Next up for his sixth-graders
study of physics is the construc-
tion of a virtual roller coaster.
Newton would surely be im-
pressed.
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 8 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013
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DHS CLASS OF 69
MEETS
The Dallas High School
Class of 1969 will meet at 6:30
p.m. on May 9 at Metro, Twin
Stacks Complex in Dallas.
Plans for the 45th anniver-
sary reunion to be held Aug.
23, 2014 at Appletree Terrace
will be discussed.
WSCCHS CLASS OF 1971
PLANS PARTY
West Side Centeral Catholic
High School Class of 1971
will hold a 60th birthday party
from 1 to 7 p.m. on Sunday,
Sept. 1 at the Grove at Check-
erboard Inn on Carverton
Road, Trucksville.
Formal invitations will be
forthcoming when all address-
es are nalized.
For more information,
contact Kate Bustin Taroli at
KBTaroli@gmail.com.
DHS CLASS OF 1983
PLANS REUNION
Dallas High School Class of
1983 is planning a 30th anni-
versary reunion for Oct. 26.
Any classmate who has not
yet received information about
the reunion and who wishes
to attend is asked to send
their current email address to
dallasclassof83@att.net or call
Sharon at (610) 737-0042.
SCHOOL BRIEFS
A book signing will be held
by Alison Roskos Treat from
6:30 to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 10
at Sue Hands Imagery, 35 Main
St., Dallas.
A former Imagery art stu-
dent, Treat recently published
a book titled One Traveler.
The historical novel is set in
Civil War era and takes place
mostly in Wilkes-Barre with a
few scenes occurring in Geor-
gia and elsewhere in the Con-
federacy.
It chronicles the unfolding
story of a 17-year old slave
owner named Sid, who trav-
els north after his parents un-
timely deaths. Upon his arrival
in Wilkes-Barre, he is discon-
certed to nd the Underground
Railroad in operation at his
uncles home.
There are many reference
to local landmarks, including
North River Street, Wyoming
Seminary, Plymouth, Nanti-
coke and the historically-cor-
rect character of William Camp
Gildersleeve.
The cover of Treats book is
depicted by a painting of Hands
from her recent Susquehan-
na Song collection, a series
of paintings from the North
Branch of the Susquehanna
River.
For more information, call
675-5094.
Book signing
slated for May 10
Allison Rosko Treat will hold a book signing on May 10 at Sue
Hands Imagery in Dallas.
Womens club
plans fashion show
The Wyoming Valley Womens Club will
hold a fashion show at noon on May 21
at Appletree Terrace at Newberry Estate.
Tickets are $20 which includes lunch and
must be purchased in advance. Proceeds
benet a $1,000 scholarship that will be
awarded to a high school senior. Tickets
may be purchased by calling Eileen Davis
at 824-8461. Shown here, Carol Carroll,
left, of Dallas, chairwoman of the fashion
show, with Cathy Beretski, of Shavertown,
modeling for Dress Barn.
Whether its wind chimes,
bird feeders, bird houses
or one of our many garden
items, we have gifs that
will help you make this
Mothers Day special.
Oh,
Mama!
What a Deal.
BIRD FOOD FEEDERS GARDEN ACCENTS UNIQUE GIFTS
Dallas Shopping Center, Dallas, 675-9900
*Valid only at the store listed below.
One discount per purchase. Offer
not valid on previous purchases, sale
items or Brome Bird Care branded
feeders. Offer expires 05/31/2013.
Any Hummingbird Feeder
20%OFF
*
Stanley who said the group be-
gins practicing in December and
that many of the students play
something other than percus-
sion in the regular band pro-
gram. The group includes fth
and sixth-graders from all of the
districts elementary schools.
Sarah Salus, of Shavertown
is an 11-year-old student at
Lehman-Jackson Elementary.
She plays bells in the percussion
group and clarinet in the band
program and said the best part
of the program for her is its big
nish. Her reason for participat-
ing? Its fun, she said.
Mirrors is the theme of the
Lake-Lehman Indoor Color
Guard program. The group just
took rst place at the Chapter
7 championships and is aiming
high for the Atlantic title.
According to director David
Marsh, the groups program ex-
plores self-image and the colors
in the program become pro-
gressively brighter and bolder
as a young person becomes his
or her own person. The group
made up of 14 girls and one boy
uses ags, gun props and large
mirrors to present an athletic
program involving ag tossing
with acrobatic choreography.
Deanna Szabo, 17, of Hunlock
Creek, is a senior. She says the
group practices 20 hours a week
and performs an outdoor fall
season and a spring indoor sea-
son. Szabo underlined how im-
portant friendship is to her ex-
perience with the group. Its the
family atmosphere that keeps us
coming back, she said.
Jessica Campbell, 18, of Lehm-
an, is also a senior. She has been
on the color guard team since
eighth grade and said her favor-
ite things about the program are
the people and the coaches.
For her, the group provides an
escape from the pressures of
high school life. But she empha-
sized the demanding nature of
the group. You can have fun but
you also have to work hard.
When it was their turn, mem-
bers of the Lake-Lehman High
School Indoor Percussion En-
semble covered the gym oor
with a giant tarp representing a
highway for their programcalled
GPS, including slides as well as
music. Unlike the elementary
group which was stationary, the
high school percussionists move
in their competition. Their pro-
gram depicts a highway journey
which begins at Lake-Lehman
and ends at the Wildwood com-
petition.
Flashing and crashing cym-
balists and focused drummers
fanned out across the stage in
complicated patterns. The front
group of musicians stayed in
place and included a drum set
player, multiple keyboard instru-
ments and percussion instru-
ments. The music was complex,
heavy on beat and rhythm and
the noise level was rock-concert
loud.
According to David Gambal
who directs the high school
percussion ensemble, students
benet from music ensembles in
various ways. Its the camarade-
rie and teamwork, he said. Its
athletic.
Gambal should know as this
marks his 20th year with the
marching band and his eighth
with indoor percussion.
Brittney Mahony, 16, of Sweet
Valley, is a sophomore who
plays trombone in the band pro-
gram but is a bass drummer in
the percussion ensemble. She
knows about the athletic ele-
ment as bass drums can weigh
up to 35 pounds. She joined the
group because it sounded fun.
I thought, Ill give it a try and I
liked it, she said.
Andrew Leahy, 14, of Sweet
Valley is an eighth grader at
Lake-Lehman Middle School
and a percussionist in the regu-
lar band. His main reason for
playing in the ensemble? A love
of music! he said.
Carolyn Price, 15, a sopho-
more at Lake-Lehman, plays bas-
soon in the band but also plays
synthesizer and cymbals. She,
like many of the other students,
mentioned the sense of belong-
ing which their group inspires.
Without it, I dont know where
Id be, she said.
COmpEtItIOn
Continued from Page 1
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE DALLAS POST
Lake-Lehman freshman Kaleigh Konek, left, performs Mirror with the Winter Guard.
Sobocinski is
back to making
projections
this week,
trying to come
up with the
right combina-
tions to defeat
unbeaten host
Holy Redeemer
Tuesday.
SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 PAGE 9
THE DALLAS POST
Sports
When Lake-Lehman was not part
of the Wyoming Valley Conference
schedule for much of the past decade,
Dallas still invited its Back Mountain
rival as the frequent opponent for its
annual Mothers Day softball game.
The schools are together in Division
2 of the WVC this year, so they were
already scheduled to meet at Dallas.
The teams have agreed to again have
their game on Mothers Day and, for
the second straight year, the contest
will be part of Autism Awareness
Night.
Festivities begin at 6 p.m. with
game time set for 7:30. All proceeds
from the night will go to the Special
Education Department of the Dallas
Area School District.
Lake-Lehman hasnt been on our
(conference) schedule in about sev-
en years, so we always scheduled a
game, Dallas coach Joyce Tinner. All
we had to do this year was move the
game.
Jennifer Yanuskavich, the Dallas as-
sistant coach, works with autistic stu-
dents as a learning support teacher at
the Wycallis Elementary School. She
said team members have helped add
interest to the game in its second year.
Once we decided to do something
for autism awareness, the kids really
ran with it, Yanuskavich said. They
researched it. They did poster boards
and yers. Theyre taking a big part
in it and getting the community in-
volved.
The players hope to make the game
special for more than just the competi-
tion between rivals.
We try every year to always have
a Mothers Day game, Yanuskavich
said. What better way to spend the
day that to invite some of the students
on to the eld for festivities? We have
a mom of two autistic children who
will be speaking.
Members of both teams have pur-
chased Autism Awareness socks to
wear during the game. Along with
concessions, all sales provide sensory
items that help autistic students in the
classroom.
Our junior class really seemed to
take off with the idea, but its been a
total team effort, Yanuskavich said.
The girls talk about it on our bus
trips.
And when Mothers Day comes,
May 12, they will use the ideas they
have come up with to help autistic stu-
dents in the district.
Mothers Day softball game benets autism awareness
By TOMROBINSON
For The Dallas Post
Dallas, Lake-Lehman girls square
off in annual benet game.
John Sobocinski did some pro-
jecting before his Lake-Lehman girls
track team faced Northwest in a key
early-season meet.
Sobocinski gured the teams
would nish within a point of each
other.
As it turned out, they tied in the
only meet the Lady Knights did not
win this season.
Sobocinski is back to making pro-
jections this week, trying to come
up with the right combinations to
defeat unbeaten host Holy Redeem-
er Tuesday. A win would give Lake-
Lehman (5-0-1) the Wyoming Valley
Conference Division 2 title outright.
Dallas also has a title shot Tues-
day. The Lady Mountaineers rout-
ed Wyoming Valley West, 124-26,
Wednesday to go into the nal week
one meet behind Pittston Area. A
win over the Lady Patriots Tuesday
would allow for a tie for rst place
in Division 1 of the WVC.
Lake-Lehman set up its title shot
with a 94-56 win over Wyoming
Area on Tuesday.
I am de-
nitely someone
who scores out
the meet, Sobo-
cinski said after
Tuesdays vic-
tory. I will be
game- planning
this meet.
Yes, I do think
we can beat Holy
Redeemer, al-
though its a very,
very difcult
meet to win be-
cause they have
so much depth.
One of the challenges is that the
distance races are usually an area
for Lake-Lehman to score well. Holy
Redeemer, however, appears even
stronger and deeper with three run-
ners Marissa Durako, Rachel So-
winski and Cassandra Gill who
nished second, third and ninth in
the state Class AA cross country
championships last fall.
Cayle Spencer, Kaylee Hillard and
Shoshana Mahoney led the way to
the win over Wyoming Area, keep-
ing Lake-Lehman in title conten-
tion.
Spencer swept the throwing
events with wins in the shot put,
discus and javelin. Hillard won the
800 and 1600 while also running
on the winning 1600 relay team.
Mahoney won the 100 and 200 and
took second in the long jump.
Emily Sutton, Brittany Faux, Ka-
tie Heindel, Amanda Mathers and
Katie Bartuska have also been a big
part of helping the Lady Knights
enter the last week of the regular
season with an unbeaten dual meet
record.
Sutton, who was part of two win-
ning relays Tuesday, has ventured
beyond her middle distance events
to help the team.
Shes helped us in many places,
Sobocinski said. Weve had her in
the high jump, two relays and the
hurdles.
Faux, a junior hurdler and jumper,
has shown signicant improvement
in her third season on the team.
Heindel is a hurdler and high
jumper.
Mathers, a senior who is wrap-
ping up a successful career, has been
a steady and dependable, sprinter
and jumper, according to Sobocin-
ski.
Bartuska, a middle distance run-
ner, has been particularly effective
in the 400. She won that event and
ran a leg of the 1600 relay Tuesday.
Dallas suffered its only loss
against Hazleton Area early in the
season, but is now tied for second
place in Division 1 with the Cou-
gars, behind Pittston Area. It swept
the top three places in six events
and won 17 of 18 events overall
Wednesday.
Making
predictions
By TOMROBINSON
For The Dallas Post
Dallas High School softball players get direction from coach Joyce Tinner.
The second annual Old Stick
Game pitting the Dallas and Lake-
Lehman girls lacrosse teams against
each other will be held at 5:30 p.m.
on Tuesday, May 7 at the Edward Ed-
wards Stadium on the campus of the
Lake-Lehman Junior/Senior High
School.
The winner will get custody of the
old stick until the second meeting
of the teams in 2014 . Last season,
the Dallas girls defeated Lehman, 17-
6, to claim the honor.
The game of lacrosse originated
with Native Americans. It was popu-
lar among the Eastern tribes and was
most likely the rst team sport ever
played in Northeast Pennsylvania.
While the rules for the modern
mens game were developed by a Ca-
nadian dentist in the 1860s, the wom-
ens game was born in 1884 at the St.
Leonards School for girls in Scotland
after the headmistress, Miss Louisa
Lumsden, witnessed a game between
the Canghuwaya Indians and the
Montreal Lacrosse club and adapted
the game for her pupils.
Lumsden wrote: It is a wonderful
game, beautiful and graceful. I was so
charmed with it that I introduced it
at St Leonards.
Queen Victoria, who in 1876 also
witnessed the touring Canghuwaya
and Montreal clubs during a private
exhibition at Windsor castle, was
said to have enjoyed the game and is
quoted as saying, It is very pretty to
watch.
After being introduced at St. Leon-
ards, girls lacrosse became extreme-
ly popular and spread throughout
Great Britain. During the pre-world
war era, demand for the hickory
crosses used for girls lacrosse often
outstripped supply.
In 1912, cricket bat and hockey
stick manufacturer TS Hattersley
& Son of Manchester, England re-
sponded to the growing market and
began producing girls lacrosse sticks.
Within a few years, demand became
so high for Hattersley`s popular Vik-
toria crosse that the company scaled
down production of cricket bats to fo-
cus primarily on girls lacrosse sticks.
While girls lacrosse had become
wildly popular in Britain, it was not
until St. Leonards alumnus Rosa-
belle Sinclair emigrated to the United
States in the 1920s that North Ameri-
can girls were given the opportunity
to play the game that had been, up
to that point, exclusive to males.
Having become a physical education
teacher at the Bryn Mawr School in
Baltimore, Maryland, Sinclair intro-
duced lacrosse to the all-girls school
in 1926.
As the rules for the girls game had
been developed and rened inde-
pendently for four decades in Great
Britain, they differed greatly fromthe
North America rules that boys had
been using. The womens game em-
phasized stick skills and prociency.
Sinclair resisted blending the rules
she had learned as a student in Scot-
land with the boys rules being used
in America as she believed the girls
game should be played with feminine
renement, stating, Lacrosse, as
girls play it, is an orderly pastime that
has little in common with the mens
Old Stick Game
set for May 7
Dallas, Lake-Lehman girls lacrosse
teams play for 100-year-old stick.
The Dallas and Lake-Lehman girls
lacrosse teams will play for this
old lacrosse stick in the annual Old
Stick Game.
See STICK, Page 10
The Misericordia University com-
munity ofcially dedicated Tambur
Field on Saturday, April 27 in between
games of a doubleheader with Wilkes
University to acknowledge the phi-
lanthropy and generosity of Robert L.
Tambur, his family and the Tambur
Family Foundation.
Tambur Field is situated on about
four acres of land adjacent to the John
and Mary Metz Field House in the
Anderson Outdoor Athletic Complex
near the North Gate of the upper cam-
pus. The construction of Tambur Field
took about 10 months to complete,
from the clearing of a wooded area to
the nal laying of sod.
The playing surface contains a
special fescue blend. It was pur-
chased from Tuckahoe Turf Farms of
Hammonton, N.J., which also installed
the turf. Tuckahoe Turf Farms has pro-
vided playing surfaces for numerous
professional and collegiate ball parks
and football elds, including Citizens
Bank Park, Lincoln Field, Fenway
Park, Citibank Park and many other
facilities.
The ineld dirt is a mixture known
as Custom Martin Ineld Mix,
which has been used on collegiate
elds throughout the northeast. The
15-foot warning track is made of Red
Martin Track Mix. The distance from
home plate to the outeld fences
ranges from 330 feet down the left and
right eld lines to 375 feet in right and
left eld, and 390 feet to straightaway
center eld.
The $520,000 ball park also features
an electronic scoreboard in straight-
away left eld, an irrigation system,
sprinkler systems, individual bullpens
for the home and away teams, as well
as dugouts for the teams and bleachers
for the fans.
Tambur is the chairman and CEO
of Tammac Financial Corp., Wilkes-
Barre, as well as president of the Ath-
letic Club, Inc., Wilkes-Barre, and Blue
Ridge Golf Club, Mountain Top.
An active member of the communi-
ty, Tambur is a past board member of
the F.M. Kirby Center and served the
Committee on Economic Growth. He
currently serves on the board of Frank-
lin Security Bank, the Tambur Family
Foundation and Hospice of the Sacred
Heart.
In 2010, Tamburs familys generos-
ity were recognized when they were
presented with the Award for Out-
standing Philanthropist by the Asso-
ciation of Fundraising Professionals.
The Tambur Family Foundation has
also supported other causes through-
out the region, including the United
Way of Wyoming Valley, Geisinger
Health System and Luzerne County
Community College.
Tamburs son, Robert Tamburro,
is a trustee and general partner with
Tammac Financial Corp. Besides be-
ing on Council Misericordia, he is also
a board member of the Tambur Foun-
dation, Luzerne County Community
College, Penn State Advisory Board
and Wyoming Seminary. He is also a
former board member of Leadership
Wilkes-Barre and the Greater Wilkes-
Barre Chamber of Commerce.
Tambur and his wife, Virginia, have
two children, Tamburro and Liza Ro-
land, and three grandchildren.
Tambur Field
dedicated
Naming of Misericordia baseball
eld acknowledges philanthropy
and generosity of Tambur family.
Members of the Tambur family and Misericordia University campus com-
munity gather during the dedication of Tambur Field. From left, are Michael
Amory 85, Board of Trustees; Chuck Edkins, associate athletic director;
Liza (Tambur) Rolland, daughter; Virginia and Robert L. Tambur, Robert
Tamburro, son; Michael A. MacDowell, president; and Sandy Insalaco, Board
of Trustees.
Robert L. Tambur, chair-
man and CEO of Tammac
Financial Corp., throws out
the rst pitch of a double-
header game at Misericordia
University as part of the
dedication of Tambur Field.
The new eld was named to
acknowledge the philanthro-
py and generosity of Tambur,
his family and the Tambur
Family Foundation.
L-L track coach seeks
right combination.
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 10 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013
SPORTS BRIEFS
CAR WASH/
BAKE SALE
The Dallas Mountaineers
High School Baseball Booster
Club will sponsor a car wash
and bake sale from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. today, May 5 at Newell
Fuel.
Members of the high school
baseball team will be on hand to
wash cars and an array of baked
goods will be sold. All proceeds
will support the Dallas School
District baseball program.
Car wash tickets are $5.
FURY TRYOUTS
The Back Mountain FURY
girls travel soccer team is cur-
rently holding tryouts for the
2013-2014 U-12G fall season.
Players born Aug. 1, 2001 or
later are eligible.
The FURY is a local travel
team that trains and plays year
round. Tryout dates are as
follows: Sunday, May 5, from
6 to 7:30 p.m. and Wednesday,
May 6 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Rain
date is Monday, May 13 from 6
to 7:30 p.m. All tryouts will be
held at 55 Outlet Road, Dallas.
Participants ae asked to show
up 15 minutes prior to start
time to register and wear a
white t-shirt. For additional in-
formation, e-mail Bernie Banks
at bernieb3@amerasphalt.com.
SOCCER TRYOUTS
The Back Mountain Fire girls
travel soccer team will hold try-
outs for the fall season at 6 p.m.
on May 8 and 10 at the Back
Mountain Rec elds, Outlet
Road, Lehman.
The team will play U11 in the
fall and girls born Aug. 1, 2002
or later are eligible to tryout.
Contact coach Paul Strazdus
at pstrazdus@comcast.net for
more information.
RAIDERS
REGISTRATION
The Kingston Township Raid-
ers will hold registration for
mini football and cheerleading
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 18
at the Kingston Township Mu-
nicipal Building, 180 E. Center
St., Shavertown.
Parents should bring the
childs birth certicate, two
proofs of residency and a photo
of the child.
Registration fees are $50 for
cheerleading and $60 for foot-
ball with a $10 sibling discount.
LEGION TOURNAMENT
Daddow-Isaacs Dallas
American Legion Post 672 will
hold its annual golf tournament
on June 8 at Stone Hedge Golf
Course in Tunkhannock with its
traditional steak dinner at the
end of the tournament.
A donation of $80 is request-
ed. Hole sponsors for $50 and
donations for door prizes will
be solicited in the near future.
Monies raised will support the
fund that awards scholarships to
Back Mountain residents who
attend a two-year college.
Applications can be picked
up at the post home or from
committee members. Further
information may be obtained by
calling Jim Baloga, golf chair-
man, at 690-0756 or Clarence J.
Michael at 675-0488.
T
he Lady Lehman Knights and The Back Mountain Bandits lacrosse
teams battled recently with the Lady Knights coming away with a 17-5
victory in a game played on the Lake-Lehman turf.
In the rst meeting between these two teams, players from fth to ninth
grade participated.
Katie Strohl had ve goals and three assists, along with Taylor Alba with one
goal and four assists.
Hallie Jenkins added two goals, Grace Butler added two goals and two as-
sists, Alicia Galasso added two goals, Makalie Blazick had a goal along with an
assist, Janelle Cawley added a goal and Makalay Adams had two goals and an
assist.
The Lady Lehman Knights Youth Club defeated Wyoming Seminary, 8-7, on
April 23 in a game played in the Wyoming Valley Girls Youth Lacrosse League.
L-L lady stickers
net two wins
AT LEFT:
Makaylie
Blasik is on
the move
for Lake-
Lehman.
BOTTOM:
Members
of the Lady
Knights la-
crosse team
celebrate
a recent
victory over
Wyoming
Seminary.
Back Mountain Bandits Youth La-
crosse (BMYL) will host the Fourth
Annual Back Mountain Brawl La-
crosse Tournament on Saturday, May
11 at the Back Mountain Recreation
Fields located on Outlet Road in
Lehman.
This annual event will host 50 teams
and over 1,500 spectators from areas
as far away as Delaware Valley, Easton,
Lower Macungie, Scranton and local
teams from Wyoming Seminary, Valley
Laxers and Mountain Top.
This day-long event will host both
boys and girlsgames and will in-
clude divisions U11 to U15 for boys,
girls grades third and fourth and girls
grades ve through eight.
Medals will be awarded to the team
with overall wins in each division.
Lacrosse has been one of the na-
tions fastest-growing team sports for
more than a decade and that trend
continues in 2013, said Rodney
Driscoll, Back Mountain Youth La-
crosse president. BMYL is proud to
offer this opportunity to the players of
the Back Mountain. The Bandits orga-
nization is on target to be one of the
areas biggest competitors.
The BMYL Girls program is grow-
ing rapidly with all of our teams from
grades three/four, ve/six and seven/
eight having great success this year,
said John Delamater, girls coordina-
tor and founder of the organization.
As our schedule keeps evolving to
playing teams more locally like Moun-
tain Top, Danville, Delaware Valley,
Tunkhannock and Pleasant Valley, we
are hopeful this trend will continue
and the opportunities for our girls to
excel at the sport will grow with it for
many years to come.
The tournament is a fun-lled day
with vendors such as Dicks Sporting
Goods, Hockey Stop Sports, Philadel-
phia Hawks professional team, Mad-
dog Lacrosse and more displaying
their wares.
In addition to vendors, there will be
a shot clock for players and spectators
to test and time their throwing skills.
There will be a concession stand of-
fering homemade and grilled items,
sno cones, funnel cakes, popcorn and
much more.
Free parking and admission are
available.
Bandits host lacrosse tournament on May 11
Phillies squeak
by the Astros
The Back Mountain Major League Phil-
lies defeated the Astros, 32, on April 25.
Jason Eiden singled home Michael
Rother, who had doubled, in the bottom of
the sixth inning to win the game, support-
ing the pitching of Alex Magdalinski, Kyle
Hromisin and Donnie Thompson.
Magdalinski, Hromisin, Kaleb Konigus
and Mark Shultz also had hits for the
Phillies.
Nicholas Kachur had two hits and
pitched ve strong innings for the Astros.
Bryan Morio, Jacob Noone and Adam Kalo
also had hits for the Astros.
BACK MOUNTAIN
LITTLE LEAGUE
tribal warfare version except the
long-handled racket or crosse
that gives the sport its name. Its
true that the object in both the
mens and womens lacrosse is
to send a ball through a goal by
means of the racket, but whereas
men resort to brute strength, the
women depend solely on skill.
Today, Sinclair, is remem-
bered as the Grand Dame of La-
crosse and was the rst woman
to be inducted into the National
Lacrosse Hall of Fame
In a tribute to the origins of
girls lacrosse, the old stick
that the Lake-Lehman and Dal-
las girls will play for is an au-
thentic Hattersleys Viktoria
hickory crosse crafted in Man-
chester, England nearly 100
years ago. The name J.L. Cray
is carved in the handle - presum-
ably by the girl who rst owned
the crosse and used it to play
with her classmates on the lawn
of her school long ago.
STICK
Continued from Page 9
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 11 SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013
Valley Tennis & Swim Club
RockRec.org
$25 DISCOUNT
ON CLUB RENTALS & MEMBERSHIPS
(Membership & Private Parties Only)
Swim Parties 5-8pm
Private Party (Mon.-Fri.)
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7 Days a week
2 hour Swim
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Single Family & Friends
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Swim Lessons
211 Harris Hill Rd
Shavertown
570-696-2769
PRIVATE PARTIES MEMBERSHIPS
ARCADE
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COMING
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The Rock Rec. Sports Complex
HAIR/FASHION SHOW
A hair and fashion show
sponsored by the Irem Divan
Ladies will be held from 1 to 3
p.m. today, May 5 at the Irem
Country Club Pavilion, Dallas
with hair and make-up by Star
Tresses.
Admission is $10. Tickets
are available at the Irem Shrine
Center ofce, Country Club
Road, Dallas, from any Irem
Divan Lady or at the door.
Proceeds benet Irem Divan
Lady projects.
OPEN HOUSE
An open house will be held
from noon to 4 p.m. today, May
5 at the Franklin Twp. Vol. Fire
Co., 329 Orange Road.
Ofcers of the company will
be on hand to answer questions
about rental of the newly-
renovated re hall, re preven-
tion, smoke alarm placement,
etc. There will be hot dogs and
hamburgers, a chance to view
the companys four retrucks,
photos and the Smokehouse
experience.
For more information, call
the re hall at 333-4124 or As-
sistant Chief Maureen Oremus
at 592-4548.
BINGO SLATED
Bingo will be held on Mon-
day, May 6 at Northmoreland
Fire Hall in Centermoreland.
Doors open at 5 p.m. and early
birds begin at 6:30 p.m.
Food and beverage will be
available. For more informa-
tion, call Jim at 333-4906.
ALZHEIMERS TRAINING
A free Community Alzheim-
ers CARE Training Workshop
will be held from 6:30 to 8:30
p.m. on May 7 and 14 at Home
Instead Senior Care, 269 Ben-
nett St., Luzerne.
To make reservations, call
714-4260.
ROUNDTABLE MEETS
The Wyoming Valley Civil
War Roundtable will meet at
7 p.m. on Thursday, May 9 in
the lower level of the Daddow-
Isaacs American Legion, 730
Memorial Highway, Dallas.
Joe Kerrigan, of Gettys-
burg, will be the speaker. A $3
donation from non-members is
requested.
For more information, call
675-8936.
GDAC PRESENTS MOVIE
The Gas Drilling Awareness
Coalition of Luzerne County
(GDAC) will present a show-
ing of Triple Divide at 7 p.m.
on Thursday, May 9 at Temple
Bnai Brith, 408 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston.
A Q&A with the creators will
follow the lm which is free to
the public.
In their co-creation of Triple
Divide, Melissa Troutman
and Joshua Pribanic break new
ground with a cradle-to-grave
investigation of shale extraction.
HAM DINNER
The Sweet Valley Volunteer
Fire Co. will hold a family-style
ham dinner from 4:30 to 6:30
p.m. on Saturday, May 11. Take-
outs begin at 4 p.m.
Cost is $9 for adults, $5 for
children ages 6 to 11 and free
for children under 6 years of
age.
MOTORCYCLE RUN
BENEFITS BLUE CHIP
A motorcycle run called
Hogs for Dogs to benet Blue
Chip Farms Animal Refuge
will be held on May 12. The
ride, which begins and ends at
Gateway Lounge in Plymouth
Twp., starts at 12:15 p.m., rain
or shine.
Registration will be held from
11 a.m. to noon. Cost is $20 per
rider and $10 per passenger.
Upon return, there will be live
bands, food, prizes, surprises
and a commemorative t-shirt
sale.
For more information, call
333-5265.
WALKING PROGRAM
Learn how to take the rst
steps toward a healthier self
during the free Starting a
Walking Program presentation
at 10 a.m. on Thursday, May
16 in the Irem Clubhouse, 64
Ridgway Drive, Dallas.
Carrie Hapeman, MSOTR/L,
geriatric occupational therapist,
and Heather Witkowski, MSPT,
physical therapist, will feature
practical tips for walking,
stretching, safety, exercise in-
tensity and staying motivated.
To register, call 570-675-1866.
RIDING HOOD
AT MUSIC BOX
The Marvelous Misad-
ventures of Little Red Riding
Hood, an original musical for
children written by Kevin Cost-
ley, will be presented at 6 p.m.
on Friday, May 17, at 1 and 5
p.m. on Saturday, May 18 and at
1 p.m. on Sunday, May 19 at the
Music Box Dinner Playhouse,
196 Hughes St., Swoyersville.
School day performances will be
held at 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.
on May 15 and 17.
Price of admission is $12
and includes a McDonalds Fun
Meal. Call 283-2195 to make
reservations.
EVENT RAISES MONEY
FOR BLUE CHIP FARMS
Get a haircut and help raise
money for Blue Chip Farms Ani-
mal Refuge from11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
on Sunday, May 19 at the Sports
Page at Twin Stacks Center, 1100
Memorial Highway, Dallas. There
will be refreshments and a rafe.
Call 675-2466 for an appoint-
ment.
BINGO SLATED
Bingo will be held on Mon-
day, May 20 at the Northmore-
land Fire Hall in Centermore-
land. Doors open at 5 p.m. and
early birds start at 6:30 p.m.
Food and beverage will be
available. For more informa-
tion, call Jim at 333-4906.
AUDITIONS FOR LES MIS
Auditions for Les Misera-
bles will be held at 7 p.m. on
Monday, May 20 and Wednes-
day, May 22 at the Music Box
Dinner Playhouse, 196 Hughes
St, Swoyersville.
All roles are open and all
those auditioning should sing a
song of his/her choice. Please
bring sheet music; an accompa-
nist will be provided. Produc-
tion dates are July 19 to 21, 25
to 28 and Aug. 1 to 4.
For more information, call
283-2195.
FASHION SHOW SET
Wyoming Valley Womans
Club will hold a spring fash-
ion show entitled Essence of
Spring on Tuesday, May 21 at
Appletree Terrace, Newberry
Estate, Dallas.
Tickets may be purchased by
calling Eileen Davis at 824-
8461.
ROAST BEEF DINNER
Aroast beef dinner will be
held from4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, May 22 at the North-
moreland Fire Hall in Centermo-
reland.
Cost is $8 for adults and $4 for
children under 12 years of age.
BUS TRIP PLANNED
Irem Womens Auxiliary will
host a bus trip on Thursday,
May 23 to the Hunterdon
Playhouse to see Wake Up Dar-
ling. The price is $85 and in-
cludes bus, lunch and the show.
For more information, call
Janet Stritzinger at 824-6418 or
Suanne Moses at 822-4976.
GRANGE MEETING
Mountain Grange No. 567 will
meet at 7 p.m. on June 4 in the
Grange Hall, 1632 W. 8th St.,
Kingston Township, Wyoming.
BLOOD DRIVE
Mountain Grange No. 567 will
hold a blood drive in conjunction
with the American Red Cross
from9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Satur-
day, June 8 in the lower level of
the Kingston Township Munici-
pal Building.
Refreshments will be provided.
WINE FESTIVAL
The Dallas Rotary Wine and
Dine Festival will be held from
11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on June 29
at the Luzerne County Fair-
grounds, Route 118, Dallas
Township.
Tickets are $15 if purchased
prior to the event and $25 at
the game. Designated drivers
pay $5. The event features
Pennsylvania wines, craft
vendors, local food vendors and
live music.
For more information,
contact Melissa Saxon at sax-
onm5@hotmail.com
SUMMER THEATRE
WORKSHOP SLATED
The Music Box Summer
Theatre Workshop 2013, a
theatre program for children
ages 6 to 11, will run July 22 to
Aug. 16 at the Music Box Din-
ner Playhouse, 196 Hughes St.,
Swoyersville
Students will perform
Disneys Winnie the Pooh on
Aug. 16, 17 and 18.
For more information, call
283-2195.
CIVIC BRIEFS
Reps. Karen Boback
(R-Columbia/Luzerne/
Wyoming) and Sandra Major
(R- Susquehanna/Wayne/
Wyoming) have announced
that Wyoming County was
awarded a $20,433 state grant
through the Department of
Environmental Protections
(DEP) Recycling Performance
Grant Program.
The Recycling Performance
Grant Program was estab-
lished under Act 101 of 1988,
the Municipal Waste Plan-
ning, Recycling and Waste
Reduction Act.
Under this law, munici-
palities with more than 10,000
residents and those with
populations between 5,000
and 10,000 that have popula-
tion densities greater than 300
people per square mile must
establish recycling programs.
Currently, 440 of Pennsyl-
vanias 2,700 municipalities
are required to recycle and
provide curbside collection
programs.
Recycling Performance
Grants are available to all
Pennsylvania municipalities
with established recycling
programs.
These grant awards were
based on the total tons re-
cycled and each municipalitys
recycling rate for the calendar
year 2010.
Wyoming County receives recycling grant
Sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy
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Our Lady of Victory
HARVEYS LAKE
Our Lady of Victory Harveys Lake continues to host the
Annual Six Month Devotion to Our Lady of Fatima
This months service will take place on MONDAY,
MAY 13TH AT 7:00 PM, the Devotions will continue to be
held on the 13th of each month through October 13th.
Handicap Parking & Access is Available
All are welcome!
The Devotions to Our Lady of Fatima consist of
The Rosary, Beautiful Marian Hymns and Benediction.
For Further Information Call 639-1535
CEREC delivers top quality restorations in one visit, so you can
get back to your busy life. Heres what makes CEREC so special:
No Temporaries No Impressions Metal Free
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100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classied ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classieds@mydallaspost.com
mydallaspost.com
SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 THE POST PAGE 12
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
503 Accounting/
Finance
522 Education/
Training
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
503 Accounting/
Finance
522 Education/
Training
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
503 Accounting/
Finance
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
548 Medical/Health
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
548 Medical/Health
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
548 Medical/Health
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
548 Medical/Health
Senior Financial/Cost Accountant
We are a leading, local food manufacturer that seeks an
experienced Senior Financial/Cost Accountant. The successful
candidates key areas of responsibility will be to prepare
financial statements and supporting schedules according to
monthly close schedule, facilitate and complete monthly close
procedures, understand standard costing to include maintaining
Bills of Materials, inventory valuations, and variance analysis,
analyze revenues, inventory costs, and expenses to ensure they
are recorded appropriately, prepare monthly account
reconciliations, assist in documentation and monitoring of internal
controls, lead monthly and year-end inventory counts and
reconciliations with our Supply Chain. Bachelors or higher
degree in Accounting or Finance required, CPA designation
preferred. The qualified candidate must have 5+ years
Accounting/Finance experience in a manufacturing environment,
be proficient in Microsoft Office applications with emphasis on
Excel, a strong understanding of accounting theory, be highly
detail oriented and organized, possess excellent communication
and interpersonal skills with a customer service focus,ability to
work cooperatively and collaboratively with all levels of
employees, management, and external agencies to maximize
performance, creativity, problem solving, and results, and the
ability to meet assigned deadlines. Qualified applicants can
submit a resume with salary requirements to:
THE TIMES LEADER
BOX 4365
15 N. MAIN STREET, WILKES-BARRE PA 18711
8
1
5
6
6
7
Full Time Inbound Account Representatives
No Weekends or Holidays!
WE ARE HIRING FOR FRENCH BILINGUAL REPS TOO!
WE CONTINUE TO GROW AND ARE NOW HIRING FOR:
START DATE: May 13th
SHIFT: 11:30am-8:00pm
Computers will be available for testing from 10:00am-3:30pm.
We will do on the spot interviews for all qualied candidates who have successfully
completed the on line application and passed the assessments!
You can visit our website @ www.telerx.com and complete the
application/assessments prior to attending the Open House. Apply to Job # 2420.
OPENHOUSE
Monday, May 6 10:00am-5:00pm
Hanover Industrial Estates
600 Lasley Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18706
INSIDE CLAIMS ADJUSTERS
GWC Warranty, a national vehicle service contract provider located in
Wilkes-Barre, is looking for Inside Claims Adjusters. Qualified candidates
must possess knowledge of the automotive repair industry, excellent
communication and negotiation skills, and demonstrated ability to set priorities.
Experienced Franchised Dealer Service Writers, Managers
and Technicians are particularly encouraged to apply.
The Company offers a competitive salary and benefits package including
medical benefits and 401(k).
Interested applicants should send their resume, along with references
to careers@gwcwarranty.com or fax to 570-456-0967.
CUSTOMER
SERVICE REP
PART TIME
20-25 hours per week, Weekends and Holidays a must.
Pleasant personality and ability to handle a fast-paced
environment, working with customers on the telephone
on incoming and outgoing calls.
Please send cover letter and resume to:
jmccabe@civitasmedia.com
or to:
Jim McCabe
The Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre PA 18711
A Civitas Media Company
An Equal Opprotunity Employer
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT - EOE
www.dallassd.com
FULL TIME TEACHING
POSITIONS FOR THE
2013-2014 SCHOOL YEAR
High School Guidance Counselor
High School Technology Education
Middle School Technology Education
Middle School/High School Music
concentration in band.
If a complete application packet is on file,
please submit a letter of interest only. All others
submit a complete application packet. For
details visit the Employment page of the district
web site, www.dallassd.com All application
packets must be received by
Deadline: May 9, 2013
HVAC/R SERVICE TECHNICIAN HVAC/R SERVICE TECHNICIAN
Immediate Full Time
We are looking for top notch technicians
experienced In servicing commercial &
industrial equipment. If you have excellent
qualifications and desire to work with a
team of great people and a growing
company with a reputation of supplying
dependable quality service, send us your
resume. Excellent wage & benefit package.
Email: rswanson@rite-temp.com
Fax: 570-563-1933
Mail: ATTN: Roxanne Swanson
101 So. Lackawanna Trail,
Dalton, PA 18414
WWW.RITE-TEMP.COM
June Hannon, Administrator
Phone: 570-718-4400
Fax: 570-718-4823
Email: jmhannon@commonwealthhealth.net
www.homecareopportunities.net
The following opportunities are currently available:
RN Home Health - Full Time
RN - Full Time - On Call
MSW Home Health/Hospice - PRN
Home Health Aide - Full Time
RN Hospice PRN (Inpatient Unit All Shifts)
LPN Hospice Part Time (Inpatient Unit Nights)
Our comprehensive benefits package includes company provided
medical, dental, vision, 401(k) and more.
For more information and immediate consideration,
please send your resume to the following:
Commonwealth Home Health and Hospice of Wilkes-Barre is a rapidly
growing community-based home care provider. We care for the needs of the
community residents by collaborating with other healthcare providers, offering
patients primary treatment programs and disease management programs
within the comfort and safety of their homes.
Our Partners in Care culture allows healthcare professionals the flexibility to
work closely with the patient, their families and our professional care team to
provide quality outcomes and excellent customer service.
CNA - LPN - RN CNA - LPN - RN
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Now Hiring For All Shifts!
(Certification/License Required)
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Great Facility & Opportunity For Growth
Jump Start Your Career Today! Contact 877-339-6999 x1 for an interview
Email resumes to Jobs@horizonshrs.com
Or apply in person at:
395 Middle Road
Nanticoke, PA 18634
100
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sons. light green
flea collar.
570-822-9561
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITOS
&
GINOS
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
150 Special Notices
ADOPTING
YOUR NEWBORN
is our dream.
Endless love, joy,
security awaits.
Maryann and Matt
888-225-7173
Expenses Paid
< < < < < <
Adoring, secure
couple longs to
adopt your new-
born. Safe, beau-
tiful life forever.
Love awaits.
Lori & Craig
888-773-6381
Expenses Paid
150 Special Notices
ADOPTION
A happily married
couple long to
provide a baby
with a lifetime of
unconditional love,
security, happi-
ness & opportuni-
ties. We promise
to cherish your
baby forever!
Assistance
available.
1-877-886-4628
or JenAndChris
2Adopt.com
IF YOURE NOT
SELLING YOUR
HEAVY EQUIPMENT,
TRACTORS, TRAILERS,
SCHOOL BUSSES, DUMP
TRUCKS TO
HAPPY HAPPY TRAILS TRAILS
YOURE LOSING MONEY
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
Free Pick up!
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
412 Autos for Sale
FORD 08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$6800 negotiable.
570-578-9222
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
To place your
ad call...829-7130
TOYOTA 04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI 01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
442 RVs & Campers
EXPEDITION 03 37U
CUMMINS 300
DIESEL PUSHER
19,000 miles, 2
slides, 7.5 kw Gen.
2 Air Cond.
Microwave-Convec-
tion Oven
4 Door Fridge - with
Automatic Ice
maker. Heated
holding tanks
Corian Counter
Tops. 2 TV - Sur-
round sound,
Cherry Cabinets,
Ice Maker
Washer-Dryer
Sleeps 6, Queen
Beds, Back up
Camera
Recently Inspected.
Garaged in winter.
$59,900.00
570-288-2649
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `98
SILVERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB LS
Runs great! 211,000
miles, 4x4, new
windshield, alter-
nator, front wheel
studs, spark plug
wires, ignition mod-
ule, brakes, throttle
body gasket, 3 oxy-
gen sensors, fuel
pump, tank, & filter.
New tires with alloy
rims. New transmis-
sion. $3,500, OBO.
570-793-5593
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
503 Accounting/
Finance
BOOKKEEPER
AP & AR; Bank &
CC Reconciliation;
Other related
duties.
8:30-5:00 M-F.
Email resume to:
NEPAJOB@
GMAIL.COM
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
General
CUSTOMER SERVICE
ASSOCIATES
Part time positions
only; Call Center
Experience,
typing skills and
working knowledge
of Microsoft Office
a must.Pet knowl-
edge preferred.
***DRESS FOR
SUCCESS***
May include Sat &
Evenings hours
TABcom, LLC is
taking applications
(on-site) from
Friday, May 3 to
Friday, May 10
10am-4pm
626 Cando
Expressway Suite 3
Hazle Twp, PA
18202
522 Education/
Training
COACHES WANTED
MMI
Preparatory
School
is seeking
Applicants for
Boys Soccer
Head Coach and
Assistant Coach,
also Girls Soccer
Head Coach and
Assistant Coach.
The position is
available immedi-
ately. Interested
candidates should
send their resume
and cover letter to
athletics@
mmiprep.org
E.O.E.
524 Engineering
SURVEYOR
Local dynamic
Engineering/
Surveying Firm has
a need for a
survey CADD
draftsperson,
Party Chief, and
Instrument Person.
Working knowl-
edge of AutoCAD
2013, Trimble GPS
equipment, TDS
Data Collection
and Microsoft
Office a plus.
Survey degree
and S.I.T. Certifi-
cate is a plus but
not required.
Full time/Part
time/summer
intern position
available.
-We offer a
competitive salary
with full benefits
including but not
limited to partially
paid Health
Insurance, Vision
Insurance, Dental
Insurance, paid
holidays, vacation,
401(k) Plan.
Send all replies in
confidence to:
Reilly
Associates
49 S. Main Street,
Suite 200
Pittston, PA 18640
(570) 654-2473
ext. 213
cgmiter@reilly
engineering.com
EOE/M/F/V/H
548 Medical/Health
GOLDEN LIVING
CENTER
TUNKHANNOCK
Director of Clinical
Education &
Part Time and Per
Diem RN's all shifts
Apply in person at
30 Virginia Drive
Tunkhannock,
PA 18657
www.goldenliving.com
570-836-5166 or
fax 570-836-7756
EOE M/F/D/V
Line up a place to live
in classified!
SLEEP LAB
TECHNICIAN
Need registered
(RPSGT) board
certified or board
eligible. Part time
or Per Diem. Sleep
Lab Technician.
Send resume to
Sleep &
Neurological
PO BOX 100
Mountain Top, PA
18707
SUNDAY, MAY 5, 2013 THE POST PAGE 13
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
EXPERIENCED CAREGIVERS NEEDED
Visiting Angels is looking for experienced
compassionate and reliable caregivers
to work in the homes of the elderly.
1st, 2nd and 3rd shifts immediately
available in Luzerne County.
Must have reliable vehicle, valid
drivers license and references.
We offer flexibility, weekend shift
differentials and a competitive rate.
Call 570-270-6703 today! or email
skahlau@visitingangels.com
Why Visiting Angels?
Because we care about our caregivers.
EOE
LOCAL PROS
The Dallas Post Call 1-800-273-7130
HIC#
PA-005521 655-6710
SMITH & MILLER
ROOFING, INC.
Flat Roofs Shingles Siding Replacement Windows
Free Estimates - Licensed & Insured
ROBERT SMITH, WEST PITTSTON
WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
member
Northeastern
& Central PA
PREFERRED CONTRACTOR
SINCE 1976
ELECTRICIAN
WOOD-COAL STOVES/FIREPLACES
WASHER/ DRYER/ RANGE
REFRIGERATOR
Bring in old part with model # and serial #
APPLIANCE PARTS &SUPPLY
936 Market Street, Kingston
Open 9-4:30-Sat til Noon - 288-5526
APPLIANCES AIR CONDITION & HEATING
AUTO BODY
PHONE: (570) 823-2211
FAX: (570) 824-0553
INSURANCE ESTIMATES COLLISION REPAIRS
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP
CALL
RICK OR NICK
105 WEST SAYLOR AVE.
PLAINS, PA 18702
Ricks Body Shop
Fender Benders
FLOORING
ROOFING
ROOFING
TOLL FREE 888-913-2015
OR 570-820-0233
FREE ESTIMATES 10% SENIOR
CITIZENS DISCOUNTS
HARDWOOD & LAMINATE INSTALLATION
TILE FLOORS, WALLS. SHOWERS, BACKSPLASHES
ETERNITY
FLOORING
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Kitchens, Baths,
Additions,
Remodeling
570-696-2828
ww.kaminskiconstruction.net
SPR, INC
SUMMIT PEAK ROOFING, INC.
Commercial & Residential
Free Estimates ~ Licensed & Insured
PA 096716
www.summitpeakroong.com
1-855-768-7325
PAVING & SEALING
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
Paving & Sealing
20 Years Customer Satisfaction
Competitive Pricing!!!
Free Estimates
PA #041254
836-3587
Bobby Harris
Residential
Commercial
TWIN HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING
Expert Service & Installation
Central Air Conditioning & Heating
Ductless Units ~ Hybrid Heat Pump Systems
Add-on Air Conditioning
Commercial & Residential
Insured & EPA Certified
570-
639-1796
548 Medical/Health
MEDICAL
RN Part-Time
11p-7:30a
CNAs 2nd
and 3rd shift
245 Old Lake
Road Dallas, PA
18612
570-639-1885
E.O.E.
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
MARKETING/SALES
Full Time, Part Time
experienced Mar-
keting/Salesper-
sons. Identify and
connect with senior
executives, open
doors and arrange
meetings. Must
have excellent
phone skills.
Fax Resume to:
(866) 969-0690
Email to: CMCNorth
east@verizon.net
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
ESTABLISHED SALON
FOR SALE
Owner retiring.
Two stylists & 1 nail
tech, all with
clientele. Very Rea-
sonably Priced! Call
570-239-0917
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
VISUAL
COMMUNICATIONS
BIZ FOR SALE
B to B Services
Repeat Client
Base
Low Overhead
Great Location
High Net to Gross
No Experience
Necessary
Finance & Training
Available
1-800-796-3234
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
YEARBOOKS.
Coughlin (30) 28-
2000. GAR -(18))
37-06, Meyers (15)
53-03, Pittston (6)
67-75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,Kingston
(11) 32-52, Hazle-
ton, (8) 40-61,
Plains, (3) 66-68,
Hanover 51-74.
Prices vary depend-
ing on condition.
$20-$40 each. Call
for further details &
additional school
editions. 570-825-
4721 arthurh302@
aol.com
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
ATTENTION VENDORS
Decorative/Sea-
sonal/Accent
Pieces for sale.
Purchase sepa-
rately or all.
Call 675-5046
after 6PM
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
$10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
758 Miscellaneous
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
776 Sporting Goods
BICYCLE
20 GIRLS
MURRAY DAZZLER
Powder blue with
pink trim accents &
wheels, white tires.
Front & rear brakes
plus coaster foot
brake. Good
condition $25.
570-814-9574
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
May 2 - 1,469.25
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
POMERANIAN
Puppies
AKC registered.
1 sable male.
1 female, 2 males,
black & party
colored. Ready
Now. $550.
Vet checked, first
shots, wormed.
Home Raised
570-864-2643
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
KINGSTON
For Sale by Owner.
229 Pringle Street
Single home, 3 bed-
rooms. Remodeled,
Kitchen & bath,
concrete cellar,
huge walk up attic,
deck & new roof.
570-287-3927
LAKEFRONT
COTTAGE
LAKE COMO,
WAYNE COUNTY
QUIET, PEACEFUL
LOT ON PRIVATE,
NON-MOTOR-
BOATING LAKE;
YEAR ROUND,
GREAT RETIRE-
MENT OR VACA-
TION PROPERTY;
SEE DETAILS AND
PICTURES AT:
LAKEHOUSE.COM
AD# 275333
OR CALL JIM
570-785-3888
$269,900
TAXES LESS THAN
$2,500.
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
EAST END SECTION
Great starter
home, 3 bedrooms,
1 modern bath.
Updated kitchen,
new roof, windows
& furnace. Off
street parking,
fenced in back
yard. New back
porch. All appli-
ances included.
$42,500
570-235-1210 after
5:30 pm.
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR RETIRE-
MENT COMMUNITY
Only eight lots
left. Custom
design you home
the way you want it.
Call 570-675-1300
912 Lots & Acreage
SWOYERSVILLE
100 x 150, cleared,
surveyed level
building lot. Utilities
are available.
$24,900.
Call: 570-288-4899
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
2 bedrooms, 2nd
floor. Off street
parking. Heat, hot
water & trash
included. Coin op
washer/dryer.
$625/month,
references,
security & lease.
No smoking.
No pets
Available May 1st
Call 570-760-4830
FORTY FORT
2nd floor, one bed-
room, living room,
office. Nice kitchen
with refrigerator &
stove. Large bath,
many closets &
large storage area.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Heat & water
included. No pets.
600/month + securi-
ty., 570-574-2829
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom , wall to
wall carpet, appli-
ances, Lake rights.
Off street parking.
No pets. Lease,
security and
references.
570-639-5920
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
Kingston &
Surrounding Areas
APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE
KINGSTON:
1 and 2 bedrooms
WYOMING:
1 and 2 bedrooms
WILKES-BARRE:
4 Bedroom
1/2 Double
WILKES-BARRE:
3 Bedroom
brick home.
Appliances,sewer
are included.
Lease, credit check
Priced affordable !
Call: Tina Randazzo
@ 899-3407 for
info/appt.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
E. E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor. Located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room, sun-
room, bath, 3 bed-
rooms; 2 large & 1
small. Lots of clos-
ets, built-in linen
closet & hutch.
Hardwood & car-
peted floors. Fire-
place. Storage
room. Yard. Washer
/ dryer, stove /
fridge. Heat and hot
water included. 1
year lease + securi-
ty. $950
570-283-4370
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpeted,
entry system.
Garage. Extra stor-
age & cable TV
included. Laundry
facilities. Air Con-
ditioned. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $785 +
utilities. Call.
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
EATON TERRACE
317 N. Maple Ave.
2 story 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath @
$850. + utilities.
Two story 3 bed-
room, 2.5 baths @
$1,110. + utilities.
Central heat & air,
washer/dryer in
unit, on site park-
ing. 1 mo. security
570-262-6947
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets. Rents
based on income
start at $405 &
$440. Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity. 570-
474-5010 TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 4 rooms &
bath. Washer/dryer
hook up. Heat & hot
water furnished. No
smoking, no pets.
Security & refer-
ences. $695/mo.
570-654-1193
WEST PITTSTON
203 Delaware Ave.
. 4 rooms, no pets,
no smoking, off
street parking.
Includes heat,
water, sewer,
fridge, stove, w/d.
High security bldg.
$450 3rd floor,
$650 1st floor.
570-655-9711
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
W-B/
PLAINS AREA
BUS STOP/
STORES
BRICK DUPLEX
BRAND NEW -
CLEAN. 2nd
floor. 1 bedroom
remodeled!
Maple kitchen,
built-ins, porch,
tiled bath, laun-
dry. Convenient
neighborhood.
BUS STOP MINI
MART & MORE!
Managed. $550
+ utilities. No
Pets. 2 YEAR
SAME RENT.
APPLICATION,
EMPLOYMENT
AMERICA REALTY
288-1422
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
2,400 Sq. Ft.
1,200 Sq. Ft.
Professional office
space. Will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
EXETER
OFFICE SPACE
Newly remodeled
120 sq. ft. All
utilities included,
except phone.
$250/month.
Lease. Call
570-602-1550
KINGSTON
GREAT SPACE
18 Pierce Street
Available immedi-
ately, off street
parking, air. $300
& up/month. All
utilities included.
570-690-0564
944 Commercial
Properties
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE/
PLAINS TWP.
WAREHOUSE
LAIRD STREET
COMPLEX,
Easy interstate
access.
Lease 132,500 s.f.,
will subdivide, 12
loading docks, 30ft.
ceilings, sprinkler,
acres of parking.
Offices available.
Call 570-655-9732,
X312
950 Half Doubles
PLAINS
LUXURY DUPLEX
This beautiful, com-
pletely renovated 2
bedroom luxury
apartment could be
yours! All new high
end amenities in-
clude: hardwood
floors, gorgeous
maple kitchen cabi-
nets with granite
countertops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Spacious
great room with gas
fireplace. Tile bath,
stacked wash-
er/dryer. Large
screened-in porch.
Many large, conven-
ient closets. Central
A/C. New gas heat-
ing system. Huge
attic for storage.
Must See! $1,000
+ utilities, lease &
security. NO PETS,
NO SMOKING
570-793-6294
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
Private, 3 bedroom
ranch, patio, porch,
appliances, work
shop. $830 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-522-0084
DORRANCE TOWNSHIP
Crestwood School,
7 minutes to 81. 3-4
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, with an
above ground pool.
$1,200/month, first
and last months
rent+security. Credit
and background
checks. Pets con-
sidered. Call Diane,
570-239-9633
953Houses for Rent
EDWARDSVILLE
Kingston Vicinity
AMERICA REALTY
MANAGED
REMODELED TO
PERFECTION!
Includes white
colonial kitchen,
center island, all
appliances, 2 glass
/ windowed
enclosed porches,
gas fireplace, 1.5
baths & more. 2
YEAR SAME RENT
$900/month
+ utilities. NO PETS/
EMPLOYMENT
VERIFICATION.
570-288-1422
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom single
family home in
quiet neighbor-
hood with great
neighbors. 1
bath, gas heat, air
conditioning, hard-
wood floors and
carpeting. Drive-
way with 2 car
garage. Large
yard with privacy
fence, shed,
above-ground pool
and swing set.
$950. per month
plus security and
utilities. Please call
570-333-4700 or
570-592-3420
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Summer
Home. Starting June
to end of August.
College students
welcome in Sept.
Lake rights. Call for
details.
570-639-5041
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central
Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
NEPA MASONRY, INC.
Stonework - stucco
- concrete - patios
- pavers - brick -
block - chimneys
www.nepa
masonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work.
Lot clearing, pool
closing & retain-
ing walls, etc.
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
1099 Fencing &
Decks
FREDERICK FENCE CO.
Locally Owned
Vinyl, Chain Link,
Aluminum, Wood.
570-709-3021
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, were
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
BAREFOOT
GROUNDS KEEPING
- Grass Cutting,
aerating, fertilizing,
mulching, weeding,
pruning, garden
tilling.
- Painting, fencing,
stonewalls,
power washing.
- Tree and snow
removal.
Fully insured
Credit cards
accepted
Commercial or
Residential
Please contact
Roger:
570-760-7249
email:
schichi@ptd.net
1165 Lawn Care
AFFORDABLE
LAWN CARE
Complete Lawn
Care Service
FREE ESTIMATES
Mike 570-357-8074
Leave Message
GRASS CUTTING
Affordable, reliable,
meticulous. Rates
as low as $20.
Emerald Green
570-825-4963
1213 Paving &
Excavating
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
1231 Pool & Spa
Repair/Services
RK POOLS & MORE
Pool openings, liner
changes, and
installations. Patios,
Decks and fencing.
Insured.
570-592-2321
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
1252 Roofing &
Siding
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
1336 Window
Cleaning
PJs Window
Cleaning &
Janitorial
Services
Windows, Gutters,
Carpets, Power
washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E DER DDD .
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746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 14 Sunday, May 5, 2013
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THIS WEEKS FEATURE
Homemade soups,
salads, sandwiches,
bread and
quiches made from
the freshest local
ingredients.
100 E. OVERBROOK ROAD SHAVERTOWN
6749787 BROWNBARNCAFE.COM
OPEN FOR LUNCH
TUESDAYSATURDAY 11 A.M.3 P.M.
OPEN FOR DINNER
THURSDAYSATURDAY 5 P.M.9 P.M.
Ah! Some Chocolates
AT
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Diane McGee
829-7153
To Advertise In The
Please Contact
5 Course
WineDinner
K
ID
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U
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12
$3.00
per yr old
Carved NY Strip Loin 4 Hot Entrees
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4 Side Dishes Dessert Selections
Phone: 696-3580
www.FIREandICEonTOBYCREEK.com
RT 309, Trucksville - Just North of Sheetz
Phone: 696-3580 www.FIREandICEonTOBYCREEK.com
RT 309, Trucksville - Just North of Sheetz
Visit our Web Site to viewour Full Buffet Menu for our
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t N
ew
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oted
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Tuesday, May 14th
Chef-Carved NY Strip 4 Hot Entrees
Shrimp Cocktail Pasta Station
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4 Side Dishes Dessert Selections
Kids Under 12
$
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OPEN MON - SAT for
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SUNDAY 4 - 8 PM
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Mothers Day
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Private Tableside Buffet
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$
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$
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Living Alone Made Easy
570-881-9716
www.CareGiversAmerica.com
Accredited by the National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers
$50 Offer!
1 Geriatric Care Manager Visit
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3 hrs. of Homecare Services
Light housekeeping, personal care, meal prep, & transportation
Kingston 287-9631 Exeter 655-8801
Building? Remodeling?
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