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Faculty Title Lord Ashcroft International Business School

Module Title Organisational Change Management


Department: HRM, Organisational Behaviour and Tourism
Module Code: MOD003478

Academic Year: 2012/13 Semester/Trimester:

Contents
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Key Information..............................................................................................................................2 Introduction to the Module ............................................................................................................. 2 Intended Learning Outcomes .........................................................................................................2 Outline Delivery .............................................................................................................................3 4.1 Attendance Requirements ..................................................................................................... 5 Assessment ...................................................................................................................................7 How is My Work Marked? ............................................................................................................ 13 Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards ............................................................................... 16 Assessment Offences .................................................................................................................. 18 Learning Resources ..................................................................................................................... 20 9.1. Library ................................................................................................................................. 20 9.2. Other Resources ................................................................................................................. 22 Module Evaluation ....................................................................................................................... 22 Report on Last Delivery of Module ............................................................................................... 22

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1. Key Information
Module/Unit title: Module Leader: ORGANISATIONAL CHANGE MANAGEMENT MOD003478 Michael Rice London School of Marketing LS Education Group Nisha Jayasuriya

Module Tutors:

Every module has a Module Definition Form (MDF) which is the officially validated record of the module. You can access the MDF for this module in three ways via: the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) the My.Anglia Module Catalogue at www.anglia.ac.uk/modulecatalogue Anglia Ruskins module search engine facility at www.anglia.ac.uk/modules

All modules delivered by Anglia Ruskin University at its main campuses in the UK and at Associate Colleges throughout the UK and overseas are governed by the Academic Regulations. You can view these at www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs. A printed extract of the Academic Regulations, known as the Assessment Regulations, is available for every student from your Faculty Office LAB301 (all new students will have received a copy as part of their welcome pack). In the unlikely event of any discrepancy between the Academic Regulations and any other publication, including this module guide, the Academic Regulations, as the definitive document, take precedence over all other publications and will be applied in all cases.

2. Introduction to the Module


This module provides the opportunity for learners to engage with, and explore, some of the practical challenges arising from planned and unplanned change in contemporary work organisations. The module is designed for learners to understand why change happens, how change happens and what needs to be done to make change a more welcoming concept. The module focuses upon on individual, team and organisational change. The module explores how different types of change whether departmental, divisional or whole organisational change affect and impact upon the people on the receiving end - individual human beings. Therefore, the module emphasizes that without looking at the implications of change on individuals we can never really hope to manage change effectively. Accordingly, this module complements the Level 3 Sustainable Management Futures module In addition, one of the themes of organisational life over recent years has been the ascendancy of the team. Much of todays work is organised through teams and requires team collaboration and team working for it to succeed. A thread running through the module will be the crucial role of leadership. If management is all about delivering on current needs, then leadership is all about inventing the future. The module focuses upon the importance of effective leadership arising throughout. Learners will be encouraged to make sense of the changes that they might undergo, initiate and implement in the workplace. Learners will also be encouraged to make sense of, and apply the ideas, concepts and theories from the academic literature on organisational change in analysis of organisational change (e.g. case study). The module aims for learners to become aware of the practical difficulties of managing and coping with organisational change; and also to consider how effective workplace change might be achieved by individuals, teams and organisations. Assessment is by way of case study (3,000 words)

3. Intended Learning Outcomes

7.

Learning Outcomes (threshold standards): On successful completion of this module the student will be expected to be able to:

Knowledge and understanding

1 2

Understand the practices and leadership behaviours that are required to participate in, and effectively respond to, change and challenges in the workplace Consider the practical difficulties and challenges arising from planned and unplanned change Evidence heightened personal awareness in relation to workplace participation.

Intellectual, practical, affective and transferable skills

3.

4.

Demonstrate critical analysis through engagement with practical difficulties of managing organizational change

4. Outline Delivery

Wk 1

Student activity Organisational Transformation Process, Community Evolution and Social Change

Student activity Reading references In order to fully benefit from Jones, G.R., 2007. the lessons, students are Organisational Theory, expected to read the Design and Change., 5th ed. recommended Lecture notes, New Jersey: Pearson Practical applications and Prentice Hall Chapter 11, Case studies, available in the 13 IMSS. Ravi, S.S.,2011. A Comprehensive Study of Education. [e-book] New Delhi: PHI Learning Private Limited Chapter 24 Smith, M. K., 2001. Peter Senege and the Learning Organisation available through infed website <http://www.infed.org/thinker s/senge.htm> [Accessed: 18 November 2012]. Gilgeous. V., 1997. Operations and the Management of Change., London: Pitman Publishing. Chapter 1,2

Organisational Change In order to fully benefit from and Change Management the lessons, students are -I expected to read the recommended Lecture notes, Practical applications and Case studies, available in the IMSS.

Organisational

Change In order to fully benefit from 3

Jones, G.R., 2007. Organisational Theory, Design and Change., 5th ed. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. Chapter 10 Gilgeous. V., 1997.

and Change Management the lessons, students are - II expected to read the recommended Lecture notes, Practical applications and Case studies, available in the IMSS.

Operations and the Management of Change., London: Pitman Publishing. Chapter 7,8,9,10,11,14 Jones, G.R., 2007. Organisational Theory, Design and Change., 5th ed. New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. Chapter 10 Northhouse, P.G., 2010., Leadership Theory and Practice., 5th ed. New Delhi: SAGE Publications. Chapter 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 Tulsian, P.C & Pandey, V., 2002., Business Organisation and Management., New Delhi: Pearson.- Chapter 23 Cheung Judge, M.Y., & Holbeche, L., 2011., Organisation Development., London: Kogan Page. Chapter 14 Pendleton, D., & Furnham, A., 2012., Leadership: All you need to know., Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapter 1,2,4, Northhouse, P.G., 2010., Leadership Theory and Practice., 5th ed. New Delhi: SAGE Publications. Chapter 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15 Pendleton, D., & Furnham, A., 2012., Leadership: All you need to know., Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan. Chapter 5, 6, Tulsian, P.C & Pandey, V., 2002., Business Organisation and Management., New Delhi: Pearson. Chapter 23

Evolutionary In order to fully benefit from Transformation Context of the lessons, students are Leadership - I expected to read the recommended Lecture notes, Practical applications and Case studies, available in the IMSS.

Evolutionary In order to fully benefit from Transformation Context of the lessons, students are Leadership II expected to read the recommended Lecture notes, Practical applications and Case studies, available in the IMSS.

Gilpin, A., 2008., Authentic Leadership Transforming your people and your organisation [pdf] Kent:

Institute of Development. 6 Contemporary Issues Organisational Transformation in In order to fully benefit from the lessons, students are expected to read the recommended Lecture notes, Practical applications and Case studies, available in the IMSS.

Human

Cateora P.R., Graham J.L., and Salwan P. 2011. International Marketing., 13th ed. New Delhi: McGraw Hill. Chapter 7,8 Kotabe, M. et al., 2005. International Marketing: An Asia Pacific Focus. New Delhi: Wiley India (P.) Ltd 8 Gilgeous, V., 1997. Operations and the Management of Change., London: Pitman Publishing.Chapter 13 Wilson, R. M. S. and Gilligan, Colin., 2011. Strategic Marketing Management: Planning, Implementation and Control. 3rd ed. New Delhi: Elsevier. Chapter 7,10 Slaper, T.F., & Hall, T.J., (n.d). The Triple Bottom Line: What is it and How Does it Work? Available at: <http://www.ibrc.indiana.edu/ ibr/2011/spring/article2.html> Scott., C., 2012, Saving Innovation - A Philosophy too Important not to Share: Futures Mindset. Available at: <http://savinginnovation.wor dpress.com/2012/01/19/aphilosophy-too-importantnot-to-share-futuresmindset-complete-chapterfrom-saving-innovation/>

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Activity -1 Activity -2

TBN TBN

4.1 Attendance Requirements


Attending all your classes is very important and one of the best ways to help you succeed in this module. In accordance with the Student Charter, you are expected to arrive on time and take an active part in all

your timetabled classes. If you are unable to attend a class for a valid reason (eg: illness), please contact academic department on academic@lseducationgroup.com . London School of Marketing will closely monitor the attendance of all students and will contact you by email if you have been absent without notice for two weeks. Continued absence can result in various consequences including the termination of your registration as you will be considered to have withdrawn from your studies. International students who are non-EEA nationals and in possession of entry clearance/leave to remain as a student (student visa) are required to be in regular attendance at London School of Marketing. Failure to do so is considered to be a breach of national immigration regulations. London School of Marketing, is statutorily obliged to inform the UK Border Agency of the Home Office of significant unauthorised absences by any student visa holders.

5. Assessment Please read carefully

DRAFT VERSION AWAITING EXTERNAL EXAMINER APPROVAL Assessment will be confirmed by the end of teaching week 3 The assessment for this module consists of one part: Part 010 Type of assessment Case study Word or time limit 3,000 Submission dates Level 6: Weds 17th May, 2013

Part 010 Assignment Read and critically evaluate the following D2 case study. Then structure your work by following and applying the Appreciative Inquiry 5D framework (Cooperider, Witney and Stavros, 2008) to design and plan a change management intervention in response to the organizational change at D-2. Use the following questions as a guide: Consider the advice you might give to (the manager): 1. Apply your developed theoretically informed knowledge of organizational change to identify what are the key issues that require attention. 2.Select one or more of these issues for detailed consideration and justify your choice. 3.Identify and critically review those theories that could aid your understanding of the issue(s) you have selected for special consideration. 4. Explain how these theories might inform the advice you will offer? Basic steps in AI involves a cycle of 5D, namely Definition, Discovery, Dream, Design and Destiny (Cooperider and Whitney, 2001 and der Haar and Hosking, 2004). Your work should address the following questions which accompany each stage of the cycle; your work must be structured into sections using only these 5D cycle headings/ the 5D framework Definition, Discovery, Dream, Design, Destiny. a. Definition what are the primary underlying case study problems and key issues? b. Discovery Select one or more of these issues for detailed consideration and justify your choice. Consider How might these underlying problems be addressed? c. Dream What and when might the possible or potential solutions be? d. Design - How, and in what ways might these possible solutions be implemented? e. Destiny - Recognition of limitations to your design and consideration/ formulation of possible solutions which might address and balance these limitations.

5D Cycle: Basic Steps in Appreciative Inquiry

DISCOVERY
The Best of What is?

Appreciating

DESTINY
How to empower, learn & adjust/improvise?

Sustaining

DEFINITION Affirmative Topic Choice


DESIGN
What should be?

DREAM
What might be?

Envisioning Result

Co-Constructing

Cooperrider, D.L. dan Whitney D. (2001), A positive revolution in change: appreciative inquiry, on Robert T. Golembiewski (ed.), The handbook of organizational behavior, second edition, New York: Marcel Decker. Online Documents : http://www.taosinstitute.net/manuscripts/ revolutioninchange.doc Appreciative Inquiry references Magruder Watkins, J., Mohr, B. J. (2011) Appreciative Inquiry: Change at the Speed of Imagination. Publisher: Jossey-Bass/Pfeiffer Library E-Book. Cooperrider, D. L., Whitney, D., & Stavros, J. M. (2008). Appreciative inquiry handbook. Bedford Heights, OH: Lakeshore Publishers. Library E-Book.

The auto-components manufacturer case D2, as it will be referred to here, is a French car components manufacturing company with two plants in France, and additional plants in Spain and the UK. The company has always focused on making a good return on investments and growing shareholder value and has pursued this goal by giving priority to product innovation, investment in new technology and developing the capability of its staff.

Over recent years D2 has managed to maintain the competitive position of its four manufacturing facilities in the face of growing competition from companies manufacturing in low-cost countries. However, the recent economic downturn has had a big impact on demand and the company is struggling to survive. The executive board has recognised the need for urgent change. It has formulated a new strategy that focuses on cutting costs as quickly as possible and to this end it has decided to stop producing some components and to concentrate the production of other components at fewer sites in order to benefit from economies of scale. This decision is still to be announced. Only a few very senior managers are aware of the new strategy.

The new strategy will involve expanding production at the companys main factory at Blois in France. Production is to be expanded here because Blois has the most advanced manufacturing technology and the factory is not yet working to capacity. It is anticipated that increasing production at Blois will lead to a significant reduction in costs.

The UK plant has been selected for closure because it is has the most outdated manufacturing technology.

Workers at the Didcot (UK) site will be shocked when this decision is announced because they have been led to expect a massive new investment in their manufacturing facilities. The closure will lead to large scale redundancies and there will be few opportunities for staff to be redeployed to other plants in France and Spain.

One group of employees who will be encouraged to relocate to Blois is the B2 team of product development engineers located at Didcot. The pace and quality of product development has been an important factor contributing to the companys pre-recession success. Product development has been concentrated at Didcot because the area is an international centre for auto product development. Many other companies (including many formula one racing teams) are located nearby and this has led to the development of a world-class pool of product engineering talent in the area. It is possible that many of the B2 product development engineers may be reluctant to relocate. However, at least in the short term, alternative employment opportunities will be in short supply. Employees at the other sites in Spain and France are likely to be worried that this may only be the first of many changes.

Assignment DOS AND DONTS Your work should meet the learning outcomes (see above p.3) Your work should minimise description and unsupported prescriptive recommendations You should read widely and use journal articles, books, concepts and theories You may write in first person, acting as a professional practitioner using and demonstrating evidenced argumentation, reasoned judgment and decision making. For example, my suggestion here is that is a good example of writing from a professional perspective. Writing in first person does not mean that colloquial terms such as I think or I believe are appropriate. A good assignment evidences awareness of contemporary issues and the strategic environmental context of change management in a contemporary organisation. A good assignment applies effective study skills to demonstrate evidenced insights and analysis. A good assignment avoids the use of inappropriate websites at level 3 study such as business balls, tutor2U.net, tru-motivation.com. A good assignment demonstrates appropriate use of English grammar and expression; and avoids use of colloquial language and jargon.

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Case Study Assessment and grading criterion


Mark 1. Definition - Apply theories and concepts of strategic change such as environmental pressures, organisational structure, types of change, resistance to change and leadership/ management styles to identify, and explain what the primary underlying case study organizational change problems and challenges are. 2. Discovery Applying theories and concepts such as leadership/ management, metaphors/ frames, engagement and communication evaluate and explain how might these underlying problems be addressed? 3. Dream Applying theories and concepts such as models of change, individual change, team, change or structural change appraise and explain What and when might the possible or potential solutions Learning Outcome

20%

LO 1- 4

25%

LO 1 - 4

25%

LO 1 - 4

be?
4. Design Applying organisational development theories, concepts

and perspectives identify, outline and explain How, and in what ways might these possible solutions be implemented?
5. Destiny Critically reflect upon and recognise the limitations of your

15%

LO1 - 4

change management intervention and formulate possible solutions which might address and balance these limitations. This section should present a balanced conclusion to your work
TOTAL MARKS

15%

LO 1- 4

100%

All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the published deadline which is detailed above. It is your responsibility to know when work is due to be submitted ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a reason for late or non-submission. Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in question. You are requested to keep a copy of your work.

5.1 Submitting a TurnitinUK Originality Report


For this module you are required to submit your TurnitinUK Digital Receipt with your assignment at the IMSS. Work submitted without the Turnitin Originality Report Receipt will have 10% of the overall mark deducted. The Originality Report will not be used to make assessment decisions unless concerns about poor academic practice, plagiarism or collusion arise out of the usual anonymous marking arrangements. The report may then be considered as part of the normal investigatory procedures undertaken by the academic team and the Director of Studies (again, please see Section 10 of the Assessment Regulations).

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5.2 Marking Grid and Feedback


Marking Grid Assessment Part 010 is marked according to the following grid:

Marking Grid for Part 010 - MOD003478

FEEDBACK
1. Definition - Apply theories and concepts of strategic change such as environmental pressures, organisational structure, types of change, resistance to change and leadership/ management styles to identify, and explain what the primary underlying case study organizational change problems and challenges are. 2. Discovery Applying theories and concepts such as leadership/ management, metaphors/ frames, engagement and communication evaluate and explain how might these underlying problems be addressed? 3. Dream Applying theories and concepts such as models of change, individual change, team, change or structural change appraise and explain what and when might the possible or potential solutions be? 4. Design Applying organisational development theories, concepts and perspectives identify, outline and explain how, and in what ways might these possible solutions be implemented? 5. Destiny Critically reflect upon and recognise the limitations of your change management intervention and formulate possible solutions which might address and balance these limitations. This section should present a balanced conclusion to your work

Mark

20%

20%

20%

20%

20%

TOTAL MARKS

12

Feedback You are entitled to feedback on your performance for all your assessed work. For all assessment tasks which are not examinations, this is provided by a member of academic staff completing the assignment coversheet on which your mark and feedback will relate to the achievement of the modules intended learning outcomes and the assessment criteria you were given for the task when it was first issued. Examination scripts are retained by Anglia Ruskin and are not returned to students. However, you are entitled to feedback on your performance in an examination and may request a meeting with the Module Leader or Tutor to see your examination script and to discuss your performance. Anglia Ruskin is committed to providing you with feedback on all assessed work within 20 working days of the submission deadline or the date of an examination. This is extended to 30 days for feedback for a Major Project module (please note that working days excludes those days when Anglia Ruskin University is officially closed; eg: between Christmas and New Year). Personal tutors will offer to read feedback from several modules and help you to address any common themes that may be emerging. London School of Marketing will publish details of the arrangement for the return of your assessed work (eg: a marked essay or case study etc.). On occasion, you will receive feedback and marks for pieces of work that you completed in the earlier stages of the module. We provide you with this feedback as part of the learning experience and to help you prepare for other assessment tasks that you have still to complete. It is important to note that, in these cases, the marks for these pieces of work are unconfirmed. This means that, potentially, marks can change, in either direction! Marks for modules and individual pieces of work become confirmed on the Dates for the Official Publication of Results which can be checked at www.anglia.ac.uk/results.

6. How is My Work Marked?


After you have handed your work in or you have completed an examination, Anglia Ruskin undertakes a series of activities to assure that our marking processes are comparable with those employed at other universities in the UK and that your work has been marked fairly and honestly. These include: Anonymous marking your name is not attached to your work so, at the point of marking, the lecturer does not know whose work he/she is considering. When you undertake an assessment task where your identity is known (eg: a presentation or Major Project), it is marked by more than one lecturer (known as double marking) Internal moderation a sample of all work for each assessment task in each module is moderated by other Anglia Ruskin staff to check the marking standards and consistency of the marking External moderation a sample of student work for all modules is moderated by external examiners experienced academic staff from other universities (and sometimes practitioners who represent relevant professions) - who scrutinise your work and provide Anglia Ruskin academic staff with feedback, advice and assurance that the marking of your work is comparable to that in other UK universities. Many of Anglia Ruskins staff act as external examiners at other universities. Departmental Assessment Panel (DAP) performance by all students on all modules is discussed and approved at the appropriate DAPs which are attended by all relevant Module Leaders and external examiners. Anglia Ruskin has over 25 DAPs to cover all the different subjects we teach. This module falls within the remit of the Departmental Assessment Panel - DAP.

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The following external examiners are appointed to this DAP and will oversee the assessment of this and other modules within the DAPs remit: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR AND TOURISM External Examiners Name Harold Birkett Dr Julia Pointon Dr Lynne Powell Dr Ross Brennan Dr Lindsey Carey Prof Roger Palmer Academic Institution None (retired) De Montfort University University of Northumbria at Newcastle University of Hertfordshire Glasgow Caledonian University Bournemouth University Position or Employer Formerly an academic member Staffordshire University Principal Lecturer Senior Lecturer Reader in Marketing Lecturer Dean of Business School

The above list is correct at the time of publication. However, external examiners are appointed at various points throughout the year. An up-to-date list of external examiners is available to internal browsers only at www.anglia.ac.uk/eeinfo.

Anglia Ruskins marking process is represented in the flowchart below:

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Flowchart of Anglia Ruskins Marking Processes


Student submits work / sits examination Work collated and passed to Module Leader

Marking Stage

Work is marked by Module Leader and Module Tutor(s)1. All marks collated by Module Leader for ALL locations2

Internal Moderation Stage

Internal moderation samples selected. Moderation undertaken by a second academic3

Any issues?

YES

NO Students receive initial (unconfirmed) feedback Unconfirmed marks and feedback to students within 20 working days (30 working days for Major Projects)

External Moderation Stage

External moderation samples selected and moderated by External Examiners4

Any issues? NO Marks submitted to DAP5 for consideration and approval

YES

DAP4 Stage

Confirmed marks issued to students via e-Vision

Marks Approved by DAP5 and forwarded to Awards Board

1 2

All work is marked anonymously or double marked where identity of the student is known (eg: in a presentation) The internal (and external) moderation process compares work from all locations where the module is delivered (eg: Cambridge, Chelmsford, Peterborough, Malaysia, India, Trinidad etc.) The sample for the internal moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever is the greater) for each marker and covers the full range of marks Only modules at levels 5, 6 and 7 are subject to external moderation (unless required for separate reasons). The sample for the external moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever is the greater) for the entire module and covers the full range of marks DAP: Departmental Assessment Panel Anglia Ruskin has over 25 different DAPs to reflect our subject coverage

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7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards 7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria


ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY GENERIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND MARKING STANDARDS LEVEL 6 (was level 3)
Level 6 is characterised by an expectation of students increasing autonomy in relation to their study and developing skill sets. Students are expected to demonstrate problem solving skills, both theoretical and practical. This is supported by an understanding of appropriate theory; creativity of expression and thought based in individual judgement; and the ability to seek out, invoke, analyse and evaluate competing theories or methods of working in a critically constructive and open manner. Output is articulate, coherent and skilled in the appropriate medium, with some students producing original or innovative work in their specialism.

Generic Learning Outcomes (GLOs) (Academic Regulations, Section 2) Mark Bands Outcome Knowledge & Understanding Intellectual (thinking), Practical, Affective and Transferable Skills
Exceptional management of learning resources, with a higher degree of autonomy/exploration that clearly exceeds the assessment brief. Exceptional structure/accurate expression. Demonstrates intellectual originality and imagination. Exceptional team/practical/professional skills. Work may be considered for publication within Anglia Ruskin University Outstanding management of learning resources, with a degree of autonomy/exploration that clearly exceeds the assessment brief. An exemplar of structured/accurate expression. Demonstrates intellectual originality and imagination. Outstanding team/practical/professional skills Excellent management of learning resources, with degree of autonomy/research that may exceed the assessment brief. Structured and creative expression. Very good academic/ intellectual skills and practical/team/professional/problemsolving skills Good management of learning resources, with consistent self-directed research. Structured and accurate expression. Good academic/intellectual skills and team/practical/ professional/problem solving skills Satisfactory management of learning resources. Some autonomy in research but inconsistent. Structured and mainly accurate expression. Acceptable level of academic/ intellectual skills going beyond description at times. Satisfactory team/practical/professional/problem-solving skills Basic use of learning resources with little autonomy. Some difficulties with academic/intellectual skills. Some difficulty with structure/accuracy in expression, but evidence of developing team/practical/professional/problem-solving skills

90-100%

Exceptional information base exploring and analysing the discipline, its theory and ethical issues with extraordinary originality and autonomy. Work may be considered for publication within Anglia Ruskin University

80-89% Characteristics of Student Achievement by Marking Band

Outstanding information base exploring and analysing the discipline, its theory and ethical issues with clear originality and autonomy

70-79%

Achieves module outcome(s) related to GLO at this level

Excellent knowledge base that supports analysis, evaluation and problem-solving in theory/practice/ethics of discipline with considerable originality

60-69%

Good knowledge base that supports analysis, evaluation and problem-solving in theory/ practice/ethics of discipline with some originality

50-59%

Satisfactory knowledge base that supports some analysis, evaluation and problem-solving in theory/practice/ethics of discipline

40-49%

A marginal pass in module outcome(s) related to GLO at this level

Basic knowledge base with some omissions at the level of theoretical/ethical issues. Restricted ability to discuss theory and/or or solve problems in discipline

30-39%

A marginal fail in module outcome(s) related to GLO at this level. Possible compensation. Satisfies qualifying mark

Limited knowledge base. Limited understanding of discipline/ethical issues. Difficulty with theory and problem solving in discipline

Limited use of learning resources. Unable to work autonomously. Little input to teams. Weak academic/ intellectual skills. Still mainly descriptive. General difficulty with structure/accuracy in expression. Practical/professional/ problem-solving skills that are not yet secure

20-29%

10-19%

Fails to achieve module outcome(s) related to this GLO. Qualifying mark not satisfied. No compensation available

Little evidence of knowledge base. Little evidence of understanding of discipline/ethical issues. Significant difficulty with theory and problem solving in discipline

Little evidence of use of learning resources. Unable to work autonomously. Little input to teams. Very weak academic/ intellectual skills. Work significantly descriptive. Significant difficulty with structure/accuracy in expression. Little evidence of practical/professional/problem-solving skills Inadequate use of learning resources. Unable to work autonomously. Inadequate input to teams. Extremely weak academic/intellectual skills. Work significantly descriptive. Major difficulty with structure/accuracy in expression. Inadequate practical/professional/ problem-solving skills

Inadequate knowledge base. Inadequate understanding of discipline/ethical issues. Major difficulty with theory and problem solving in discipline

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1-9%

No evidence of knowledge base; no evidence of understanding of discipline/ethical issues. Total inability with theory and problem solving in discipline

No evidence of use of learning resources. Completely unable to work autonomously. No evidence of input to teams. No evidence of academic/intellectual skills. Work wholly descriptive. Incoherent structure/accuracy and expression. No evidence of practical/professional/ problemsolving skills

0%

Awarded for: (i) non-submission; (ii) dangerous practice and; (iii) in situations where the student fails to address the assignment brief (eg: answers the wrong question) and/or related learning outcomes

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8. Assessment Offences As an academic community, we recognise that the principles of truth, honesty and mutual respect are central to the pursuit of knowledge. Behaviour that undermines those principles diminishes the community, both individually and collectively, and diminishes our values. We are committed to ensuring that every student and member of staff is made aware of the responsibilities s/he bears in maintaining the highest standards of academic integrity and how those standards are protected. You are reminded that any work that you submit must be your own. When you are preparing your work for submission, it is important that you understand the various academic conventions that you are expected to follow in order to make sure that you do not leave yourself open to accusations of plagiarism (eg: the correct use of referencing, citations, footnotes etc.) and that your work maintains its academic integrity.

Definitions of Assessment Offences Plagiarism Plagiarism is theft and occurs when you present someone elses work, words, images, ideas, opinions or discoveries, whether published or not, as your own. It is also when you take the artwork, images or computer-generated work of others, without properly acknowledging where this is from or you do this without their permission. You can commit plagiarism in examinations, but it is most likely to happen in coursework, assignments, portfolios, essays, dissertations and so on. Examples of plagiarism include: directly copying from written work, physical work, performances, recorded work or images, without saying where this is from; using information from the internet or electronic media (such as DVDs and CDs) which belongs to someone else, and presenting it as your own; rewording someone elses work, without referencing them; and handing in something for assessment which has been produced by another student or person.

It is important that you do not plagiarise intentionally or unintentionally because the work of others and their ideas are their own. There are benefits to producing original ideas in terms of awards, prizes, qualifications, reputation and so on. To use someone elses work, words, images, ideas or discoveries is a form of theft. Collusion Collusion is similar to plagiarism as it is an attempt to present anothers work as your own. In plagiarism the original owner of the work is not aware you are using it, in collusion two or more people may be involved in trying to produce one piece of work to benefit one individual, or plagiarising another persons work. Examples of collusion include: agreeing with others to cheat; getting someone else to produce part or all of your work; copying the work of another person (with their permission); submitting work from essay banks; paying someone to produce work for you; and allowing another student to copy your own work.

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Many parts of university life need students to work together. Working as a team, as directed by your tutor, and producing group work is not collusion. Collusion only happens if you produce joint work to benefit of one or more person and try to deceive another (for example the assessor). Cheating Cheating is when someone aims to get unfair advantage over others. Examples of cheating include: taking unauthorised material into the examination room; inventing results (including experiments, research, interviews and observations); handing your own previously graded work back in; getting an examination paper before it is released; behaving in a way that means other students perform poorly; pretending to be another student; and trying to bribe members of staff or examiners.

Help to Avoid Assessment Offences Most of our students are honest and want to avoid making assessment offences. We have a variety of resources, advice and guidance available to help make sure you can develop good academic skills. We will make sure that we make available consistent statements about what we expect. You will be able to do tutorials on being honest in your work from the library and other central support services and faculties, and you will be able to test your written work for plagiarism using TurnitinUK (a software package that detects plagiarism). You can get advice on how to honestly use the work of others in your own work from the library website (www.libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/referencing.htm) and your lecturer and personal tutor. You will be able to use TurnitinUK, a special software package which is used to detect plagiarism. TurnitinUK will produce a report which clearly shows if passages in your work have been taken from somewhere else. You may talk about this with your personal tutor to see where you may need to improve your academic practice. We will not see these formative TurnitinUK reports as assessment offences. If you are not sure whether the way you are working meets our requirements, you should talk to your personal tutor, module tutor or other member of academic staff. They will be able to help you and tell you about other resources which will help you develop your academic skills.

Procedures for assessment offences An assessment offence is the general term used to define cases where a student has tried to get unfair academic advantage in an assessment for himself or herself or another student. We will fully investigate all cases of suspected assessment offences. If we prove that you have committed an assessment offence, an appropriate penalty will be imposed which, for the most serious offences, includes expulsion from Anglia Ruskin. For full details of our assessment offences policy and procedures, see the Academic Regulations, section 10 at: www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs To see an expanded version of this guidance which provides more information on how to avoid assessment offences, visit www.anglia.ac.uk/honesty.

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9. Learning Resources 9.1. Library: Lord Ashcroft International Business School libteam.aibs@anglia.ac.uk

Reading List Template Anglia Ruskin University Library


Resources Key text Cameron, E. and Green, M. (2004) Making Sense of Change Management: A Complete Guide to the Models, Tools and Techniques of Organizational Change, London Sterling VA, Kogan Page. Notes (on content and access) Cameron and Green provide a clear interrelationship between theory and practice connecting with different approaches to change Available as a Library EBook or classmark 658.406 CAM In a world of organizations that are in constant change scholars have long sought to understand and explain how they change. This book introduces research methods that are specifically designed to support the development and evaluation of organizational process theories. The authors are a group of highly regarded experts who have been doing collaborative research on change and development for many years. Available/ free to download from Google/ Google Scholar [PDF] Handbook of Organizational Change and Innovation wxy.seu.edu.cn/humanities/sociology/.../20101112173029 397.pdf File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat 12 Nov 2010 Handbook of organizational change and innovation / edited by Marshall Scott Poole, Andrew H. Van de Ven. p. cm. Includes bibliographical ... Books: Burnes, B. (2009) Managing Change: A Strategic th Approach to Organisational Dynmaics (5 Edition), Harlow: Financial Times/Prentice Hall Managing Change provides the student with an understanding of and guide to managing the complexities of organisational change effectively. The techniques and methods that can be used are reviewed and discussed. Real-life case studies illustrate how these techniques happen in practice and problems and obstacles that can be encountered when managing a change program. These are set in the context of the development of organisational theory and strategy formulation. Available as Library EBook or classmark 658.406 BUR

Marshall Scott Poole and Andrew H. Van de Ven (eds.)(2004) "Handbook of Organizational Change and Innovation", New York: Oxford University Press.

Hayes, J. (2010) Theory and Practice of Change Management, Basingstoke, Palgrave MacMillan.

John Hayes examines and applies all of the key theories on change to organisational settings Available in library: classmark658.406 HAY Reflections on Groups and Organizations looks at the interpersonal and group processes that determine how organizations work within specific contexts, including family firms. It includes studies on dysfunctional leaderfollower relationships, downsizing, and organizational transformation Available as library EBook or classmark 158.7 KET The themes covered in the book are: the emotional world of the organisation and its significance for understanding, decision and action; different perspectives on the nature and exercise of leadership; the dynamics of resistance to change and of creativity; the impact of contextual change on re-shaping the concept of the organization; different ways organizations are responding to issues of personal challenge or vulnerability. Available in library classmark 302.35 WOR

Kets de Vries, M. (2011) Reflections Organizations, San Francisco, Jossey- Bass.

on

Groups

and

C. Huffington, D. Armstrong, W. Halton (2004), L. Hoyle and J. Pooley (Eds.), Working Below the Surface: The Emotional Life of Contemporary Organisations, Karnac: London

Hughes, M. (2010) Change Management: A Critical Perspective. CIPD

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Explores how and why change occurs, and how this process can be managed effectively; Offers a critical perspective, challenging the main assumptions in this area and ensuring that the complexity of the subject is understood; Critical perspective balanced with an improved including an appendix featuring 20 popular change management techniques Available in library classmark 658.406 HUG Journals Academy of Management Executive Administrative Science Quarterly Community Development Ephemera Group Analysis: The Journal of Analytic Psychotherapy Group Dynamics Harvard Business Review Journal of Management Studies Journal of Change Management Journal of Organizational Change Management Journal of Applied Behavioural Science Journal of Applied Psychology Journal of Managerial Psychology Leadership Leadership Quarterly Learning Organization Management Learning Organization Organizational Dynamics People Management Social Science and medicine Journal of Leadership Studies Journal of Leadership and Organisational Studies These journals are indicative develop your research skills to search the library databases and target specific articles and connect with other disciplines (e.g. education, nursing, psychoanalysis) e.g. business source premier

Specific journal articles Weick, K. & Quinn, R., (1999). 'Organizational change and development'. Annual Review of Psychology, 50, pp.361-386. Tsoukas, Haridimos and Robert Chia. 2002. "On Organizational Becoming: Rethinking Organizational Change." Organization Science 13:567-582.

Clear and comprehensive overview and review of organisational change literature.

Traditional approaches to organizational change have been dominated by assumptions privileging stability, routine, and order. As a result, organizational change has been reified and treated as exceptional rather than natural. In this paper, we set out to offer an account of organizational change on its own terms-to treat change as the normal condition of organizational life

Websites Academy of Management: http://www.aomonline.org/Network of Leadership Scholars: http://aomweb.pace.edu/lig/leader.html International Leadership Association: http://www.ila-net.org/ Social Science Research Network: http://www.ssrn.com/ Centre for Leadership Studies - University of Exeter, UK: http://www.centres.ex.ac.uk/cls/ The Center for Public Leadership - John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University: www.ksg.harvard.edu/leadership/ Lancaster Leadership Centre: www.lums.lancs.ac.uk/leadership

Websites which relate to cutting edge/ contemporary developments and innovations in leading change

Additional notes on this reading list Link to the University Library catalogue and Digital Library http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/ Link to Harvard Referencing guide http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm

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9.2. Other Resources


VLE In Class activities

10. Module Evaluation


During the second half of the delivery of this module, you will be asked to complete a module evaluation questionnaire to help us obtain your views on all aspects of the module. This is an extremely important process which helps us to continue to improve the delivery of the module in the future and to respond to issues that you bring to our attention. The module report in section 11 of this module guide includes a section which comments on the feedback we received from other students who have studied this module previously. Your questionnaire response is anonymous. Please help us to help you and other students at Anglia Ruskin by completing the Module Evaluation process. We very much value our students views and it is very important to us that you provide feedback to help us make improvements. In addition to the Module Evaluation process, you can send any comment on anything related to your experience at Anglia Ruskin to tellus@anglia.ac.uk at any time.

11. Report on Last Delivery of Module

This is a new module and it is the first delivery so there are no Module Report Forms available.

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Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information

THIS INFORMATION ONLY APPLIES TO STUDENTS WHO ARE UNSUCCESSFUL IN THEIR FIRST SUBMISSION DRAFT VERSION AWAITING EXTERNAL EXAMINER APPROVAL
Assessment will be confirmed before the re-assessment period
The re-assessment for this module consists of one part: Part 010 Type of assessment Case study D2 Word or Submission dates time limit 3,000 Resit period: 15th-19th July, 2013

Part 010 Assignment Learning Outcome

Mark
1. Definition - Apply theories and concepts of strategic change such as environmental pressures, organisational structure, types of change, resistance to change and leadership/ management styles to identify, and explain what the primary underlying case study organizational change problems and challenges are. 2. Discovery Applying theories and concepts such as leadership/ management, metaphors/ frames, engagement and communication evaluate and explain how might these underlying problems be addressed? 3. Dream Applying theories and concepts such as models of change, individual change, team, change or structural change appraise and explain What and when might the possible or potential solutions be? 4. Design Applying organisational development theories, concepts and perspectives identify, outline and explain How, and in what ways might these possible solutions be implemented? 5. Destiny Critically reflect upon and recognise the limitations of your change management intervention and formulate possible solutions which might address and balance these limitations. This section should present a balanced conclusion to your work TOTAL MARKS

20%

LO 1 4.

25%

LO 1 - 4

25%

LO 1 - 4

15%

LO1 - 4

15% 100%

LO 1- 4

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