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OregOn Observer

The
Thursday, May 16, 2013 Vol. 129, No. 45 Oregon, WI ConnectOregonWI.com $1
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Oregon, WI
Village of Oregon
Agencys opposition clouds recreation trails future
Fish and Wildlife Service
refuses to allow a boardwalk
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Village leaders were unpleasantly
surprised last week when an official
from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Ser-
vice said the village would not be
allowed to build a boardwalk across the
agencys property.
That news put the brakes on a plan to
build a new recreation path just north
and west of the village and left offi-
cials wondering how to accomplish
their goal.
For much of the past year, village
administrator Mike Gracz and Village
President Steve Staton believed that
Fish and Wildlife was supportive of a
plan to construct a boardwalk across
part of the Swan Pond Waterfowl
Production area in order to establish a
bicycle/pedestrian trail from the Alpine
Business Park to Fish Hatchery Road.
But Gracz told the Village Board last
Monday that Steve Lenz, district man-
ager of the Fish and Wildlife Service,
informed him that the agency would
not approve the boardwalk because the
construction could interfere with the
areas delicate ecosystem.
Turn to Trail/Page 2
Photos Seth Jovaag
Cameras outside Oregon Middle School feed into two computer monitors at the schools main office, where staff can remotely unlock
doors to let visitors in.
Cameras, buzzers installed at
school entrances
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
Starting this week, visitors
to several Oregon schools
have to appear on camera to
receive permission to enter
the buildings.
In January, the Oregon
School Board approved
spending up to $40,000 to
add a variety of security
cameras and intercom sys-
tems that would require
building staff to buzz in
visitors during normal school
hours. The new systems were
installed in recent weeks and
went live Monday.
Of t he di st r i ct s si x
schools, three Oregon
High School, Oregon Middle
School and Brooklyn Ele-
mentary School now have
surveillance cameras mount-
ed near building entrances to
allow office staff to see visi-
tors before letting them in.
The other three schools
Prairie View and Neth-
erwood Knoll elementary
schools and Rome Corners
Intermediate School are set
up so staff could see visitors
and press a switch to unlock
the office door.
Camera-and-buzzer sys-
tems were also installed at
the districts central office
and the community pool,
said business manager Andy
Weiland.
Total costs exceeded pro-
jections and were roughly
$50,000, Weiland said Mon-
day, mostly because of a
decision to add a system at
the pool and because of tech-
nical glitches when install-
ing the systems at the high
schools two main entrances.
The board approved the
changes by a 4-2 vote in
January, one month after the
school shooting in Newtown,
Conn., that killed 20 young
children and six educators.
Some members questioned
if the changes would make
schools more secure, while
others felt it was a necessary
step following the Connecti-
cut shooting.
Other security changes are
coming this summer. For an
estimated $48,145, Prairie
View will get a new, secure
vestibule, and a hallway will
be reconfigured to allow
kids to get to the cafeteria
without passing through the
vestibule. OHS will get card-
activated locks on 15 interior
doors for $17,500, according
to a capital maintenance plan
approved by the board last
month.
A buzzer at the entrance of Oregon Middle School is part a push for
better security in the district.
Oregon School District Oregon School District
Board authorizes offer
for property purchase
officials seek more
downtown area
parking
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Several nights a week,
people form a long line out-
side Seor Peppers Mexican
Restaurant waiting to get
into the newly expanded
business.
And with a new 100-
seat restaurant set to open
soon on South Main Street,
downtown Oregon has sud-
denly emerged as a vibrant
small-town business district.
But with the increased
activity comes a need for
more parking.
In an attempt to address
the need, the Village Board
last week authorized village
administrator Mike Gracz to
make an offer to purchase a
property at 146 S. Main St.
in hopes of building a new
parking lot.
The property owners,
Deb Bossingham and Steve
Newton, have made a coun-
ter offer, and the two parties
are negotiating on a pur-
chase price for the historic
home.
Gracz said hes not sure
but expects that if the deal
goes through, the village
Turn to Business/Page 3
Proposed
insurance
changes stir
outrage
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
Faced with an $850,000
spike in health insurance
costs next school year,
Oregon School District
officials recently proposed
hiking how much employ-
ees pay for health care.
But after a tense, nearly
two-hour discussion, that
change was post poned
Monday by the Oregon
School Board on a split,
4-3 vot e t hat exposed
fissures in a group that
recently added two new
members.
Most district staff cur-
rently pay a 10 percent
share of health insurance
premiums and no deduct-
ibles beyond that. The
new proposal would hike
deductibles to $500 annu-
ally for individuals and
$1,000 for families and
impose higher co-pays
on prescri pt i on drugs,
emergency room visits
and CT or MRI scans.
The changes woul d
near l y wi pe out t he
$850,000 increase, offi-
cials said, and would help
t he board offer sal ary
increases while avoiding
layoffs, higher class sizes
or program cuts.
Board member Steve
Zach said the changes are
unfortunate but necessary,
given the districts budget-
ary constraints.
We all recognize that
this is not something we
Turn to OSB/Page 12
Inside
New board
members make
their mark
Page 14
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May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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2012 002098 Rev. 11/12
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At Oregon Community Bank, we have always rmly
believed in giving back to the community through
local activities and donations
and now you can give back too!
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Tom
Pippin
UN285682
Please bear in mind that
wetland preservation is
among the highest of pri-
orities for Wetland Manage-
ment Districts, so the U.S.
Fish and Wildlife Service
sets the bar pretty high when
it comes to projects and
practices that concern wet-
lands, Lenz wrote in a letter
to the village.
Staton, who has pushed
hard to acquire the ease-
ments and funding needed to
create a trail, said Fish and
Wildlifes decision, coupled
with the Alpine Dairys
refusal to grant the village an
easement to cross its proper-
ty with the path, has sudden-
ly cast doubt on the projects
feasibility.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife
has been on board the whole
time with the project, but
they now told us they dont
want a boardwalk over the
wetland, Staton said. And
we cant get the easement
for the Keller property, so
were stalled right now.
Staton said Lenz offered
to talk with sisters Dorothy
and Betty Keller, owners of
the Alpine Dairy, on behalf
of the village in an attempt
to acquire an easement on
their property.
The Observers phone
calls to the Kellers were not
returned.
For the past year, Staton
and village staff have been
planning to build a $1.2 mil-
lion trail that would extend
from the business park to
Fish Hatchery Road, with a
long-term goal of the county
later extending the path west
to the Badger State Trail.
That would give cyclists the
opportunity to pedal from
the village to Madison (and
vice versa) without riding on
roadways.
If the Alpine Dairy owners
would allow the village to
build part of the path on their
property, that would elimi-
nate the need for a board-
walk, Staton said.
Tha t woul d r e duc e
the project cost by about
$300,000.
It would also increase the
value of the Alpine Dairys
property, Staton said.
He noted that future resi-
dent i al devel opment of
the Alpine Dairy property
probably wont happen in
the next 20 to 25 years at
least, because the property
would have to be annexed
by the village. Dane County
wont grant an unsewered
development out there, so
if they (the Keller fam-
ily) want to put residential
development on that prop-
erty, theyre going to have to
become part of the village,
and thats going to require
sewer and water, Staton
explained. That would be a
long ways off.
The property is within the
villages 3-mile extraterrito-
rial jurisdiction, so the vil-
lage will control that devel-
opment, no matter when
it happens, Staton said.
Given that, whenever its
developed if it is the vil-
lage will require a bike trail
anyhow. It would be really
nice to get the bike trail in
there now so it could be used
the next number of years.
The trail would be built
along the northern edge of
the property and wouldnt
change the dynamics out
there very much, Staton
said.
Without a boardwalk, vil-
lage officials estimate the
total cost of the trail at about
$895,700; with the board-
walk, the trail would cost
an estimated $1,219,600 to
build.
Last month, the board
directed village staff to
apply for a second Dane
County PARC matching
grant of $250,000, as well
as a $480,000 Department of
Natural Resources Knowles-
Nelson Stewardship grant.
Gracz said upon learning
of Fish and Wildlifes deci-
sion, he waited to submit the
grant applications until dis-
cussing the situation with the
board.
So far, the village has been
given an easement donation
for the path from the Har-
ris family on Fish Hatchery
Road and planned on buying
an easement from the Wis-
consin Department of Cor-
rections for about $10,000.
Last Monday, the Vil-
lage Board delayed action
on the DOC easement until
it knows for sure the Keller
sisters final decision.
If they grant the ease-
ment, then it gets all done,
Staton said. We can go
into their woods and dont
need a boardwalk and that
makes it much more appeal-
ing because the cost to build
goes down dramatically.
Trail: $1.2 million trail has been in the works for more than a year
Continued from page 1
Oregon School District
Teacher resigns
after accusation
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
An Oregon High School
math teacher accused in
April of accosting a student
has resigned.
The teacher, who is not
being named by the Observ-
er because he has not been
charged with a crime, was
on paid leave since mid-
April until he submitted
a letter of resignation last
week, said superintendent
Brian Busler.
Busler, citing employee
confidentiality, declined
to name the employee or
say whether the accusation
played a role in his resigna-
tion.
An April 10 entry in the
Oregon Police Department
log book said a 16-year-old
student accused the teacher
of grabbing him by the arm
and pulling his fingers back
to take a ball, then twisting
his arm in a way that caused
him to fall.
Police Lt. Karey Clark
denied a request from the
Observer to see the full
police report because the
Dane County Districts
Attorneys office has not
yet decided whether to press
charges.
The Observer obtained a
copy of a May 4 letter sent
by OHS principal Kelly
Meyers to parents and stu-
dents in the teachers class.
It said the teacher will be on
leave for the balance of the
school year and will no lon-
ger teach your son/daugh-
ters math class.
The letter also apologized
for the challenges associat-
ed with the absence of your
childs teachers and said a
certified math teacher will
fill in and other OHS math
teachers will be available
for additional instruction
and support.
Photo by Jim Ferolie
Cruzin for a Cure
The third annual Cruizin for a Cure Car and Bike Show to benefit the Crohns and Colitis Foundation of was Saturday, outside Prairie
View Elementary School.
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
3
Business Improvement District idea lacks support
Trustee Phil Harms last
Monday pitched the con-
cept of creating a Business
Improvement District down-
town but didnt get much
support for the idea.
I know theres not a busi-
ness owner in town that
likes the idea, but were
here tonight to give down-
town Oregon a rebirth,
Harms said. Were all in this
together.
Harms was mostly correct
about others opinions of the
idea, but not entirely.
Business and property
owner John Deits said he
would support a Business
Improvement District if the
money it generated were used
for things like hiring a service
to provide uniform sidewalk
shoveling or maintaining the
planters downtown, but not
for establishing and maintain-
ing a new parking lot.
Downt own pr ope r t y
and business owner Bon-
nie Thiel said she wouldnt
support establishing a Busi-
ness Improvement District
because there had been
too much deferred main-
tenance of the villages
municipal lot on Jefferson
Street.
Chamber of Commerce
director Brett Frazier called
the idea a nonstarter.
He noted that a Business
Improvement District would
cost downtown business
owners money that many
cant afford.
Ive been in many con-
versations about that and the
downtown property owners
are not in support of it, he
told the Observer. Theyre
looking to see the village
refurbish the parking lot and
maybe build another.
The business owners feel
theyre investing substan-
tially in their buildings and
businesses, and it will be
reflected in increased prop-
erty values, which go on the
tax roll. Theyre asking for
adequate municipal parking
in the lot that already exists,
and we support the addition
of new or improved parking
downtown.
Trustee David Donovan
said he would rather levy
special assessments against
downtown business and
property owners than create
a BID, an idea that Jerry and
Bonnie Thiel also rejected.
I have no idea of what
specific projects we would
do, Donovan said. All Im
saying is if we do something
downtown that spends public
funds to benefit private busi-
ness, there has to be some
give back to the community.
Jerry Thiel responded that
by pouring their own money
into historic buildings and
making other investments
downtown, business owners
are already giving back to the
community.
Deits asserted that a new or
refurbished parking lot would
benefit everyone who uses
the downtown not only the
property and business own-
ers.
Its part of the social
fabric of the community,
he said.
Bill Livick
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Building pictured is not priced in ad. Crew travel required over 50 miles. Local building code modifcations extra. Price subject to change without notice.
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The
Chocolate Caper
The Times They Are A Changing...
We will be closing to the public by
the end of 2013. The only way to
get chocolate for Thanksgiving or
Christmas will be to give us your
order by July 1. Order forms are at
the shop before Memorial Day or on
the website www.chocolatecaper.com.
Our fall and winter schedules are also
available there.
We will re-open the shop on
September 17. See you then.
Have a good summer.
Ellen & Claude
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would relocate the house and
convert the property into a
parking lot. He and the board
have set aside something in
the range of $400,000 to buy
the property and build the lot.
And the board is check-
ing into other properties as
well, including a house on
Jefferson Street, next to the
Jefferson Street parking lot
behind the row of businesses
on South Main Street, thats
owned by local developer
Paul Lynch.
Lynch responded to the vil-
lages inquiry about his prop-
erty this week, saying he is
not interested in selling at this
point in time.
The village is also look-
ing to refurbish the Jeffer-
son Street parking lot, which
business owners and village
officials alike have described
as an eyesore. The lot has
not been resurfaced since the
mid-1970s.
That parking lot needs to
come up to the standard of
the rest of the downtown,
Village President Steve Sta-
ton said at last weeks Vil-
lage Board meeting.
The board asked Public
Works director Mark Below
to request the engineering
firm MSA Professional Ser-
vices to provide a proposal
for designing improvements
to the village-owned lot
behind the South Main Street
businesses. Village officials
have budgeted about $50,000
for the improvements, which
could include resurfacing the
pavement and redesigning
the layout of the lot.
We want to do that lot this
year, Gracz said.
Downtown parking
The Village Board spent a
long time last week discuss-
ing what to do about down-
town parking. Everyone
agreed that the Jefferson
Street lot needs improve-
ments.
Tr us t ee Phi l Har ms
stressed that time is of the
essence to get more parking
downtown.
We could be sitting here
at this time next year with
nothing, he warned. That
is not acceptable. If we can
move in an expeditious man-
ner, maybe by fall we can
have a lot that folks can use.
He said until more park-
ing is established, business
owners ought to encourage
their employees to park a
few blocks away and walk to
work.
After hearing Harms and
t rust ee Davi d Donovan
endorse spending money to
create more parking down-
town, trustee Jerry Bollig
asked, What do we tell
business owners who arent
downtown why we provide
money for parking there but
not for them? How do we
justify that?
Donovan responded that
the board ought to listen to all
requests for local government
assistance and then deal
with it on a case-by-case
basis.
Im not willing to say I
wont help out one part of
town just because Im wor-
ried about what I might
have to do in another part
of town, he said. That just
doesnt make any sense.
Donovan added, If we
buy property for a parking
lot, thats an asset for future
economic development.
Staton noted the downtown
is the hub of the commu-
nity, and the village should
continue the revitalization
that it started in 2008.
Its a small area, but its a
multi-faceted downtown, he
said. Not all communities
have that.
Trustee Jeanne Carpenter
asserted that a vibrant
downtown is directly related
to a vibrant community.
She said everyone wants
Oregon to be a vibrant com-
munity, and there currently is
not enough available parking.
I dont want people to not
go downtown because theres
no parking, she said.
In an email to village offi-
cials and also at last weeks
meeting, business owner
Bonnie Thiel said she has
concerns about the village
buying the historic home on
South Main Street to create
more parking.
She and her husband,
Jerry, have spent well over
$100,000 restoring historic
buildings on South Main
Street, and Thiel said she
would not support destroying
or moving the house.
As one of the first resi-
dences with substantial his-
toric significance, I would
hope it would remain in
its current location, Thiel
wrote. Additional parking
gained by the destruction
of the site/trees would be a
shame, and I oppose this type
of progress.
But Thiels view was
a minority opinion. The
boards unanimous decision
to offer to buy the Bossing-
ham/Newton property was
supported by Chamber of
Commerce director Brett Fra-
zier and downtown property
owner Scott MacWilliams.
I only hope that you look
long-term, MacWilliams
told the board. Weve only
got about one-third of the
number of parking stalls that
we need.
Then, referring to Dono-
vans earlier comment, he
said, If you acquire an asset,
its an asset.
Business: MacWilliams: We only got about 1/3 of the parking stalls we need.
Continued from page 1
4
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Thursday, May 16, 2013 Vol. 129, No. 45
Unified Newspaper Group, a division of
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Opinion
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david.enstad@wcinet.com
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Reporters
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R
ecent debates and discus-
sion regarding health care
costs and the growing
amounts of sickness and disease
in this country have raised ques-
tions about our personal respon-
sibility to the larger group of
society.
Is my health or lack of health
a national concern? Yes it is,
and so is yours.
One can
argue that
America is lag-
ging behind
the progressive
efforts of other
countries that
currently pro-
vide universal
health care for
their citizens.
I feel strongly that all people
have a right to health care, but
we do have to confront the fact
that America is also considered
the sickest nation in the world.
If we dont reduce the amount
of disease and illness in our
society, there is no way that
America or ANY country can be
expected to financially support
so many sick people.
Americas biggest avoidable
health care plague is obesity.
Sugar, salt, fat too much of
this makes too much of us. We
all know the key ingredients of
moderate exercise, clean water,
eating your veggies and staying
away from the junk food.
Michelle Obama, Jaime Oli-
ver, The Biggest Loser and
many others have been promot-
ing the fight against obesity and
the illness it creates for years.
And yet, the obesity rates con-
tinue to rise and our nations
health continues to decline.
But we here in America love
our freedom and we love our
addictions.
Sugar is my drug of choice
if its dipped in chocolate, I
probably need to eat it. Even
though I dont have a weight
issue, I know that if I dont keep
this addiction in check I will
create problems with the func-
tion of my pancreas, hardening
of artery tissue along with a
million other destructive side
effects of too much sugar in the
body.
But even if I do eat too much
sugar, so what? This is America
and if I want to kill myself with
sugar, thats my choice!
The only problem with my
freedom of death by chocolate
scenario is that I probably wont
die suddenly. I will die slowly
as my organs begin to fail to
function properly, I feel sick, I
get pills, etc. Now my choices
have created illness with the
potential of long-term medical
dependency.
Its not just about me any-
more. Perhaps I am hiding from
the responsibility of my abusive
behavior behind a flawed belief
of freedom.
Lets face it: People dont
really want freedom. We want
freedom from being responsible
for the consequences of our
actions.
We see this reflected when
our kids break a lamp or when a
mining company strips the land
of all its resources and leaves
behind a toxic wasteland for the
surrounding community to deal
with or when I eat too many
cookies. Perhaps we all have a
bigger responsibility to society
to make healthier choices.
People want complete free-
dom to own guns, but they dont
want to accept the inherent
dangers of living in a society
that has complete access to
guns. Wall Street wants com-
plete freedom to run the stock
exchange without responsibility
to those who lose retirement
savings in their rigged games.
Corporations want freedom to
create food addictions without a
care as to its contribution to the
nations obesity problems.
We like freedom, not respon-
sibility. This unwillingness to
act responsibly is impacting our
nation in a destructive way. We
must begin to define our person-
al responsibilities to the greater
whole of our society if we are to
move forward in a progressive
way.
We all want certain things
from our communities, but we
need to ask what we are willing
to contribute so that all of us
can have a better quality of life.
The time has come for all of
us to pull our heads out of the
denial sandbox and have lots
of meaningful discussion over
Freedom vs. Responsibility.
The reality of life is that you
cant have one without the oth-
er, and we as a society must be
willing to embrace this attitude
and make progressive, healthy
choices and decisions for the
good of our communities.
Doris Deits is an Oregon resi-
dent and the owner of Peaceful
Heart Gifts.
Making good choices is
everyones responsibility
Deits
Community Voices
Letters to the editor
Man seeks return of iPad with sentimental value
I was at the Firefly last Saturday
morning for a meeting.
I left around 12:30 p.m. after
talking with a friend and later, to
my dismay, discovered that I had
left my iPad on a stool at the back
of the coffeehouse.
When I discovered that my iPad
wasnt with the other things I had
picked up, I returned to the Fire-
fly and checked with the staff but
someone had apparently taken it,
because nobody had turned it in.
This iPad is very special to me.
It belonged to my wife who passed
away from brain cancer nearly two
years ago. It was given to her by
her mother and sister, and it has
a lot of photos and a video from
my wifes memorial service along
with a lot of our favorite songs.
I am troubled not only by the
loss of the iPad but by the thought
that someone could think that it is
OK to take and keep something
so personal that doesnt belong to
them.
The Firefly has been a very
friendly and welcoming place. It
is disturbing to think that some-
one who frequents this wonder-
ful establishment would steal my
iPad.
I havent reported the loss of my
iPad to the police, yet, and would
greatly appreciate help in recover-
ing it. Someone who frequents the
Firefly has to have it or may have
seen the person who took it.
I am hopeful that someone who
has or finds my iPad will return it
to the Firefly, no questions asked.

Charles Uphoff
Fitchburg
Get on your bikes and ride
May is National Bike Month
a perfect time for our community
to recognize and celebrate all the
benefits of bicycling.
Bicycling keeps us healthy, car-
ries us efficiently from point A to
point B, saves us from high gas
prices, and makes our air cleaner
and our roads less congested.
Bicycling is good for our com-
munity and helps address many
of our most pressing societal and
environmental problems. Bicy-
cling is fun!
Americans spend $81 billion
on bicycling annually, generat-
ing 770,000 jobs and $10 billion
in taxes, according to the Outdoor
Industry Association.
From 1990 to 2009, the num-
ber of U.S. bike trips doubled,
from 1.8 to 4 billion trips per year,
according to the U.S. Department
of Transportation.
Adolescents who bike are 48
percent less likely to be over-
weight as adults, as found in a
2009 study.
If more people in our commu-
nity bike, even just once a week or
once a month, well all be better
off (even those who dont ride).
This month, dust off your bike
and give two wheels a try!
Kristie Schilling
Town of Oregon
The Oregon Observer encourages citizens to engage in discussion through letters to the editor. We take
submissions online, on email and by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high letter volume, and the editorial staff
reserves the right not to print any letter, including those with libelous or obscene content. We can accept
multiple submissions from local authors, but other letters will take priority over submissions from recent-
ly printed authors. Please keep submissions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions on our editorial policy, call editor Jim
Ferolie at 845-9559 or email ungeditor@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
Otis Sampson American Legion Family Post 59
All You CAn EAt
BreAkFASt
Pancakes
French Toast
Ham
Sausage Links
Scrambled Eggs
Biscuits & gravy
803 N. Page St.
Stoughton, WI
No Smoking
Wheelchair Accessible
tickets on sale at the door
Adults
$
8.00
Children (under 10)
$
4.00
Proceeds to beneft the American Legion
Sunday, May 19
7 a.m. to 11 a.m.
U
N
2
8
5
6
6
1
Lefse Sale by the Auxiliary
AmericAn Legion BAr
803 N. Page St., Stoughton, WI
Syttende Mai Saturday
DaN RIley
Country Variety
Saturday, May 18 7:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m.
Coming Up:
Blue Moon Karaoke
With Renee
Saturday, June 1 8:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m.
Open to the Public (608) 205-9090
Friday Fish Fry 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
Meat Raffe every Saturday 2 p.m.
UN287795
All Local And Homemade From Scratch!
6895 Paoli Rd., Paoli
(608) 845-3663
Open 7 days a week
8 a.m.-7 p.m.
UN284937
Ruegsegger Reuben Stuffed Sweet Peppers
Stuffed Hamburgers Stuffed Chicken Breasts
Eggs Benedict & Quiches Pies & More
VanderSanden selected as Dane County Fairest of the Fair
Oregon resident Melissa
VanderSanden will serve as
the 2013 Dane County Fair-
est of the Fair.
During the selection pro-
cess on May 5, she was
chosen from a pool of eight
candidates based on an
interview, ability to create
and execute a mock radio
commerci al and publ i c
speaking skills featuring
general fair knowledge.
She will serve as the offi-
cial youth ambassador for
the Dane County Fair, July
17-21, and will make mul-
tiple appearances across the
county to promote the Fair
and the participating youth
exhibitors.
Va n d e r Sa n d e n , t h e
19-year-old daughter of
Scott and Pam VanderSan-
den of Oregon, is a mem-
ber of the Oregon Headlin-
ers 4-H Club, where she
served as president and
youth leader in multiple
projects. She also served
as youth advisor of the 4-H
leaders board and as 4-H
youth representative on the
Dane County Fair Board.
She is a sophomore study-
ing Dairy Science at UW-
Madison. Melissa is active
in many student organiza-
tions including Association
of Women in Agriculture,
Sigma Alpha and Badger
Dairy Club. Once she com-
pletes her degree, her long-
term goal is to continue her
education to become either
a physician assistant or
pediatrician.
VanderSanden will be
officially crowned Dane
County Fairest of the Fair
on Saturday, June 8 at the
Dane County Dairy Break-
fast on the Farm to be held
at White Gold Dairy in
Waunakee. She will also
be making appearances at
Cows on the Concourse
in downtown Madison on
June 1 and at the Twilight
Wednesday program at the
Madison Childrens Muse-
um on June 5 and July 3.
This years Fairest of the
Fair will represent Dane
County Fair at the Wiscon-
sin Fairest of the Fairs com-
petition in January 2014 in
Wisconsin Dells.
Photo submitted
Oregon resident Melissa VanderSanden (center) was chosen as
the 2013 Dane County Fairest of the Fair. She is flanked by Alice in
Dairyland, Rochelle Ripp (left) and the 2012 Dane County Fairest of
the Fair, Andrea Servas.
Photo by Seth Jovaag
Culture and character
Oregon High School handed out inaugural distinguished achieve-
ment awards to three seniors Monday night. Rachel Hakes, left,
received the character award; Rebecca Wyland, right, received
the culture award; and Lucas Walowit, not pictured, received
the community award. The awards recognized the students for
their all-around contributions to the school and community.
6
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
845 Market St., Oregon
(608) 835-9030
www.communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
Weekly Life Groups
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Celebratory Worship
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. All-ages activity

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger, Leah
Lonsbury
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 & 10:15 am Worship service at
the Oregon High School PAC
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLES UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHNS LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community Worship
(9:30 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
7 p.m., Al-Anon meet-
ing at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, Peoples United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Coming up
Friday, May 17
9:30 a.m., UW-Extension nutrition class, Oregon
Senior Center, 835-5801
- 6-8 p.m., Open Mic night led by OHS drama stu-
dents, Firefly Coffeehouse, 835-6238
Saturday, May 18
8:30 -11 a.m., Garden swap, Union Bank and Trust -
Brooklyn, pleasantprairiegreenhouse.com
9 a.m., Basketball tournament fundraiser, Hillcrest
Bible Church
1-6 p.m., Academy of Sound Spring Recitals,
Oregon High School Performing Arts Center,
academyofsound.org
Monday, May 20
Click it or Ticket safety campaign starts
Noon, Market Day orders due, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-8501
1-6 p.m., Blood drive, Oregon Fire Station
5:30 p.m., Village of Oregon board, Village Hall
Tuesday, May 21
11:30 a.m., Silver Threads, Oregon Senior Center,
835-5801
1:15- 2 p.m., Continuing piano class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
2:15- 3 p.m., Beginning piano class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
6:30 p.m., Green film discussion Play Again,
Oregon Public Library
Wednesday, May 22
1 p.m., Anniversary celebration, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
Monday, May 27
Memorial Day
8 a.m., Union Bank & Trusts Grove Gallop, Lake
Leota Park, Evansville
8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Horse show and parade,
Triple K Stables
Community calendar
Thursday, May 16
Quilt Stories Program @
Oregon Senior Center (of Dec.
10)
Friday, May 17
Accordion Jamboree Part
1 (of May 12)
Saturday, May 18
Accordion Jamboree Part
2 (of May 12)
Sunday, May 19
Worship Service: St. Johns
Lutheran Church
Monday, May 20
6pm--LIVE--Oregon Village
Board Meeting
Tuesday, May 21
Cherry Pie Band @ Oregon
Senior Center (of May 21)
Wednesday, May 22
Oregon Daycare Kids @
Oregon Senior Center (of May
21)
Thursday, May 23
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of May 20)
WOW 98 & 983
Monday, May 20
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:00 Rubber Stamping
9:00 Caregivers Support
10:00 T.O.P.S. Weight Loss
12:00 Market Day Due
1:00 Get Fit
1:30 Bridge
Tuesday, May 21
9:15 Movement & Balance
11:30 Silver Threads
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:15 Piano Class
2:15 Piano Class
Wednesday, May 22
AMFoot Care
9:00 CLUB
9:15 Zumba Gold
11:00 Internet Basics
Computer Class
1:00 Anniversary Celebration
1:00 Euchre
2:00 Knit/Crochet Group
Thursday, May 23
AMChair Massage
9:00 Pool Players
9:15 Movement & Balance
12:30 Shopping at Bills
1:00 Cribbage
5:00 Market Day Pickup

Friday, May 24
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
1:00 Get Fit
Monday, May 20
Brat on Bun, Baked Beans,
Copper Pennies Salad, Fresh
Fruit
VO-Veggie Dogs
Tuesday, May 21
Roast Beef, Mashed
Potatoes, Roasted
Vegetables, Chunky
Applesauce, Multi Grain
Bread, Cookie
VO-Veggie Patty
Wednesday, May 22
Baked Chicken, Baked
Potatoes w/Sour Cream,
Yellow Beans, Apricots Half,
W.W. Bread
VO-Broccoli Cheese
Sauce
Thursday, May 23
Tomato Barley Soup,
Sliced Turkey & Cheese
on Rye, Fresh Orange, Bar,
Crackers
VO- Cheese Sandwich
SO-Taco Salad

Friday, May 24
Mediterranean Pasta
Salad w/Chicken Spring
Green Salad w/Tomato
Slices, Fresh Fruit Medley,
French Bread, Lemon Cake
V.O. Mediterranean Pasta
Salad w/Cheese
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, May 16
Oregon School Board
Meeting (of May 13)
Friday, May 17
OHS Senior Music Recitals
(of May 11)
Saturday, May 18
OMS Orchestra Concert (of
May 13)
Sunday, May 19
RCI Orchestra Concert (of
May 14)
Monday, May 20
The World Is a Rainbow
by Oregon Daycare Kids (of
Apr.13)
Tuesday, May 21
Oregon Summer Fest Hilites
(of June 12)
Wednesday, May 22
OHS Jazz Percussion
Concert (of May 20)
Thursday, May 23
Oregon Elementary
Orchestra Concert (of May 21)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings
Senior center
How Failure Makes Us Stronger
We have the capacity to learn from our mistakes, and thus
there is a great advantage in making some big mistakes early in
life. Most people have a number of failed relationships before they
find the love of their life. Those failed relationships help them to
know what they are looking for in a mate. Failures in business may
be costly, but they often lead to more profitable and better-run
businesses in the future. Even in the realm of health, we see that
getting sick often immunizes us against that particular disease in
the future and broken bones heal themselves to become stronger
than the original. It seems that we live in a universe that thrives
on adversity. Stressing a muscle makes it stronger, and the bones
attached to that muscle become stronger too. Character works
on the same principle. Those who have been profoundly tested
are usually the most robust and resilient. People born before the
Great Depression and who then lived through it have a lower risk
of becoming depressed than people born after the depression.
Perhaps the stress and strain that many are living through now will
bring out the best in them. Dont seek an easy life for you or your
children. If you want them to be robust and resilient, let them expe-
rience a loss or failure every now and then. They just might thank
you for it someday.
Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you
face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of
your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work
so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything.
James 1:2-4
Spring Recitals
Academy of Sound will host their
spring recitals from 1- 6 p.m. Saturday,
May 18, at the Oregon High School
Performing Arts Center.
A suggested donation of $5 per per-
son, or $10 per family, is requested.
For info, visit academyofsound.org.
Garden Swap
The annual garden swap will be held
from 8:30-11 a.m. Saturday, May 18,
on the lawn at Union Bank and Trust
Brooklyn, 210 Commercial St.
Bring plants that need a new home
and find a new treasure for your own
garden.
Lawn and garden expert Kend-
all Wethal, owner of Pleasant Prairie
Greenhouse and Urban Landscaping,
will be on hand to offer advice and
answer questions.
For more information call 455-2311.
Fill the Nets
A 3-on-3 basketball tournament for
adults will serve as a fundraiser for the
Oregon NINA (Neighbors in Need of
Assistance) Fund.
The tournament, organized by Com-
munity of Life, will be at 9 a.m. Satur-
day, May 18, at Hillcrest Bible Church,
725 E. Netherwood St.
A youth free throw contest will be
held at noon.
Jazz Worship and Picnic
First Presbyterian Church, 408 N.
Bergamont Blvd., will host a wor-
ship service and potluck picnic May
19 accompanied by Autumn Under-
ground, a group of young jazz musi-
cians who are gaining renown in our
area. Worship is at 9:30 a.m. with
indoor/outdoor picnic afterwards.
Both events are open to the public.
Free-will donations accepted. Please
bring a dish to share.
Click it or ticket kicks off
Oregon Police Department officers
will join hundreds of law enforcement
agencies throughout Wisconsin for the
annual Click it or Ticket safety belt
enforcement mobilization from May
20 to June 2.
Our officers will be on the lookout
day and night for unbuckled motor-
ists, said Oregon police chief Doug
Pettit. If youre not wearing a safety
belt, we will stop your vehicle and you
will get a ticket.
Green film
Head to the Oregon Public Library
for a green film and discussion at
6:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 21.
This months film is Play Again.
At a time when children play more
behind screens than outside, Play
Again explores the shift from the nat-
ural to the virtual world. Is our connec-
tion to nature disappearing down the
digital rabbit hole?
Market Day
The deadline to place orders for Mar-
ket Day, a fundraiser that offers a vari-
ety of nutritious and easy-to-prepare
foods, is noon Monday, May 20.
Order forms are available at the senior
center or online at marketday.com.
The pickup date is May 23 at the
senior center between 5-6 p.m.
Silver Threads
Seniors can socialize with friends,
neighbors and other seniors and enjoy
entertainment by the children of Oregon
Day Care, Inc. at the Silver Threads
among the Gold club.
The group meets every third Tuesday
from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. for a potluck,
socializing and entertainment. The next
gathering will be Tuesday, May 21, at
the Oregon Senior Center.
New members are always welcome.
Dues are $10 per person or $15 for a
couple.
Anniversary celebration
Join the Oregon Area Senior Center
as it celebrates its 33rd anniversary at 1
p.m. Wednesday, May 22.
As Yankee Doodle Duggleby, John
Duggleby will lead a tuneful tour of
the red, white and blues of our nations
unique musical heritage. Singing along
is not only permitted but encouraged.
Hot and cold hors doeuvres provided.
Call 835-5801 to sign up.
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
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Discover
new
galaxies
here.
CALL FOR STORE HOURS.
Stoughton
Evansville Oregon
2384 Jackson St., 608-877-9548
1015 North Main St., 608-835-2980 613 East Main St., 608-882-0680
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St. Johns Lutheran Church
Really Big Sale
St. Johns Lutheran Church, 625 E. Netherwood St., Oregon
Fundraising Event
Saturday, May 18th, 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Featuring: Fresh Bakery, Favorite Garage Sale
Items, Infant & Childrens Clothing and LUNCH
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Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Community service orga-
nizations will be allowed
to place messages on signs
that are not on the organi-
zations own property after
the Village Board last week
unanimously approved an
amendment to Chapter 17
of the village code.
Previ ousl y, organi za-
tions could not place signs
off-site, explained Mark
Below, director of Public
Works.
Now, with a property
owners permission, service
groups will be able to place
message signs elsewhere in
the village.
The change was adopted
after Oregon Area Cham-
ber of Commerce execu-
tive director Brett Frazier
brought the measure for-
ward. The chamber is erect-
ing new message signs at
the north and south ends
of the village and replac-
ing old signs that welcomed
visitors to the village and
announced community ser-
vice groups events.
The new signs will be
placed on 4-inch by 4-inch
poles and will be larger than
the ones theyre replacing,
Frazier explained.
These are community
service signs, he said.
Theyll be very similar
to those trailer signs but
will look 100 percent bet-
ter. Theyll be on 4-by-
4-inch posts, and the signs
are about 8-feet wide and
6-feet tall, with four lines
of channels for the letters
to go in. Well get all new
letters too, so itll be much
nicer for the nonprofits and
community organizations
that use those signs on an
almost constant basis.
One sign will go up on
the north side at 833 N.
Main St. on Union Bank
and Trust land, between
Dorns True Value Hard-
ware and the bank. The
other sign will be on village
right-of-way at 981 Park
St., near the Sienna Crest
Assisted Living facility.
Frazier said the signs will
be installed this week or
next and will hold up bet-
ter than the signs theyre
replacing.
These are not for busi-
ness advertising but for
community service events,
Frazier told the Village
Board.
He sai d t wo busi ness
members of the chamber
donated a good deal of
money to purchase the new
signs, which will replace
the existing signs on rusted
trailers that occasionally
have a flat tire.
The signs will present a
much better image of the
village as visitors come to
town, Frazier said.
Village of Oregon
New signs to go up after board amends village code
8
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Photos submitted
From left, OHS students Shane Walford and Seb Goplin work under
the hood during a statewide competition last Wednesday.
Seb Goplin and Shane Walford earned trophies, scholarships and
prizes with their second-place finish.
Oregon School District
OHS team fares well
in auto competition
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
Facing some stiff com-
petition, Seb Goplin and
Shane Walford proved last
week that they know a thing
or two about cars.
The Oregon High School
students earned scholar-
ships and other prizes last
Wednesday when t hey
finished second in Wis-
consins 2013 Ford/AAA
Student Auto Skills Com-
petition at the Milwaukee
Area Technical College in
Mequon.
The competition required
10, two-student teams from
around the state to diagnose
and repair identical bugs
in 2013 Ford Focus sedans
in under 90 minutes.
Gopl i n, a j uni or, and
Walford, a senior, were
one of just two teams to fix
their car in the time allot-
ted. The other team, from
Grafton High School, won
only because they were
slightly faster, said OHS
technology and engineering
teacher Ned Lease.
Its a really big honor,
Lease said.
The team of Goplin and
Walford qualified for the
competition by collectively
scoring in the top 10 state-
wide on a written exam in
February.
Both students won their
choice of scholarships
$8,000 to attend Universal
Technical Institute, $5,000
t o at t end Ohi o Techni -
cal College or $2,000 for
MATC plus about $300 in
tools.
Goplin, a junior, has tak-
en two years of auto tech-
nology classes at OHS and
said he likes to work on
vehicles in his spare time,
such as the 1987 Chevrolet
K20 pickup truck he recent-
ly rebuilt with his cousin.
Hes considering studying
diesel equipment technol-
ogy after high school. Wal-
ford could not be reached.
Th e Gr a f t o n t e a m
advances to the national
competition in Dearborn,
Mich., in June.
Last year, an OHS team
finished eighth at the state
competition, Lease said.
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
If you go
What: WIAA D1
Middleton regional
When: 9 a.m. Tuesday,
May 21
Where: Pleasant View
Golf Course
Look for results and photos from
the Badger South Conference meet
Thursday morning
ConnectOregonWI.com
Boys golf
Postseason
hopes depend
on season-
best scores
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
The Oregon boys golf team
must shoot much lower than
its season average if it expects
to advance beyond the Mid-
dleton regional at 9 a.m.
Tuesday, May 21, at Pleasant
View Golf Course.
The Panthers will need to
shoot well below the 330s,
most likely below 317 if they
expect to get past teams that
have shot in the low 300s.
Oregon must contend with
Madison Memorial, ranked
No. 4 according to the Wis-
consin High School Golf
Association, Verona, ranked
No. 8, Middleton, ranked No.
10, Stoughton, an honorable
mention, Waunakee, Sauk
Prairie and Madison West.
But as head coach Ben
Cowan has said this sea-
son, there are no expecta-
tions beyond having fun and
improving in a season meant
to be a rebuilding year, with
only two seniors on the team.
An example of what the
Panthers will need to shoot
to move on can be seen from
last weeks Morgan Stanley
Shootout at Hawks Landing
Golf Course.
Regional opponent Verona
shot back-to-back 310s to
win, while Madison Memorial
Girls soccer
Track and field
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Junior Jamie Wood (right) and freshman Maddie LeBrun (third from left) make the turn halfway through the 400-meter dash Tuesday in the Badger South Conference
meet at Oregon High School. Wood won the event with a time of 59.76 seconds. LeBrun took fourth (1:02.23).
Racing to individual titles
Girls finish third as boys
grab fifth tuesday at the
Badger South meet
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
Juni or Jawon Turner never
expected to be a conference cham-
pion for the Oregon boys track
and field team.
So it would make sense that he
was surprised to jump a foot ahead
of Milton senior Brock Krebs to
claim the triple jump title Tuesday
at the Badger South Conference
meet at Oregon High School.
I was very shocked, sai d
Turner, who reached 42 feet, 6
1/2 inches. I came out jumping
not too well at first but somehow
managed to pull it off. ... I didnt
believe it at first.
Turner hadnt done the triple
jump before this year, and he had
to not only learn the event, but
also had to get better every week
in order to compete.
Turner had to go through long
hours of practices with coaches.
They were very specific drills
to help get our feet forward, head
back and not up too high, he said.
It was a lot of technical stuff but
was also mental.
Turner had the only title of the
night for the Oregon boys, which
finished fifth overall with 86
points, but it did have a few top
eight finishers.
Freshman Alex Duff took sec-
ond in the 200 (41.58 seconds),
while sophomore John Hermus
finished eighth (44.98).
Sophomore Christian Alcala
was third in the 110 high hurdles
(16.47), while both the 4x100 and
4x200 relays took third, as well.
The 4x100 team of sophomore
Lucas Knipfer, freshman Lucas
Mathews, Turner and sophomore
Brock Buckner finished in 44.76,
while the same team had a time of
1:32.96 in the 4x200.
Se ni or Gr a ha m Ot i s a nd
Mathews finished tied for fourth
in the high jump (5-8). Junior Jack
Maerz grabbed fifth in both the
shot put (45-8 1/2) and the discus
(133-1).
If you go
What: WIAA Division 1 Verona
regional
When: Monday, May 20. Field
events at 4:15 p.m., track at 5 p.m.
Where: Verona Area High
School
File photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior goalie Brit Peckham collects four saves last week to
help Oregon out score its opponents 11-2 last week and win
its second straight Badger Conference championship.
Panthers win second straight conference title
Anthony Iozzo
Assistant sports editor
One goal down, several to
go.
A first-half goal by fresh-
man Jen Brien was the only
offense t he Oregon gi rl s
soccer team needed Mon-
day, as the Panthers shut out
Madison Edgewood 1-0 and
clinched its second straight
Badger South Conference
title.
Freshman midfielder Tay-
l or Mart i n col l ect ed t he
assist on the goal in the 17th
mi nut e, and t he Or egon
defense did the rest, holding
the Crusaders to just one
shot on goal.
Senior goalie Brit Peck-
ham was able to save that
shot to preserve the shutout.
The ni nt h-ranked Pan-
thers, according to the Wis-
consin High School Soccer
Coaches Association poll,
finished the conference sea-
son undefeated (6-0) and
moved to 12-1-1 overall.
Oregon hosts Waunakee
at 7 p.m. Friday and Madi-
son West at 7 p.m. Tuesday,
May 21.
It closes the season at 7
p.m. Thursday, May 23, at
home against Sun Prairie
Oregon 3, Stoughton 1
The Panthers traveled to
St ought on l ast Thursday
and stayed ahead in a 3-1
win.
Seni or f or war d Anni e
Zavoral , sophomore for-
ward Kelsey Jahn and Kris-
tin Marshall all scored goals
for the Panthers.
Juni or f or war d Hai l i e
Schnabel, senior defender
Kara Jahn and Martin all
earned assists
Peckham had one save for
the Oregon
Alex Weeden scored the
l one goal f or St ought on
wi t h an assi st t o Hayl ey
Bach, while senior goalie
St e pha ni e Mys z kows ki
picked up nine saves.
Oregon 7, Monroe 1
Zavoral, Brien and Make-
na Fanning all scored mul-
tiple goals last Friday in a
7-1 win over Monroe.
Zavoral picked up a hat
trick and an assist, while
Fanni ng and Br i en each
scored two goals. Brien also
had an assist.
Kel sey Jahn added t wo
as s i s t s , whi l e Schnabel
picked up one.
Peckham col l ect ed t wo
saves.
Badger South
Team W-L-T
Oregon 6-0-0
Madison Edgewood 4-1-1
Monona Grove 2-2-0
Fort Atkinson 2-2-0
Monroe 1-4-1
Stoughton 1-4-0
Milton 1-4-0
Turn to Conference/Page 10 Turn to Golf/Page 11
10
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U
N
2
8
7
8
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1
Seni or Jar ed Novi n-
ska took fifth in the 400
(54.76), while junior Nick
Kapusta (54.97) took sev-
enth.
Freshman Chris Cutter
(2:09.99) and senior Jeff
Jaeggi (2:11) took fifth and
sixth, respectively, in the
800.
Cutter also took seventh
in the mile (4:46.48), and
sophomore Josh Christian-
sen rounded out the scoring
with a seventh-place finish
in the two mile (10:51.20).
Buckner added a fifth
place in the 100 (11.66).
Monroe won the Badger
South title with 167 points.
Girls
On the girls side, juniors
Jamie Wood and Valerie
Jones helped the Panthers
win three titles at Tuesdays
conference meet.
Wood grabbed the 400 in
59.76, while Jones won the
800 in 2:23.33.
The two then joined the
4x400 along with freshman
Maddie LeBrun and senior
Danielle Steinberg to win in
4:09.21.
Girls head coach Kathy
Mentink said the 4x400 title
was an exclamation point
on the night.
It is always a fun race
to watch, she said. Those
girls are the cheerleaders
on the team and are setting
examples of how to work
hard and race hard.
The runners of the 4x4
added a few other top fin-
ishes at the meet.
Wood took second in the
200 (26.7) and second in
the long jump (16-5), while
Jones was third in the high
jump (4-10) and fourth in
the mile (5:30.71).
Steinberg added a third in
the mile (5:30.38), was tied
for fifth in the high jump
(4-8) and took seventh in
the 800 (2:33.94).
LeBrun was fourth in the
400 (1:02.23).
Oregon also had a sec-
ond place by senior Brooke
DeBroux in the two mile
(12:36.97).
Junior Ruby Carpenter
added a fourth place in the
300 low hurdles (50.7), a
fifth in the 100 high hurdles
(17.81) and a fifth in the
pole vault (8-0).
Juniors Bailey Adkins
and Katie Boehnen and
freshman Cianna Pieper all
grabbed sixth places.
Adkins had a distance
of 32- 1/4 in the shot put,
while Boehnen had a dis-
tance of 92-9 in the discus.
Pieper finished the 100 hur-
dles in 18.03.
The Pant her s added
f our t h pl aces wi t h t he
4x100 and 4x200 rel ay
teams.
The 4x100 t eam of
Adki ns , j uni or Ha l i e
Osborne, freshman Saman-
tha Girard and freshman
Lauren Tower had a time
of 53.69, while Adkins,
Osborne, Girard and senior
Taylor Anderson finished
the 4x200 in 1:53.58.
Ever ybody put i n a
strong effort, Mentink
said. We talked all along
that it is a team effort. We
have some people who are
shining and are superstars,
but everybody on the team
pulls together and pushes
hard.
The Panthers wound up in
third place overall with 115
1/2 points. Stoughton won
its third straight conference
title with 133 points. Madi-
son Edgewood was second
with 132 1/2 points.
Oregon travels to the
WIAA Division 1 Verona
regional at Verona Area
High School Monday.
The field events begin at
4:15 p.m., while the track
events start at 5 p.m.
Tom Mueller
Invitational
Turner, Buckner, Knip-
fer and Joe Milz guided
Oregons 4x200 relay to a
runner-up finish at Fridays
Tom Mueller Invitational
in 1:34.24. The Panthers
same quartet turned in a
fourth-place finish in the
4x100 (45.49).
Her mus ( 16. 15) and
Alcala (17.24) helped the
Panthers turn in their best
finish as a team taking third
and fifth in the 110 hurdles.
Otis tied for third in the
high jump, stretching the
bar to 5-8.
Duff continued to shine
in the 300 hurdles, finishing
fourth in 42.84.
Maerz was fifth in the
shot put 45-9 ..
Novinska took fifth in the
400-meter dash (54.87). He
then joined Cutter, Jaeggi
and Kapusta to take sixth in
3:44.93.
Jaeggi and Cutter opened
the meet with teammates
Ben Vogt and Christiansen
to finish second overall in
the 4x800 (8:32.68).
Platteville (114) held off
Waukesha West (110) and
Sun Prairie (95) for top
honors. The Panthers fin-
ished seventh overall with
58 points.
Girls
Adkins, Jones, Steinberg
and Wood led Oregon to a
runner-up finish last Friday
in the 4x200 relay with a
time of 1:49.50 at the annu-
al Tom Mueller invite.
Jones, Wood and Stein-
berg closed the meet with
senior Maranda Ricker, rac-
ing out to a third-place fin-
ish in 4:11.93.
LeBrun finished fourth
i n t he 800- met er r un
(2:35.31).
Pieper added a sixth-
place finish in the 100 high
hurdles (17.65).
Adkins, Osborne, Lauren
Tower and Anderson led
the Panthers 4x100 relay to
sixth place in :54.58.
Steinberg tied for fifth in
the high jump with a height
of 4-8. Jones took seventh
based on jumps.
Adkins (31) and Wood
(15-7) added third-place
finishes in the triple and
long jump, respectively.
Wausau West (165 )
distanced itself from Sun
Prairie (94) for top hon-
ors, while Platteville and
Oregons Badger Sout h
Conference rival Stoughton
finished tied for third with
74 points.
The Panthers finished
second-to-last in the team
standings with 45 points.
Conference: Jones, Wood win individual titles for girls
Continued from page 9
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Sophomore Brock Buckner (third from left) speeds up the course in the 100-meter dash Tuesday in the
Badger South Conference meet. Buckner took fifth in 11.66 seconds.
Photo submitted
Enforcers advance to state cup
The U13 Oregon Enforcers won the Froedert tourney championship in Milwaukee with an 3-0 record
May 4-5. The victory advanced the team to the state cup in Appleton on Memorial Day weekend.
Team members (front, from left) are: Jamie Jakusz, Emma Whip, Maggy Henschler, Sammy
Eyers and Kailie Sweeney; (second) Emma Krause, Addie OBrien, Grace Roemer, Maya Mathews
and assistant coach Lynn Roemer; (third) Emma Roemer, Karina Sande, Katie Reisdorf, Marah
Weidensee and Carolyn Christofferson; (back) coach Danny Gildea, Sydney King, Jackie Smith and
Morgan Hanson.
Panthers bats remain cold in shutout to MG
Jeremy JoneS
Sports editor
The Oregon softball teams
struggles to put the bat on the
ball continued last Friday at
Taylor Prairie Elementary
school in Cottage Grove as
the team was nearly no-hit
once again in a game-short-
ened 10-0 loss to Monona
Grove.
Silver Eagles freshman ace
Kelsey Stinson held Oregon
to one hit over five innings,
striking out eight.
Hailey Morey took the loss
for the Panthers, allowing six
earned runs on seven hits in
2 1/3. Mackenzie Kressin
worked the final 1 1/3, giving
up four runs on six hits.
Oregon found out its seed
for the WIAA postseason
on Wednesday after the
Observer went to press. The
Panthers (1-13 overall, 1-10
conference) expect to open
the playoffs on the road.
Mount Horeb (canceled)
Saturdays Mount Horeb
tournament was canceled due
to weather.
Oregon, Portage
(canceled)
The Panthers game against
Portage on Tuesday was can-
celed so the Warriors could
make up a conference game
Oregon looked to avenge
a 10-run loss last week at
Monona Grove on Wednes-
day. The game did not make
the Observers Tuesday eve-
ning press deadline.
Oregon strike out against Bielke
The Oregon baseball team was held to one
hit in a 5-2 loss against Monona Grove last
Friday.
The one hit was a double by junior Pierce
Peterson. Oregon scored once in the second
and once in the fifth.
Senior Zach Ragels started for Oregon
and took the loss. He went four innings and
allowed two earned runs on two hits. He
walked four.
Jason Bielke picked up the win for Monona
Grove. He allowed an earned run on one hit
in six innings. He struck out five and walked
one.
Oregon hosted Watertown Wednesday,
but the game was after the Observers Tues-
day deadline. The Panthers travel to Monona
Grove at 5 p.m. Thursday for a rematch with
the Silver Eagles before hosting non-confer-
ence Verona at 5 p.m. Friday.
Oregon finishes the week at 5 p.m. Tues-
day at home against Madison Edgewood.
Softball
Baseball
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
11
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U
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Slow start dooms Panthers in home dual against Edgewood
Jeremy JoneS
Sports editor
Now well have to get them at confer-
ence.
That was the message Oregon boys
tennis coach Ben Conklin kept trying
to reinforce to his players Monday eve-
ning following a 5-2 loss at home against
Badger South Conference rival Madison
Edgewood.
We were counting on 1, 2 and 3 sin-
gles for wins, but it just didnt happen,
Conklin said. I think we can get them
there at conference. Thats our theme.
While the Crusaders have had a stran-
glehold on the conference ever since
Verona left for the Big Eight five years
ago, Conklin and the Panthers finally
thought this was their season.
Following Mondays loss, in which
Oregon was only able to pick up wins at
No. 1 singles and No. 3 doubles, the Pan-
thers will have to outperform Madison
Edgewood at conference on Friday and
Saturday.
Junior Jackson Schneider cruised to
a first-set victory, but Edgewoods Pat-
rick McKenna proved to be anything but
easy to put away, dragging the match into
three sets.
It was frustrating that we couldnt get
the team win tonight because thats what
we said our goal was all season, said
Schneider, who fought back to win 6-1,
6-7 (7), 7-5. I was really frustrated after
being so close in that second set. I knew
I had to slow down, play a little bit and I
was glad I could pull it off.
From a personal standpoint, Schneider
knew the win was big for seeding after
he had already lost to Waunakee, Fort
Atkinson and Monroe.
I know I can dig deep and get the job
done late, Schneider said of his expecta-
tions when the Panthers travel to Nielsen
Tennis Stadium this Friday and Saturday
for the Badger Conference tournament.
Im not going be seeded as high as I
want to. Im going to have to pull through
in matches sooner.
Jackson Wilhelm and Brady Behrend
were the only other spot where the Pan-
thers picked up a win Monday, taking
their No. 3 doubles match 3-6, 6-4, 6-4.
Seniors Adam Bessemer and Alex-
ander Nasserjah also forced a third set,
but lost 4-6, 6-1, 6-2 at 2 doubles. Junior
Alec Onesti dropped a rare No. 2 sin-
gles match, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2 against Billy
OBrien.
Memorial 4, Oregon 3
The Panthers looked to be in prime
position to knock off host Madison
Memorial last Wednesday after sweep-
ing the top three singles spots.
Oregon struggled to sneak out a vic-
tory at the other four flights, however,
falling 4-3.
Despite forcing a third set in a decisive
No. 1 doubles match between seniors
Brian Johnson and Nick Hepner and the
Spartans team of William Xiang and
Jamy Dennis, the Panthers lost the match
6-1, 4-6, 6-2.
Schneider, Onesti and Dakota Tollak-
son cruised to wins at No. 1 through 3
singles. Schneider nearly blanked Memo-
rials Andrew Liu, 6-0, 6-1, while Onesti
cruised, 6-1, 6-1, over Chris Diaczun at
2 singles.
Tollakson capped the evening with a
6-4, 6-0 win over Connor Koval.
Oregons JV team fell 5-2.
Oregon 6, Milton 1
Oregon fell one match shy of the
sweep Friday in Milton, rolling 6-1
against the conference rival Red Hawks.
Onesti and Tollakson breezed through
their No. 2 and 3 singles matches, 6-0,
6-1, and 6-2, 6-2, respectively.
Schneider faced by far the toughest
singles match of the evening in taking
Ken Yap to three sets, where he finally
wore down his Red Hawk opponent, 6-4,
4-6, 6-2.
Drew Christofferson, meanwhile, con-
tinued to improve at 4 singles since mak-
ing the move from 3 doubles a couple
weeks ago, winning 7-5, 6-1 against Sam
Miller.
Johnson and Hepner took their No. 1
doubles match 6-2, 6-2, while Behrend
and Wilhelm continued to click after
a first-set hiccup, wining 1-6, 6-1, 6-4.
Nasserjah and Bessemer lost a highly-
competitive No. 2 doubles match, 7-6
(8-6), 6-4.
Oregon 7, Reedsburg 0
Oregon took out its frustrations after its
loss to Edgewood, blanking Reedsburg
7-0 in a Badger Conference crossover
dual.
Schneider and Tollakson both cruised
6-0, 6-0, while Onesti won 6-1, 6-0 at 2
singles. Christofferson capped the single
sweep 6-1, 6-3 at 4 singles.
Johnson and Hepner took their No.
1 doubles match by a score of 6-1, 6-2,
while Nasserjah and Bessemer rolled 6-2,
6-2 at 2 doubles and Wilhelm and Beh-
rend took their 3 dubs match, 6-1, 6-0.
Youth Flag Rugby
Registration is open for
Youth Flag Rugby until June
1. Click on the forms tab at
madisonunitedrugby.org
for registration and waiver
forms.
Practices (in Oregon)
are twice a week, starting
the week of June 10. Four
games will be played June
29, July 13, 20 and 27.
This is a co-ed, non-con-
tact sport for kids going into
sixth, seventh and eighth
grades. All three age levels
combined to form teams.
Game locations are: Good-
man Park, Tenney Park,
Middleton and Cottage
Grove.
The cost is $75, which
includes rugby shorts and
a T-shirt. Contact Richard
Bergemann at 608-630-
0129.
Girls lacrosse
Oregon girls lacrosse trav-
eled to Verona on Tuesday
where they lost 11-8.
Junior midfielder, Hannah
Kane led with four goals.
Kenzie Torpy added two.
Katie Glover, Kari Bertler
and Kayla Whip each scored
once. Assist were made by
Glover, Bertler and Torpy.
Sophomore goalie Tasha
Martin had five saves.
The Panthers played
Thursday in Middleton.
They led 5-1 at halftime 5-1
but fell to Middleton, 10-8.
Kane again led with four
goals.
Torpy added two goals
and an a pair of assists, while
Bertler had two goals and an
assist.
Martin had 11 saves for
the night.
Boys tennis
shot a 318 and a 305 to take
second. Middleton was third
with a 317 and a 319, and
Waunakee took fifth with a
320 and a 334.
Oregon shot a 337 and a
330 to finish seventh.
Do not forget Sauk Prairie,
which shot a 317 at its season
finale at the Reedsburg Invi-
tational at Reedsburg Coun-
try Club, and Stoughton,
which has scored below 320
several times this season.
Based on those scores,
Oregon needs to drop 10-15
strokes to be in contention.
Individually, if Oregon
doesnt make it as a team,
the challenge is just as diffi-
cult. The primary opponents
would be from Stoughton,
Sauk Prairie or Waunakee.
Oregon sophomore Car-
son Torhorst, freshman Grant
ODonnell and sophomore
Collin Bundy all shot 81s on
the first day of the Shootout
and have been around that
number all year. Torhorst and
ODonnell have a few rounds
in the upper 70s as well.
Sauk Prairies finale fea-
tured RJ Budd, who shot a
70, and Jack Rauner, who
shot a 79. Sauk Prairie also
has Darrin Pulsfus and Ben
Baker who shot in the mid-
to-low 80s at the meet.
Waunakee has Max Mur-
phy, with a low round of 72
at the Morgan Stanley Shoot-
out, and Kyle Connors, with
a low round of 79. No. 1
Warriors golfer Devin Lynse
shot in the low 80s both days.
Stoughton senior Henry
Klongland, who has shot
from the low 70s to the upper
60s all year, junior Max
Fergus, who has averaged in
the low 80s, and seniors Kip
Nielsen and Anders Tiffany,
shooting in the mid-to-low
80s most of the season, are
also contenders.
So based on statistics,
no one is really guaranteed
a berth, but Torhorst and
ODonnell both look to have
a shot, Cowan said last week.
Badger South meet
The Badger South Confer-
ence meet at the House on the
Rock Golf Resort took place
Wednesday, which didnt
meet the Observers Tues-
day deadline. Look for results
and photos online Thursday
morning at ConnectOregon-
Wi.com.
Morgan Stanley Shootout
Torhost shot an 81 and a
78 in the two-round Mor-
gan Stanley Shootout last
Wednesday and Thursday
to lead the Panthers (667) at
Hawks Landing.
ODonnell was next with
an 81 and an 82, while Bundy
shot an 81 and an 84. Austin
Busler finished the scoring
with a 94 and an 86.
Verona won the meet
(620), while Madison Memo-
rial finished second (623).
Madison Edgewood was
third with a 631.
Spartan Invitational
The Panthers traveled to
BlackHawk Country Club
Monday to compete in the
Spartan Invitational and fin-
ished eighth out of 14 teams
with a 346.
Torhorst finished with a
78, while ODonnell shot an
86. Bundy and Busler fin-
ished the scoring with a 90
and a 92, respectively.
Golf: Regionals start Tuesday
Continued from page 9
Sport shorts
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Number 1 singles player Jackson Schneider
returns a shot against Madison Edgewoods
Patrick McKenna on Monday. Schneider
fought back for a 6-1, 6-7 (7), 7-5 win, but
Oregon lost 5-2.
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Off to the races
Christian Poe breaks away from a Sauk Prairie defender on his
way to one of his four goals Monday evening. The Panthers lost
the game 14-11.
12
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
want to do, that it will cost
our young teachers money,
he said.
But new board member
Dan Krause who, with
Rae Vogeler, bested two
incumbents in the April 2
election shot back that
the district was using scare
tactics to balance the bud-
get on the backs of teachers.
Krause said that over the
past three years, too much
has been taken from the
pockets of teachers and
school employees. Thats
the wrong place to look for
the money it costs to edu-
cate our kids.
Teachers in the audience
applauded that line and the
eventual vote by Krause,
Jeff Ramin, Wayne Mix-
dorf and Rae Vogeler to
table the motion.
Vogeler said the deduct-
ible hike amounted to a pay
decrease for teachers and
argued that the board need-
ed more time to mull such a
momentous decision.
Krause also suggested the
board dip into its reserve
fund or hold a referendum
asking residents to pony up
more in taxes for the esca-
lating costs of education.
Both suggestions stirred
opposition. Its too late
to hold a referendum that
could affect next years
budget, Zach said. And
board member Lee Chris-
tensen said dipping into
district reserves is a bad
practice that would set up
problems down the road.
Do you want to start (the
next budget cycle) four or
five hundred thousand dol-
lars in the hole? he asked.
Deficit looms
District officials have
been worrying for months
about a bleak 2013-14 bud-
get picture that forecasts
a $1 million deficit even
without staff salary increas-
es.
Complicating matters is a
state budget plan from Gov.
Scott Walker that freezes
districts spending limits.
If those limits are increased
as many legislators have
called for Oregons short-
fall could be reduced by
$380,000 or more.
But meanwhi l e, rat es
from the districts health
insurance plans, Unity and
Dean, are set to skyrocket
16 percent next year. That
prompted a district commit-
tee last fall to investigate
options.
The committee which
included several staff mem-
bers but no union represen-
tatives concluded that it
didnt want to change insur-
ance plans this late in the
year and decided that sav-
ings from the new deduct-
i bl es shoul d go t oward
wage increases, explained
district human resources
director Jina Jonen. About
70 percent of staff receive
health insurance through
the district.
Mondays postponement
could carry a cost. The
district hoped to wrap up
the new health insurance
contracts by the end of the
month, with the changes
taking effect July 1. If
changes are pushed back a
month or two, district sav-
ings could decline. Each
extra month, theoretically,
could cost one-twelfth of
t he $850, 000 i ncrease,
t hough super i nt endent
Brian Busler on Tuesday
couldnt provide exact esti-
mates.
As of Tuesday, Busler
said any decision on health
insurance is still up in the
air. No new meetings have
been set, though he thinks
the board will regroup
and find a solution. (A sep-
arate motion Monday by
Vogeler to start a new com-
mittee to study the issue
was voted down, 5-2, with
Krause and Vogeler voting
yes.)
Asked if doing nothing
could force the district to
lay off employees, Busler
said thats an absolute last
resort and that he believes
a solution will arise first.
I believe theres a solu-
tion out there and we will
find that solution, he said.
Union option
Leader s of t he l ocal
teachers union on Mon-
day called for the district
to reimburse part of the
deductibles so staff would
pay $200 annually for indi-
viduals and $400 for fami-
lies. Officials indicated
they werent certain if that
was a viable option.
In a May 10 letter to the
board, union president Jon
Fishwild chastised officials
for asking teachers to swal-
low the $850,000 premium
increases with no guaran-
tee that any of those savings
will go back to the employ-
ees in the form of increased
wages.
Teachers wages have
been frozen for three years,
he said, and their take-
home pay has dipped after a
2011 state law commonly
known as Act 10 forced
them to pay roughly 6 per-
cent of their annual pension
contribution.
I have young teachers
saying, How am I sup-
posed to get ahead, when
Im only going backwards?
If they are taking health
insurance with this district,
they have just gone back-
wards, big time, if this pass-
es.
Moreover, he later said
t hat t eachers for years
accept ed smal l er wage
increases in exchange for
good health benefits. This
pl an j eopar di zes t hose
gains, he said.
He also aired concerns
that the districts reserve
fund has grown at a time
when st af f compensa-
tion has dwindled. Busi-
ness manager Andy Wei-
land countered Fishwilds
contention, however, and
offered to meet with Fish-
wild or anyone else to
explain the details.
Mondays dispute over
health care comes after
months of tense interactions
between the union and dis-
trict leaders.
St af f l as t f al l wer e
offered a 2.75 percent wage
increase retroactive to last
July. Negotiations remain
stalled, however, as the
union has asked to negoti-
ate issues other than wages,
something prohibited under
Act 10, which is facing
legal challenges. A second
mediation session between
both sides has been tenta-
tively slated for later this
month.
www.oakwoodvillage.net/health-care
Its your health. Its our calling.
Meet Emily,
a person who loves what she does.
Assisted Living Memory Care Rehabilitation
(608) 230-4266 (608) 230-4646
6205 Mineral Point Road
Madison, WI 53705
5565 Tancho Drive
Madison, WI 53718
Find us on
Facebook.
Call either of our communities to learn more
and be sure to visit us online at
www.oakwoodvillage.net/health-care.
At Oakwood Village, we know that health care really comes
down to peoplepeople like Emily. Like our other staff
members, she couldnt imagine doing anything else because
she simply loves helping people, creating meaningful
relationships, listening, being a positive inuence on the
lives of others; helping every day. And, to us, thats what
providing health care services should be all about.
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CARING DENTISTRY
FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
General and
Cosmetic Dentistry,
Crowns, Bridges,
Implants, Veneers
Tooth Colored Fillings,
Whitening, Emergencies
New Patients Always Welcome
Mueller Dental Clinic
978 Park Street
Oregon, WI 53575
(608) 835-0900
www.muellerdental.com
Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for 15 Years!
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Tim Andrews Horticulturist - LLC
Drought get your lawn?
Call us and sharpen
your mower blades!
608-223-9970
www.tahort.com
Caring for our Green World since 1978
Tim Andrews Horticulturist - LLC
Drought get your lawn?
Call us and sharpen
your mower blades!
608-223-9970
www.tahort.com
Caring for our Green World since 1978
P
V
2
8
4
7
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0
Caring for our Green World since 1978
Spring Cleanups, Tree and Shrub Pruning,
Planting and Removals, Stump Grinding,
Mulching,Seeding, Lawn Care and
Complete Landscape Makeovers
OSB: 2013-14 budget picture forecasts a $1M deficit even without staff salary increases
Continued from page 1
Proposed changes
Current / Proposed
DeDuctibles
$0 / $500 annually for individuals, $1,000 for
families*
PrescriPtion Drug co-Pays
$6 for generic, $10 for brand-name / $10 for
generic, $20 for brand-name
Mri/ct scan co-Pays
$0 / $150
eMergency rooM coPay
$75 / $100
*preventative care wouldnt count toward
deductibles
See additional OSB story
Page 14
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
BREITBACH
CHIROPRACTIC
Serving the Community Since 1961
167 N. Main St., Oregon
Dr. John E. Breitbach
HOURS:
Monday, Tuesday and Friday
8 am-12 noon; 1:30 pm-6 pm
Wednesday
8 am-12 noon; 1:30 pm-5 pm; 7-9 pm
Saturday 8 am-11 am
835-5353
www.breitbachchiropractic.com
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5'x10' $27 Month
10'x10' $38 Month
10'x15' $48 Month
10'x20' $58 Month
10'x25' $65 Month
At Cleary Building Corp.
190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI
(608) 845-9700
EMERALD INVESTMENTS
MINI SToRAgE
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EARLY DEADLINES
Due to the Memorial Day holiday,
the display ad deadline for the May 29, 2013
Great Dane Shopping News
will be Wednesday, May 22 at 3 p.m.
Classified ad deadline will be Thursday, May 23 at Noon
Deadlines for the May 30, 2013
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub and Verona Press
will be Friday, May 24 at Noon
In observance of the holiday,
our offices will be closed Monday, May 27.

STEEL CO.
New Used Surplus
A Division of Anich
Lumber Co., Inc.
414 3rd Street
Palmyra
MULTI-METAL DISTRIBUTION CTR
PIPE-PLATE-CHANNEL
ANGLE-TUBE- REBAR-GRATING
PLATE-SHEET-LINTELS
B-DECKING- PIPE BOLLARDS
DECORATIVE IRON PARTS
STAINLESS STEEL & ALUMINUM
I&H BEAMS $3 & UP PER FOOT
LUMBER & BUILDING SUPPLIES
ROOFING & SIDING
NEW, USED & SECONDS
@ 43c SQ. FT. & UP
FABRICATION &
CRANE SERVICE
FR
EE
Stock Book 262-495-4453
fax 262-495-4100
P
a
l
www.palsteel.net
TOWN OF RUTLAND
OPEN BOOK
Tuesday, May 31, 2013
4:00 P.M. TO 6:00 P.M.

The Town of Rutland Open Book will be held
at the Rutland Town Hall, 785 Center Rd., on
Friday, May 31, 2013 from 4:00 p.m. until
6:00 p.m. Open Book is an informal meet-
ing with the assessor (Gardiner Appraisal)
to ask questions and review assessment
records. Property Owners are encouraged
to attend this Open Book to verify the
assessment of their property.
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Paul Shedivy
Paul J. Shedivy passed
away peacefully on Nov. 3,
2012 from congestive heart
failure, just three weeks
after his 91st birthday and
69th wedding anniversary.
Paul was born on Oct. 12,
1921 in Two Rivers, to Car-
olyn (Stangel) and Adolf
Shedivy. When he was 2
years old, his mother died
during surgery, so Paul and
brothers Archie and Melvin
went to live with three sep-
arate families, while Addy
and Marcy continued to live
with their father. Pauls
father changed careers from
policeman to tavern keeper
in order to spend more time
with his family, although he
died when Paul was 9. Paul
was raised lovingly by Aunt
Anna and Uncle Rudy Pru-
cha, whose children Butch,
Helen, Gladys, and Roger
became sisters and broth-
ers to Paul in addition to his
original siblings. Paul con-
tinued to have close bonds
with all of his siblings and
their families. Family was
important to him.
Paul gr aduat ed f r om
Two Rivers High School
in 1939. He was a talented
athlete, excelling in track,
and basketball. He played
competitive basketball for
the Air Force. He played
community league softball
through his 60s and man-
aged a community softball
team in Whitefish Bay, WI
until age 70. He was a big
fan of the Packers, Brewers,
Bucks, and Badgers.
At 21, Paul ventured west
on Route 66 to attend tech-
nical school in California.
Soon Mildred Ouradnik
(from Kewaunee) joined
him and they roomed in
houses across the street
from each other. Together
they rode their bicycles
seven miles to work the
swing shift at Lockheed
Aircraft Company in Bur-
bank, where Lockheed was
producing the Constellation
aircraft. Paul and Mildred
took a bus to Las Vegas to
be married in a Catholic
Mass on Pauls 22nd birth-
day in 1943. Soon, Paul
joined the U.S. Air Force,
where he spent two years in
Officer Candidate School
and Navigation School. He
served in Okinawa follow-
ing WWII and later flew
many bombing missions
over Korea. Much later,
while stationed in England
and France, he flew recon-
naissance flights over East
Germany.
Dur i ng hi s 20- year
career in the Air Force,
Paul moved Mi l dred t o
Gl endal e, CA; It azuke,
Japan; Shreveport , LA;
Tucseon, AZ; San Antonio,
TX; Orlando, FL; Wichita,
KS; Chelveston, England;
Toul-Rosieres, France; and
Sacrament o, CA. Four
children were born along
the way. When Paul retired
from the Air Force in 1964,
the family moved back to
their Wisconsin roots, set-
tling in Whitefish Bay. He
started his second career as
a stock broker for the Mil-
waukee Company, t hen
Robert W. Baird Co. where
he retired in 1999 at age 78.
One of Pauls greatest
sources of pride was pro-
viding a college education
for each of his children.
He encouraged them to
work hard and follow their
dreams. He was a great
father who loved having
the grown kids come home
to visit. He loved gather-
ing the family for birthdays
and holidays.
He loved danc-
i n g p o l k a s
a nd wa l t z e s
w i t h Mi l -
dred. He loved visiting
extended family members
and friends. He loved cod-
dling his grand children.
He loved fishing, hunting,
playing cards, watching his
favorite sports, hearing a
good joke, and drinking a
cold beer. Paul was an eter-
nal optimist, a stable pres-
ence, a kind soul, an honor-
able gentleman, a patriot.
Paul and Mildred moved
to Oregon, in July 2004
to live near their daugh-
ters. Unfortunately, that
December he suffered a
brain injury when knocked
to the pavement at a pedes-
trian crosswalk by a motor-
ist following an Oregon
Hi gh School basket bal l
game. Surrendering his
drivers license because of
the brain injury hurt him
deeply. Through physical,
occupational, and speech
therapies, he regained some
of his abilities. Paul gra-
ciously accepted help from
his children as needed. He
appreciated rides to the
Oregon Senior Center for
exercise classes, bridge
games, sheepshead, and
special events. He enjoyed
the company of Romeo, the
cat, and the 2 shihtzus, Har-
ley and Shadow. He ben-
efitted from the services of
Agrace Hospice. On May
19, 2012, Paul was accom-
panied by his daughter,
Susan, on the Badger Honor
Flight to Washington D.C.,
truly an uplifting experi-
ence for him.
Paul is survived by his
wi fe, Mi l dred (Mi l l i e);
his children Jane Sheffy,
Susan, Paul (Sandy) and
Steve Shedivy; his eight
grandchildren, Sara Shef-
fy (Jon) Hawkins, John
( Hol l y) Shef f y, Kel l y
(Chris) Calvelli, Dan, Pete,
Ali, Maddy, and Walker
Shedivy; his four great-
gr andchi l dr en, Si enna
and William Calvelli, Eli
Hawkins and Indigo Shef-
fy; and many nieces and
nephews. He was preceded
in death by his parents; his
Aunt Anna and Uncle Rudy
Prucha; his sister, Marcella
(Al) Gospodarek; and his
brothers, Adolph, Archie
(Ann), and Melvin (Gert
and Jo).
Funeral services were
held Nov. 10, 2013 at Holy
Mot her of Consol at i on
Church, Oregon.
Mildred Shedivy
Mildred M. Shedivy, age
93, passed away peacefully
on Sunday, May 5, 2013,
from Alzheimers Disease.
Mildred was born on Jan.
8, 1920, near Kewaunee, to
Katherine Rose (Boushek)
and Joseph W. Ouradnik.
Ame r i c a n - b o r n a n d
raised, Rose and Joe taught
t hei r chi l dren t o speak
Bohemian as a second lan-
guage. Mildred was the
third of seven children.
Her mot her operat ed a
country store, grew a huge
vegetable garden, baked
bread, canned, butchered
her own chickens, and was
a caretaker for the Rosebud
School across the street.
Mildreds father operated
a cheese factory and later
became a night watchman
for the Leyse Aluminum
Company in Kewaunee.
Mi l dr ed s chi l dhood
home had no indoor bath-
room, and t he dri nki ng
water needed to be carried
in a pail from an outdoor
well and pump. Mildred
would walk two miles for
catechism class in Slovan.
She attended the one-room
Rosebud School through
eighth grade and graduated
from Casco High School
in 1938. She attended two
years of Business College
in Two Rivers.
As a worki ng gi rl at
Hamilton Manufacturing
Co. in Two Rivers, Mildred
met Paul Shedivy at a dance
at the Waverly Hotel. Paul
wooed her and won her
love. After Paul drove west
with a buddy on Route 66
to California for technical
school, Mildred informed
her employer that she too
would be leaving for Cali-
fornia. Her kind employ-
er told her to rethink this
decision, as jobs were hard
to find and she was mak-
ing top pay at 35 cents per
hour. Mildred took the risk
and traveled west by train.
Mildred and Paul roomed
in houses across the street
from each other. Together
they would ride their bicy-
cles seven miles to work
the swing shift at Lockheed
Aircraft Company in Bur-
bank, where Lockheed was
producing the Constellation
aircraft.
Paul and Mildred took
a bus to Las Vegas to be
married in a Catholic Mass
on Oct. 12, 1943. Paul
soon joined the U.S. Air
Force. During his 20 year
military career, Mildred
moved with him to Glen-
dale, Calif.; Itazuke, Japan;
Shreveport, La.; Tucson,
Ariz.; San Antonio, Texas;
Orl ando, Fl a. ; Wi chi t a,
Kan.; Chelveston, England;
Toul-Rosieres, France; and
Sacramento, Calif.. Four
children were born along
the way.
When Paul retired from
the U.S. Air Force in 1964,
the family moved back to
their Wisconsin roots, set-
tling in Whitefish Bay,
where Paul started his sec-
ond career as a stock broker
and Mildred kept the home-
fires burning. Grandma
Millie was a great cook,
preparing everything from
common meatloaf to Bohe-
mian dishes and Japanese
sukiyaki; she was especial-
ly known for her rotisserie
chicken and sweet and sour
cabbage. She served a hot
family meal every night.
She had a great sense of
humor. She enjoyed gar-
dening, dancing, and cards.
She taught her children to
be healthy, responsible,
respectful and resourceful,
and to have an interest and
excitement about the world
and about learning. It is no
wonder that three of four
children became teachers.
She inspired her children
to do well in school, insist-
ing that they do their home-
work each night instead of
washing the dinner dishes.
She typed several lengthy
college papers for daugh-
ter, Susan. She babysat
her grandchildren and pro-
vided loyal assistance to
her elderly neighbors, Julia
and Violet Maves. Mildred
and Paul moved to Oregon,
Wisc., in July 2004 to live
near their daughters. Mil-
dred frequented the Oregon
Senior Center for exercise
classes and special events.
She enjoyed the company
of cat, Romeo and shihtzus,
Harley and Shadow. She
benefitted from services of
Agrace HospiceCare.
Mildred is survived by
her children, Jane Shef-
fy, Susan, Paul (Sandy)
and Steve Shedivy; eight
grandchildren, Sara Sheffy
(Jon) Hawkins, John (Hol-
ly) Sheffy, Kelly (Chris)
Calvelli, Dan, Pete, Ali,
Maddy, and Walker She-
divy; four great-grandchil-
dren, Sienna and William
Cal vel l i , El i Hawki ns,
and Indigo Sheffy; sister,
Ei l een Veeser; brot her,
Ken; and si st er-i n-l aw,
Carol Ouradnik. Mildred
was preceded in death by
her husband, Paul; her par-
ents, Rose and Joe; sisters,
Dorothy (Joseph) Crabb
and Viola (Jack) Seiler; and
brothers, Joey (Gladys)
Ouradnik and Leo (Ruth)
Ouradnik.
A Mass of Christian Buri-
al were held at Holy Mother
of Consolation Catholic
Church, 651 N. Main St.,
Oregon, on Friday, May 10,
2013. Burial was at Tisch
Mills at 1 p.m. on Saturday,
May 11, 2013.
Online condolences may
be made to gundersonfh.
com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1150 Park St., 835-3515
Obituaries
Shedivy Shedivy
14
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
970 Horses
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
990 Farm: service &
mercHandise
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
340 autos
2002 HONDA Civic SI Hatchback (ep3)
2.0 liter K20 V-Tec. Lowered, 18" wheels,
low profile tires, silver/aluminum color.
Many performance and appearance
modifications, nice car, good condition.
Less than 200 miles on recently replaced
5-speed tranny, new clutch & flywheel,
rebuilt CV axles, new ball joints and
sway bar links. Excellent heater and A/C,
Alpine stereo/cd/mp3 jack, etc. Asking
$7,500 OBO. Call 608-575-5984.
DONATE YOUR Car, Truck oR Boat to
Heritage for the Blind. Free 3-Day Vaca-
tion. Tax Deductible. Free Towing. All
paperwork taken care of! 888-439-5224
(wcan)
342 Boats & accessories
1966 THOMPSON 15/FT, 50/HP Mer-
cury and trailer. Runs-Great. $2200 815-
382-9620
$9995+ FSD for a new boat or pontoon
pkg-both w/lots of standard features!
New 16' pontoon w/furniture & 25HP or
new 16' boat, locator, trailer & 25HP.
Your Choice $9995+FSD. American
Marine & Motorsports Shawano-
866-955-2628 www.americanmarina.
com (wcan)
BOAT WORLD Over 700 New and Used
Pontoons, Fishing Boats, Deck Boats,
Ski-Boats, Bass & Walleye boats, Cudd-
ys, Cruisers up to 33 feet and Outboards
@ Guaranteed Best Price! Crownline
Axis Malibu Triton Alumacraft Mirrorcraft
Misty Harbor & more! American Marine
& Motorsports Super Center Shawano-
where dreams come true 866-955-2628
www.americanmarina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & Lift Head-
quarters! New & Used. We do it all.
Delivery/Assembly/Install & Removals.
American Marine & Motorsports, Scha-
wano = SAVE 866-955-2628 (wcan)
350 motorcycles
BUYING CYCLES Nonrunners ok! Wis-
consin Cycle Salvage 920-722-1283
parts@cyclesalvage.net (wcan)
355 recreational veHicles
ATVS SCOOTERS & GO KARTS,
YOUTH ATVs & SCOOTERS
(80mpg) @ $49/MO. SPORT &
4x4 ATVs @ $69/MO. AMERI-
CAN MARINE & MOTORSPORTS,
SHAWANO=SAVE=866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com. (wcan)
360 trailers
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
390 auto: Wanted to Buy
WANTED: Autos, heavy trucks,
equipment and scrap iron.
Steve's Recycling. Hollandale, WI.
608-574-2350 (cell)
508 cHild care & nurseries
BROWN DEER Family Daycare Stough-
ton/Pleasant-Springs Licensed Child-
care. Openings available. 22 yrs exp.
- Quiet acre lot. Best area summer trip
program. Location-Experience-Referenc-
es. Indoor Slide- Competitive Rates. 873-
0711 www.browndeerdaycare.com
OPENINGS FOR child care infants to
school age welcome.Stoughton area
Meals included. Fun learning environ-
ment. 20+ years experience with excel-
lent references. Debbie 608-877-1711
516 cleaning services
CLEANING SERVICES Weekly, Bi-
weekly or Monthly will also organize with
great references. 608-774-3170
KEDLEY CLEANING
For all your cleaning needs.
Great rates! Excellent references.
608-695-1191
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B & R
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TOWN OF MONTROSE - $35,500. Elaine Holpin, (608) 278-4180.
MLS# 1660776.
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OREGON - MVP $700,000 - $800,000. Laurie Howard ,(608) 469-6710.
MLS# 1674715.
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TOWN OF OREGON
BOARD OF REVIEW
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
SATURDAy, MAy 18, 2013
10:00 A.M. 12:00 p.M.
The 2013 Town of Oregon Board of
Review will be held on Saturday, May 18,
2013 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. To ap-
pear at the Board of Review, it is required
that an appointment is scheduled 48
hours prior to the start of Board of Re-
view. Appointments are scheduled with
the Clerks Offce at 835-3200.
Denise Arnold
Town Clerk
published: May 9 and 16, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
NOXIOUS WEED NOTICE
Notice is hereby given to each and
every person who owns, occupies or
controls land in the Town of Oregon,
Dane County, State of Wisconsin, is re-
quired by law to cut or destroy all nox-
ious weeds, including all Canada thistle,
leafy spurge, and feld bindweed (creepin
Jenny) before such weeds bloom, bear
seed and spread to adjourning proper-
ties, as required in Section 66.0407 of the
Wisconsin States Statutes.
(Photos available here http://dnr.
wi.gov/fles/pdf/pubs/fr/FR0464.pdf.)
If property is found not in compli-
ance with the above Notice, the Town
of Oregon shall issue an Offcial Notice
stating that action must be taken within
fve days of the witten notice or the Town
of Oregon will destroy the weeds at the
responsible persons expense.
Dated this 7th of May, 2013.
Darryl Weber, Town Chairman
posted: May 7, 2013
published: May 9 & 16, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
TOWN OF RUTLAND
NOTICE
ALCOHOL LICENSE
AppLICATIONS
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing alcohol license renewal applica-
tions have been received by the Town of
Rutland. The licenses applied for are for
the period beginning July 1, 2013 through
June 30, 2014.
Class B Fermented Malt Beverage:
Jenni Investments Inc., 15824 W.
143RD ST., HOMER GLEN IL 60491
David Kevin Grueneberg, 635 E.
Countryside Drive, Evansville, WI 53536,
agent.
License Location: Madison Interna-
tional Speedway, 1122 Sunrise Road, Or-
egon, Wisconsin
Dawn George, Clerk
published: May 16, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
TOWN OF RUTLAND
NOTICE
ALCOHOL LICENSE
AppLICATION
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing beer and liquor license renewal
applications have been received by the
Town of Rutland. The licenses applied for
are for the period of July 1, 2012 through
June 30, 2013.
Class B Fermented Malt Beverage
and Class B Liquor:
Grueneberg Enterprises, DBA
Davess White Rock, 596 State Road 14,
Brooklyn, WI 53521
License Location: White Rock Bar
Dawn George, Clerk
published: May 16, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
TOWN OF RUTLAND
NOTICE
ALCOHOL LICENSE
AppLICATIONS
Notice is hereby given that the fol-
lowing alcohol license application has
been received by the Town of Rutland.
The licenses applied for are for the pe-
riod beginning July 1, 2013 through June
30, 2014.
Class B Fermented Malt Beverage:
Eugsters Farm Market, Inc., Joseph
Eugster, agent.
License Location: 3865 Hwy 138,
Stoughton WI 53589
Class C Wine:
Eugsters Farm Market, Inc., Joseph
Eugster, agent.
License Location: 3865 Hwy 138,
Stoughton WI 53589
Dawn George, Clerk
published: May 16, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
NOTICE OF pUBLIC
HEARING ON REQUEST FOR
CONDITIONAL USE pERMIT,
AT 350 BRAUN ROAD,
OREGON WISCONSIN
pLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, June 6, 2013, in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin, to
consider the application of Trachte As-
sociates, LLC, for the property located
at 350 Braun Road, for a conditional
use permit regarding General Industrial
pursuant to Section 17.105(5)(b), and
17.206(9)(b) of the Village Code to allow
for modular building assembly.
Parcel #: 165/0509-021-1300-1
Lot 1 CSM 12402
The property is presently zoned GI,
General Industrial
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
peggy Haag
Village Clerk
published: May 16 and 23, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
NOTICE OF pUBLIC
HEARING ON REQUEST FOR
CONDITIONAL USE pERMIT,
AT 214 SpRING STREET,
OREGON WISCONSIN
pLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the
planning Commission of the Village of
Oregon will hold a public hearing at 6:30
p.m. on Thursday, June 6, 2013, in the
Board Room of the Oregon Village Hall,
117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wisconsin,
to consider the application of Oregon
Bowl, LLC for the property located at
214 Spring Street, for a conditional use
permit permitting regarding Central Busi-
ness pursuant to Section 17.105(4)(c),
17.206(4)(i), and 17.206(9)(b) of the Vil-
lage Code to allow for outdoor recreation/
entertainment.
Parcel #: 165/0509-122-0475-2 Lot 15
Block 6 Village of Oregon Original plat
Parcel #: 165/0509-122-0724-0 Outlot
124 Village of Oregon Assessors plat
The property is presently zoned CB,
Central Business
Subsequent to the hearing, the Com-
mission intends to deliberate and act
upon the request.
peggy Haag
Village Clerk
published: May 16 and 23, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
TOWN OF OREGON
pLAN COMMISSION AGENDA
TUESDAy, MAy 21, 2013
6:30 pM
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
1. Open public Hearing:
a. Land Division and Rezone; pe-
tition # DCpREZ-2013-10563; parcel #
0509-224-9000-4. The request is to sepa-
rate existing residence from farm land.
The property is zoned A-1Ex (40.7 acres)
and RH-1 (2.11 acres). The request is to
rezone 24.68 acres to A-4 and 16.18 acres
to RH-4. No building sites will be created.
The property is located at 589 Glenway
Road, Brooklyn, WI 53521. petitioner and
Owner is Bill Krajco, 589 Glenway Rd.,
Brooklyn, WI 53521.
2. Close public Hearing.
3. Call plan Commission meeting to
order.
4. Discussion and possible Recom-
mendation to the Town Board:
a. Land Division and Rezone; pe-
tition # DCpREZ-2013-10563; parcel #
0509-224-9000-4.
5. Approval of minutes from the last
meeting.
6. public Comments.
7. Discussion and possible Action
re: Alliant tree planting on Netherwood
Rd.
8. Discussion and possible Action
re: TORC procedures.
9. Discussion and possible Action
re: Towns Submittal Application for Land
Division, Rezones and CUp.
10. Communications.
11. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Towns e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerks offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
posted: May 14, 2013
published: May 16, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
NOTICE OF pUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE HEREBy GIVEN for a pUB-
LIC HEARING to be held on Tuesday, May
21, 2013 at 6:30 p.m., before the Town of
Oregon plan Commission at the Oregon
Town Hall, 1138 Union Road, Oregon, WI
53575.
1. Land Division and Rezone; pe-
tition # DCpREZ-2013-10563; parcel #
0509-224-9000-4. The request is to sepa-
rate existing residence from farm land.
The property is zoned A-1Ex (40.7 acres)
and RH-1 (2.11 acres). The request is to
rezone 24.68 acres to A-4 and 16.18 acres
to RH-4. No building sites will be created.
The property is located at 589 Glenway
Road, Brooklyn, WI 53521. petitioner and
Owner is Bill Krajco, 589 Glenway Rd.,
Brooklyn, WI 53521.
An effort has been made to notify
neighbors of this proposed change. To
ensure that everyone has been notifed,
please share this notice with anyone who
you think would be interested.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Towns e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerks offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
Denise R. Arnold
Clerk
posted: May 6, 2013
published: May 16, 2013
WNAXLp
* * *
AGENDA
OREGON TOWN BOARD
SATURDAy, MAy 18, 2013
9:45 A.M.
OREGON TOWN HALL
1138 UNION ROAD
OREGON, WI 53575
9:45 A.M. BOARD MEETING
1. Call Town Board meeting to order.
2. Discussion and possible Action
re: Seal Coat Bids.
3. Adjournment.
Note: Agendas are subject to amend-
ment after publication. Check the offcial
posting locations (Town Hall, Town of
Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon
Village Hall) including the Town website
at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the
Towns e-mail list to receive agendas at
townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi-
ble that members of and possibly a quo-
rum of members of other governmental
bodies of the town may be in attendance
at any of the meetings to gather informa-
tion; however, no action will be taken by
any governmental body at said meeting
other than the governmental body spe-
cifcally referred to in the meeting notice.
Requests from persons with disabilities
who need assistance to participate in
this meeting or hearing should be made
to the Clerks offce at 835-3200 with 48
hours notice.
posted: May 14, 2013
published: May 16, 2013
WNAXLp
Legals
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seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
Any doubts that Aprils
election changed how the
Oregon School Board oper-
ates were erased in about five
minutes Monday.
New members Rae Vogel-
er and Dan Krause, who easi-
ly topped two incumbents on
the April 2 ballot, came out
firing Monday and rarely let
up during the nearly 5-hour
meeting, which board presi-
dent Courtney Odorico said
was the longest in her 9-year
tenure.
The newcomers began
the meeting by voting not to
approve the agenda a pro-
cedural step thats rarely, if
ever, challenged. Each ques-
tioned whether certain agenda
items were properly worded
to let the public know what
the board was to discuss.
By meetings end, theyd
helped shoot down a com-
mittees recommendation to
increase health care costs for
staff, revisited a controver-
sial 2012 board decision that
made it easier to discipline or
terminate teachers and lob-
bied for giving the teachers
union more of a voice in dis-
trict decisions.
As candidates, both cam-
paigned on similar issues and
had union backing. Krause
noted they each won the elec-
tion fairly handily, which
he saw as a reason to push for
changes.
The key is the teachers,
Krause said. Lets start treat-
ing the teachers like they are
special. Theyve sacrificed
a lot for this district over the
last three years.
Speci f i cal l y, Kr ause
requested data supporting a
move last year that allowed
the district to discipline, fire
or not renew a teachers con-
tract so long as its decision
was deemed good and suf-
ficient, a legal standard less
stringent than the former just
cause standard.
As a resident, Krause spoke
out last year about keep-
ing just cause. As a board
member, he said he wanted to
keep (the issue) on the table
and verify board claims last
year that the higher standard
had driven up legal costs.
Superi nt endent Bri an
Busler told Krause he would
share that information with
the board in closed session
later that night because it con-
tained personal information.
Attempts to reach Krause
Tuesday were unsuccessful.
Likewise, Vogeler was
vocal Monday, particularly
during the debate over health
insurance costs. For example,
she succeeded after about a
half-dozen attempts in get-
ting OEA president Jon Fish-
wild to speak to the board
about a May 10 letter he
wrote criticizing the proposed
changes.
Vogeler also thanked
teachers and residents who
criticized the board during the
public comment portion of
the meeting. In an exchange
after that statement, Odorico
said that, as the meetings
chair, Vogeler should ask
(me) at the appropriate time
before making such state-
ments.
I know that that was
appropriate by public meet-
ing law, so thank you very
much, but I will ask in the
future, Vogeler said.
New board members make mark
May 16, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
30 + Years Professional
Interior-Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

RECOVER PAINTING Currently offering
spring discounts on all painting, drywall
and carpentry. Recover urges you to join
in the fight against cancer, as a portion of
every job is donated to cancer research.
Free estimates, fully insured, over 20
years of experience. call 608-270-0440
SENSIBLE PAINTING 20 years
experience. Great quality at a sensible
price. Free estimates, Insured, Polite,
Professional.
608-873-9623
550 insurance
SAVE MONEY $$$ On Auto Insurance
from the major names you trust. No
forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call
READY FOR MY QUOTE now!
888-708-0274 (wcan)
554 landscaping, laWn,
tree & garden Work
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing, trimming,
rototilling ,etc. 608-235-4389
LAWNCARE MAINTENANCE and land-
scaping. Lawn mowing and cleanup,
organic fertilization and weed control pro-
grams. Tree and shrub planting, edging,
shredded bark application, etc. Also tree
pruning and cutting. Serving Belleville/
Brooklyn/Oregon/Verona /Stoughton and
Madison areas. Call 608-575-5984
LAWN MOWING Rototilling, Aerat-
ing Dethatching Tree/Bush Trimming,
Spring/fall clean-ups landscaping, &
more. Quality work Reasonable. Price
608-219-4606
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, and
Lawnmowing. Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 proFessional services
BOOKKEEPING SERVICES:
Accounts Payable & Receivables
For your small business. Call now!
Joy's Bookkeeping Services
608-712-6286
MY COMPUTER WORKS! Computer
problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer issues, Bad Internet Connections
- Fix It Now! Professional, US Based
Technicians. $25 off service. Call for
Immediate Help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
576 special services
ALONE? EMERGENCIES Happen.
Get Help with one button push! $29.95/
month. Free equipment. Free set-up.
Protection for you or a loved one. Call
LifeWatch USA
800-642-0549 (wcan)
FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED! Are you
a 2-parent family over age 25 with 1
stay-at-home parent able to work with
youth 10-17 years of age?
Call 866-776-3760 or
CommunityCareResources.com/now-
recruiting. (wcan)
586 tv, vcr &
electronics repair
SAVE ON Cable TV-Internet-Digital
Phone- Satellite. You've Got A Choice!
Options from ALL major service provid-
ers. Call us to learn more! 888-714-5772
(wcan)
590 Wanted: services
NEED HOST Parents for German/Swiss
High School Students, for all or part of
2013-14 school year. Reflections Int'l
608-583-2412 www.
reflectionsinternational.org (wcan)
143 notices
ROTARY INVESTS in people to generate
sustainable economic growth. For more
information: www.rotary.org This mes-
sage provided by PaperChain and your
local community paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their ability.
Unfortunately, many unscrupulous people
are ready to take your money! PLEASE BE
CAREFUL ANSWERING ANY AD THAT
SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE!
For more information, or to file a com-
plaint regarding an ad, please contact The
Department of Trade, Agriculture & Con-
sumer Protection 1-800-422-7128 (wcan)
150 places to go
MEDFORD GUN Show May 17-18.
Simek Center, 1037 W. Broadway. Fri.
3-8pm, Sat. 8am-4pm, Buy-Sell-Trade-
Browse. $5 adm. We pay cash for guns
& related items. Gun Buyer Shows 608-
548-4867 (wcan)
163 training scHools
AIRLINE CAREERS: become an Avia-
tion Maintenance Tech. FFA approved
training. Financial aid if qualified. Hous-
ing available. Job placement assistance.
Call AIM 888-242-3193 (wcan)
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
SATURDAYS! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on FACEBOOK! Next class
begins 9/7/2013. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
203 Business opportunities
ESTABLISHED PALLET RECYCLING
Business. No Real Estate. Disc pallet
dismantler, repair tables & Jigs, repair
nail guns, 1-ton Truck w/V=Plow, 7-ton
Gooseneck, 843 Bobcat, Client List.
Great Deal! 54937 920-948-0603 (wcan)
602 antiques & collectiBles
SYTTENDE MAI Plates Pristine Cond. 1975
Thur. 2009 won't divide. 608-873-0371
606 articles For sale
ORIGINAL RAINBOW CASTLE Swing
set. It has all the pieces for the entire
system. Ladder, swings, tire swing, club
house, rock wall, monkey bars, three
swings. disc swing, large tube slide and
much more. $2,000.00 Originally priced
is over $6000.00. Located in Oregon, WI.
Please call 608-751-3635
632 clotHing: FormalWear
STORE CLOSING SALE
All Prom Dresses 20-75% off
Over 400 dresses
Princess Prom
410 Mall Drive, Appleton
920-933-4500, ediths.com (wcan)
638 construction &
industrial equipment
FARMI 3PT Logging Winch's, Valby
3pt PTO Chippers, New 3pt Rototill-
ers, Loader Attachments and 3pt Attach-
ments, New Log Splitters. www.threeriv-
ersforestry.com (866) 638-7885 (wcan)
648 Food & drink
100% GUARANTEED Omaha Steaks
- Save 69% on the Grilling Collection.
Now Only $49.95. Plus 2 Free Gifts &
to-the-door-delivery in a reusable cooler.
Order today. 1-888-676-2750 Use Code:
45102DJW www.OmahaSteaks.com/
gcoffer83 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts for Mother's Day! SAVE 20%
on qualifying gifts over $29. Fresh-dipped
berries from $19.99 call 888-479-6008 or
visit www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
652 garage sales
2364 S.SYENE Rd. 5/16-17 8am-6pm,
5/18 8am-2pm. Multi-family Sale! See
craigslist.
ESTATE SALE: 417 S. Main Street,
Edgerton, May 18 & 19, Saturday &
Sunday 9:00-4:00 Sign up early doors
open at 9:00. Very nice Sale! Zaphir,
Lladro, Hummel, Belleek, Reverse paint-
ed lamps, Antique clock, cuckoo clock,
Marx train set (stations,signs,etc.) vin-
tage cameras, Huge Dept. 56 Snow
Village collection, Santa collection,
Snowbabies, Royal Doulton, Cut glass,
China,Silverplate, oil paintings, Lenox,
area rugs, dresser & mirror, dining set,
wing back chairs, antique twin beds,
Electric fireplace, linens, bedding, patio
furniture, lawn ornaments, holiday decor,
vintage Schwinn Conqueror, Kitchen Aid
mixer, pots & pans, cookie jars, kitchen-
ware, a garage full of old & new tools- a
handy man's paradise - plus much more!
ESTATE SALE, Stoughton, 1727 Sever-
son Dr. Fri (5/17) & Sat (5/18) 8am - 4pm;
bed, rolltop desk, tables, chairs, house-
hold, tools, freezer. All must go.
EVANSVILLE- MULTIPLE Rummage
Sales on Millard Court. 5-17 Friday 8am-
4pm, 5-18 Saturday 8am-12pm. Fishing,
Muskie Lures, Toys, Hot Wheels, Hall-
mark ornaments, Collectibles, Kitchen
items, Furniture, TV, Birdcage with stand,
bike, Queen Bed, baby items, jumper,
walker, stroller, Coleman Road Trip Grill
and much more,
FITCHBURG 2270 Gold Dr. 5/17
8am-5pm, 5/18 8am-noon. South Syene
to Old Indian. See craigslist.
OREGON 5420 Honeysuckle Lane
Thursday 12-6pm, Friday 8am-6pm, Sat-
urday 8-12. Multi-Family. Clothing, Toys,
Household.
OREGON HOLY Mother of
Consolation 651 N Main St.
Trash and Treasure Sale
Thursday-Saturday, May 16,17,18
8am-2pm.
Half price Saturday.
STOUGHTON- 1502 TARA LN. 5/16-
5/18 9AM-5PM. Lots of Misc.;p
STOUGHTON- 1708 Skyridge Ct. 5/17-
5/18 9am-4pm. Dining table w/chairs,
end table, mirror, book case, patio set,
office chairs, TV, wildlife prints and more.
Stougthon
STOUGHTON 208 Harding (corner Page
& Harding) May 17-18; 9am-5pm. Inside.
Scrubs, NASCAR, Teddy Bears, Cobalt
Glass, Collectibles.
STOUGHTON- 3173 McComb Rd. Mul-
tiple Household/Moving Sale. May 16th
1pm-7pm, May 17th 9am-7pm, May 18
9am-5pm. Furniture, fishing gear, tools,
kitchen items, antiques and much more!
STOUGHTON- 3198 & 3192 Duncan Rd
2 Family Garage Sale. May 16-18 (8-4)
Great Buys. Harley Davidson, House-
wares, Clothing, Xmas, furniture items.
STOUGHTON- 532 Nygaard St. 5/17
9am-5pm. 5/18 9am-2pm. Retired
HVAC Tech/Electriciial. Cleaning house.
New and used parts, dryer, household,
clothes, misc. See Craigs List.
STOUGTHON- 2792 Oaklawn Rd 5/16-
5/18 8am-4pm. Lots of crafts, household
664 laWn & garden
3'-12' EVERGREEN & Shade Trees.
Pick up or Delivery! Planting Available!
DETLOR TREE FARMS 715-335-4444
(wcan)
666 medical & HealtH supplies
ATTENTION JOINT & Muscle Pain Suf-
ferers: Clinically proven all-natural sup-
plement helps reduce pain & enhance
mobility. To try HydrAflexin Risk Free for
90 days. Call 888-550-4066 (wcan)
ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFER-
ERS with Medicare. Get FREE CPAP
Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus
FREE Home Delivery! Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection! 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL ALERT FOR SENIORS - 24/7
monitoring. Free Equipment. Free ship-
ping. Nationwide Services. $29.95/month
Call Medical Guardian today. 877-863-
6622 (wcan)
668 musical instruments
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
676 plants & FloWers
PROFLOWERS -THRILL MOM Enjoy
50% Off the All the Frills Bouquet $19.99.
Plus take 20% off your order ovwer $29!
Go to www.Proflowers.com/Act-Now or
call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
690 Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - TaX Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
and Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 electronics
DISH NETWORK STARTING at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where available)
SAVE! Ask about SAME DAY installa-
tion! Call 888-719-6981(wcan)
HIGHSPEED INTERNET EVERY-
WHERE By Satellite! Speeds up to
12mbps! (200x faster than dial-up). Start-
ing at $49.95/mo. Call Now & Go Fast!
888-709-3348 (wcan)
SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
Phone. Packages start at $89.99/mo (for
12 mo's) Options from ALL major service
providers. Call Aceller today to learn
more! 866-458-1545 (wcan)
696 Wanted to Buy
TOP PRICES Paid. Any kind of Scrap
Metal. Cars, Batteries, Farm Equipment,
Free Appliance Pick Up. Property
Cleanouts. Honest.
Fully Insured. U Call We Haul.
608-444-5496
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks. We sell
used parts. Monday through Friday 8 am
- 5:30 pm. Newville
Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59,
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 rentals
1 BEDROOM apartments available in
Verona for persons 62+ and/or hand-
icapped/disabled. Rent starts a $443
and includes major appliances, off street
parking, water and sewer, garbage pick-
up and SNOW REMOVAL. Call 888-237-
5710 for more details. This institution is
an Equal Housing Opportunity provider
and employer.
2 BEDROOM 1 1/2 bath laundry includ-
ed. Large yard. $650/mo 2 bedroom 1
bath, 1st floor. Fenced yard. $650/mo.
608-628-9569
BROOKLYN BEAUTIFUL Modern upper
1 bedroom apartment in quiet neighbor-
hood. Stove, refrigerator, W/D includ-
ed. $525. per month plus $525.secu-
rity deposit. Utilities not included. 1 year
lease. No pets. No smoking. If interested
call 608-669-2460
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
ON LAKE KEGONSA Home to share
with single person w/private bedroom.
Cable & internet, utilities, included.
No/Smoking/Pets. $465/mo.
815-238-1000
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes all
appliances, A/C, blinds, private parking,
laundry and storage. $200 Security depos-
it. Cats OK. $650/month. 608-219-6677
OREGON 3 bedroom, ranch style mod-
ern DUPLEX, 2 car garage. C/A. Great
location near school, park. Available
June 1. $910. per month plus utilities. No
pets. 608-575-5000
STOUGHTON- 105 West ST. 2
bedroom, appliances, water, heat,
A/C, ceiling fan, on site laundry.
Well kept and maintained. On site
manager. Next to Park. $725 per
month. 608-238-3815
STOUGHTON 3 Bedroom Duplex in
quiet neighborhood near Fox Prairie
School. $850 Month +Utilities. Water/
Sewer Included.
608-843-7098
STOUGHTON-LARGE 2-BDRM unit
in quiet, owner managed 10 unit. All
appliances, C/A, gas heat. Close to
shopping, off street parking, large yard.
Laundry. $665/month. Water included,
elec/gas extra. Approx. 850 sq ft.
Available June 1. Call
608-772-0234
STOUGHTON- LARGE 2 BR + Den in
award winning Restored Victorian. Beau-
tiful refinished woodwork, French doors,
family kitchen, appliances, laundry, C/A.
No smokers. 608-238-1692
STOUGHTON- N/W LOCATION 2 BR
Duplex. Single Car Garage. Very, Very
nice. Great Neighborhood. Please No
Pets/Smoking, Available June 1. 608-
743-0092
VERONA 1 BEDROOM Upper small
apartment. Off Street parking. Heat,
water, sewer, stove, refrigerator and
electric included. No Pets. 1yr. lease.
$500/month plus deposit.
608-575-2607
720 apartments
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location,
on-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call
Kelly at 608-255-7100 or visit www.ste-
vebrownapts.com/oregon
STOUGHTON ONE Bedroom Upper +
garage. $550/month plus utilities. 608-
576-7037 please leave message
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
750 storage spaces For rent
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Units in all sizes
5x10 thru 10x30
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337

FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
VERONA SELF-STORAGE
502 Commerce Pkwy.
10'x5', 10'x10', 10x15', 10x20, 10'x30'
24/7 access, security lit. Short/long term
leases. Call Jim:
608-334-1191 or fax 608-845-7165
760 moBile Homes
WE PAY CASH for your used Mobile
Home. Home Source One. Text or
call today 920-889-7440 or Barbara.
Schauf@assetdevelopment.com (wcan)
801 oFFice space For rent
BEST LOCATION in Stoughton. Retail
space for rent. 211 E Main 4,000+ sq
ft. Beautifully renovated. Available Now
$1900/mo.Call Connie 608- 271-0101
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
805 commercial &
industrial lots
VERONA INDUSTRIAL Park 2600 sq ft.
shop, warehouse, office space. Available
NOW. 845-7630
820 misc. investment property
For sale
FOR SALE BY OWNER: Near Copper
Harbor & Lake Medora, MI. 700 wooded
acres. CFR tax. Will divide. Terms avail-
able. Asking $800 per acre. 715-478-
2085 (wcan)
FOR SALE BY Owner: Near Copper
Harbor, MI. 400 wooded acres. Mon-
treal River runs through land. CFR tax.
Will divide. Terms available. Asking
$350,000. 715-478-2085 (wcan)
870 residential lots
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895

402 Help Wanted, general
FULL TIME Laborer for concrete
foundation work. Must have DL.
Experienced preferred.
Call between 8:30am-11:30am
608-695-2191
PRODUCT DEMONSTRATORS Now
hiring friendly, outgoing, dependable
people to sample products in local
grocery stores. Must have card table &
transportation. Carlson Specialty Temps
800-453-9390 www.
carlsonspecialtytemps.com
RESIDENTIAL CLEANER needed to
work 2 to 3 days per week. $8.50 per
hour. Days only . Experience helpful.
Non smoker 835-0339
STUDENT HELP wanted. Saturdays
8:30am-2:30pm. Summer and Fall
Hours. Lawn, garden and various house
projects. Stoughton Area. Must have car
and able to lift 40 lbs. $10/hour. 608-
877-0562
TRAVEL-WORK ON AMUSEMENT
RIDES & Concessions. Living Quarters
Available. Apply May 21-26 @ Carnival
Office, Church Parking Lot, 117th St. 3
blks North of Greenfield Ave. Milwaukee.
414-732-7257 (wcan)
444 construction,
trades & automotive
ASPHALT PAVING CREW Madison
Asphalt Contractor has openings for
skilled paver operator,roller, lute man and
laborer.CDL Drivers and Plant Yard/Load-
er man. Call 608-274-4932 for Details.
447 proFessional
OTR TEAM and SOLO DRIVERS
* Above Average Mileage Pay
*Teams Avg 6000 Miles per Week*
*Solos Avg 2500-3500/wk*
* Flexible Home Time
* 100% No Touch/Drop&Hook
* Full Benefit Pkg CDL/A
* 12 Months Exp. Preferred
1-888-545-9351 Ext. 13
Jackson WI
www.doublejtransport.com (wcan)
453 volunteer Wanted
THE UNITED Way Volunteer Center
has information and resources to help
you connect with hundreds of volunteer
opportunities at non-profit agencies within
Dane County. Call 246-4380 or visit www.
volunteeryourtime.org to find out how you
can get involved. United Way 2-1-1 is
seeking new volunteers to become Infor-
mation and Referral Specialists. If you are
looking for an opportunity to learn more
about community resources and would
like to assist people in finding ways to
get and give help, United Way 2-1-1 may
be the place for you! Our volunteers staff
our telephone lines, answering questions
about resources available in the service
area.
Attention College Students
and 2013 HS Grads!
Summer Work,
$17 base-appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service,
no exp nec, conditions apply,
all ages 17+, call now for
interview 608-662-2092
or apply online at
www.summeropenings.com

** DRIVERS **
FULL-TIME DRIVERS
FOR REGIONAL WORK
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreens
Private Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI.
Drivers make hand deliveries to Walgreens
stores within a regional area (WI, IL, IA, MN, ND,
SD). Workweek is Tuesday-Saturday. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
Full Beneft Pkg. includes Life, Dental, Disability, &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
Paid Holidays and Vacation
Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min.
2 yrs. tractor-trailer exp. & meet all DOT require-
ments. Send resum to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755.
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Web Designer
Are you a skilled web designer? Does working in an
ever changing, fast-paced environment excite you? Are
you a self-motivated person with creative ideas? If you
answered yes to all three of these questions, you might
be the TH Medias next Web Designer.
This Web Designer position is located in Dubuque,
IA. Responsibilities include developing, testing, and
auditing of THonline, other TH Media websites, and
our mobile site. In addition, this person should also
be skilled in print design, provide a high level of timely
and accurate customer service, and stay abreast of the
latest trends as it relates to web development.
To be considered for this position, you must have
a two-year college degree in a related feld (or the
equivalent in experience) and one to three years
experience with Web site creation, design and online
publishing. Additionally, experience with content
management systems is a plus.
For consideration, apply online at
www.wcinet.com/career.cfm.
TH Media, a division of Woodward Communications,
is an Equal Opportunity Employer
SYTTENDE MAI KOUPON
50 Off
Limit 6 per Koupon. Valid 5/15/13 - 5/20/13
only at Kopkes. One Koupon per Kustomer per day.
Starting at
$1.99 ea.
All Sizes,
Great Selection
Save up to $3.00
Perennials
Come and Visit Wisconsins Premier Grower of
Quality Bedding Plants & Hanging Baskets
Quality bloomers at reasonable prices.
We offer a complete line of Proven Winner

and a good supply of Wave Petunias

.
$2.00 Off
Any American Made
Shepards hook, Plant
Stand or Trellis
Valid 5/15/13 - 5/20/13 only at Kopkes.
SYTTENDE MAI KOUPON
$2.00 Off
Window boxes or Patio Tubs
Valid 5/15/13 - 5/20/13 only at Kopkes.
One Koupon per Kustomer per day. Limit 2 per koupon.
1828 Sandhill Rd. Oregon, WI 53575 608-835-7569
Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 am-7:30 pm; Saturday 8:30 am-5 pm; Sunday 9 am-4 pm
.
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Directions from Stoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugsters
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on Sun-
rise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left on
Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions from Fitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Nether-
wood Road. Turn left and go through Oregon
past Walgreens to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions from Verona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn right
and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left at
Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past Wal-
greens to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
#
VISIT THE STOUGHTON AREA FARMERS MARKET ON FRIDAY MORNINGS IN FRONT OF DOLLAR GENERAL.
Support Local Agriculture.
Shop Outside the Box Stores!
Check Out Our
Organic Line
of Seeds, Soil and
Fertilizer
In Stoughton youll find our
Growers Outlet located in the
Main Street Plaza parking lot.
Sale Dates May 16-20, 2013
Specials
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www.kopkesgreenhouse.com
KOPKES HONOR FLIGHT BENEFIT
& MEMORIAL SERVICE
Sunday, May 26
4:00 p.m. Memorial Service
16 - The Oregon Observer - May 16, 2013