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Martindale: The Complete Drug Reference, 37th Edition Edited by Sean C Sweetman BPharm FRPharmS. Published by Pharmaceutical Press, London, UK, 2011. ISBN 978-0-85369-933-0. Clothbound, 2 volumes, 4142 pp. (29.5 22.5 cm), $774.99. www.pharmpress.com. Offered solely as a print and online package, it consists of the 2-volume reference book in a slip case, plus 1 years individual access to the online version of Martindale via MedicinesComplete, with all the attendant benefits, including updating every 90 days. Therapeutic Area: This resource provides information about medications and other substances (eg, herbal products) relevant to general medical practice in different countries and regions around the world. Format: The printed resource is available in a 2-volume set, with access to an online version that is updated every 90 days. The user has the option to renew the online component at a discounted annual rate. Audience: Information is relevant to pharmacists, physicians, students, and other health care professionals who treat patients who travel from other countries. Purpose: The purpose is to provide reliable, unbiased, referenced information for health care professionals on a variety of medications and other substances that are available internationally. Content: The first volume contains monographs on medications and other substances that are organized by therapeutic use or mechanism of action in 49 chapters. Each chapter begins with an introduction that discusses the general class of medications (eg, antiepileptics). There are several unique chapter topics as well (eg, pharmaceutical excipients, radiopharmaceuticals, disinfectants and preservatives, and miscellaneous agents [eg, herbal products]). More than 240 monographs have been added to this edition, for a total of over 5900 monographs. The electronic version may include some of the 171 monographs that have been removed from the resource this year, as well as other unique information that is not in the print version (eg, the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List). The second volume contains more than 160,000 proprietary preparations, contact information for over 15,000 distributors and manufacturing companies, and an extensive index. To aid in identifying a particular product, the use of synonyms has been expanded in this edition, including the use of street names for drugs of abuse. Over 41 countries and regions are represented. There is also a list of pharmaceutical formulations written in 13 major European languages, to assist in interpreting product information or prescriptions written in another language. Usability: This resource is well referenced and the preface describes in detail the extensive process that the staff editors used when including information within the text. The general index is very user-friendly and is sorted by a variety of types of information (synonyms, approved names, chemical names), for a total of 172,000 entries. Highlights: This resource provides information on medications available worldwide, so that an equivalent national product and manufacturer can be identified if available. The monographs list key characteristics of

the products, including therapeutic use and administration, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects, precautions, and interactions. The information is concise and well referenced. The resource also provides information on products other than medications for clinical use, including excipients, herbal remedies, street drugs, and multi-ingredient preparations available in other countries. Limitations: The specific information on each product is not extensive, and more information may be necessary before decisions can be made regarding medication use in a clinical setting. Reviewers Summary: Overall, this book is a standard resource that provides information on medications and other substances that are available internationally. The resource is available both in a print and online format. Despite the extensive amount of information available, it is easy to navigate the index that is found in the second volume. Reviewer: Mary Lea Harper PharmD FASHP, Independent Pharmacy Consultant in Medication Information and Policy, Lexington, KY Conflict of interest: Author reported none Published Online, 27 Sept 2011, theannals.com DOI 10.1345/aph.1Q183

Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk, 9th Edition By Gerald G Briggs BPharm FCCP, Roger K Freeman MD, Sumner J Yaffee MD. Published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a Wolters Kluwer business, Philadelphia, PA, 2011. ISBN 978-1-60831-708-0. Clothbound, xxii + 1703 pp. (28.5 22 cm), $135. Includes online access to a mobile application, fully searchable text, and links to the Briggs Update newsletter. www.lww.com Therapeutic Area: This book provides information on the safe use of prescription and nonprescription drugs during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Format: The ninth edition of this hardcover reference book, in its twenty-sixth year of publication, contains monographs on more than 1200 drugs; 105 new drug monographs have been added to this edition. Many monographs from the previous edition have been updated with new information. The reference is organized into a preface describing the structure of the book, changes from previous editions, and how to use the book, followed by an alphabetical listing of drug monographs, using generic names, and an appendix. Audience: The primary audience appears to be pharmacists and physicians, but other health care providers, such as lactation consultants, nutritionists, nurses, and nurse practitioners, may also find this reference quite useful. Purpose: The purpose of the reference is to provide the clinician with the best estimate of embryo/fetal and nursing infant risk for drugs used during pregnancy and lactation.

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Content: Three significant changes have been made to the ninth edition: (1) The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Risk categories (A, B, C, D, and X) that appeared in all previous editions have been removed. The reasons are clearly highlighted in the preface. The authors own recommendations on the risk of each drug during pregnancy and lactation were added in the seventh edition and continue to be available in the ninth edition. The FDA has proposed new labeling for risk during pregnancy and breastfeeding. When available, the new labeling and the authors recommendations will allow the reader to make a more informed decision on the risk:benefit ratio of a drug used in pregnancy or lactation. (2) Drugs that are no longer available on the market have been removed from the ninth edition. (3) Prescription combination drugs have been added to the index, listed by trade name with a goal of making this comprehensive reference easier to use. Each monograph has 8 sections and a standardized format: generic name (US), pharmacologic class, pregnancy recommendations, breastfeeding recommendations, pregnancy summary, fetal risk summary, breastfeeding summary, and references when available. The drug name, pharmacologic class, pregnancy and breastfeeding recommendations, and the pregnancy summary are encased in a box at the beginning of each monograph for quick reference. The summaries are brief reviews of existing literature on the subject, including manufacturers recommendations. The recommendations are intended to assist with determination of level of risk of a specific drug. The pregnancy (fetal risk) recommendations, categorized into compatible, probably compatible, contraindicated in a specific trimester, or contraindicated throughout pregnancy, only apply to the usual therapeutic dose of the drug in a typical patient. Animal data are cited when available and when appropriate human data are lacking. The recommendations for breastfeeding are categorized into compatible, potential toxicity, and contraindicated. These are based on the known toxicity of the drug or similar drugs in adults or children (when known) and the amount of drug excreted in breast milk (if known). The summaries are followed by references. The risk factors are assigned to all drugs, based on the level of risk that they pose to the fetus, and help the reader quickly classify a drug for use during pregnancy, but clinicians are always advised to use this risk factor classification in conjunction with the fetal risk summary. They do not refer to breastfeeding risk. These risk factors are defined using a system similar to that used by the FDA. The FDAs risk categories have been eliminated from this edition but can be easily found in the manufacturers product information. The overall recommendations for both pregnancy and breast feeding are divided into 2 broad categories: compatible (which, for pregnancy recommendations, implies that the maternal benefit is >> embryo-fetal risk), or contraindicated. Usability: The usability of this edition is much improved over the previous editions. The boxed drug names and boxed pregnancy and breastfeeding recommendations are easy to find and interpret. The term fetal risk summary has been replaced with pregnancy recommendations, providing much clearer recommendation for use during pregnancy. Readers interested in details of fetal risk can read the full descriptions at the beginning of each monograph. Highlights: The standardized format of the monographs, generic and trade name cross references (including foreign trade names) in the index, and availability of the online version for mobile use provide the user the convenience of having the reference available at any time, making this reference desirable and user friendly. Limitations: Lack of institutional subscription offer is a limitation. This publication has multidisciplinary use and is a useful reference to have on all pediatric wards that deal with drug-related risks. However, the publisher does not offer an institutional subscription, limiting its timely accessibility. Comparison with Previous Edition or Version: There are several changes to the ninth edition, compared with the eighth edition. First, 105

new monographs have been added, making the reference more comprehensive. This edition includes more information on herbal medicines and nutritional supplements used by women, and contains lists of drugs contraindicated during breastfeeding, drugs contraindicated during pregnancy, and drugs known to cause human developmental toxicity. Second, the overall recommendations now include recommendations for both pregnancy risk (including risk:benefit ratio of mother to fetus) and breastfeeding in a highlighted box at the beginning of the monograph. This provides the reader with a quick classification for use during pregnancy but should not be a proxy for reading the entire monograph before making a final clinical decision. Finally, the complete text of this new edition is now available online, making it more accessible to the practicing clinician. Comparison with Other Related Books or Products: This is a unique, comprehensive reference that incorporates data from research done in the area as well as manufacturers literature when developing the drug monographs. Reviewers Summary: The text provides extremely useful information on drug use during pregnancy and lactation. There is continuous effort to increase the number of monographs and make the book comprehensive. The ninth edition contains 105 additional monographs not available in the previous edition. It is well organized and easy to use. The size of the text limits its portability. The availability of an online version with this edition makes the book more desirable. The online version is available to institutional and individual purchasers of the hard copy. This resource is valuable for any institution that tends to pregnant and lactating women. Reviewer: Varsha Bhatt-Mehta MS(CRDSA) PharmD FCCP, Clinical Associate Professor, Pharmacy, Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Departments of Pediatrics and Clinical, Social, and Administrative Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Conflict of interest: Author reported none Published Online, 6 Sept 2011, theannals.com DOI 10.1345/aph.1Q329

Infectious Diseases, 3rd Edition Edited by Jonathan Cohen MB BS FRCP FRCPath FMedSci, Steven M Opal MD, and William G Powderly MD FRCPI. Published by Mosby, an imprint of Elsevier Ltd., Philadelphia, PA, 2010. ISBN 978-0-72343503-7. Clothbound, xxv + 2070 pp. (28.5 22 cm), $399. Companion Web site with searchable full text online. www.elsevierhealth.com Therapeutic Area: Infectious diseases. Format: This is a 2-volume hardcover text that includes a searchable full text online. The online program through Expert Consult includes references (hyperlinked to PubMed), book updates, images, a pharmacokinetics mannequin, case studies, an outbreak map, links to several Lancet articles, and questions from Infectious Disease Secrets, 2nd edition, by Robert H. Gates MD. Audience: Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, students, residents, and other health care personnel. Purpose: This is a comprehensive, in-depth textbook on infectious diseases and antimicrobial agents that is meant for practical application in patient care, primarily in the US. Content: Volume 1 is divided into 4 sections: an introduction to infectious diseases; syndromes by body system; special problems in practice (eg, fever, occupational infections, and bioterrorism and biodefense); and infections in immunocompromised hosts. Volume 2 is divided into 4 sections: HIV and AIDS; international medicine (including travel medicine and unique or unusual diseases from across the globe); antiinfective therapy (beginning with introductory principles, and separated into antimicrobial agent class); and clinical microbiology (divided by organism or disease classification). Each section is subdivided into chapters that conI

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tain tables, charts, graphs, and many pictures and illustrations. Overall, the book provides complete, up-to-date, practical information for the practitioner that is written in an easily readable and understandable format. A limited number of case studies in the online companion include questions and responses. The section on syndromes includes practical points in addition to traditional diseases (such as treatment of a positive Toxoplasma titer in pregnancy). Usability: The book can be used either as a comprehensive text or a quick reference tool. The online product requires an easy registration process and is most useful for references, quick text searching capabilities, and the case studies. The depth of most chapters is dictated by the needs of the practitioner. The chapters are not meant to be authoritative and exhaustive in nature, but are easy to read and digest for practical use. Highlights: The practice points highlight both common and uncommon clinical scenarios, present specific diagnostic and treatment recommendations, and provide a reading list for further investigation. There are many illustrations and photos, all of which can be downloaded from the online site. Limitations: As with most textbooks, the dates of the most current references tend to be 2-3 years earlier than the books publication date, with some more recent material listed online. Comparison with Previous Edition: The third edition has been updated and includes new, recently approved antimicrobial agents, in addition to updates in each of the sections, such as revised data on the H1N1 influenza virus. References have been updated. The online tool also supports the previous versions of the book. Comparison with Other Related Books: There are several comprehensive textbooks on infectious diseases. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennetts Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases remains the authoritative text, but Infectious Diseases offers a greater number and variety of illustrations and practical points in an easy-to-use format. The list of authors includes many well-known and well-published individuals in infectious diseases research and practice. Reviewers Summary: This is an excellent textbook on infectious diseases for the student, resident, or practitioner. The online companion includes the entire book and offers the portability and searchability that younger generations demand. The price dictates that this book will likely be a reference tool in libraries, drug information centers, and where multiple users can access the hard copy. Reviewer: Steven J Martin PharmD BCPS FCCP FCCM, Professor and Chairman, Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH Conflict of interest: Author reported none Published Online, 6 Sept 2011, theannals.com DOI 10.1345/aph.1Q267

the reader through various physical assessment skills and laboratory and diagnostic tests. Chapter 6 discusses the presentation of patient cases, while Chapters 7 and 8 provide a general review of developing plans and monitoring therapy. The final chapters discuss drug information skills and ethical issues in pharmacy. The appendices provide a list of acronyms used in the various chapters. The end of each chapter includes self-assessment questions, application activities for group learning, and a Web site link that provides an audio glossary, videos of physical assessments, and electronic checklists for use in everyday practice. Usability: This book provides a lot of information on a variety of subjects. The text is easy to read and the application activities should be useful when applying the information in a group setting. Based on the Elsevier Web site, the price of $74.95 seems a bit high for this reference. Highlights: Although the information in the text is general and helpful, the group activities at the end of each chapter uniquely provide for the development of skills in small-group settings. Also, the Web site information, such as the videos reviewing physical assessment skills, will probably be the most helpful to students. Limitations: Sometimes it seems that this reference is trying to provide too much information on a variety of subjects, instead of focusing on 1 or 2 important patient care activities. Additionally, some of the information is a little out of date. For instance, in the Practice of Pharmacy chapter, there is no discussion of or reference to the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists 2015 goals or the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative. Comparison with Previous Edition or Version: This is the third edition, updated from the 2003 edition. Improvements in this edition include more pictorial representations of concepts, updates on several chapters, and the supplemental information listed above. Comparison with Other Related Books or Products: There are several other books available that address developing practice or clinical skills. These are generally more focused on pharmaceutical care and are less expensive, but they do not have the group application activities that could be performed in a classroom setting. Reviewers Summary: Overall, this reference would be useful as a compilation of basic information that generally could be found in other textbooks or references. It could be considered as a supplementary reference for a class on developing patient care skills. While the supplemental information is useful and somewhat unique, it can be accessed for free from the publishers Web site and does not require purchase of the book. Reviewer: Melissa M Blair BS PharmD BCPS CDE, Pharmacist III, Drug Use Policy, New Hanover Regional Medical Center, Wilmington, NC Conflict of interest: Author reported none Published Online, 6 Sept 2011, theannals.com DOI 10.1345/aph.1Q303

Clinical Skills for Pharmacists: A Patient-Focused Approach, 3rd Edition By Karen J Tietze PharmD. Published by Mosby Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier, Inc., St. Louis, MO, 2012. ISBN 978-0-323-07738-5. Paperbound, ix + 200 pp. (27.5 21.5 cm), $74.95. www.elsevierhealth.com Therapeutic Area: Pharmacy practice/patient care skills. Audience: The text is primarily geared toward students in their first 2 years of pharmacy school. It could also be used by pharmacists who need a general guide to improving patient care skills. Purpose: To provide a compilation of skill-related topics to be used in conjunction with other references such as clerkship manuals and textbooks. Content: The contents, divided into 10 chapters, provide the reader with general information on a wide variety of topics. Chapter 1 reviews the practice of pharmacy. Chapters 2 and 3 review communication skills and the mechanics of taking medication histories. Chapters 4 and 5 guide

Putting a Name to It: Diagnosis in Contemporary Society By Annemarie Goldstein Jutel. Published by The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD, 2011. ISBN 978-1- 4214-0067-9. Clothbound, xvii + 175 pp. (23.5 16 cm), $45. www.press.jhu.edu Therapeutic Area: Medical sociology. Format: Hardcover book with foreword and preface followed by 6 chapters, conclusion, notes/references, and index. Audience: Medical sociologists would find this book most intriguing. Clinicians and the lay public with an interest in medical sociology also would find the book a delightful read. Purpose: The purpose of this book is to describe the social nature of medical diagnosis in which diagnosis is rooted in societal, cultural, and entrepreneurial contexts. Also, it describes how this social nature of medical diagnosis frames experiences with illness, treatment of disease, and health.

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Content: The author presents a cogent argument for how medical diagnosis is a social creation and provides a cultural expression of what a given society is prepared to accept as normal and what it feels should be treated. Each chapter in this book is devoted to a different depiction of uses for medical diagnosis, including: (1) a means for classification, (2) social framing, (3) defining relationships and roles, (4) discussing contested diagnoses, (5) medicalizing normal human experience for entrepreneurial gain, and (5) so-called technoscientization or reliance on population-based, evidence-based medicine for decision-making. The conclusion chapter briefly summarizes future directions for the sociology of diagnosis. Usability: This book is authored by one individual and this contributes to the outstanding flow of the book. I believe that medical sociologists would find the book intriguing and useful for generating new ideas. However, the book is not a scientific text, which makes it very readable for clinicians and the lay public who do not have backgrounds in medical sociology. For these audiences, the book would provide insights about the patient care process and how to avoid pitfalls and make improvements. Highlights: Readers will continue thinking about the content well after the book is read. The book is written in one voice that beautifully weaves a single thread of thought about various social aspects of medical diagnosis. The author provides insights about what many may view as a one-dimensional concept and exposes its multidimensional, social nature. Limitations: The conclusion chapter is limited in that it presents only a sociological understanding of medical diagnosis. The discussion of future directions in this chapter would be strengthened by including suggestions and insights for a broader social sciences role for understanding medical diagnosis (eg, economics, psychology, history, anthropology, linguistics, law, political science). Reviewers Summary: This book describes the social nature of medical diagnosis, in which diagnosis is rooted in societal, cultural, and entrepreneurial contexts. Also, it describes how this social nature of medical diagnosis frames experiences with illness, treatment of disease, and health. Social scientists, clinicians, and members of the lay public would enjoy reading this well-written book. Reviewer: Jon C Schommer PhD, Professor, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN. Conflict of interest: Author reported none Published Online, 6 Sept 2011, theannals.com DOI 10.1345/aph.1Q314

BOOKS RECEIVED

Adult Epilepsy. Edited by Gregory D Cascino MD and Joseph I Sirven MD. Published by Wiley-Blackwell, an imprint of John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2011. ISBN 978-0-470-74122-1. Clothbound, xv + 307 pp. (25 17.5 cm), $160. www.wiley.com/go/medicine Basic Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics: An Integrated Textbook and Computer Simulations. By Sara E Rosenbaum PhD. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, 2011. ISBN 978-0470-56906-1. Paperbound, xviii + 430 pp. (25.5 18 cm), $59.95. www.wiley.com Bipolar Psychopharmacotherapy: Caring for the Patient, 2nd Edition. Edited by Hagop S Akiskal MD and Mauricio Tohen MD DrPH MBA. Published by Wiley-Blackwell, an imprint of John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK, 2011. ISBN 978-0-470-74721-6. Clothbound, xxiii + 520 pp. (25 18 cm), $123.95. www.wiley.com/wiley-blackwell Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapeutics, 3rd Edition. Edited by William H Frishman MD and Domenic A Sica MD. Published by Cardiotext Publishing LLC, Minneapolis, MN, 2011. ISBN 978-0-9790164-3-1. Clothbound, xix + 775 pp. (28.5 22. cm), $199. www.cardiotextpublishing.com New with this edition is an accompanying Web site, cvpct3.com, which highlights advances in cardiovascular drug therapy. Along with providing periodic updates to each chapter, including links to latest studies, the site reviews cardiovascular drugs newly approved by the FDA for clinical use as well as drugs under investigation. Drug Interaction Facts 2012: The Authority on Drug Interactions. Edited by David S Tatro PharmD. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, St. Louis, MO, 2011. ISBN 978-157439331-6. Paperbound, xlix + 2176 pp. (23 15.5 cm), $99.95. www.factsandcomparisons.com Respiratory Medicine, 3rd Edition: Self-Assessment Colour Review. By Stephen G Spiro BSc MD FRCP, Richard K Albert MD, Jeremy S Brown MBBS PhD FRCP, and Neal Navani MA MRCP. Published by Manson Publishing, Ltd., London, UK, 2011. ISBN 978-1-84076-1399. Paperbound, 207 pp. (21 15 cm), $39.95. Available as an e-book. www.mansonpublishing.com Published Online, 3 Oct 2011, www.theannals.com DOI 10.1345/aph.1BR11J

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