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Atom

Unit 3

Name_____________________

Calendar
Wed, Jan 19 Powerpoint on history of the atom.Vocabulary words to define. Please define on a separate sheet of paper. Please number and underline the words. Due Friday 1/21. We will also have a quiz over the first 10 words on Friday.
proton, electron, neutron, element, atom, atomic mass, atomic number, nucleus, AMU, orbital, ion, isotope, metal, nonmetal, metalloid, periodic, valence, group, period, alkaline-earth metals, alkali, halogens, noble gasses

Thurs, Jan 20 Discuss parts of atom, charges, size, location, symbols, mass, atomic number. Diagram the atom. Homework assignment due 1/21. Fri, Jan 21 Vocabulary definitions due. Quiz. Activity. Mon, Jan 24 Computer Lab Atom tutorial. Homework assignment. Tues, Jan 25 Isotopes Powerpoint. Quiz. Activity. Wed, Jan 26 Periods, families, Groups, Metals, Non-metals, metalloids. Thurs, Jan 27 Periodic Table of Elements. Octet rule. Brainpop. Vocab Quiz. Monday, Jan 31 Computer Lab finish Atom tutorial. Tues, Feb 1 Quiz. Activity. Wed, Feb 2 Review Unit 4 Thurs Feb 3 Test over Unit 4 Closed Book/Closed Note. Fri, Feb 4 Computer lab research Mon, Feb 7 Computer lab research (Final product Due Friday Feb 11.)

Notes on Atomic Mass:


Because atoms are so small, their masses cannot be measured in grams or milligrams. Instead, scientists have created the atomic mass unit (amu) to measure mass of subatomic particles. The mass of a proton or a neutron is about 1 amu (1 proton = approximately 1.7 x 10 -27g). The mass of an electron, however, is about 1/1800 amu. To find the atomic mass of an atom, add the number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus Example: If an atom has 3 protons, 4 neutrons, and 3 electrons, the atomic mass is 7 amu, because you do not count the very small mass of the atom's electrons (1/1800 amu). Only add the number of protons and neutrons (each has a mass of 1 amu) in the nucleus. Question: If you were given the mass of an atom and the number of protons, could you find out how many neutrons it had? Describe.

Activity Journal

Please create a journal to keep the answers to the questions that are included in each activity. Each activity will have a new entry that starts out with the date and the name of the activity.
Activity: Create an atom of Hydrogen (In-Class Activity) Draw a circle using your compass that has a radius of 10 centimeters. This will represent your atoms nucleus. Cut out a blue proton using a penny to trace. On your blue proton, draw a sign that represents positive in the center this is the protons charge. Do this every time you add a blue proton in this activity. Glue the proton in the center. Draw another circle that has a radius of 15 centimeters. This will represent the first energy level, where the electrons reside. Label it First Energy Level. The maximum number of electrons you can have in this level is two. Since electrons are almost 2000 times less massive than protons, use a pen to draw a tiny electron right on your line, but dark enough that you can still see it. Draw a sign that represents negative right next to the electron. This is the electrons charge. Do this every time you add an electron in this activity. Important to note: A proton has a mass of 1 AMU, but we dont count the mass of an electron. Answer these questions: 1. What is the mass number of this hydrogen atom? (count all the particles in the nucleus) 2. What is the atomic number? (to calculate atomic number, count the number of protons) 3. How many protons are needed to make Hydrogen? What is the over all charge? Add the positive charges to the negative charges. Activity: Create an atom of Helium Cut out another blue proton. Cut out two Red neutrons using pennies to trace. Neutrons have a mass of 1 AMU just like the protons, but they do not have a charge. Paste them into the nucleus. Add another electron to the first energy level. Answer these questions: 4. What is the mass number of this helium atom? What is the atomic number? (two points) 5. How many protons are needed to make Helium? How many electrons do you have in this energy level? 6. What is the over all charge? Add the positive charges to the negative charges. Activity: Create an atom of Lithium

Cut out another blue proton and draw its charge. Cut out two more Red neutrons. Paste them into the nucleus. Draw another circle that has a radius of 20 centimeters. This will represent the second energy level, where the electrons reside. Label it Second Energy Level. The maximum number of electrons you can have in this level is eight. Draw in one electron in this level. Answer these questions: 7. What is the mass number of this atom? What is the atomic number? (two points) 8. How many protons are needed to make lithium? How many electrons do you altogether? 9. What is the over all charge? Add the positive charges to the negative charges. Activity: Create an atom of Carbon Cut out 3 more blue proton (should have 6) and draw their charge. Cut out four more Red neutrons (should have 6). Paste them into the nucleus. In the Second Energy Level draw in three more electrons (should have 6). Answer these questions: 10. What is the mass number of this atom? What is the atomic number? 11. How many protons are needed to make Carbon? How many electrons do you altogether? 12. What is the over all charge? Add the positive charges to the negative charges. Activity: Create an isotope of Carbon Cut two more Red neutrons (should have 14). Paste them into the nucleus. Define Isotope. Answer these questions: 13. What is the mass number of this atom? What is the atomic number? 14. Did adding two more neutrons change this into a new element? Why or why not? 15. Does adding neutrons affect the atomic number? Why or why not? 16. Does adding neutrons affect the charge of the atom? Why or why not? Activity: Create an ion of Fluorine Cut out as many neutrons and protons needed to make the Fluorine on your Periodic Table of Elements. Paste them into the nucleus. In the Second Energy Level draw in enough electrons so that the second shell is filled.. Answer these questions: 17. What is the charge on the atom? Why? 18. How does the number of electrons affect the charge. 19. Can you easily add and subtract electrons? Why or why not? 20. Can you easily add and subtract protons? Why or why not? 21. Can you easily add and subtract neutrons? Why or why not? 22. Define Ion. Activity: Create an atom of Neon Cut out as many neutrons and protons needed to make the Neon on your Periodic Table of Elements. In the Second Energy Level draw in as many electrons needed to make an electrically neutral atom. Answer these questions: 23. What is the mass number of this atom? What is the atomic number? How many protons are needed to make neon? 24. What is the over all charge? Add the positive charges to the negative charges. 25. How many electrons do you altogether? Why is Neon a noble gas? 26. What is the relationship to a Noble gas and the number of electrons in it last shell?

Review Please answer in full sentences. You may use your book and notes.
1. 2. 3. 4. How many protons, electrons, and neutrons does neutral Iron have? Draw Iron. How many protons, electrons, and neutrons does Calcium with a +2 charge have? Draw Calcium.. The rate of decay of a radioactive isotope is called what. For each element listed, state the elements name, its symbol, number of protons, neutrons, and electrons. a. element 6 b. I (-1 charge) c. Ca (+2 charge) d. element 28 e. element 54 f. element 80

Element Wall of Fame


Students will create a periodic table of elements that will be displayed on the wall. Each student will be responsible for one element which will include the following information: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Picture showing how the element is used Symbol Mass number Atomic number Electron configuration Number of Protons, Neutrons and Electrons

Students will be given a card in which to display their information. Grading:

Correctness of information for each of the 6 areas of information - 5 points each. Overall creativity 10 points Overall neatness 10 points