Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 118
FREE 100-Page Guide of Pocket Learn basics colours and styling before the you start shoot
FREE
100-Page
Guide
of Pocket
Learn
basics
colours
and
styling
before
the you
start
shoot
a portrait
NOMINEES OF POY, WPOY • BP POCKET GUIDE: SECRETS OF SHOOTING ABSTRACTS
June 2013
(Total 222 pages + 8 pg supplement
+ 2 Pocket Guides of 100 pg each)
www.betterphotography.in
Better technique. Better Insight. Better Pictures
SPECIAL MAGAZINE INSIDE TO MAKE WITH GREAT PICTURES YOUR HOW CELLPHONE
SPECIAL
MAGAZINE INSIDE
TO MAKE
WITH GREAT
PICTURES
YOUR
HOW CELLPHONE

EXCLUSIVE tEStS Fujifilm X100S Nikon COOLPIX A Olympus VG-190

GREAt MAStERS Dario Mitidieri on his iconic imagery on Mumbai's streets

MARKEt SENSE All you need to know about publishing your own eBook AMIT ASHAR ASHOK
MARKEt SENSE
All you need to know
about publishing
your own eBook
AMIT ASHAR
ASHOK SALIAN
SHANTANU SHEOREY
VIKRAM BAWA
RAFIQUE SAYED
Give a Practical Guide on how they Make a Great Portrait
(with 40 Simple tips)
VISUAL MUSINGS
ON ASSIGNMENT
PHOTOFEATURE
PROFILE
Jörg Colberg ponders over the
importance given to the project
Portraying a home through
the wall scribbles of a child
Exploring fantasy & dreams
of industrial workers in Dhaka
Saibal Das on bridging the gap
between two parallel worlds
VOLUME 17 ISSUE 1 JUNE 2013 Founder & Editor, Network18 Raghav Bahl President & Editorial

VOLUME

17

ISSUE

1

JUNE

2013

VOLUME 17 ISSUE 1 JUNE 2013 Founder & Editor, Network18 Raghav Bahl President & Editorial Director,
VOLUME 17 ISSUE 1 JUNE 2013 Founder & Editor, Network18 Raghav Bahl President & Editorial Director,

Founder & Editor, Network18

Raghav Bahl

President & Editorial Director, TV18

Senthil Chengalvarayan

Editor-in-chief, Web & Publishing, Network18

R. Jagannathan

EDITORIAL

Chief Editor

K Madhavan Pillai

Executive Editor

Gurjender Singh Virdi

Deputy Editor - Technical

Shridhar Kunte

Features Editor

Raj Lalwani

Senior Features Writers

Ambarin Afsar, Supriya Joshi

Features Writers

Chandni Gajria, Priyanka Chharia, Ketan Kundargi, Conchita Fernandes

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Assistant Art Director

Santosh D Kamble

Senior Designer

Bhavna Bastav

Designer

Uttam Kumar

Chief Photographer

Mexy Xavier

Photographers

Joshua Navalkar, Nachiket Gujar

MARKETING & SALES

Senior Vice President-Sales

Siddhartha Chatterjee

National Sales Head

Badri Narayan

West Mehul Bajaj

Bengaluru Md. Azmath Ulla

Hyderabad Rocky Joseph

Chennai Madhivaanan R

New Delhi Harshvardhan Verma, Rajat Chauhan

Head - Marketing

Amit Seth

Senior Manager Marketing

Garima Bajpai

Senior Sales Support Executive

Umesh Desai

Group CEO, Network18

B

Sai Kumar

CEO-Network18 Publishing

Sandeep Khosla

EVP-Human Reasources

Sanjeev Kumar Singh

NEWSSTAND & SUBSCRIPTION

Distribution Head

Sunil Nair

Dy General Manager

Manoj Palsay

Managers

Surendra Desai (Mumbai) Kripanand S (South)

Subscriptions Manager

Rajeev Mani

Senior Manager Subscriptions

Sheetal Kotawdekar

Coordinators

Sarita Quadros, Chaitali Parkar, Kamlesh Mathakar, Vaibhav Ghavale, Meena Katta, Kiran Jadhav, Madhavi Naik

Logistics Team

Percy Palkhiwala, Anant Shirke

PRINTING

Assistant General Manager - PPC

Shekhar Khot

Production Team

Dnyaneshwar Goythale, Ravikumar Potdar, Ravi Salian

NEWSSTAND & SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES

For newsstand and trade queries, please write to Manoj at manoj.palsay@network18publishing.com

For any subscription queries, please write to Sheetal

at

customercare@network18publishing.com

To subscribe to Better Photography online, visit

http://eshop.infomedia18.in

ADVERTISING SERVICES

For advertising and sales queries, please write to

umesh.desai@network18publishing.com

HEAD OFFICE

Network18 Media & Investments Ltd,

‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai – 400 028, Maharashtra, India.

GET PUBLISHED IN BETTER PHOTOGRAPHY

Share your best images, tips and techniques with us and get your work noticed. Follow these simple guidelines:

For PhotoCritique and Your Pictures:

simple guidelines: For PhotoCritique and Your Pictures: Digital files should be a minimum of 1800 x

simple guidelines: For PhotoCritique and Your Pictures: Digital files should be a minimum of 1800 x

simple guidelines: For PhotoCritique and Your Pictures: Digital files should be a minimum of 1800 x

simple guidelines: For PhotoCritique and Your Pictures: Digital files should be a minimum of 1800 x

simple guidelines: For PhotoCritique and Your Pictures: Digital files should be a minimum of 1800 x

simple guidelines: For PhotoCritique and Your Pictures: Digital files should be a minimum of 1800 x

Digital files should be a minimum of 1800 x 2700 pixels at 300dpi and prints should be of 6 x 9-inches Include a 100-word note on how and why you shot the image with the following information:

Your name, address, and contact details. Title of the Image. Name of the section for which you are sending the image Details: camera, lens, aperture & shutterspeed used.

Send in a synopsis, with low-resolution images for viewing, to contribute articles to the following sections:

On Assignment, Step-by-Step, Photofeature, Tips & Tricks, Shooting Technique, History, Story Behind the Picture

Get in Touch with us:

History, Story Behind the Picture Get in Touch with us: To have your images reviewed by

History, Story Behind the Picture Get in Touch with us: To have your images reviewed by

History, Story Behind the Picture Get in Touch with us: To have your images reviewed by

History, Story Behind the Picture Get in Touch with us: To have your images reviewed by

History, Story Behind the Picture Get in Touch with us: To have your images reviewed by

To have your images reviewed by our panel of experts:

photocritique@betterphotography.in To showcase your best photographs:

entries@betterphotography.in To contribute articles and for questions on photography: editor@betterphotography.in For your suggestions, appreciation and criticism on the magazine: feedback@betterphotography.in To send any of the above by post, send us a CD or prints to our Head Office in Mumbai.

Views and opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18)*, its publisher and/or editors. We at Network18 do our best to verify the information published but do not take any responsibility for the absolute accuracy of the information. No part of this magazine can be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Infomedia18 Limited and printed at Network18 Media & Investments Ltd Plot No. 3, Sector No. 7, Off Sion Panvel Road, Nerul, Mumbai - 400 706, and published at Network18 Limited, Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Readers are recommended to make appropriate enquiries before sending money, incurring expenses or entering into commitments in relation to any advertisment appearing in this publication. Better Photography does not vouch for any claims made by advertisers, products or services. The printer, publisher, editor or members of the publication shall not be held liable for any consequences in the event of such claims not being honoured by the advertisers.

Editor K Madhavan Pillai

Published by Network18 Media & Investments Ltd

Tel: 022 3003 4515 Fax: 022 3003 4499 *Ownership of this magazine stands transferred from Infomedia18 Ltd (Infomedia18) to Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18) in pursuance of the scheme of arrangement between Network18 and Infomedia18 and their respective shareholders and creditors, as approved by the Hon’ble High Court of Delhi and the necessary approval of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting is being obtained.

11
11
approval of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting is being obtained. 11 JUNE 2013 B E T

JUNE 2013

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

12
12
12 EDITORIAL “Sell your skill, not your convictions. Make your money but live for the art.”

EDITORIAL

“Sell your skill, not your convictions. Make your money but live for the art.”

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

but live for the art.” B E T T E R P H O T O

Eternally Sixteen

We bring in this sixteenth anniversary special issue with so many mixed feelings. Joy for turning sixteen, pride for being the best photography magazine in India, and sorrow for the passing of yet another legendary photographer, Jagdish Mali, who was very dear to BP and to me personally. There is some solace in knowing that Jagdish lived a life full of passion and zeal. Those who knew him will remember him as being wonderfully friendly, approachable, open minded, ever giving and forever young at heart. When we had contacted him some time ago, for being a judge for POY 2012, and for being a part of this issue, he had politely declined, citing commitments beyond his control. At the moment, I cannot help feeling a twinge of selfish regret that I had not interacted with Jagdish more. I keep thinking of a piece of advice that he had given me a long time ago, which I took to heart. “Never lose yourself to being a commercial photographer,” he had said. “Sell your skill, not your convictions. Make your money but live for the art. Otherwise, it will suck up your soul and leave you empty. There is no existence worse than being a hollowed out photographer with nothing inside.” Somehow, despite his passing, I also cannot help but think his quintessential youth sprung from his being a photographer, a characteristic that all photographers seem to share. In that sense, I have never met an old photographer. I am writing this editorial from the Rift Valley in Kenya, where the BP team, along with the category winners of POY 2012, are in the middle of a superb, adventurous face-off, travelling to Africa’s deepest

gorge and to a pristine lake island little known to tourists. The contestants come from all backgrounds and ages, and from all over India. And yet, they are all wonderfully young in spirit and at heart. The common thread that binds them is photography. Photography is beautiful because it always keeps you learning and yearning to see something new, makes you fall in love over and over… keeps you eternally sixteen.

fall in love over and over… keeps you eternally sixteen. K Madhavan Pillai editor@betterphotography.in Untitled,

K Madhavan Pillai

editor@betterphotography.in

sixteen. K Madhavan Pillai editor@betterphotography.in Untitled, from the series Circus Girl by Saibal Das What

Untitled, from the series Circus Girl

by Saibal Das

What does it take to make an exultant photo project? Why should we walk that extra mile? Why must we keep looking through the viewfinder? And why should we continue making magic?

Saibal believes, “Making a project is not a hit-and- run thing. You learn to work as a photographer,

a creator, a visionary, all

at the same time.”

To read more about Saibal Das’ fascinating images from the circus —

Turn to page 110

JUNE 2013

June 2013

84 104
84
104

SnapShots

30

BookReview ‘Te TirthancheMaher’by ShirishShete

44

LookWho’sShooting Helena Schätzle

45

VisualMusings By Jörg Colberg

46

Tribute

RememberingJagdish

FREE 100-Page Pocket Guide Learn basics styling of colours before the you start and shoot
FREE
100-Page Pocket Guide
Learn
basics
styling
of colours
before
the you
start
and shoot
a portrait
ON THE COVER
NOMINEES OF POY, WPOY BP POCKET GUIDE: SECRETS OF SHOOTING ABSTRACTS
(Total 222 pages + 8 pg supplement
+ 2 Pocket Guides of 100 pg each)
SPECIAL
MAGAZINE INSIDE
TO MAKE
WITH GREAT
PICTURES
YOUR
HOW CELLPHONE
AMIT ASHAR
ASHOK SALIAN
SHANTANU SHEOREY
VIKRAM BAWA
RAFIQUE SAYED
VISUAL MUSINGS
ON ASSIGNMENT
PHOTOFEATURE
PROFILE
DESIGN: SANTOSH D KAMBLE

GearGuide

 

48

TEST

Fujifilm X100S Perfectingthe X factor

 
 

54

Nikon COOLPIX A

Great concept on paper,

 

but in reality

eh?

60

NikonCOOLPIXS6500

WillWiFisavethe

 

compactcamera?

NikonCOOLPIXS6500 WillWiFisavethe   compactcamera? 64 Olympus STYLUS VG-190    

64

Olympus STYLUS

VG-190

 
 

Powerfulflashbutis

thatgoodenough?

VG-190     Powerfulflashbutis thatgoodenough? 66 MICRO TEST   Think Tank Photo CityWalker 10

66

MICRO TEST

 

Think Tank Photo CityWalker 10 and Peak Design Camera Clip

CellphonePhotography

70

TEST

Sony Xperia Z

 

Is

speed everything?

72

Nokia Lumia 620 Impressivecameraina compact, sturdybody

73

Photoshop Touch Layer-based editing, now in a cellphone

74

CELLPHONE TECHNIQUE

On the Road Again Shoot while on themove, from insideavehicle

 
 

78

Ready Steady

Shoot!

Learn how to hold your

 

cellphoneright

80

READERS’ GALLERY

Learnings from our readers’ best cameraphone shots

82

CELLPHONE DIARIES

A

new monthly column

byDineshKhanna

InFocus

110 128
110
128

BetterPictures

84

ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

The Makeover Cheat Sheet

 

5prophotographersgive

40easytipsonportraiture

96

ON ASSIGNMENT

Scribbled Walls Taking over spacesand makingthemyourown

 
 

104

TIPS & TRICKS

Make scanographs, shoot macros&bloomingfields

TRICKS Make scanographs, shoot macros&bloomingfields ShowCase 110 PROFILE Saibal Das Documenting the

ShowCase

110

PROFILE

Saibal Das Documenting the whimsicalIndian circus

116

GREAT MASTERS

Dario Mitidieri And his sensitive visuals of war and street life

122

SPECIAL FEATURE

WPOY 2012 Nominees

 
 

128

SPECIAL FEATURE

POY 2012 Nominees

138

PHOTOFEATURE

Samsul Alam Helal Portrayingthe hopesof theindustrial workersin Bangladesh, in astudio

PhotoFinish

218

MARKET SENSE

eBook Publishing Made Easy for Photographers

220

STORY BEHIND THE PICTURE

TheMostViewed

 

ImageEver

BEHIND THE PICTURE TheMostViewed   ImageEver Regulars   FEEDBACK PHOTOCRITIQUE Q & A 1000

Regulars

 

FEEDBACK PHOTOCRITIQUE Q & A 1000 WORDS YOUR PICTURES

18

100

108

136

144

Regulars   FEEDBACK PHOTOCRITIQUE Q & A 1000 WORDS YOUR PICTURES 18 100 108 136 144

MEET THE BP TEAM

This is Us!

For the longest time, we were unable to decide how to pose for this year’s team photo, how to say hello to you. Finally, we decided to get back to the basics, and ask ourselves what photography means to us. Sixteen years of Better Photography, sixteen years with

you, and photography is all this

and some more.

PRIYANKA CHHARIA

and photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN
and photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN
and photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN

KETAN KUNDARGI

photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI
photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI
photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI

CONCHITA FERNANDES

photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI
photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI
photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI

K MADHAVAN PILLAI

photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI
photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI
photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI

RAJ LALWANI

photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI
photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI
photography is all this and some more. PRIYANKA CHHARIA KETAN KUNDARGI CONCHITA FERNANDES K MADHAVAN PILLAI

AMBARIN AFSAR

AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE
AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE
AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE

SUPRIYA JOSHI

AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE
AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE
AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE

SHRIDHAR KUNTE

AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE
AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE
AMBARIN AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE

GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI

AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM
AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM
AFSAR SUPRIYA JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM

CHANDNI GAJRIA

JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All
JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All
JOSHI SHRIDHAR KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All

BHAVNA BASTAV

KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All photographs by
KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All photographs by
KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All photographs by

SANTOSH D KAMBLE

KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All photographs by
KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All photographs by
KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All photographs by

UTTAM KUMAR

KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All photographs by
KUNTE GURJENDER SINGH VIRDI CHANDNI GAJRIA BHAVNA BASTAV SANTOSH D KAMBLE UTTAM KUMAR All photographs by
All photographs by Ambarin Afsar
All photographs by Ambarin Afsar
18
18

“Through the magazine, I found the answers to some of my personal questions about photography.”

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

Feedback

th

16Anniversary

SPECIAL

Better Cellphone Photography was introduced in BP’s May 2013 issue.
Better Cellphone
Photography was
introduced in BP’s May
2013 issue.

Changing Perceptions

I was pleasantly surprised to find

Better Cellphone Photography in the last edition. From photo editing apps and

photographers to follow on Instagram, to taking care of the cellphone

camera

this magazine. The advent of advanced cellphone cameras has changed the way I photograph. In fact, I have discarded my DSLR as

I find it easier to shoot with my cellphone.

However, most of my friends still consider

cellphones to be incapable of shooting good pictures. Thus, when I shared the stories from here with my friends, they were pleasantly surprised to find out just how much a cellphone camera can do. Gaurav Bhola, New Delhi, via email

I

learnt a lot simply by reading

A Look Into the Future

I subscribed to Better Photography magazine

more than a decade ago. I am a professional photographer and a regular reader of the magazine. Every month, I eagerly await the arrival of my copy. Out of all the sections, I have always preferred to read Shooting Technique the most, as it provides a combination of technical as well as the idea based stories. This is what working photographers like me often look for in a photography magazine. Additionally, I find Q&A very informative. One section in which however, I feel that BP can considerably improve is its quality

of printing. Many a times, I have received copies where the B&W photos look decolored and unappealing. I wish that the magazine changes the quality of its printing in the years to come. Rupesh Dabhi, Ahmedabad, via email

Photographing Family & Friends

I picked up a copy of Better Photography at

the airport, after a friend recommended it to me. As a hobbyist photographer, I am always looking for ways to learn. I find it redundant to join a photography school

or organisation, since I have a regular job to do.

I remember reading the article ‘From

a Family Album’ in BP’s December 2013

issue. I liked the story a lot as it taught me the value of my old family album.

I have been wanting to photograph my

family for a while now. However, I could not figure out if these images would categorise as ‘art’, or would they simply be for fun. I could not visualise the eventual outcome. Then, in the May 2013 issue, I came across K Madhavan Pillai’s story ‘20 Simple Secrets For Fun Holiday Photos’. The 20 tips helped me to think of photographing my family vacations in an entirely new way! In this issue, I also found the answers to a whole lot of personal questions pertaining to photography. Anna Karthika, Mangalore, via Facebook

A Keeper of Images

‘20 Simple Secrets For Fun Holiday Photos’ article spoke about photographing family holidays. Ever since
‘20 Simple Secrets
For Fun Holiday
Photos’ article spoke
about photographing
family holidays.
Ever since I can remember, I wanted to be
a photographer. My father and uncle used
to own a Nikon film camera, and would
constantly keep shooting in the house.

JUNE 2013

20
20

FEEDBACK

Twitter: twitter.com/betterphoto Facebook: facebook.com/betterphotography Youtube: youtube.com/betterphotoindia Website: betterphotography.in

FIND US ONLINE!
FIND US ONLINE!
Website: betterphotography.in FIND US ONLINE! Educating One and All I started reading Better

Educating One and All

I started reading Better Photography 16 years ago,

since the launch of its very first edition! In fact,

I have carefully collected each and every BP issue.

I came to know about this magazine when I was

reading The Times of India, which carried an article

on Better Photography then. I have an old film camera that was gifted to me by my father. Additionally, I own a few digital cameras as well. I am an avid reader of photobooks, and discovered the works of Raghu Rai, Pablo Bartholomew and Hari Mahidhar only after reading Better Photography. Over the years, I have learnt many aspects about photography from this magazine. The works of great masters have changed my perspectives

on photography considerably. For instance,

I learnt how to use blurs aesthetically after

discovering Prabuddha Dasgupta’s work. Additionally, I found great inspiration in the colourful portraits of Steve McCurry. I am affected by polio, and unable to physically move independently. Thus in many ways, BP has been my only teacher and guide. In its 16th year, BP has made considerable impact on Indian photography. It has made it possible for laymen like me to pursue and access photography with rigour.

I thank the magazine for encouragement, and

wish the team all the best for the future!

Umesh Singh, Ahmedabad, via email

Write in to

Better Photography

with your feedback, and if your letter wins the Letter of the Month, you will get a Envie Speedster charger!

“The internet savy generation of today should cultivate a habit of reading and learning

through books.”

I spent most of my childhood making

pictures. It was the only hobby that

I really cultivated. According to me, even though things have vastly shifted to digital photography, the chance to see a printed photograph is a real blessing. Thus, I make it a point to keep the photographs that I like and save them in a

scrapbook. Till today, I have a collection of more than a 1000 stunning images! Some of my favourite photographs are by Raghu Rai, Steve McCurry, Ansel Adams and Umrao Singh Sher-Gil. Dayanand Kamble, Mumbai, via email

Celebrating the Single Image

I am a housewife, and I initially started

taking photographs to pass time. Over the

years, I came to fall in love with the camera, and turned into a compulsive

image maker. I travel regularly and shoot

a lot at home as well. I particularly like

making portraits of my two children. However, I noticed that I tend to make more of stand alone images than a comprehensive photo series. I feel that most contemporary photographers today are obsessed with the idea of ‘the project’. While I am not against the idea of photoessays, I feel that we could do without forced bodies of work. Photographers can not pass shoddy

Corrigendum

The Special Feature on National Photo Awards in the May 2013 issue incorrectly mentioned Anil Risal Singh as a winner of the Green India:

Environmental Stories category. He was the winner of the Professional Open category. We apologise for the error.

work simply by calling it ‘art’. I feel that its more important to create a single great photograph, than to produce a bunch of average ones. Sultana Raza Khan, Kolkata, via email

Read, Read, Read!

For me, photography has always been a very personal practice that I have shaped over the years. I spend a considerable amount of time every day reading photobooks. I like buying old photobooks and magazines at book sales. In fact, I have found several amazing editions of National Geographic at throw away prices! I hope that today’s internet savvy generation cultivates a healthy habit of reading and learning through books. Ramanan Srinivas, Chennai, via email

A collection of some old and new issues of Better Photography.
A collection of some
old and new issues of
Better Photography.

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

JUNE 2013

22 WHAT’S NEW   Samsung NX2000 This latest interchangeable lens mirrorless camera fits in right
22
22

WHAT’S NEW

 

Samsung NX2000

This latest interchangeable lens mirrorless camera fits in right between the recently launched NX1100 and NX300. The NX2000 features a large 20.3MP APS-C CMOS sensor, 3.7-inch touchscreen LCD, 8fps continuous shooting, WiFi connectivity, Samsung’s NFC technology and Full HD video recording. Like the NX1100, this camera too, comes bundled with Adobe Lightroom. NX2000 is priced at USD 649.99 (approx. Rs. 35,600)

the NX1100, this camera too, comes bundled with Adobe Lightroom. NX2000 is priced at USD 649.99

1 Nikkor 32mm f/1.2

This mid-telephoto prime lens from Nikon is built for the Nikon 1 System mirroless cameras and is ideal for photographing portraits. This fast lens offers a focal length equivalent to 86mm in 35mm parlance. It is also the first lens in the Nikon 1 System line up to use a Silent Wave Motor for focusing and incorporates

to use a Silent Wave Motor for focusing and incorporates the company’s proprietary ‘Nano Crystal Coat’

the company’s proprietary ‘Nano Crystal Coat’ that will reduce effects of ghosting and flare in the images.

Fotopedia Reporter App

Well known website Fotopedia Reporter has now launched an iPad app to make it easier to publish photo essays on the go. You can create a photo story with the photos from your iPad. All you need to do is add a title, cover photo and description or hot link text from Wikipedia. One can even browse through various stories posted by other contributors through this app.

Mecablitz 58 AF-2 Flash

Mecablitz 58 AF-2 Flash

Metz has brought this flash gun to India after three years of its launch. This affordable flash gun for Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax and Four Thirds cameras is equipped with high end features.

Ace Lensman and Renowned Bollywood Photographer Jagdish Mali Passes Away

Renowned Bollywood Photographer Jagdish Mali Passes Away P hotographer Jagdish Mali passed away on the morning

P hotographer Jagdish Mali passed away on the morning of 13 May 2013

at a hospital in Mumbai. Mali had been admitted for a hip-bone fracture a few days ago but doctors were unable to operate on him, due to several complications. At the same time, Jagdish’s old liver conditions showed up, eventually resulting in a multiple organ failure. He was 59. Mali had started his photography career in the 80s. Within a short span of time, he went on to become one of the most respected photographers in Bollywood. In his long career, he has had a wide and illustrious portfolio, photographing superstars across generations.

When Better Photography had interviewed Jagdish in 2009 (log on to www.

betterphotography.in/2013/05/13/jagdish-mali

for the article), he had said, “It is my

dream

to make films that leave an impact on the viewer in just five minutes.” While some of his dreams may have been left unfulfilled, it is his photographs that launched a thousand dreams. From portraits of a young Sachin Tendulkar to one of a photogenic Rekha here have been several portraitists, but Jagdish’s work was unusually spontaneous, reflecting the man and his happy-go-lucky nature towards life itself. Jaggi, as he is often called, not only brought about a refreshing visual change in Bollywood magazines in the nineties, but also created a legacy that will stay strong, even though he is not around.

To read our special tribute to the man and his work, turn to page no. 46

Jagdish Mali
Jagdish Mali

This image for Filmfare brought together two of the biggest superstars of that era in front of his camera.

the biggest superstars of that era in front of his camera. I want my photographs to

I want my photographs to be a long string of images, held together with grace.

PRABUDDHA DASGUPTA (1956–2012)

held together with grace. PRABUDDHA DASGUPTA (1956–2012) Prabuddha Dasgupta was a noted fashion and fine-art

Prabuddha Dasgupta was a noted fashion and fine-art photographer. Known for his iconic black and white imagery, he had a career spanning three years primarily as a fashion photographer. The 2013 edition of Delhi Photo Festival is themed Grace as a tribute to him.

12
12
12 EDITORIAL “Sell your skill, not your convictions. Make your money but live for the art.”

EDITORIAL

“Sell your skill, not your convictions. Make your money but live for the art.”

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

but live for the art.” B E T T E R P H O T O

Eternally Sixteen

We bring in this sixteenth anniversary special issue with so many mixed feelings. Joy for turning sixteen, pride for being the best photography magazine in India, and sorrow for the passing of yet another legendary photographer, Jagdish Mali, who was very dear to BP and to me personally. There is some solace in knowing that Jagdish lived a life full of passion and zeal. Those who knew him will remember him as being wonderfully friendly, approachable, open minded, ever giving and forever young at heart. When we had contacted him some time ago, for being a judge for POY 2012, and for being a part of this issue, he had politely declined, citing commitments beyond his control. At the moment, I cannot help feeling a twinge of selfish regret that I had not interacted with Jagdish more. I keep thinking of a piece of advice that he had given me a long time ago, which I took to heart. “Never lose yourself to being a commercial photographer,” he had said. “Sell your skill, not your convictions. Make your money but live for the art. Otherwise, it will suck up your soul and leave you empty. There is no existence worse than being a hollowed out photographer with nothing inside.” Somehow, despite his passing, I also cannot help but think his quintessential youth sprung from his being a photographer, a characteristic that all photographers seem to share. In that sense, I have never met an old photographer. I am writing this editorial from the Rift Valley in Kenya, where the BP team, along with the category winners of POY 2012, are in the middle of a superb, adventurous face-off, travelling to Africa’s deepest

gorge and to a pristine lake island little known to tourists. The contestants come from all backgrounds and ages, and from all over India. And yet, they are all wonderfully young in spirit and at heart. The common thread that binds them is photography. Photography is beautiful because it always keeps you learning and yearning to see something new, makes you fall in love over and over… keeps you eternally sixteen.

fall in love over and over… keeps you eternally sixteen. K Madhavan Pillai editor@betterphotography.in Untitled,

K Madhavan Pillai

editor@betterphotography.in

sixteen. K Madhavan Pillai editor@betterphotography.in Untitled, from the series Circus Girl by Saibal Das What

Untitled, from the series Circus Girl

by Saibal Das

What does it take to make an exultant photo project? Why should we walk that extra mile? Why must we keep looking through the viewfinder? And why should we continue making magic?

Saibal believes, “Making a project is not a hit-and- run thing. You learn to work as a photographer,

a creator, a visionary, all

at the same time.”

To read more about Saibal Das’ fascinating images from the circus —

Turn to page 110

JUNE 2013

   

EVENTS

 
 

18

May–1 June

Something About

 

Hair

 

Alliance Francaise De Delhi, New Delhi

 

Kabul-based French photographer Oriane Zerah was attracted to the hair of inidan women upon her travel

to various cities in India. Her work explores the different associations of

a

woman’s hair in

 

different cultures.

O r i a n e Z e r a h

Oriane Zerah

23

May–2 June

Exhibit On Indian Railways

 

IGNCA, New Delhi

 

Entering its 160th year, the exhibit highlights the role of the Indian Railways in socio- economic and political growth of the nations.

 
26
26

10

June–4 July

Japanese Graphic

 
 

Posters Exhibition

The Japan Foundation, New Delhi

Around 15 renowned Japanese graphic

 

designers will showcase

a

remarkable collection

 
Kasumasa Nagai

Kasumasa Nagai

of graphic posters dating back to 80’s and 90’s. These posters depict the economic changes in Japan.

16

June

The Last Lecture Series

 

The Big Bang Bar and Cafe, Mumbai

Every third Sunday of the month, Better Photography will conduct an interactive talk session with two photographers or visual artists. The artists will share their thoughts, opinions and speak on any topic related to the art of photography.

PRO TALK Blowup is an enlargement of an image beyond its orignal size for print
PRO TALK
Blowup is an
enlargement of
an image beyond
its orignal size for
print or digital use.

Controversy Hits World Press Photo of The Year

I mmediately after the 2013 World Press Photo awards were announced,

the winning photograph by Swedish photographer Paul Hansen came under scrutiny for digital manipulation. The colours of the picture submitted for the award were more cinematic compared to the

original image published in the newspaper. While those allegations died down soon enough, a new one has emerged recently. On the ExtremeTech website, Neal Krawetz, a forensic image analyst, claimed that the winning image was a composite of three

photographs. So strong were the allegations that both the photographer and

Paul Hansen
Paul Hansen

Paul Hansen’s photograph, Gaza Burial, shows a procession of weeping men carrying the bodies of deceased Palestinian children in sheets.

World Press Photo Foundation were forced to look into it and respond. World Press Photo conducted an immediate forensic test to confirm the integrity of the photo. However, it later admitted that the image had been digitally altered for colour and tone. While the image might have been accepted by the standards of World Press Photo, one wonders if a news photograph can be enhanced without distorting the truth.

CALL FOR ENTRIES

 
Love shooting panaromas? Then the Epson Pano Awards are a great opportunity for you.
Love shooting
panaromas? Then the
Epson Pano Awards are
a great opportunity
for you.

Reminders Photography Stronghold Grants

The competition: Photographers, curators, publishers and organisations can apply for a grant to use Reminder Photography Stronghold’s gallery space. Category: Any alternative proposal on photography for the best use for this gallery space is welcome

Prizes: Winners get to exhibit their work for upto 30 days at no cost. They will also get world wide publicity through the gallery’s global network. Selected winners will also get to attend talks and seminars along with a free stay at the RPS residency. Website: www.reminders-project.org/rps/grants Deadline: 15 June 2013

Epson International Pano Awards

Categories: Open, Amateur and VR/360 awards Prizes: Cash Prize for category winners: USD 1000 (Approx. Rs. 55,000). Winners will also be given a photo printer from Epson Website: www.thepanoawards.com Entry Fee: USD 22 (Approx. Rs. 1200 ) Deadline: 14 July 2013

Asian Environmental Journalism Awards

The competition: The Singapore Environment Council’s awards aim to recognise and reward excellence in environmental journalism. From passionate citizen journalists to outstanding professional journalists, the AEJA highlights exceptional work and encourages high- quality coverage of environmental issues in Asia. Prizes: Cash Prize for category winners:

3000 Singapore Dollars (Approx. Rs. 1,31,030) and a trophy. Website: www.sec.org.sg/aeja Deadline: 4 August 2013

Travel Photographer of the Year

The competition: The Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY) photo contest is run by photographers for photographers. It is open to photographers across the world. Categories: Monochrome, Vanishing & Emerging Cultures, Wild Stories, First Shot, One Shot and New Talent category. Website: www.tpoty.com/awards Entry Fee: 20 Pounds (Approx. Rs. 1700), Free for New Talent category. Deadline: 1 October 2013

 

The competition: The Epson International Pano Awards invites entries for panoramic photographs worldwide.

JUNE 2013

     

EVENTS

 
 

June 22

 

Post Processing

Workshop with

 

Phillip Ross

Toehold Seminar Hall, Bengaluru

 

Amateurs who have no idea about post processing can attend this workshop. Participants however should understand the basic concepts of photography.

Charges are Rs. 3,900.

To register, visit www. toehold.in/

22–23 June

Workshop by

 

Sachin Rai

Hotel Forte, Chennai

Toehold organises another workshop for amateur photographers. Sachin Rai will be conducting this

 

workshop. Charges are 6,200. To register, visit www.toehold.in/

28
28
28

13–14 July 2013

 

Workshop with

 

Rahul Sachdev

E-Mall, Kolkata

For beginners, this photography workshop will aim to improve your skills as a phtographer. There is no age-limit. Just bring your DSLR or point and shoot compact and a few pictures on a pen drive. Charges are Rs. 4,900.

5–14 July

Magnum Ke

Tasveer

NID, Ahmedabad

Magnum Photos and Tasveer will highlight some of the best photographs of India photographed by eight Magnum photographers. Raghu Rai, Werner Bischof, Olivia Arthur are some of the Magnum photographers whose work will be displayed at the exhibit.

Olivia Arthur/ Magnum Photos
Olivia Arthur/ Magnum Photos

PRO TALK

XMP file stands for Extensible Metadata Platform which lets you store metadata information across multiple image file formats.

Photographs of Syria Sweep Pulitzer Prizes

B oth winning photographs of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for photojournalism

are from Syria. A five-member team from

the Associated Press won the Breaking News category for their coverage of Syria’s civil war. The winning team included Rodrigo Abd, Manu Brabo, Narciso Contreras, Khalil Hamra and Muhammed Muheisen. The work of these photographers captured the manner in which the conflict has affected the civilian population.

Javier Manzano
Javier Manzano

Light streams through the multiple holes in a tin wall made by bullets and shrapnel as rebel soldiers take aim.

Javier Manzano, a freelance photographer working with Agence France-Presse won the Pulitzer for Feature Photography. His dramatic image shows two Syrian rebel soldiers holding their positions as light streams through bullet holes in a tin wall. The Pulitzer Prize is one of the most prestigious award in the world of journalism. Every year, the award is presented to deserving photojournalists for their distinguished bodies of work from around the world.

Manu Brabo
Manu Brabo

Displaced Syrian men wait for food near an NGO kitchen in a refugee camp near Azaz, Syria.

Between The Lines: Identity, Place and Power National Gallery of Modern Art and Ministry of

Between The Lines: Identity, Place and Power

National Gallery of Modern Art and Ministry of Culture, Government of India held a Printmaking exhibition from 27 April–28 May in Bengaluru. The exhibit was curated by Lina Vincent Sunish and showcased collections from the Waswo X. Waswo Collection of Indian Printmaking. Programmes like curator’s talk, film screening, gallery walk were also organised as a part of the exhibition.

Carpe Diem

The Shaurya Foundation presented 45 artwors photos

of Ishaan Suri. The exhibit curated by Sakshi Mahajan

was held from 1–31 May at Select Cityw

alk mall, New

Delhi. Moreover, the photographs displayed were from Ishaan’s travel expeditions to central Europe and Asia. To transform the image into an abstract art, Ishaan used digital post processing.

Through the ‘The Homeless’ series, Angus Boulton shows the plight of homeless through their things.
Through the ‘The
Homeless’ series,
Angus Boulton shows
the plight of homeless
through their things.
This was a part of the
Homelands exhibit.
Angus Boulton, From The Homeless London 1995-2000.

Enchanted by India

On the 50th death anniversary of Hungarian art historian, Ervin Baktay, the Hungarian Information and Cultural Centre (HICC) and the India International Centre organised an exhibition from 7–17 May. At the opening, Prof Geza Bethlenfalvy and Dr Margit Koves presented a lecture which was followed by an exhibition opening and a film screening on the life of Ervin Baktay.

Workshop Young Photographers

A

children photography workshop for three age groups

of

4 to 7 years, 8 to 11 years and 12 to 18 years took

place in Kolkata. Organised by the Council For Cultural Relations (ICCR) from 20–27 May, the workshop taught

children aspects of composition and lighting techniques. Selected pictures from the workshop were also put up

in an exhibition.

Homelands

British Council presented Homelands: A 21st Century Story of Home, Away, and All the Places In Between.

The exhibit curated by Latika Gupta took place from 28 April–9 June at Dr Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum, Mumbai. The artworks were culled from the British Council collection and focussed on transforming identities, belonging, alienation and varied geographies. Over 80 works by 28 artists like David Hockney, Tim Hetherington, Martin Parr were displayed. As a part of the exhibit, a talk by Mona Hatoum, Anthony Haughey, Zineb Sedira and Suki Dhanda was held on 29 April. The show will travel to Bengaluru by June.

JUNE 2013

30
30

SNAPSHOTS

 

INDUSTRY VOICE

 

“We are excited by the immense potential that Creative Cloud holds for a country like India.”

Since Adobe’s official US release of Creative Cloud in April 2012, the creative sector has

Since Adobe’s official US release of Creative Cloud in April 2012, the creative sector has responded quite enthusiastically. We have seen an incredible uptake, with more than one million individuals

Umang Bedi

in the US and around the world, joining Adobe

Managing Director - South Asia, Adobe

Creative Cloud. Our goal is to now make Creative Cloud the ultimate hub for professionals in India, where they can access the world’s best tools; store and collaborate across their workplace and ultimately showcase their creations. We are excited by the immense potential this holds for a country like India. With the easy availability of our products through the Creative Cloud and the attractive price points, we do see a significant impact on the piracy rate of the products. The Cloud brings with it great promises for the Indian market, where the product has traditionally been

positioned as a premium offering. With its subscription-based pricing model, the Cloud brings down the total cost of ownership for professionals and organisations. It also takes away the headache from organisations who want to stay updated to current versions of tools. It helps them leverage product innovation as and when they are introduced. Both these factors will likely change the dynamics in favour of Adobe India in the the times to come, as it positions the offering for a mass adoption.

 

—As told to Ambarin Afsar

Camera Technology Helps Locate Boston Bomber

U nlike ever before, camera technology was used extensively in the Boston

Marathon investigations in the US. Right from identifying the suspects to hunting down the second bomber, cameras

played a key role in the investigations. Two pressure cooker bombs exploded in Boston, USA, on April 15, 190 metres away from the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring 264. In the immediate aftermath, investigators turned to crowd-sourced photographs and surveillance video to put a face to the two Boston marathon bombers. Images from countless cameras and cellphones

were used by investigators

to analyse the events of that day and pin down the two suspects. When Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the younger of the two Boston bombing suspects, was discovered, the cops enlisted the help of an infrared aerial camera to confirm his location before the police got him out.

to confirm his location before the police got him out. This infrared photo taken from a

This infrared photo taken from a police helicopter shows Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the white figure in the centre, hiding in a boat.

Samsung Faces Copyright Controversy, Apologises

S amsung Singapore was in the middle of a copyright infringement controversy as

it published a photographer’s work without permission as an advertisement on its Facebook page. To make it worse, the image was not even shot with a Samsung camera as the post claimed. Photographer Danny Santos II noticed his image shared on

Samsung’s Facebook page with the text, “Crisp. Cinematic. This street shot is taken by one of our Samsung photographers!”. His protest saw several comments and the shares began making the rounds of the web. However, Samsung quickly took notice about the issue and publicly apologised to the photographer about the mistake.

BOOK REVIEW

Title: Te Tirthanche Maher

Author: Shirish Shete ISBN: 978-9-3805-4947-7 Publisher: Maitrey Prakashan Price: Rs 500

Honouring Pilgrimage

Te Tirthanche Maher is one of the rare regional photo books out in the market. It showcases the three-week long pilgrimage that the Warkaris of Maharashtra undertake from Dehu to Pandharpur in Maharashtra. But more than simply being a photo book, it takes you on a chapter-by-chapter visual tour of the entire journey in 188 exhaustive pages. Publishing a book catering to regional readers often comes with a lot more challenges than usual. It needs to be affordable and at the same time, needs to make a strong connect with the readers. This book does exactly that. It is well compiled, with equal importance given to the text as well as the images. As you flip through the pages of the book, you come across the story behind every ritual and the relevance of important locations along the journey. What is truly captivating about this book is the intermittent prayers and scriptures in an interesting, traditional typography. While the hardbound cover is impressive at this price, the print quality leaves a lot more to be desired. A rather amusing thing that one notices in the book is a double-page advertisement spread in the first few pages of the book. It is probably the first time you will see this in a photobook. The Warkari pilgrimage is a very divine event and one of the most significant traditions in Maharashtrian culture. The book does justice to this and puts the experience on paper to treasure the memories. This is a good enough reason to buy this book.

experience on paper to treasure the memories. This is a good enough reason to buy this

— written by Ketan Kundargi

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

JUNE 2013

Photograph by: Atish Sen

Click to the World of Photography with

by: Atish Sen Click to the World of Photography with A TRIBUTE TO ICONIC P OMINEES
A TRIBUTE TO ICONIC P OMINEES www.betterphotography.in Better Technique. Better Insight. Better Pictures BETTER
A TRIBUTE TO ICONIC P OMINEES
www.betterphotography.in
Better Technique. Better Insight. Better Pictures
BETTER PHOTOGRAPHY
ASK YOUR NEWSPAPER VENDOR FOR THE HINDI EDITION
EXCLUSIVE TESTS
Canon PowerShot S100
Carl Zeiss 21mm f/2.8
Sony 30mm f/2.8 Macro
HOW TO USE ON-CAMERA
FLASH
Fire the flash to add magic to your macro, wildlife,
portrait, action & even landscape photographs
Shoot in the dark using high ISOs
while keeping noise to a minimum
ON ASSIGNMENT
OON ASSIGNMEASSIGNMASSIGNMASSIGNMSSIGNMESSIGNMSSIGNMESSIGNMSSIGNMESSIGNMSSIGNMESSSSIGNSSIGNSSIGNMESSIGNMESIGNMENNMNMMENT
GREAT MASTERS
VISUAL MUSINGS
MARKET SENSE
Capturing memories of letters
CaptCaptuCapturingCapturinaptuaptuapturiap ur
memories of letttters
written written by by one's one's grandfather grandfafaaaather
Craftsman O P Sharma on
his love for the darkroom
Magnum legend Martin Parr
talks of photographic clichés
Using Creative Commons to
share your images safely
190
19191919191191111999990
PagesPagesPPagesPagesPagesPPagesagesagesagesagesagesgesgesgegegggesesessss
Pages
aaaaaaa ofofofoofoofofofofofofofofofofofofofof
a of
testestestetesttestestettestestestestetests,ts,ts,tts,ts,ts,ss,
tests,
techniques,
ttechtechnttechntectechntechntechntetechntechniqun
es,
ideasideasideasideasideasdeasdeasdeddeaseasasasaasass
ideas
andandandandandandandandandandandandandandandandanndnd and
aadadadadadadadaadaadadadaaadviceviceviceiceicei advice
e PPLUSPP
PLUS
comprehenscomprehenscomprehcocomprehcomprecomprehenscomprehenscomprehenscomprehenscomprehensmprehempreprrehrehensreeehensiveivivv
comprehensive
Buyer’sBuyeBuyerBBuyeuyeuyeuyeuyeuy
Buyer’s
Guide
Guide

Shooting stunning pictures is now so simple. Everything you ever

wanted to know about photography is here. Tips, tricks, techniques,

and more!

news, views, reviews, assignments, brilliant pictures

more! news, views, reviews, assignments, brilliant pictures 3 1SUBSCRIPTION SUBSCRIPTION Cover Price: ` 1,800 YOU
3 1SUBSCRIPTION SUBSCRIPTION Cover Price: ` 1,800 YOU PAY: ` 1,450 YOU SAVE: ` 350
3
1SUBSCRIPTION
SUBSCRIPTION
Cover Price: ` 1,800
YOU PAY: ` 1,450
YOU SAVE: ` 350
YOU GET:
Cover Price: ` 5,400
YOU PAY: ` 4,100
YOU SAVE: ` 1,300
YOU GET:
YOU GET
3
YOU GET
1SUBSCRIPTION
33%
SUBSCRIPTION
43%
YOU PAY: ` 1,200
YOU SAVE: ` 600
ON COVER PRICE
YOU PAY: ` 3,100
YOU SAVE: ` 2,300
ON COVER PRICE
Check
Page
no 68
for
More
Exciting
Offers!
DISCOUNT
GIFT
OFFER
OFFER
     100    100 

 


100 


100 
 

150

0


 
   
  
   
  · 


 

 2012  `60
 2012  `60
Better Photography Hindi Subscription Offer
www.betterphotography.in
www.betterphotography.in
Better Technique. Better Insight. Better Pictures

 .1

SUBSCRIPTION PERIOD
COVER PRICE
YOU PAY
YOU SAVE

    


 


 

MV MV
800
800
1 J1 
J1 
 XXX11100
X10

 
? 



  T*85mm f/1.4
www.betterphotography.in
www.betterphotography.in
  T* 858 55mmm mmm f/f/1f/1.1.4

 17-35mm 
 1177--333555mmmmmm 





 
2 YEARS
` 1,800
` 1,300
` 500
 
  E-PM1
E-PM1
  SX40 HS
 SSX40 HS
 - HX100 V
--
HHX100 V
Better Technique. Better Insight. Better Pictures
 
  


 
 
  

   
   

  .1


   


1 YEAR
` 900
` 700
` 200
   
 ‘’
 
 
 

  
 

201
1
     


 
    


 

WB700
 

 
-


 
  
   
   
  

 
  
   
 
 





  


150

 
 
    
  
  

10
10 
To Subscribe
NOW IN
Digital
Better Photography
ALSO
Magazine Subscription Made Simple
HINDI
Edition Now


·  

1 · 
2011
1 · 
  
  
·     
SMS BP to 51818
log on to
Available On

Subscription Department: Network18 Publishing, ‘A’ Wing, 2nd Floor, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 28 Toll Free : 1800 200 1021 : 022 30034631/33 : 022 30034499 : customersupport@network18publishing.com

Terms & Conditions: Your subscription will start from the next available issue. No cancellation will be entertained after commencement of the subscription. Network18 Media & Investments Limited reserves the right to extend, cancel or discontinue the offer. Though Network18 Media & Investments Limited. will take utmost care to dispatch the copies safely. Network18 Media & Investments Limited does not take the responsibility of any postal delays and damaged copies dispatched. Gifts will be dispatched 6-8 weeks after processing of your subscription. Gifts are subject to availability. Network18 Media & Investments Limited has got rights to change the gifts without prior information. The Image is for representation purposes only. Actual model, colors may vary. For more information contact Network18 Media & Investments Limited subscription department. The company at its absolute discretion and without further notice may discontinue, publication of the magazine and in the event of such discontinuation, we shall refund the subscription amount for the unexpired term only, without any interest, cause and consequence.

SNAPSHOTS

Google+ Now Selects And Edits Your Images

G oogle is rolling out a new update that will makes Google+ a strong

contender among photographers’ social networks. It includes four new features, all of which are completely

It includes four new features, all of which are completely 36 automatic. They are customised to
36
36

automatic. They are customised to backup your pictures, select your best photos, postprocess them and create fun GIFs out of your images. If they are as

effective as Google claims they are, it will be a great platform for photographers to store, organise and edit their photographs with ease. Auto Highlight uses a complex algorithm to highlight the best photos from your image dump. It also throws out any blurs or duplicate images, making a selection of just the good images. Auto Enhance then picks up these photos to apply automatic corrections. Brightness, contrast, noise and other aspects are tweaked for best results.

Tamron Launches Indian Subsidiary

T amron has opened a subsidiary company, Tamron India Pvt Ltd,

in a bid to expand its operations in India. This will enable Tamron to have a better understanding of the market and design products to cater to the needs of Indian photographers. Morio Ono, President & CEO of Tamron, Japan would be inaugurating the new office on 5 June 2013. We look forward to see how this will affect Tamron operations in India.

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

New Smartphone To Take Snaps Underwater

A fter launching the water-resistant Xperia Z, Sony has taken a

step further and announced a new dust-resistant and completely waterproof smartphone. The new Sony Xperia ZR can be used up to a depth of five feet for up to 30 minutes at a stretch.

So, one can jump into a pool with the Xperia ZR instead of buying a separate tough waterproof camera or underwater housing. The Android phone has a 13MP Exmor RS sensor, a 4.6-inch display screen, 1.5GHz quad-core processor and 2GB RAM. It will also have a dedicated

processor and 2GB RAM. It will also have a dedicated camera button which should be a

camera button which should be a great addition when using the cameraphone underwater. The smartphone will be launched by Sony in the market sometime during the second half of this year. With underwater cameras already costing a bomb, having waterproofing built into a smartphone is bound to be popular. The threat posed by smartphone cameras to the compact camera market only seems to increase each day.

P51: Latest Mobile from Panasonic in India

J apanese camera manufacturer Panasonic has entered the smartphone market with

its first Android smartphone. The P51 runs on Android 4.2 Jelly Bean, boasts of dual- SIM capabilities and has a 720p HD 5inch IPS display. It packs a 1.2GHz quad-core processor, 1GB of RAM and 4GB of internal memory. For Rs. 26,900, the phone is set

to face tough competition from Samsung Galaxy SIII and LG Nexus 4. The company has also launched two 7-inch tablets, the Toughpad FZ-G1 which runs on Windows 8 and the Toughpad JT-B1 which runs on Android. Since this has been an untapped market for Panasonic, we are curious to see how they perform.

New Lumia Phones With Improved Camera Ability

T he past month has seen two new back-to-back Nokia Lumia launches.

With this, it is clear that Nokia is concentrating on improving its imaging abilities in a bid to increase its popularity. Yet, disappointingly

enough, neither of the two Windows Phone 8 smartphones have technology like the Nokia 808-like PureView. The Nokia Lumia 925 features a 8.7 MP CMOS sensor, an f/2

lens and optical image stabilisation just like the flagship Lumia 920. However, it comes with an improved lens design featuring six elements and the capability to shoot at ISO 3200. Nokia also claims that image processing in the Lumia 925 has been significantly improved and that it now offers better low light quality. The Lumia 928, on the other hand, is only a minor upgrade of the Lumia 920. The LED flash on the 920 is replaced by a Xenon flash on the 928.

is only a minor upgrade of the Lumia 920. The LED flash on the 920 is

JUNE 2013

SNAPSHOTS

WEBSITE REVIEW www.photography-now.net With a name like Photography Now, you would expect the website to
WEBSITE REVIEW
www.photography-now.net
With a name like Photography Now, you would
expect the website to be a resource for the latest
events, launches and news about photography.
However, it is everything but that. Instead, the
website showcases the work of the great
masters of photography and a few contemporary
photographers. Rather than simply publishing the
work as a slide show of the images, Photography
Now shows them off in a classy and unique
photobook style layout.
The website has drop-down menus with links to
several magazines, a few blogs and book publishers.
Some of the best resources on the internet are listed
amongst these links. However, disappointingly, none
of these links work.
With 73 photographers exhibiting their work,
you can spend hours going through the images for
inspiration. The website stays true to its claim and is
indeed an excellent one-stop place to connect with
your creative vision.
— Ketan Kundargi
38
38

SOFTWARE OF THE MONTH

 

Ketan Kundargi

Ketan Kundargi

Funny Photo Maker

Want to have a phot of yourself with George Bush? Or a snapshot of the time you landed on the moon even if you have never been there? If yes, then this free app is perfect for you. Funny Photo Maker is a photo editor that lets you select an image and then crop faces to fit fun frames, movie posters and hilarious backgrounds. It also allows you to add animation effects to your photos or make GIFs. Pick a photo you want to use, choose the effect you want and instantly view the results. But beware! Some of the results might result in you falling off the chair laughing! The ease of using the software ensures that anyone can create fun pictures with a single click of the button. One of the shortcomings of this software is the inability to control the exposure of your image so that it blends with the background frame. While this software will not deliver images that are perfectly alligned, rest assured that it will provide enough fun for you to be entertained for hours.

 

Ketan Kundargi

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

Photoshop CC: Only Available On Subscription

A dobe has announced the latest version of Photoshop CC, the Creative Cloud

version of its most popular photo editing software. The updated version packs some new powerful features making Adobe Photoshop CC, a very interesting launch. Adobe has finally brought out the new Camera Shake Reduction tool which promises miraculous fixes

for your blurry shots. It also includes an updated RAW engine and a very effect Smart Sharpen tool. But here is the catch! This new version of the software will only be available through the Creative Cloud subscription plan. This means that while the software is installed on your computer, you will still not own

it. Users will have have to pay a monthly charge of USD 30 (approx. Rs. 1620) to continue using it. While Adobe has made this move in a bid to curb piracy, it is the photographers who have to pay the price. One will end up spending more money in the long run than they would on a one-time purchase charge.

the long run than they would on a one-time purchase charge. Adobe Launches Public Beta Version

Adobe Launches Public Beta Version of Lightroom 5

T he announcement of Adobe Lightroom 5 public beta has taken everyone

by surprise. The beta launch comes 13 months after Lightroom 4 was launched. This launch features the introduction of an advanced Healing Brush along with a new Radial Gradient, Smart Previews and other

features. However, this version is no longer compatible with Windows XP, which is still used by many Indian photographers. As the next version of Adobe Photoshop is being shifted to Creative Cloud, most photographers might turn to Lightroom as an affordable photo editing solution.

SNAPSHOTS

Finally! Freeware to Tether Nikon Cameras

U nlike Canon, Nikon camera users have had very few options when it

came to controlling their cameras from

few options when it came to controlling their cameras from 40 a PC. A newly launched
40
40

a PC. A newly launched free software called digiCam Control lets you access Live View, focus, expose and trigger your shutter remotely. It also has features for

sequences, bracketing, time-lapse and focus stacking in addition to shooting single frames. Once a picture is taken, you can also control the image transfer, naming and storing the file to your computer from inside the program.

Sigma Announces Fastest Zoom Lens Yet

T hird-party lens manufacturer Sigma has been making a name for itself

by launching some excellent lenses in the past few months. Their latest lens announcement, the18–35mm f/1.8, breaks new ground in the industry. It is the world’s first lens that offers a fixed f/1.8 aperture throughout its zoom range. It has a new AF/ MF switch, a hypersonic motor for speedy and stealthy autofocusing, full time manual focus override, a brass mount and rugged build quality.

focus override, a brass mount and rugged build quality. B E T T E R P

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

Three New Cameras From Panasonic

P anasonic launched three new cameras for Asia-Pacific during an event

held in Bali, Indonesia on 13 May 2013.

The event saw the company introducing two new mirrorless cameras, the

Shridhar Kunte
Shridhar Kunte

From L to R: Hiroyoshi Suga, Ichiro Kito and Junichiro Kitagawa from Panasonic pose with the latest cameras.

Lumix GF6 and Lumix G6 as well as an enthusiast point-and-shoot Lumix LF1. Panasonic aims to capture 25% of the mirrorless camera segment, and the Lumix GF6 and Lumix G6 are a step in this direction. Less than a year after releasing the G5, Panasonic has already launched the updated G6. The mid-range interchangeable lens MFT camera is expected to give entry- level DSLRs a run for their money. The GF6, on the other hand, is a more compact mirrorless camera. The LF1 is an upgrade of the LX1. It is one of the first cameras in Panasonic’s upcoming lineup of of WiFi enabled RAW shooting advanced compact cameras.

Retro Styling Comes to Olympus with the E-P5

T he new Olympus PEN E-P5 is the company’s new flagship Micro Four

Thirds PEN mirrorless camera. It features

a pleasing retro styling on the outside

and powerful specs on the inside. The camera is modeled after the old Olympus PEN F SLR and was launched on the 50th anniversary of the same. The E-P5 packs the same core as the Olympus OM-D EM-5. Also, with the E-P5, WiFi makes its first appearance in an Olympus camera. It can be used with the company’s smartphone app to instantly

share images and use a remote shutter. The camera has been priced at USD 1000 (approx. Rs. 54,720 ) for body only.

been priced at USD 1000 (approx. Rs. 54,720 ) for body only. Hasselblad V System Cameras

Hasselblad V System Cameras Come To An End

H asselblad has killed off its popular 503CW medium format cameras.

This means that its V System line of cameras

is officially coming

to an end. This marks the end of over a half

century of evolution for the company’s original camera line. The Hasselblad V System was first introduced in 1948 as founder Victor Hasselblad wished to

see a camera that is as easy to hold as a Leica, but which shot medium format film. The 503CW was one of the most popular medium format cameras among professional and amateur photographers since it was launched 17 years ago. However, dropping number of sales led to Hasselblad reluctantly scrapping the camera.

was launched 17 years ago. However, dropping number of sales led to Hasselblad reluctantly scrapping the

JUNE 2013

SNAPSHOTS 23rd TIPA Awards Recognise the Best of Photo Industry
SNAPSHOTS
23rd TIPA Awards Recognise the Best of Photo Industry
42
42
23rd TIPA Awards Recognise the Best of Photo Industry 42 T he Technical Image Press Association

T he Technical Image Press Association has announced the 23rd edition of the renowned

TIPA Awards. These awards highlight the best photo and imaging products introduced in the market during the previous 12 months. Selected by an esteemed jury of 27 member magazines across 14 countries around the world, TIPA editors take into account innovation, the use of cutting edge technology, design and ergonomics, ease-of-use, as well as price/performance ratio before any product is awarded a prize. As a result, these awards are highly coveted in the industry. Some of the prominent award categories are listed below:

Best DSLR Entry Level

Best Rugged Compact

Best CSC Professional

Best Pro Camcorder

Best Photo Accessory

Canon EOS 100D

Panasonic Lumix DMC-

Panasonic Lumix DMC-

Sony NEX-VG900

Metabones Speed

FT5 (DMC-TS5)

GH3

Booster

Best Digital SLR Advanced

Best Expert Photo Printer

Nikon D7100

Best Superzoom

Best CSC Expert

Canon PIXMA PRO-10

Best Portable Lighting

Best DSLR Expert

Nikon COOLPIX P520

Fujifilm X-E1

Best Inkjet Photo Paper

System Nissin MG8000 Extreme

Canon EOS 6D

Best Expert Compact

Best CSC Entry-

ILFORD GALERIE

Fujifilm X20

Level Lens

Prestige Mono Silk

Best Imaging Storage

Best Video DSLR

Nikon 1 NIKKOR

Media

Canon EOS-1D C

Best Pro Camera

11–27.5mm f/3.5-5.6

Best Photo Software

Panasonic SDHC Gold,

Leica M (Typ 240)

DxO Optics Pro 8

Silver and Blue, series

Best Entry-Level DSLR

Best CSC Expert Lens

Lens

Best Professional Lens

Sony 10–18mm f/4 OSS

Best Multifunction

Best Tripod

Sigma 17-70mm F2.8-4

Canon EF 24–70mm

Photo Printer

Vanguard ABEO PRO Kit

DC MACRO OS HSM

f/2.8L II USM

Best CSC Prime Lens

Epson Expression XP

283 CGH and GH300T

Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R

Best Expert DSLR Lens

Best CSC Entry Level

Best Mobile Photo App

Best Photo Bag

Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG

Olympus PEN E-PL5

Best Premium Camera

Tiffen Photo fx Ultra

Vanguard Quovio 41

HSM

Sony DSC-RX1

 

Best CSC Advanced

Best Photo Monitor

Best ActionCam

Best Easy Compact Camera

Samsung Smart Camera

Best Mobile Device

LG IPS ColorPrime

GoPro Hero 3

Nikon COOLPIX S01

NX300

Samsung Galaxy Camera

27EA83

COOLPIX S01 NX300 Samsung Galaxy Camera 27EA83 B E T T E R P H O

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

Better Photography Now a Member of TIPA

T he next time you log on to the Technical Image Press Association (TIPA) website,

do not be surprised to see us there! That is because Better Photography magazine is now a member of the elite organisation. BP was accepted as the newest member of TIPA during its General Assembly in April 2013. TIPA’s association with BP shows the organisation’s aim to transform into a global organisation.Its globalisation strategy represents a shift from simply

being a Europe-based organisation, to being a worldwide organisation that works in partnership with its members across borders and cultures. TIPA now has a membership of 28 photo and imaging magazines from 15 countries, across five continents. TIPA has continuously strengthened and grown to increase its readership and reach out to more and more photographers and enthusiasts.

JUNE 2013

44
44

SNAPSHOTS

Indian Photographer in FotoVisura Grant

P oulomi Basu is one of the top finalists of the FotoVisura Grant 2013 for

Outstanding Personal Photography project. Her series, To Conquer Her Land, was placed second from over 800 submissions from across the world. This series documents the lives of women in the Indian Armed forces. She says, “The Indian woman in the forces is not only battling against the enemy, but also against a largely patriarchal society.” Poulomi’s work focuses on projects in India that explores the role of marginalised rural women. She is currently working on a project that explores the world of Naxal women.

Poulomi Basu
Poulomi Basu

Shabbo Kumari at the border Indo-Pak of Attari, Punjab. October 2011.

Photographers Banned from Beyoncé Concert

E arlier last month, unflattering photos snapped by photographers

during a Beyoncé concert left the artist fuming. These images soon became viral and turned into humorous memes on the internet. So, in a bid to make sure that it does not happen again, Beyonce has completely banned pro photographers from her concerts. Newspapers and magazines looking to publish pictures of the star will have to register to receive a selection pre- approved photographs.

LOOK WHO’S SHOOTING

Helena Schätzle

WHO’S SHOOTING H e l e n a S c h ä t z l e

“Often, parents who had themselves experienced the distress of childhood marriage, still subjected their children to the same practice.”

Documenting Stories of Women Subjected to Violence

Helena Schätzle, a German photographer, first visited

India when she came to photograph the country in 2006. On her second visit to India, she started to travel with photographer Sudharak Olwe. He was then teaching photography at an organisation called Vanangana, which worked with women who were subject to violent domestic abuse, in Uttar Pradesh. It is here that she first started working on her series Circle of Everyday Violence. The first images were made during her days with Vanangana. This eventually sparked her project on documenting the hardships faced by Indian women. In the beginning, being a Western woman, she found it difficult to find access into the world of the Indian women. Gradually, as she started living

amongst the women, she found insights into their lives. “I interacted with several women, both strong and interesting. And yet, only a few of them could resist the violence they were faced with.” Over the past few years, Helena has made several trips to India to continue her work. Every time she got to know another woman who had a story to violence to tell, I would make her portrait and capture her story in words and pictures. She says, “I don’t know whether a single photographer can bring societal change, but the more people draw attention to violence against women, the more likely it is, that change will happen.”

—Written by Ketan Kundargi

Helena Schätzle Driven to desperation by her husband, Girija poured kerosene on herself and set
Helena Schätzle
Driven to
desperation by her
husband, Girija poured
kerosene on herself and
set herself on fire.

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

JUNE 2013

VISUAL MUSINGS

The Single Photograph:

Thoughts on the Project Windmill

The Single Photograph: Thoughts on the Project Windmill Jörg Colberg A sk any photographer what they’re

Jörg Colberg

A sk any photographer what they’re working on, and they’re

sure to tell you about their project. It’s almost as if these

days photographers don’t take pictures any longer, they

take projects. This being the internet, it would be tempting to

simply find someone to blame. Pretend you’re raising a question, and you’d be ready to go: “Have art schools (alternatively: galleries, bloggers, photographers, photobooks, everybody’s grandmothers, whoever else you can think of) killed photography by insisting on projects?” But it’s easy to see how little would be gained from that approach. Instead, it might be worthwhile to try to probe a little deeper. I started thinking about single photographs—as opposed to photo projects - when I was walking around with my Fuji Instax camera while teaching photography earlier this month. There I was, talking mostly about projects, even asking photographers what kind of project they’d like to work on; and at the same time, I was looking for photographs that had nothing to do with a project. Teaching (the non-technical aspects of) photography is hard. How do you teach someone to express themselves in a creative way? Without going too much into the details of how I believe this can be done, it’s almost too obvious to point out that starting from something that is not a photo can be—and usually is—a wonderful set of training wheels: “What are you interested in?” That which

a student might be interested in can then, often with all kinds of

modifications and usually with all kinds of clarifications, turned into a project.

It’s important to keep in mind what ‘project’ here can mean:

A project can literally be anything, whether it’s an artful almost-

reportage on a community of like-minded people in some very specific location, or a set of photographs that were created under similar conditions and that reflect the photographer’s mindset reacting to those conditions. I noticed that when talking about

projects many people love to assume that a project always is

something that is very obvious, very clear. But often, it isn’t.

A typology of portable toilets in all likelihood is. But many projects

are only clear in the sense that when you see them you feel that all these photographs belong together and convey something that feels whole. People love talking about art schools as focusing on the former, whereas in reality that’s absolutely not the case. Add to that the fact that we have become very literate in terms of what photographs can do, how they can work. Put two photographs next to each other, and we start finding something else, “the third photograph,” to use a phrase by Michael Schmidt. This is where photography gets especially juicy: a project with, say, 20 photographs in reality often has many more images in it. It’s just

that most of them are invisible. They’re created in the viewers’ minds, from the skeleton provided by the 20 pictures. This often (always?) is where things get really interesting. And it is here where we can witness the strength of the contemporary photobook. The project ‘problem’ thus changes once you consider the various nuances that are involved. But there is more still. As it turns out, there are quite a few photographers who essentially produce single, individual images. Those photographs might exist in some sort of project (or photobook), but they are only loosely connected to each other. Loosely, but not so loosely that there isn’t something that holds them together. At the very least, there always is something that holds photographs together: the photographer. Of course, if you cast your net very wide, every photo lives in a project. I wouldn’t want to necessarily go into that direction, but it’s important to keep this in mind. And even if none of this convinced you, if you are the photographer who only produces single photographs that have nothing to do with each other—isolated little beauties—why wouldn’t have you a place in this world? Why or how would what the rest of the world does affect you? I have a funny feeling that the answer might come across the lines of: “I will not be as accepted because I am supposed to do projects.” Which is simply not true. As convenient as the idea of the art world being dominated by a small cabal of people might be, a cabal that dictates what is allowed and what is not allowed, the reality is that that cabal does not exist. If you’re a single-photo photographer, it might be time to stop fighting the ‘project’ windmill.

might be time to stop fighting the ‘project’ windmill. 45 Lisa Gidley Colberg is the founder
45
45
Lisa Gidley
Lisa Gidley

Colberg is the founder and editor of the Conscientous blog, which led him to be included in American Photo’s list of ‘Photography Innovators of 2006’. This article was first published on Conscientous Extended (www.jmcolberg.com/weblog/extended), where he publishes longer articles and interviews.

JUNE 2013

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

46
46

TRIBUTE

46 TRIBUTE Jagdish Mali (1954–2013) “I wanted to be someone worth looking up to.” The Man,

Jagdish Mali (1954–2013)

“I wanted to be someone worth looking up to.”

The Man, His Memories

Better Photography remembers the person behind some of Bollywood’s most iconic photographs, who brought fame to several celebrities.

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

to several celebrities. B E T T E R P H O T O G R

His first camera was a Mamiya which I had suggested. Some of his early enigmatic photos of Rekha were shot using this.

Jagdish was a student of mine at the Pillai School of Photography. His father and

I were good friends. I remember his dad

being anxious about him enrolling in the courses offered at my school. Although he came from a vernacular background, he overcame all communication barriers and performed

really well. In fact, he shot to fame just

a few years later, and yet, this never

changed him as a person. However, we did lose touch over the years. But as I recall, our last interaction was roughly around three years ago. We spoke about meeting and catching up. He even insisted on coming himself and seeing me. But it never happened. I think

I will remember him the most, as being a humble and nice person.

Dr P K M Pillai, founder of the first photography school in India, Pillai School of Photography.

photography school in India, Pillai School of Photography. His photographs have always struck me as being

His photographs have always struck me as being fresh and innovative, considering the times that they were shot in.

It was only 10–15 years ago when I met

him for the first time. I remember Jagdish being the person who always stood out from the crowd. After all, you would not see anyone else donning a cap and a pair of shorts, the way he did. As a person, he was friendly and exuded warmth. Our last interaction was a Facebook message he left me, “What’s up in the photography world?”

Ian Pereira, advertising and industrial photographer.

JUNE 2013

I have always known him to be a simple and honest man.How do I summarise Jaggi? Where do I begin? Our friendship goes way back to

How do I summarise Jaggi? Where do I begin? Our friendship goes way back to the 1980s and I used to wonder how a man of his nature would cope with the complicated egos of the film industry. But Jaggi was an uncomplicated man, which is why he rose to great heights. He loved cats and everything from clothes to fashion accessories like headgear and belts. He loved to look

different, a characteristic that his photos had.

Ashok Salian, fashion and art photographer.

photos had. — Ashok Salian, fashion and art photographer. He willingly welcomed everyone. I met Jagdish

He willingly welcomed everyone.

I met Jagdish Mali very early in my career through a few mutual friends. He came across as a warm and friendly

person. We did not interact much but I have heard people comment that he is one of the easiest photographers to work with.

Dabboo Ratnani, advertising, fashion and celebrity photographer.

Ratnani, advertising, fashion and celebrity photographer. His photographic process was there free-spirited and organic

His photographic process was

there

free-spirited and organic was nothing pseudo about him.

He was another Jaggu, just like me. A complete hippie he was—bohemian, rebellious, crazy, exactly the way I feel about life, which is why we were such good friends. My first outdoor shoot was done by Jaggu. This was just after Hero had released. We just went for a walk, chatted

TRIBUTE

TRIBUTETRIBUTE

Jagdish Mali
Jagdish Mali

about life, our beliefs

he spontaneously clicked away

even realise when the pictures got made! Man, nostalgia has kicked in while I say this. Everyone will miss him. Quite simply, the coolest dude I have ever known. — Jackie Shroff, actor

while we walked,

I didn’t

Born to a middle class family in Mumbai, Jagdish Mali’s gift for photography was apparent at a very young age. He was the most sought after photographer in Bollywood. However, due to deteriorating health, he passed away on 13 May. Better Photography will fondly remember this legendary portraitist.

will fondly remember this legendary portraitist. Jagdish Mali Jagdish Mali Ishaan Dixit JUNE 2013 B E
Jagdish Mali
Jagdish Mali
Jagdish Mali Ishaan Dixit
Jagdish Mali
Ishaan Dixit

JUNE 2013

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

47
47

TEST TESTTETESTST

HOW WE TEST

Product Categorisation

We first segregate products into categories for the purpose of equitability in testing. The DSLR is divided into entry-level, semi-professional and professional categories. For compacts, we distinguish between advanced and basic compact cameras. Similarly, we also test consumer and pro lenses, flashguns, printers, and other photographic accessories and gear.

The Process

We primarily test for features, performance, build, ergonomics, warranty and support. While this remains constant, the weightage we give to these parameter differs from category to category, because different types of consumers have diverse expectations from products.

Final Ratings

Under each main parameter,

48 48
48
48

we list out hundreds of individual variables (for eg. colour accuracy for individual colours in different lighting, individual features, dynamic range, center-to-edge definition, light falloff, etc) against which we either give points or simply mark ‘yes’ or ‘no’. Thus, we arrive at a score for that parameter, and then, the final score, denoted as a percentage. Additionally, based on the current pricing of a product, a star rating for ‘Value for Money’ is considered. Value for Money does not affect the final percentage, because prices for products change constantly.

Our Seals of Approval

Any product that scores 80% or higher in individual tests gets ‘BP Recommended’—a seal of approval from our team. In comparison tests, we also tag products as ‘BP Best Performer’ and ‘BP Best Value for Money’.

BP Excellence Awards

At the end of the calendar year, the highest rated products in each category automatically win the Better Photography Excellence Award. This is Better Photography’s recognition of the very best products launched in the course of the year, and the companies that made them.

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

Gear Guide

Fujifilm X100S A Sense of Wonder is what Raj Lalwani feels, as he rediscovers the
Fujifilm X100S
A Sense of Wonder
is what Raj Lalwani feels, as he rediscovers the gaze of love, while
peering through the viewfinder of the Fujifilm X100S.
S trange things happen when you
travel. I was in Delhi last month,
and a few hours into the trip,
I was suddenly hit by a sense of
WEIGHTAGE OF
longing. Visuals tend to do that to
PARAMETERS
me, they spur off memories of a long time
ago. I pressed the shutter and sighed.
5%
20%
Features
20%
15%
40%
This is like an affair revisited. I tested the
X-Pro 1 exactly a year ago, and the X-E1,
soon after. They both had their share of
flaws, but there is nothing better than a
Features
camera that makes you want to shoot more,
Performance
Build Quality
alters your way of seeing and shows you a
Ergonomics
different side to your own self.
Warranty &
Support
As I sprung out of my nostalgia, I looked
at the X100S, and realised how similar she
was, to the earlier X cameras. The original
X100 was the camera that set the ball rolling,
but though it had its share of admirers, they
seemed to share a complicated relationship
with it. Focusing was slow, write times poor,
there were an insane number of bugs and
manual focus was downright unusable.
The X100S has a 16.3MP X-Trans sensor,
similar to the one used in the X-Pro 1 and
the X-E1. Though it is not full frame, it is
one of the most special digital chips in the
photographic world right now.
It does not have an AA filter, which
significantly improves sharpness.
But unlike other cameras that have taken
this decision (Nikon D7100, COOLPIX
A), there is no visible moiré, due to an
innovative colour filter which simulates

JUNE 2013

All photographs by Raj Lalwani

TEST

NikonA

Coolerthanother

COOLPIXcameras

54

by Raj Lalwani TEST NikonA Coolerthanother COOLPIXcameras 54 TEST OlympusVG-190 Basic P&S with not-so-greatquality 64

TEST

OlympusVG-190

Basic P&S with not-so-greatquality

64

TEST OlympusVG-190 Basic P&S with not-so-greatquality 64 TEST TEST TEST MicroTest Think Tank bag, PeakDesignCapture

TEST TEST

TEST

MicroTest

Think Tank bag, PeakDesignCapture

66

TEST TEST MicroTest Think Tank bag, PeakDesignCapture 66 All the speed problems that plagued the older

All the speed problems that plagued the older X cameras are now gone. The S in the X100S probably stands for speed!.

Exposure: 1/200sec at f/8 (ISO 400)

stands for speed!. Exposure: 1/200sec at f/8 (ISO 400) film emulsion rather than a conventional digital

film emulsion rather than a conventional digital sensor pattern. The 35mm field of view offered by the fixed lens remains unchanged from the X100. Easily my favourite focal length, it is relatively normal, considering that it does not give a dramatic perspective. It also forces you to be closer to your subject, than you would with a standard 50mm lens. Based on how close you get and how you play with foreground-background relationships, there is a lot that can be done with a lens like this. The camera shoots Full HD video at 60fps, but the lack of image stabilisation really hurts video capture. One can use Advanced Filters like Pop Colour and Toy Photo, some of which I enjoyed using with the flash capabilities of this camera.

Handling

Analogue-style dials for aperture, shutterspeed and Exposure Compensation ensure that you rarely need to get into

the menu of the camera, if ever at all. I sometimes wonder why certain camera manufacturers cannot understand that such simplicity is all that one needs. It is the simplicity and constraints that actually set you free, without too much of gadgetry to come between the pictures you see and the ones you end up making. The X100 was filled with several other ‘constraints’ (read that as ‘flaws’ in this case), but Fujifilm seems to have listened to all the complaints. The X100S gains on-sensor phase detection autofocus, which has largely improved the AF performance. Manual focus lovers, rejoice! The X100S allows you to use focus peaking to gauge the area that is in focus. If you are zone focusing, the camera remembers the distance setting even after being switched off. Most importantly, the X100S has a splitscreen viewfinder display, identical to the one used in fully manual cameras of yore. The display does this by using the phase-detect data from the sensor. It is

this by using the phase-detect data from the sensor. It is WHAT’S IN THE BOX JUNE

WHAT’S IN THE BOX

by using the phase-detect data from the sensor. It is WHAT’S IN THE BOX JUNE 2013

JUNE 2013

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

49
49

TEST

Test Shots

Test Shots The splitscreen viewfinder makes it easy to focus manually on the fly, and the

The splitscreen viewfinder makes it easy to focus manually on the fly, and the use of ISO 12,800 (to get a fast enough shutterspeed) did not affect colours in any way!

fast enough shutterspeed) did not affect colours in any way! Considering that the X-Trans sensor demands

Considering that the X-Trans sensor demands better optics, I was concerned whether the lens would match up, but even in this photo shot at f/16, diffraction is controlled.

ALSO LOOK FOR 50
ALSO LOOK FOR
50

to Fujifilm’s credit that they have been the first camera company to implement something so simple, yet so practical. The optical viewfinder is a joy to use in the daytime and as light fades, it is best to switch to the EVF, which now has a higher resolution of 2.35 million dots. The minimum shooting distance in the

capacity, shot-to-shot lag and write speed have been significantly improved. Unlike the X100 and X-Pro 1 that forced you to slow down, the X100S matches your urgency, step for step. The X100S has a leaf shutter, which allows you to sync flash at the fastest of shutterspeeds! Combined with the in-built ND filter, I could overpower sunlight at high noon with a regular flashgun! Even the on-camera flash works beautifully, allowing just the right amount of ambient light, even at default settings. Shooting with the X100S is like juggling between different kinds of film emulsions. Not only can you choose

PLUS regular, non-Macro shooting mode has been significantly improved (from 40cm to 21cm). This means
PLUS
regular, non-Macro shooting mode has
been significantly improved (from 40cm
to 21cm). This means that one does not
need to switch to the Macro mode as often
as earlier.
MINUS
Performance
The X100S is a surprise performer in
the speed aspect. Startup time, buffer
optimal yet
ERGONOMICS
Front
Top
Rear
Intuitive AF-point
Viewfinder
Drive mode
Stereo mic
selection button
toggle switch
Shutterspeed
dial
dial
Customisable
Fn button
AF mode switch
Threading for
Hybrid VF with
dioptre adjustment
Mid resolution
Irritating data-
AF-assist lamp
Aperture ring
mechanical
Hot shoe
LCD screen
writing indicator
shutter release
The AF mode switch, to the left of the camera,
has been redesigned. AF-C, which one would
rarely (or I would say never) use on this kind of a
camera, is now rightly in the middle, and the two
extreme positions swap between AF and MF.
The manual focus ring is far more responsive
now and works well with the focusing aids.
Unfortunately, there is no lens hood included and
the proprietary one is very expensive! Make your
own hood to avoid lens flare.
Since I’m a left-eyed shooter, the data-writing
signal bulb kept flashing in my eye after each
image—best to cover it up with duct tape!
The LCD has a resolution of 460k dots, which is a
little disappointing.

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

JUNE 2013

52
52

TEST

Noise Test

ISO 6400
ISO 6400
ISO 12,800 (Hi 1)
ISO 12,800 (Hi 1)
ISO 25,600 (Hi 2)
ISO 25,600 (Hi 2)

This is the best APS-C sensor in terms of noise performance, and even better than some full frame

sensors. ISO 6400, shot in RAW, opened up by more than two stops, is remarkably detailed!

a Film Simulation mode, you can also determine the tonal curve of the final file. So, do you want really soft highlights in an overexposed photo, but dark shadows? Or would you rather underexpose but get detail in the shadows?

Very few cameras allow you this extensive a control over the final look, both in RAW and JPEG. Most importantly, the ones that allow you to do so (Olympus OM-D, for instance), do not have a sensor which is so good, and so, the file quality starts crumbling if you try to open up the shadows too much. Battery life is very good. Unless you are an obsessive shooter, you can manage a full day of shooting on a single charge. Compared to competing cameras like the Sony RX1, this is remarkable.

Conclusion

The X100 and the X-Pro 1 were endearing because of their flaws. They were useful tools, but with a lot of constraints that one needed to keep in mind. The X-E1 showed improvement, but the X100S is a generation leap from each of these cameras. Constraints are now freedom. Endearment is now allure. Just a caution—this camera is not for everyone. It makes you think, wonder, wander. It makes you feel. If you cannot wait for the magic to happen, you may be better off with a conventional DSLR. If you enjoy technology more than you crave simplicity, you may want to look at other mirrorless options. But if you long for a camera that makes you fall in love every time you look through it, maybe this is the one.

love every time you look through it, maybe this is the one. The flash balances with
The flash balances with ambient light beautifully, and one can fine tune the tonal curve
The flash balances
with ambient light
beautifully, and one can
fine tune the tonal curve
to a large degree.

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

SPECIFICATIONS Model name Fujifilm X100S MRP Rs. 74,999 Sensor size, type APS-C, X-Trans CMOS II
SPECIFICATIONS
Model name
Fujifilm X100S
MRP
Rs. 74,999
Sensor size, type
APS-C, X-Trans CMOS II
Resolution
16.3MP, 4896 x 3264 pixels
LCD
2.8-inch, 460k dots
Focal range
35mm (35mm equivalent)
ISO range
Auto, 200–6400 (expandable up
to ISO 25,600 in JPEG)
Aperture range
f/2–16
Shutterspeed
30–1/4000sec
Metering modes
Multi, Average, Spot
File formats
Still: JPEG, RAW; Movie: H.264
Hot shoe
Yes
RECOMMENDEDE
Battery
Li-ion
Storage
SD, SDHC, SDXC
Dimensions, weight
127 x 74 x 54mm, 445g

FINAL RATINGS

Features

18/20

Excellent Hybrid AF, leaf shutter, no IS

Performance

39/40

Class-leading noise performance, excellent dynamic range, improved AF

Build Quality

13/15

Extremely sturdy metal body that can easily withstand a bit of rough use

Ergonomics

18/20

Fabulous manual focusing experience, no lens hood provided with the camera

Warranty & Support

3/5

Two-year warranty, limited service facilities

OVERALL

91%

Who should buy it? Street and travel

photographers, those who love to use external flashguns

Why? The X100S comes close to the full frame RX1’s quality, while being almost one third its price. The leaf shutter allows you to sync flash at any shutterspeed!

Value for Money

Value for Money

JUNE 2013

54
54

TEST

Nikon COOLPIX A Nikon, Eh? Raj Lalwani finds that the name of the Nikon COOLPIX
Nikon COOLPIX A
Nikon, Eh?
Raj Lalwani finds that the name of the Nikon COOLPIX A is not only a little
amusing, but also indicative of the experience of using this mixed bag.
W hy has Nikon called their
latest COOLPIX camera A?
No, that is not a grammatical
error on my part. That is
really the name. A. Just
WEIGHTAGE OF
that. When I first read the announcement,
PARAMETERS
5%
20%
20%
15%
40%
I couldn’t really get over the name.
So while all its on-paper specifications
suggested that it would be way cooler
than other COOLPIX cameras, I kept
wondering whether there are any hidden
implications of the name.
Features
Features
At first glance, ‘A’ seemed to stand for being
Performance
an A-lister. Or maybe APS-C. After all, the
Build Quality
company has managed to fit in a 16.2MP
Ergonomics
Warranty &
DX sensor inside a camera body that is
only around 10% larger than the pocketable
Support
Sony RX100. This is a similar sensor to
the one we had seen in the superb D7000,
which produced such brilliant dynamic
range and noise performance.
‘A’ could also stand for Acuity. Unlike the
older D7000, this camera does not have
an optical low-pass filter. This increases
chances of moiré, but while producing
better detail, sharpness and acuity. To make
best use of the sensor’s capabilities,
the camera allows you to shoot 14-bit
uncompressed NEF files as well.
Or maybe ‘A’ = Adult. Or Advanced.
This is not a camera for the beginner.
After all, there is no zoom. With a fixed
lens that gives a field of view similar to
a 28mm, the COOLPIX A is only for
those who appreciate that kind of wide
focal length and know how to make

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

JUNE 2013

LalwaniRajbyphotographsAll

TEST best use of it. Landscape photography, check. Street photography, check. WHAT’S IN THE BOX
TEST
best use of it. Landscape photography,
check. Street photography, check.
WHAT’S IN THE BOX
Environmental portraits, check. The Nikon
A is perfect for intimate shots, where you
are not only a part of the action, but at its
very heart.
All of this sounds great, but here is
where the camera’s name starts to sound
like a cruel joke. The camera does not have
a viewfinder. So if you are a traditionalist
who loves the experience of holding
the camera to your eye, you might just
disapprove and say, “Nikon, eh?” Of course,
the company is selling an optional Optical
Viewfinder for the A, at Rs. 25,250. No, that
is not a misprint. Nikon, eh, really?
Unlike most lenses,
the Nikon A’s optics do
not suffer much from
diffraction, giving sharp
images even at f/16.
Exposure: 1/1000sec at
f/16 (ISO 3200)
Of course, if you do not want to spend
half the cost of the camera on a viewfinder,
you can go to an ordinary store, buy a
keyhole for Rs. 250 and figure out a rig to
attach that to the hot shoe.
Video is a bit of a disappointment. It is
hidden away in the Drive modes, much
like the Fuji X100S, but the A does not
even have a direct shortcut to access these
modes. There is nothing wrong with
making a camera purely targetted at stills,
but then one cannot accept compromises
like the viewfinder and flash.
Flash, did I say? The flash itself
produces excellent results, but it
does not have a Commander mode.
The first serious APS-C compact
from the company that has a fabulous
Creative Lighting System does not
have a Commander mode. Nikon, eh?
This, despite the fact that the much
cheaper COOLPIX P7700 has the same
mode? Again, eh?
I was disappointed to see that the
camera does not have image stabilisation.
Sure, some of its competitors are not

JUNE 2013

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

55
55

TEST

Test Shots

Test Shots ISO 3200 is not clean, but the grain produced is very film-like and looks

ISO 3200 is not clean, but the grain produced is very film-like and looks pleasing, as seen in this in-camera B&W shot using the Red Filter option.

in this in-camera B&W shot using the Red Filter option. The 28mm equivalent lens is decently

The 28mm equivalent lens is decently sharp across the aperture range. I was impressed to see how well the camera controls distortion.

PLUS
PLUS

MINUS
MINUS

stabilised either, but they have faster lenses and superior high ISO performance.

Handling

These missing features do rob the COOLPIX A of a lot of its excitement value, but it is largely a very pleasant camera

to use. On the face of it, the handling is typically Nikon—conservative, but strikes the right notes. Almost every button is in the right place and though there is barely any grip, the camera is quite comfortable to grip. I was pleased to see that the company has provided a customisable Fn button right

under the lens, but accessing the button sometimes becomes a little difficult. Manual focus is facilitated by a large ring around the lens, but has one fatal flaw. While there is a distance scale displayed on the LCD, there is no DOF scale. Shockingly, the lens gets reset every time you switch off the camera! So while this could have been a perfect camera for using manual focus (wide lens, great DOF, the advantages of prefocusing at a set hyperfocal distance), the functionality is completely crippled. Another ‘Eh’ moment, if there was one.

56
56
ALSO LOOK FOR
ALSO LOOK FOR
ERGONOMICS Front Top Rear Mode dial Hot shoe Pop-up Stereo flash switch microphone Drive mode
ERGONOMICS
Front
Top
Rear
Mode dial
Hot shoe
Pop-up
Stereo
flash switch
microphone
Drive mode
dial
On/Off switch
Customisable
PC Sync
Fn1 button
Focusing ring
Small textured
socket
Mode dial
Primary
ISO/Customisable
High-resolution
rubber grip
control dial
Fn2 button
LCD screen
Lens
In several ways, the COOLPIX A is like an oversized
P320, with a larger sensor and body. Even the
menu and interface is similar to the P320, and is
reminiscent of the company’s entry-level DSLRs.
The hot shoe can mount a flash or the optional OVF. I
personally liked the On/Off switch mechanism. It was
unusual, but very intuitive. The Lens Control Ring can
only be used for manual focusing.
The layout of buttons at the back is simple, yet intuitive.
The ISO and Exposure Compensation buttons fall
perfectly at one’s fingertips. The pop-up flash needs to
be raised manually to be active.

Rear control

wheel

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

JUNE 2013

Noise Test

ISO 6400
ISO 6400
ISO 12,800 (Hi 1)
ISO 12,800 (Hi 1)
ISO 25,600 (Hi 2)
ISO 25,600 (Hi 2)

The camera produces barely any noise up to ISO 1600. After this, luminance noise increases rapidly, but it remains very film like. ISO 3200 looks great and ISO 6400 is usable, in an emergency. ISO 12,800 is avoidable, unless you are shooting in B&W.

I also wish the manual focus ring

was used a little more intelligently. Other cameras like the Canon PowerShot S105 and Sony RX100 allow you to customise this ring to access other camera functions. There is no shortcut to jump to a 100% view. This is a small, but vital feature that makes a big difference while shooting in the real world. The RX100 has it, as do most smartphones, funnily enough. Eh?

Performance

The camera uses a small battery, identical

to the one used in the 1 J1. In spite of this, the battery life is quite commendable, and

I could easily shoot around 400 to 500

photos—a little more if I conserved power while shooting.

I can tell you what ‘A’ does not stand

for—action. The autofocus of this camera

is substandard. It never happened that

I could not lock focus, but the speed at

which it happens is poor. Thankfully, the A scores an A+ in the other aspects of performance. The latent detail that is present in the shadows at base

JUNE 2013

ISO is superb—one can easily open up an underexposed photo by three stops, without causing too much noise. At high ISO settings, the quality does not suffer too much, but it is nowhere near as good as the Fujifilm X100S. The optics are stunning. There is some light falloff at the widest aperture, but no flaring and fringing that one could observe. Sharpness is excellent, even at the extreme ends of the aperture.

Conclusion

I really wanted to like the Nikon A.

It is incredibly compact and the image

quality is nothing short of stunning, due to a good sensor and fantastic optics. But there were so many things in practice that made me go, “Huh? What?

Eh?” that the camera seemed like a bit of

a compromise. Slow AF and problematic MF were quirks that plagued even cameras like the older Fujifilm X100. But then, the X100 was unique for its time, while the Nikon

A is surrounded by several large-sensor

fixed-lens compact cameras from Sony,

Fujifilm, Sigma, Leica and Ricoh.

Can you live without a viewfinder?

If so, the Sony RX100, at Rs. 20,000

lesser, provides much better value. At 28mm, the RX100 has a maximum aperture of f/1.8. This makes up for its slightly smaller sensor size. Also, the

RX100 has 4-stops of stabilisation, as compared to the A, which has none!

And well, of course, the RX100 costs only

a little more than the cost of one Nikon A viewfinder! Uh-oh-eh! If you add the viewfinder’s cost to the camera’s, the COOLPIX A package becomes more expensive than the Fujifilm X100S! The Fuji sensor is significantly better and the camera has

a Hybrid viewfinder, as opposed to the

A’s optical option. Of course, the bigger problem is that Ricoh, more recently, announced a camera called the GR, which on paper, is almost identical to the A. As of now, we do not know when the GR will be available in India, but abroad, the Ricoh costs USD 300 (approx. Rs. 16,500) lesser than the Nikon! Seriously Nikon, eh?

Rs. 16,500) lesser than the Nikon! Seriously Nikon, eh?   TEST SPECIFICATIONS   Model name
 

TEST

SPECIFICATIONS

 
  TEST SPECIFICATIONS   Model name Nikon COOLPIX A Rs. 54,950 Sensor size, type APS-C, CMOS

Model name

Nikon COOLPIX A

Rs. 54,950

Sensor size, type

APS-C, CMOS

16.2 megapixels, 4000 x 3000 pixels

3-inch, 921k dots

Focal range

28mm (35mm equivalent)

Auto, 100–6400 (expandable up to 25,600)

f/2.8–22

 

30–1/2000sec

Metering modes

Multi, Center-weighted, Spot

File formats

Still: JPEG, RAW; Movie: H.264, MPEG-4

Yes

Battery

Li-ion

 

Storage

SDHC, SDXC

111 x 64 x 40 mm,

299g

 

FINAL RATINGS

Features

9/15

28mm lens, no image stabilisation, no Commander flash mode, no ND filter

Performance

40/45

Slow AF, very good sensor, excellent optics

Build Quality

13/15

All-weather design, magnesium alloy body

Ergonomics

13/20

MF resets itself after power off, other quirks

Warranty & Support

4/5

Two-year warranty, good service network

OVERALL

79%

57
57

Who should buy it? Nikon loyalists who do not mind compromising on AF speed to get excellent image quality.

Why? If you do not mind looking at other brands, there are several options that can compete with the A and win, either based on price, value for money or functionality.

Value for Money

Value for Money

B E T T E R

P H O T O G R A P H Y

TEST

TEST Nikon COOLPIX S6500 60 WEIGHTAGE OF PARAMETERS B E T T E R P H

Nikon COOLPIX S6500

60 WEIGHTAGE OF PARAMETERS B E T T E R P H O T O
60
WEIGHTAGE OF
PARAMETERS
B E T T E R
P H O T O G R A P H Y

Click & Share Instantly

Ketan Kundargi finds out what happens when Nikon comes out with the WiFi enabled COOLPIX S6500.

N ikon’s COOLPIX Style series of digital compact cameras has a curvaceous new addition. And if you have watched the latest Priyanka Chopra advertisement,

you know exactly what I am talking about. The S6500 is Nikon’s latest affordable superzoom compact camera targeted for beginners. It is similar to the S6400, but with additional WiFi. Yet, it is priced lesser than its predecessor. Does it pack enough features and deliver a performance to make it as good as Nikon claims it to be?

Features

CES 2013 was all about WiFi connectivity in compact cameras with Nikon showing off the COOLPIX S6500. While the

company has launched a bundle of

WiFi compact cameras since, the S6500

continues to be one of their best offerings.

It has a 16MP back-illuminated CMOS

sensor, a 12x optical zoom lens with a range of 25–300mm (35mm equivalent) and

optical image stabilisation. The high-speed Continuous mode shoots at an impressive speed of 10fps at full resolution. The camera comes packed with as many as 18 Scene mode options. These come handy as they help to make up for the absence of any manual control while still being useful for a beginner. You can also choose from an extensive list of filter effects such as Toy Camera, High Contrast Monochrome, Cross Process and many more. Nikon has also bundled in five new beauty effects to its proprietary Glamour Retouch option. Now shooting portraits and group shots will be a lot more fun and the right postprocessing can deliver some great results. Last but not the least is the all-new WiFi feature. You can now connect the camera to your Android or iOS smartphone or tablet. This means you can now click a picture with the excellent capabilities of the camera and then immediately transfer them to your smartphone or tablet for

WHAT’S IN THE BOX

JUNE 2013

instant sharing. Effective up to a range of 30 feet, the Wireless Mobile Utility app from Nikon also lets you use your smartphone

as a remote shutter release.

Handling

In spite of a 12x optical zoom, the camera

body is impressively compact in size.

The camera is lightweight, pocketable and the metal build makes it a sturdy compact.

A 3-inch LCD display with a decent, but

not class-leading resolution of 460k dots. Nikon has taken out the touchscreen from the COOLPIX S6400 and gone back to traditional buttons. The layout is standard except for an additional dedicated video record button. Several Scene modes and one touch filters can now be accessed by a single click with a dedicated Scene mode button when shooting. A completely revamped Menu system makes navigation through the multiple settings a breeze.

Performance

Nikon’s latest BSI CMOS image sensor makes the camera faster and better in low light. The Nikon S6500 can produce usable images even at ISO 800. This is good performance for a compact camera. Even at ISO 1600, there is a slight loss of detail but can be fixed in postprocessing. Add to that the effective lens-shift VR. You can shoot photographs at a shutterspeed as low as

1sec and still get a sharp image. This makes the camera a great option even in low light. The lens is a bit disappointing as it tends to flare badly. There is visible purple fringing in high contrast situations. It delivers similar quality at both ends of the focal length range and tends to be soft towards the corners throughout. According to Nikon, the camera is rated for 150 shots on a single battery life. This was a complete let down until, surprisingly, the camera performed much better in the test and took almost 250 images before the battery ran out of power.

Conclusion

Nikon COOLPIX S6500 packs in a wide zoom range, interesting scene modes and a excellent performance in a compact body. But what really makes it stand out is the WiFi connectivity. If you are not someone who wants this feature, you will easily find other affordable and specialised cameras with better features. Nikon could not have brought out the camera at a better time. In this age of instant sharing, this WiFi connectivity is the icing on the cake and is bound to silence competing smartphones. And with the holiday season around the corner, this makes for a great buy to take along for your vacation.

this makes for a great buy to take along for your vacation. In spite of a
In spite of a slow shutterspeed, the optical IS makes sure that camera shake is
In spite of a slow
shutterspeed, the optical
IS makes sure that
camera shake is limited.
Ketan Kundargi
Exposure: 1sec at f/3.1 (ISO 900)

JUNE 2013

TEST

SPECIFICATIONS Nikon COOLPIX S6500 Rs. 11,950 1/2.3 inch, CMOS 16 million, 4608 x 3456 pixels
SPECIFICATIONS
Nikon COOLPIX S6500
Rs. 11,950
1/2.3 inch, CMOS
16 million, 4608 x 3456 pixels
3inch, 460,000 dots
25–300mm
125–1600, Auto
f/3.1–6.5
1/2000–1sec
Matrix, Center-weighted, Spot
JPEG, MPO, MOV, WAV
Rechargeable Li-ion Battery
Built-in Memory, SD/SDHC/SDXC
95.4 x 58.3 x 26.3mm, 153g
RECOMMENDEDE
PLUS
PLUS