Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 34

California State University San Marcos School of Education

Single Subject Credential Program

HANDBOOK
http://www.csusm.edu/education/ClinicalPractice/HandbookSS.html

Revised June 2013

Table of Contents

Welcome from the School of Education Interim Director,...........................................................3 CSUSMCOLLEGEOFEDUCATIONOVERVIEW................................................................4 MissionStatement.....................................................................................................................5 SummaryOfCredentialPrograms.........................................................................................6 ARecapoftheCaliforniaStandardsfortheTeachingProfession....................................7 AnOutlineoftheTeacherPerformanceExpectations(TPEs)............................................8 SINGLESUBJECTCREDENTIALPROGRAMOVERVIEW.............................................11 OrganizationoftheSingleSubjectProgram.........................................................................12 FullTimeTypicalSchedule...................................................................................................14 INFORMATIONFORTEACHERCANDIDATES................................................................15 TeacherCandidateRole.........................................................................................................16 TeacherCandidateResponsibilities.....................................................................................16 SomeQuestionsYouMayWanttoAsk.................................................................................19 SchoolOrganizationalCompetencies(FormA).................................................................20 ProfessionalExperiencesChecklist(FormB).....................................................................21 AFewThoughts......................................................................................................................22 ImportantInformationtoCollectandRecord....................................................................22 INFORMATIONFORUNIVERSITYSUPERVISORS.........................................................23 UniversitySupervisorResponsibilities...............................................................................23 AFewThoughts......................................................................................................................25 ContactInformation...............................................................................................................26 INFORMATIONFORONSITELIAISONS.........................................................................27 OnSiteLiaisonResponsibilities...........................................................................................27 AFewThoughts......................................................................................................................28 INFORMATIONFORCOOPERATINGTEACHERS..........................................................29 CooperatingTeacherResponsibilities.................................................................................29 AFewThoughts......................................................................................................................30

School of Education

California State University San Marcos CA 92096-0001

333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Road

San Marcos,

School of Education California State University San Marcos 333S. Twin Oaks Valley Road San Marcos, CA 92096-0001 Tel: 760.750.8545 Fax: 760.750.3352 khayden@csusm.edu www.csusm.edu/education Tel: 760.750.8545 Fax: 760.750.3352 khayden@csusm.edu www.csusm.edu/education

August 2012

Welcome to the School of Education! You have joined a program that isamong the most effective and highly regarded programsin the CSU system and the state of California. We are pleased to count you among our candidates, supervisors or cooperating teachers. Each of you is an important member of our team as we continue to strive to improve educational outcomes for all children in the state of California. This is a demanding and rigorous program. At times the journey may seemoverwhelming and never ending. Nonetheless, you will come to understand how all the readings, assignments and activities fit into a cohesive body of knowledge, skills and dispositions needed to be successful in your first years asa classroom teacher. Furthermore, as part of the SoE learning community you will learn that collaboration with colleagues is among the most useful and powerful resources at your fingertips. As you begin your journey with us, I urge you to connect with the talented and dedicated faculty and staff in the SoE. We are a strong learning and teaching community that models how to successfully teach diverse students with a central focus on social justice and equity. The credential program at CSUSM has an outstanding reputation in the region. We attribute this reputation to the content of our mission statement and the quality of faculty, staff, teacher candidates, and MA and doctoral students we attract and retain. Public schools need dedicated and talented individuals like you. Whether you are a teacher candidate, a clinical practice supervisor, or a cooperating teacher, you play a vital role in the process of how we make the mission of the SoE a living document. Together we can collaboratively transformpublic education in significant socially just ways so that all students are successful learners. Sincerely,
The California State University
Bakersfield | Channel Islands | Chico | | Dominguez Hills Angeles Sacramento | | San Marcos | | | East Bay | | | Fresno | Fullerton | | Humboldt | | Long Beach | | Los Maritime Academy San Diego Stanislaus San Francisco San Jose San Luis Obispo Sonoma

Dr. Katherine Hayden Monterey Bay | Northridge | Pomona Interim Director School of Education

San Bernardino

CSUSM School of Education Overview

California State University San Marcos School of Education MISSION STATEMENT


The mission of the School of Education community is to collaboratively transform education. We: Create community through partnerships Promote and foster social justice and educational equity Advance innovative, student-centered practices Inspire reflective teaching and learning Conduct purposeful research Serve the School, College, University, and Community

The School of Education Believes: 1. Professionalism is a unifying principle of our organization.


Continuous improvement is essential to our roles as life-long learners. Collaboration is valued in all aspects of the School of Educations work. Professionalism is demonstrated by our service to the School of Education, the University, and the communities. Respect for the contributions of all members of the School of Education is vital. Effective teaching is everyones role and is central to our endeavors. Reflection and/or research to solve problems is an integral part of our professional responsibility.

2. Students are the focus of our work.


We model effective teaching. Through our students, research, collaboration and service, we strengthen education in the communities we serve.

3. Shared governance provides a foundation for the work of the School of Education and is dependent upon the active involvement of each member.
The School of Education continuously expands its use of shared governance. Contributions of each member are valued. Effective communication is critical to the process and is every members responsibility.

4. The success of the School of Education depends on creating and sustaining an inclusive environment that reflects and affirms diversity.
A diverse faculty, staff, and student body are vital to serving the community. All members of the School of Education are committed to serving a diverse population. The responsibility for affirming diversity rests with everyone.

SUMMARY OF CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS


The California State University San Marcos Teacher Credential Program offers five emphases: 1. Multiple Subject Cross-Cultural Language and Academic Development (CLAD) Emphasis: designed to prepare teacher candidates to work at the elementary level, while infusing theories and methods of first and second language acquisition across the curriculum through English language development techniques. 2. Middle Level Cross-Cultural Language and Academic Development (CLAD) Emphasis: designed to prepare teachers to work at the middle school level, while infusing theories and methods of first and second language acquisition across the curriculum through English language development techniques. 3. Concurrent Multiple Subject/CLAD with Special Education Specialist: Learning Handicapped Credential Program: incorporates the disciplines of multiple subjects, special education and multilingual education into an integrated curriculum designed to prepare teachers to work with the heterogeneous group of students in today's schools. 4. Single Subject Credential Program Cross-Cultural Language and Academic Development (CLAD) Emphasis: designed to prepare candidates to teach students at the secondary level (grades seven through twelve). The CLAD emphasis is designed to teach candidates theories and methods of first and second language acquisition across the curriculum through English language development techniques. 5. Bilingual Authorization certificate: designed to train candidates to infuse theories and methods of first and second language acquisition across the curriculum through English language development techniques. It will also prepare teacher education candidates to provide primary language instruction (Spanish) in Language and Literacy, as well as Language 1 instruction in the content areas. This emphasis may be added to a Multiple Subject Credential, the Middle Level Credential, the Concurrent Special Education Specialist /Learning Handicapped Credential, or the Single Subject Credential.
The core content in Cross-Cultural Language and Academic Development occurs across all courses and reflects the appropriate curriculum, pedagogy, and skills for ethno-linguistically diverse students. Inherent in the program is the focus on appropriate curriculum, pedagogy, and instruction for use in English (mainstream) classes as well. The Multiple Subject CLAD and BCLAD are offered both as full and part-time programs. Teacher candidates are assigned to cohorts of 25 - 30 and attend all classes together. These cohorts may be themed with a specific focus such as "Ways of Knowing through the Arts," or "Math, Science and Technology." The Single Subject CLAD and BCLAD are offered in all programs.

An Outline of the California Standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP)


(More information can be found at www.cst.ca.gov/cstppublication/cstpreport.html)

Engaging and Supporting All Students in Learning


Connecting students prior knowledge, life experiences, and interests with learning goals. Using a variety of instructional strategies and resources to respond to students diverse needs. Facilitating learning experiences that promote autonomy, interaction, and choice. Engaging students in problem solving, critical thinking and other activities that make subject matter meaningful. Promoting self-directed, reflective learning for all students.

Creating and Maintaining Effective Environments for Student Learning


Creating a physical environment that engages all students. Establishing a climate that promotes fairness and respect. Promoting social development and group responsibility. Establishing and maintaining standards for student behavior. Planning and implementing classroom procedures and routines that support student learning.

Understanding and Organizing Subject Matter for Student Learning


Demonstrating knowledge of subject matter content and student development. Organizing curriculum to support student understanding of subject matter development. Developing student understanding through instructional strategies that are appropriate to the subject matter. Using materials, resources, and technologies to make subject matter accessible to students.

Planning Instruction and Designing Learning Experiences for All Students


Drawing on and valuing students background, interests, and developmental learning needs. Establishing and articulating goals for student learning. Developing and sequencing instructional activities and materials for student learning. Modifying instructional plans to adjust for student needs.

Assessing Student Learning


Establishing and communicating learning goals for all students. Collecting and using multiple sources of information to assess student learning. Involving and guiding all students in assessing their own learning. Using the results of assessments to guide instruction. Communicating with students, families, and other audiences about student progress

Developing as a Professional Educator


Reflecting on teaching practice and planning professional development. Establishing professional goals and pursuing opportunities to grow professionally. Working with communities to improve professional practice. Working with families to improve professional practice. Working with colleagues to improve professional practice. Balancing professional responsibilities and maintaining motivation.

An Outline of the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs): The CSTP Focus for Credential Candidates
(The full text of the TPEs can be found at www.csusm.edu/coe) While it is our expectations that teacher candidates will work on ALL TPEs throughout the program, due to the more rigorous and demanding nature of Clinical Practice II, TPEs 1, 4, 9, 11, and 12 cannot be marked as meets in Clinical Practice I.

A.

MAKING SUBJECT MATTER COMPREHENSIBLE TO STUDENTS


TPE 1 - Specific Pedagogical Skills for Subject Matter Instruction (for each area) TPE 1A- Subject-Specific Pedagogical Skills for Multiple Subject Teaching Assignments o Understanding the State-adopted academic content standards o Understanding how to teach the subject matter in the standards o Planning instruction that addresses the standards o Demonstrating the ability to teach to the standards TPE 1B - Subject-Specific Pedagogical Skills for Single Subject Teaching Assignments o Understanding the state-adopted academic content standards o Understanding how to teach the subject matter in the standards o Planning instruction that addresses the standards o Demonstrating the ability to teach to the standards

B.

ASSESSING STUDENT LEARNING


TPE 2 - Monitoring Student Learning During Instruction o Determining student progress toward achieving the state-adopted academic content standards o Using instructional strategies and techniques to support students learning TPE 3 - Interpretation and Use of Assessments o Understanding a range of assessments o Using and interpreting a range of assessments o Giving feedback on assessment results

C.

ENGAGING AND SUPPORTING STUDENTS IN LEARNING


TPE 4 - Making Content Accessible o Addressing state-adopted academic content standards o Prioritizing and sequencing content o Selecting and using various instructional strategies, activities, and resources to facilitate student learning TPE 5 - Student Engagement o Understanding of academic learning goals o Ensuring active and equitable participation o Monitoring student progress and extending student thinking TPE 6 - Developmentally Appropriate Teaching Practices TPE 6A - Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades K-3 o Understanding important characteristics of the learners o Designing instructional activities o Providing developmentally appropriate educational experiences TPE 6B - Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades 4-8 8

o o o

Understanding important characteristics of the learners Designing instructional activities Providing developmentally appropriate educational experiences

TPE 6C - Developmentally Appropriate Practices in Grades 9-12 o Understanding important characteristics of the learners o Designing instructional activities o Providing developmentally appropriate educational experiences TPE 6D - Special Education o Articulating rationale for inclusive education for all students o Understanding and applying principles of universal design to differentiate instruction o Developing modifications and adaptations in curriculum assessment and instruction for students with special needs o Understanding of roles and responsibilities as members of SST & IEP Teams o Collaborating with others to plan, teach and assess students with special characteristics TPE 6E - Middle Level Philosophy and Teaching o Understanding the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level schools o Understanding the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and using this knowledge in their practice. o Valuing developmentally responsive and socially equitable teaching, learning, and schooling in a variety of organizational settings TPE 7 - Teaching English Learners o Understanding and applying theories, principles, and instructional practices for English Language Development o Understanding how to adapt instructional practices to provide access to the state-adopted student content standards o Drawing upon student backgrounds and language abilities to provide differentiated instruction

D.

PLANNING INSTRUCTION AND DESIGNING LEARNING EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS


TPE 8 - Learning about Students o Understanding child and adolescent development o Understanding how to learn about students o Using methods to learn about students o Connecting student information to learning TPE 9 - Instructional Planning o Establishing academic learning goals o Connecting academic content to the students backgrounds, needs, and abilities o Selecting strategies/activities/materials/resources

E.

CREATING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR STUDENT LEARNING


TPE 10 - Instructional Time o Appropriately allocating instructional time o Effectively and efficiently managing instructional time

TPE 11 - Social Environment o Understanding the importance of the social environment o Establishing a positive environment for learning o Maintaining a positive environment for learning o Creating classroom community through promotion of students social competence and natural peer supports

F.

DEVELOPING AS A PROFESSIONAL EDUCATOR


TPE 12 - Professional, Legal, and Ethical Obligations o Taking responsibility for student academic learning outcomes o Knowing and applying professional and ethical obligations o Knowing and applying legal obligations o http://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/rules-of-conduct.html TPE 13 - Professional Growth o Evaluating teaching practice and subject matter knowledge o Using reflection and feedback to improve teaching practice and subject matter knowledge TPE 14 - Educational Technology

Addressing all six of the ISTE National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers. See www.iste.org

TPE 15 - Social Justice o Valuing socially equitable teaching, learning, and schooling in a variety of organizational settings o Incorporating pluralism and divergent perspectives on educating diverse students o Democratizing public education to achieve social justice and equity TPE 16 Biliteracy o Applying pedagogy, theories, and principles for biliteracy programs o Assessing and addressing the needs of biliterate students o Designing biliteracy curriculum utilizing developmentally appropriate instructional approaches for biliterate students

10

Single Subject Credential Program Overview


http://www.csusm.edu/education/ClinicalPractice/HandbookSS.html

11

ORGANIZATION OF THE SINGLE SUBJECT PROGRAM


The CSUSM Teacher Preparation Program differs from many other university programs in the way teacher candidates are organized to work together and in the way courses are designed to work with clinical practice. An outline of the key features of our Single Subject Credential Program is provided below: COHORT MODEL: All teacher candidates belong to a cohort. Teacher candidates take all university courses with their cohort colleagues. Co-teaching, on-line and blended instruction are just some of the best practices which are modeled in coursework. SCHOOL TEAMS: Within each cohort, teacher candidates are grouped into school teams of 3-4 individuals. Each team represents the various disciplines within the cohort as much as possible (social science, English, Spanish, Physical Education, science, and math). Teams will work together at one high school (or possibly a middle school) first semester and then move, as a team- if possible, to a second high school or middle school for second semester. All candidates will have a minimum of one high school placement. UNIVERSITY COURSE WORK : The philosophy of the CSUSM Single Subject Program is to weave course work as closely as possible with practical experiences in the field. CLINICAL PRACTICE: California State University San Marcos School of Education clinical practice models the belief that relevancy is crucial in teaching, schooling and learning. Teacher candidates are placed in public school classrooms while attending university classes. Lessons and units developed in the university courses will be designed to complement and support the candidates field work. The co-teaching model will be used on all settings. For CLAD certification, teacher candidates will be expected to plan and teach Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) for English learners in the general classroom or in an ELD (English language development) or sheltered class as one of their placements. For BCLAD certification, candidates should also prepare and teach SDAIE lessons, as well as prepare for and teach primary language instruction (i.e. reading/Spanish/language arts/math/biology). Semester one Candidates will attend core coursework each Monday from 7 a.m. until 4 p.m. The core coursework includes co-teaching by faculty, combined sessions and online work. Candidates will also have 10 methods sessions (2 units, 30 hours) spread over the semester on Tuesday evening/s and with some Saturday sessions. Candidates will be at the assigned school site, following the teacher contract hours, with an interdisciplinary cohort group (3-4 candidates) each Tuesday Friday beginning with pre-service days and continuing until the day before winter break. A co-teaching approach to clinical practice will be used in all settings. Candidates will participate in all class activities and move gradually from assisting in the supportive co-teaching approach to leading all aspects from planning to presentation by the end of the experience. University Supervisors (US), the instructors for clinical practice, will formally observe each candidate 4 times which will include observing one or two planning sessions. They will also evaluate the TPE portfolio.
12

Candidates will be placed with one Cooperating Teacher (CT) for 2 periods of the same assignment (e.g. two English 9 classes) and one setting for assisting such as AVID, SEI, ELD or special education whatever best suits the needs of the site. During the remaining unassigned periods candidates will be expected to plan with the CT and work with their cohort partners on site to complete university projects and assignments. Candidates will also have a standing weekly lunch with the OSL. Semester two Candidates will attend core coursework each Monday from 7 a.m. until 4 p.m. The core coursework includes co-teaching by faculty, combined sessions and online work. Candidates will also have 10 methods sessions (2 units, 30 hours) spread over the semester on Tuesday evening/s and with some Saturday sessions. Candidates (with the interdisciplinary cohort) will be on the assigned school site, following the daily site schedule, each Tuesday Friday beginning with the first day of the school site spring semester and continuing until the last day of school for the assigned site. A co-teaching approach to clinical practice will be used in all settings. Candidates will participate in all class activities and move gradually from assisting in the supportive co-teaching approach to leading all aspects from planning to presentation and assessment by the end of the experience. University Supervisors will formally observe each candidate 4 times which includes observing one or two planning sessions. The US will also evaluate the TPE portfolio. Candidates will be placed with one Cooperating Teacher (CT) for 2 periods of the same assignment (e.g. two English 9 classes) and two classes, one for ELD and a second such as AVID, SEI or special education whatever best suits the needs of the site. During the two remaining unassigned periods candidates will be expected to plan with the CT and work with their cohort partners on site to complete university projects and assignments. Candidates will also have a standing weekly lunch with the OSL.

ON-SITE LIAISON: The Single Subject Program uses a shared supervision model. Each middle or high school will have a member of their teaching staff serve as an on-site liaison for CSUSM teacher candidates. The on-site liaison will meet regularly with the candidates and share supervision responsibilities with a university supervisor. Both of these assignments are described more completely in this handbook.

13

CSUSM Single Subject Credential Program - Typical Schedule (Note: schedule may be adapted to fit the individual site schedules such as block, 4X4, etc.)

FALL SEMESTER
Coursework Monday from 7 a.m. until 4 p.m.: classes: EDSS 511, 521, 555 Clinical Practice University Tues-Fri: Full day at school site every day: Clinical Practice I [EDSS 571] Class Period Breakdown: 2 periods = Clinical Practice I co-teaching 1 period = Work in AVID/SEI/ELD/CAHSEE, or special education classroom 1 period = Observations (in and outside of content area) 1 period = Preparation for clinical practice class 1 period = Preparation for university work

*Tuesday Evenings and some Saturdays: Special Content Methods Course

Bilingual Authorization Requirements: Successful completion of EDUC 653 during Fall semester Successful completion of a Clinical Practice placement in a Bilingual setting first or second semester Successful completion of the Spanish language assessment (CSET LOTE Part III and Written) See Program Coordinator about enrolling in a second methods course for additional credential authorizations

SPRING SEMESTER
Coursework Monday from 7 a.m. until 4 p.m.: classes: EDSS 511, 521, 555 Clinical Practice University Tues-Fri: Full day at school site every day: Clinical Practice II [EDSS 572]

Class Period Breakdown: 2 periods = Clinical Practice II (one Cooperating Teacher *Tuesday Evenings and some Saturdays: Special 1 period = Assist in an ELD class Content Methods Course 1 period = Assist in SEI, AVID,CAHSEE, special education classroom or in a supplemental Area of possible certification (see Program Coordinator) 1 period = Preparation for clinical practice classes 1 period = Preparation for university work Bilingual Authorization Requirements: Successful completion of EDUC 654 Successful completion of a Clinical Practice placement in a Bilingual setting first or second semester Successful completion of the Spanish language assessment (CSET LOTE Part III and Written) See Program Coordinator about enrolling in a second methods course for additional credential authorizations
14

Information for Teacher Candidates

15

TEACHER CANDIDATE ROLE


As a teacher candidate you should become as familiar with your assigned school as quickly as possible. Familiarize yourself with important school information, such as attendance procedures, grading policies, important deadlines, department and school-wide meetings, expectations of your cooperating teacher(s), administrative assignments, and any other area of the profession which you should be aware of and which will enrich your clinical practice. Some resources and tools to guide you in this process are found later in this section (see Interview Questions to Ask Your Cooperating Teacher, School Site Information, School Site Participation Checklist and the Co-teaching web link ). You should establish open communication with your cooperating teacher. He/she will guide you through the semester, but you must share your concerns, frustrations, or any problems which may be affecting your classroom if your cooperating teacher is to be of any assistance. Remember, no one expects you, as the teacher candidate, to perform as an experienced instructor. Ask for what you need! Finally, clinical practice is a time of learning, expanding, and experimenting; it is the time for you to discover what methodologies meet your personal style and which do not. Use a variety of methodologies and activities over the course of the semester. Also, you are encouraged to observe as many teachers as you can during the semester and from these experiences begin building your own repertoire of teaching skills and teaching styles. Enjoy this experience. Teaching can be a very rewarding profession. As a teacher, you impact a students life each day. TEACHER CANDIDATE RESPONSIBILITIES Your clinical practice is intended to give you the opportunity to practice the theories and instructional strategies you have learned in your coursework. Your on-site liaison, university supervisor and cooperating teacher(s) are there to offer advice and suggestions and to counsel you throughout the semester. Our main priorities are your personal and professional growth in education and success in your assigned classroom(s). 1. 2. Read this handbook to become familiar with the CSUSM Teacher Preparation Program. Become familiar with the credential you are earning. If you need more information your supervisor, program coordinators, or School of Education--Education Services personnel will be happy to provide you with a detailed outline. Organize your website (REQUIRED) with tabs for each TPE to contain artifacts and evidence for TPEs. This website will provide evidence to your university supervisor and it will also provide artifacts for inclusion in your professional portfolio that you develop in the second semester. Meet with your supervisor and on-site liaison to establish a schedule of assignments and observations. Be sure to provide a current address and phone number. YOU MUST USE YOUR CSUSM EMAIL FOR ALL PROGRAM COMMUNICATION CHECK IT DAILY. Attend any meetings arranged with your cooperating teacher and/or the principal AND all site, department and/or Professional Learning Community (PLC) meetings with your CT.
16

3.

4.

5.

6. 7.

Learn the school regulations and rules pertaining to attendance and discipline before starting. You might ask to see the school handbook. Confer daily with your cooperating teacher and develop a planning schedule to discuss your program requirements, university schedule, observation feedback, planning guidelines, student progress and concerns, lesson implementation, progress on TPEs, TPAs and other appropriate topics. You should be on campus every Tuesday through Friday for a full day (mirroring a full-time teachers day) to teach and observe classes, to assist in the AVID/SEI/ELD classes, to prepare for your classes and university assignments, to attend meetings, and to generally get a sense of what a contracted teaching day feels like. Be available to remain after school to plan, attend staff meetings, in-services, parent conferences, and other school functions, such as "Back to School Night" and "Open House where applicable. Become acquainted with the various learning materials, district curriculum guides, mastery learning objectives, and equipment, which are available (texts, workbooks, films, audiovisual equipment, library resources, and computers). Keep up-to-date and accurate lesson plans during your clinical practice. You are required to have a written lesson plan for each lesson that you teach. Be sure to confer with your cooperating teacher to insure that your lesson plan meets his/her expectations and satisfies the demands of the curriculum and the needs of students. Submit any observations logs and lesson plans that are required and other assignments listed in the Clinical Practice syllabi (EDSS 571 for CP I, EDSS 572 for CP II). Develop techniques for varying classroom activities such as presentations, small group work, individualized instruction, testing and grading procedures, and using instructional (audio/visual) aids. Establish and maintain effective classroom control and environment according to site and cooperating teachers expectations. Become familiar with the California Content Standards, Grade Level/District Continuums, Curriculum Guides and the Common Core Standards. Be professional at all times. You are expected to be appropriately dressed, well groomed, and maintain professional communication at all times. Everything speaks during this experience: what you say, what you do, the decisions you make all contribute to your character and readiness as a teacher. In a public position, such as teaching, others perceptions of you are important. You never know who will be on an interview panel or who will be consulted as a reference; impress everyone.
http://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/rules-of-conduct.html

8.

9.

10.

11. 12.

13. 14. 15.

17

Clinical Practice and Coursework Attendance Policy


Be punctual and regular in attendance. In the case of unavoidable absence, inform your instructors (in the case of coursework) and your cooperating teacher, on-site liaison, and university supervisor (in clinical practice) in advance. Also, prepare substitute plans for your cooperating teacher to utilize as appropriate. The attendance policy for clinical practice mirrors what is expected of teachers, which is generally 10 days per year. Candidates are on the school site 4 of 5 days (80%) which means that candidates would be allowed 4 absences in clinical practice I and 4 in clinical practice II (8 days). Three or more consecutive days of absence will require a doctors note. Extensive absences, for whatever reasons, jeopardize the learning of your students and your growth as a professional educator. Extensive absences may result in removal from clinical practice and necessitate additional semesters to complete the program.

Teacher Performance Expectations Professional Website


In your Clinical Practice, you will develop a (REQUIRED) professional website focusing on the TPEs. The purpose of this website is to collect artifacts and evidence for demonstration of satisfactory completion of the TPEs. In addition to directly observable evidence, this website will provide information that your university supervisor may not see in classroom visits. You will make a tab on your website for each TPE. In the Forms section of this handbook on the SOE website, you will find a page for each TPE with suggestions for evidence to include in each section. You may use these pages as checklists to identify what has been included in the website, and what might need to be added. In post observation conferences with your University Supervisor, use the website as a reference to discuss your understanding and progress with regards to the TPEs. Your knowledge and accomplishment of TPEs are essential to successful completion of the credential program and required by the state of California. In addition to coursework and observations of performance, your TPE website helps you to be responsible for assuring that TPE requirements are met.

18

INTERVIEW QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR COOPERATING TEACHER 1. 2. How many times per week will you want to meet for planning? When, where, and for how long will we meet? What are your requirements for written lesson plans? (Note: Even if your cooperating teacher does not require a written plan from you, you are still responsible for generating them during clinical practice. At the very least, the on-site liaison and university supervisor will want a copy of your lesson plans.) What are your most important goals for this semester? What role can I play in helping you to achieve these goals? What grading procedures do you use? Do you group students according to their ability level during any assignments? Are there any students who have special needs I should be aware of? Where can I get students IEPs or 504s to read? Will you please explain your philosophy concerning classroom discipline? What behaviors do you discourage and encourage? What kinds of bulletin boards or other displays do you prefer to have in your classroom? Which ones would you like me to plan for while Im doing my clinical practice? How did you arrive at this particular room arrangement? May I rearrange for special activities? What is your field trip policy? Would you like me to plan a field trip for this semester? How do you maintain active communications with parents? What techniques do you use to motivate students? What are the special challenges of teaching this subject or grade level? How would you describe your schools community relations? How important are standardized test scores to your school? What assessments do you use and why? (Informal, Formal, Benchmark, Projects, Common Core...)

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

19

CSUSM Single Subject Credential Program


To be completed by teacher candidates during each placement and submitted as partial evidence for TPE 12.
In order to insure that a broad range of experiences is accomplished during your preparation as a teacher candidate, this checklist has been developed to assist you. You are expected to accomplish as many of these enriching observations /experiences as possible each semester at each school site. This checklist should be presented to your university supervisor as evidence of partial completion of TPE requirements.

School Site Information

NAME: SCHOOL SITE: Semester One Semester Two

Semester 1 Organizational Competency


Date Completed

Semester 2
Date Completed

1. Attendance/Tardy Reporting Procedures 2. Grading and Reporting Procedures 3. Curriculum Guides for Courses 4. Faculty / Department Meeting Times and Places 5. Access to Resources: AV Equipment, Copy Machine 6. Computers or Computer Lab Use for Students 7. Video Approval Process (especially R rated videos) 8. Controversial Issue Policy (alternative assignment policy) 9. Field Trip Approval Process 10. Classroom Repair, Supplies Process 11. Proficiency Exams Required: When Taken 12. Child Abuse: Identification and Reporting 13. Special Needs Students: Identification and Reporting 14. Parent Conferences 15. Location of Cum Files 16. Job Application Procedures for District 17. Explore the Schools Website, Mascot, etc. 18. Student Study/Success Team Meeting 19. Individual Education Plan Meeting 20. Other: 21. Other 22. Other:

20

School Site Participation Checklist


CSUSM Single Subject Credential Program
To be completed by teacher candidates during each placement and submitted as partial evidence of TPE 12.
In order to insure that a broad range of experiences is accomplished during your preparation as a teacher candidate, this checklist has been developed to assist you. You are expected to accomplish as many of these enriching observations /experiences as possible each semester at each school site. This checklist should be presented to your university supervisor as evidence of partial completion of TPE requirements.

NAME: SCHOOL SITE: Semester One Semester Two

Semester One
Date Completed

Semester Two
Date Completed

ACTIVITY
participated in parent conferences attended Parent-Teacher-Student Association meeting attended school board meeting contacted parents (via phone, mail, home visits) participated in community activities planned an event (e.g. field trip) experienced a class dedicated to special populations (e.g. special education, alternative special day class, primary language) led an advisor/homeroom experience attended professional development training (conferences, etc.) supervised/observed extracurricular or non-instructional activities (lunch, intramurals, student activities) attended staff/departmental meeting attended teacher association (union) meeting participated in business partnership/activity attended Bilingual Parent Advisory Committee meeting participated in a lab (technology lab, computer lab, writing lab, etc.) attended/observed an SST (Student Study/Success Team) meeting for one student attended/observed an IEP (Individualized Education Program) meeting for one student Other
21

A FEW THOUGHTS
If you are experiencing any sort of difficulty in your placement, share this with your on-site liaison or university supervisor immediately. They are there to serve as your advocate and liaison between you, the cooperating teacher, and the school site. Do not make any placement arrangements or changes on your own! It may appear that you are helping, but keep in mind we have an average of 60-65 placements to make in our area districts, and we have worked hard to make our contacts with the best schools and teachers in these districts. If you have special needs, communicate these directly to the program coordinator. Always be the professional: in dress, demeanor, and attitude. You may hear or see things in classrooms with which you do not agree, or you may learn confidential information about a student. Keeping these issues confidential is essential. http://www.ctc.ca.gov/credentials/rules-ofconduct.html

Be willing to go the extra mile. Offer to assist with room set-up and take on duties. Become known as a problem-solver not a problem-maker. Take the initiative to ask what can be done or to offer your assistance. Enjoy your clinical practice. You will be, perhaps, on the largest learning curve of your life. We are committed to ensuring that it is a positive growth experience for you and a positive learning experience for the students in your classrooms.

Collect important contact information (phone and e-mail) of your university supervisor, on-site liaison, and cooperating teacher.

22

Information for University Supervisors


UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR RESPONSIBILITIES
The three keys to being a successful supervisor are communication, communication, and communication. It is necessary to guide and counsel the teacher candidate by offering suggestions and providing encouragement to ensure that they can meet their full potential. Communication is also vital in the intermediary role with the cooperating teacher, ensuring the establishment of the best possible classroom/university working relationship. Thank you for accepting such important responsibilities in our program. General Protocols: 1. Please read the entire Handbook to become familiar with the CSUSM Teacher Preparation program. Become especially familiar with the California Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs), which can be found in outline form at the beginning of the handbook and in full-text form on the School of Education website: (www.csusm.edu/soe). These TPEs comprise a significant portion of the assessment process with the teacher candidates. Candidates will have evidence on their single subject website with a tab for each TPE. Become familiar with the credential we are offering; Single Subject with the CLAD or Bilingual Authorization certificate. If you need more information on this, the Single Subject Program Coordinator or School of EducationEducation Services personnel will be happy to provide you with more detailed outlines. Since teacher candidates are earning a CLAD credential, they need to demonstrate the use of SDAIE (Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English) strategies during their clinical practice. Arrange to receive teacher candidate information packets from the clinical practice coordinator. If working with clinical practice II candidates, ask them for a copy of their Clinical Practice I final summary and Assessment of TPEs. At US Communication meetings discuss observation guidelines, assessment processes (TPEs and final summary), and guidelines for communicating and documenting concerns. (Refer to single subject forms on the SOE website). Work with the on-site liaison to schedule a one-hour introductory meeting of all parties at the beginning of the semester. During the first 30 minutes, with just CTs, conduct a Cooperating Teacher training based on the handbook and power point provided. During the second 30 minutes, include the TCs and facilitate a discussion of co-teaching, planning protocols and observation dates with both the TC and CT. Work with the on-site liaison and the program coordinator to adjust assignments, when necessary, to ensure that the teacher candidates have the best possible learning situations.
23

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Formally observe each teacher candidate a minimum of four (4) times (which includes 1 or 2 planning observations) and discuss the observations with the teacher candidates. Mentor and coach teacher candidates as needed. If working with an advanced teacher candidate, give special attention to establishing goals for meeting all TPEs by the end of Clinical Practice II. Be prepared to make additional observations if a teacher candidate is working to remediate concerns. Meet with the teacher candidate for post-observation conferences to discuss observation feedback and to confer on TPE progress. For each observation, provide the candidate with a written summary and suggestions (see forms page). Review and discuss the TPE evidence during each conference. Evidence cannot be gained for many of the TPEs through observation of teaching alone. It will be through conversation that youll gain evidence of some of these TPEs (for example, the teacher candidates ability to plan long term, their ability to adequately assess student progress, etc.). During CP I all candidates are expected to be at the Approaching level and at the Meets level for CP II. All TPEs should be addressed during both experiences. Maintain a record of your observations of and conferences with each teacher candidate on the University Supervisor Visitation Log. Maintain ongoing communication with the on-site liaison and/or cooperating teacher and assist in solving field-related problems. Act as liaison between teacher candidates, school site personnel, and the university. Have a method for checking in with each teacher candidate regularly to gauge their level of concern, their feelings during teaching, etc. If you have serious concerns regarding the teacher candidates performance or professionalism this should be communicated and discussed early with the Program Coordinator. Document these concerns on the Statement of Concern (found in the single subject forms section on the SOE website) and counsel the teacher candidate on a course of action to address the concerns. It is CRITICAL that concerns are communicated in detail early with a specific timeline for improvement. Concerns should be focused around relevant TPEs. Notify the Program Coordinator immediately if an SOC is to be written.

7.

8. 9.

10.

On-Going Paperwork Procedure 1. Throughout the semester collect the assignments and weekly reports as specified in the Clinical Practice Syllabi (EDSS 571 or 572). Throughout the semester collect the Weekly Progress Report from the CT by email (many supervisors have the CTs copy these to the OSL).

End of Semester Evaluation Paperwork Procedure 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. With the on-site liaison, arrange for the final exit meeting at the conclusion of clinical practice. Based on your own observations and collected documentation throughout the semester, complete drafts of the TPE assessment and write the summary. E-mail the drafts to the CT, OSL, and TC for review and additional input (if needed). E-mail final TPE assessment and summary to the CT, OSL, and TC prior to the exit meeting. The exit meeting is a time to recap what you appreciated about the teacher candidates work and growth and any areas youd like to see them continue to work on. All participants will discuss and
24

6.

sign the Clinical Practice Summary and Assessment of TPEs and copies will be distributed to all. Sign all original forms in blue ink. Deliver the original forms of the Clinical Practice Summary and the Assessment of TPEs, and your Supervisor Visitation Log to the program coordinator. These assessment forms are very important. Without them, teacher candidates will not be cleared to receive their credential .

A FEW THOUGHTS
Professionalism should always be encouraged. Teacher candidates need to know that they are in a very sensitive position and that confidentiality is vital. Your teacher candidates or on-site liaison should provide you with the bell and subject schedule for their class(es). This information will be useful in arranging observations and post-observation meetings. Obtain a district calendar and school map. Your teacher candidates should provide you with a written lesson plan for each lesson you observe (and any others you request). Be aware that your teacher candidates will have emotional as well as professional needs. It will be necessary to strengthen morale as they learn to cope with the realities of teaching. Teacher candidates who are having difficulty may need more than the minimum number of observations. Each of your teacher candidates files should contain this information: name, phone number, address, cooperating teacher's name, school site and room number.

25

CONTACT INFORMATION
CSUSM Single Subject Program Coordinator: Julie Rich jrich@csusm.edu. 760.750.8550 TPA Coordinator: Ginny Sharp gsharp@csusm.edu CSUSM Support Staff: Bonnie Mottola bmottola@csusm.edu 760.750.4300 On-site liaison: Name: Name: Phone: Phone: E-mail: E-mail:

Teacher candidates: CSUSM email use required for all program communication Name: Name: Name: Name: Name: Name: Name: Name: Name: Name: Name: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: Phone: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail: E-mail:

Information for On-site Liaisons

ON-SITE LIAISON RESPONSIBILITIES


Thank you for your willingness to become an on-site liaison with CSUSMs Single Subject Credential Program. The role of the on-site liaison is critical to the success of the Single Subject Program and the preparation of teacher candidates. You are a critical liaison between the teacher candidate, the cooperating teacher, and the university supervisor. As the on-site liaison you will:

General Protocols: 1. Please read this handbook to become familiar with the CSUSM Teacher Preparation Program. Become especially familiar with the California Standards for the Teaching Profession and the Teacher Performance Expectations. 2. Help select cooperating teachers for content areas classes as well as an additional class for assisting such as Special ed, ELD, AVID, CAHSEE prep, etc. according to your school process. As soon as possible after you have received your placements, contact the administrators, cooperating teachers, and teacher candidates to arrange for all around introductions and a brief orientation to your school site and district. 3. Welcome teacher candidates and familiarize them with the school site by introducing them to other faculty members, administrators, counselors, and by inviting them to faculty meetings and in-service activities, and providing a tour of the school facilities. 4. Work with the university supervisor to schedule a one-hour introductory meeting of all parties at the beginning of the semester. During the first 30 minutes, with just CTs, the university supervisor will conduct a Cooperating Teacher training based on the handbook and power point provided. During the second 30 minutes, the TCs will be included and the university supervisor will facilitate a discussion of co-teaching, planning protocols and observation dates with both the TC and CT. 5. Work with the university supervisor to adjust assignments, when necessary, to ensure that your students have the best possible learning situations.

6. Act as liaison between teacher candidates, cooperating teachers, school administrators, and the university supervisor. Maintain ongoing communication with the university supervisor and cooperating teacher and assist in solving field-related problems. 7. Hold weekly meetings for your teacher candidates. These may be used to assist teacher candidates in resolving issues and to help with common needs (e.g. management or planning issues). Many onsite liaisons use these meetings to invite guest speakers to address specific issues for their teacher candidates (e.g. special educator, administrator, BTSA support provider, counselor, etc.). 8. Arrange for the final exit interview at the conclusion of full-time clinical practice. The interview is a time to recap what you appreciated about the teacher candidates work and growth and any areas youd like to see them continue to work on. All participants will discuss and sign the Assessment of TPEs and the Clinical Practice Summary and copies will be distributed to all. These forms are very important; without them, a teacher candidate will not be cleared to receive their credential. 9. California Teacher Performance Assessments (CA-TPA). This legislatively mandated Performance Assessment, by its nature, must be coordinated with the clinical practice of the teaching candidate. In the first semester, candidates must video-tape a teaching episode. The logistics of securing permission from the class will be different at each school site. Please assist candidates with this procedure.

A FEW THOUGHTS
Professionalism should always be encouraged. Teacher candidates need to know that they are in a very sensitive position and that confidentiality is vital. Be aware that your teacher candidates will have emotional as well as professional needs. It will be necessary to strengthen morale as they learn to cope with the realities of teaching. Teacher candidates who are having difficulty may need more than the minimum number of observations and your University Supervisor may ask you to observe a candidate who is struggling. Please notify the university supervisor immediately if you have concerns about the teacher candidates performance in the classroom or professionalism.

Information for Cooperating Teachers


COOPERATING TEACHER RESPONSIBILITIES
Thank you for your willingness to become a cooperating teacher with CSUSMs Single Subject Credential Program. As a cooperating teacher you are one of the teacher candidate's most important resources during the clinical practice. You are that teacher candidate's professional coach and mentor. As such, you will need to provide regular feedback, constructive and positive criticism, and positive suggestions so that your teacher candidate may improve and grow into the professional we all want him/her to be. Your active involvement is critical to a successful clinical practice. General protocols 1. Please read this Handbook to become familiar with the CSUSM Teacher Preparation program. Become especially familiar with the California Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs), which can be found in outline form on pages 8-10 of the handbook and in full-text form on the School of Education website: (www.csusm.edu/coe). 2. Help the teacher candidate feel at home in the school by working with the on-site liaison to introduce the teacher candidate to other faculty members, inviting him/her to faculty meetings and in-service activities, and providing a tour of the school plant. 3. Share ideas with the teacher candidate about goals, unit and lesson planning, sheltering instruction, classroom management, effective discipline programs, and other areas of importance to you. Share appropriate student information such as IEPs, 504s, or other information that will help the teacher candidate adequately plan for the various needs of the class. Share planning, resource and reference materials that have been effective for your class. 4. Attend a one-hour introductory meeting of all parties at the beginning of the semester. During the first 30 minutes, with just CTs, the university supervisor will conduct a Cooperating Teacher training based on the handbook and power point provided. During the second 30 minutes, the TCs will be included and the university supervisor will facilitate a discussion of co-teaching, planning protocols and observation dates with both the TC and CT. 5. Attend a training meeting for all Cooperating Teachers which will include the use the co-teaching model. Allow the teacher candidate to apply what he/she is learning in University coursework; allow the use of a variety of teaching strategies. 6. Solo time: leave the classroom periodically when the teacher candidate is teaching. The teacher candidate needs to learn to handle the classroom on their own. This is a valuable learning situation for the teacher candidate and an opportune time for the cooperating teacher to offer suggestions for dealing with issues that might have arisen.

7.

Assist the teacher candidate in both long-term and short-term planning of lessons and units. As part of his/her learning and evaluation process, the teacher candidate is required to have a written lesson plan for each lesson taught.

8. Meet with the teacher candidate for post-observation conferences to discuss observation feedback and to confer on TPE progress. Evidence cannot be gained for many of the TPEs through observation of teaching alone but through conversation to gain evidence of some of these TPEs (for example, the teacher candidates ability to plan long term, their ability to adequately assess student progress, etc.). 9. Conduct evaluative discussions with the TC and provide specific recommendations, in advance, regarding anticipated methods, materials and procedures. Review the successes and problems of prior lesson presentations, affirm the positive, and set a few attainable goals. If working with an advanced teacher candidate, give special attention to helping him/her meet those TPEs that were not met at the end of Clinical Practice I. 10. Submit the Clinical Practice Weekly Progress Report at the end of each week to the university supervisor and OSL by e-mail. This will help maintain ongoing communication with the supervisor and assist in identifying field-related challenges or individual needs early on. 11. Provide input, as needed, to the US as preparation for the teacher candidate's final Assessment of TPEs and Clinical Practice Summary prior to the exit interview. Attend the exit interview with the TC, OSL, and US to finalize and sign the Assessment of TPEs and Clinical Practice Summary. 12. California Teacher Performance Assessments (CA-TPA). This legislatively mandated Performance Assessment, by its nature, must be coordinated with the clinical practice of the teaching candidate. Teacher candidates will need your support as they complete these assessments. In the first semester, candidates must video-tape a teaching episode for use in the methods course. The logistics of securing permission from the class will be different at each site. During CP II candidates must submit a video-taped lesson as part of TPA 4. 13. If you have concerns about a teacher candidates performance, these concerns must be documented EARLY and communicated to the on-site liaison and university supervisor for appropriate action.

A FEW THOUGHTS
If you are experiencing any sort of difficulty with your teacher candidate, do not hesitate to share this with the on-site liaison or university supervisor. They are there to assist you and the teacher candidate. Should any problems arise, it is critical that they are dealt with in a collaborative and timely fashion. When assisting your teacher candidate in assuming classroom and teaching responsibilities it may be helpful to allow them to take over one subject at a time, adding a new subject each week. Using a calendar for long-range planning is especially helpful for your teacher candidate to see the whole picture. Keep in mind that like all learners, our teacher candidates will move at different rates as they transition into their teaching responsibilities. Use your discretion as to how much "solo" time your teacher candidate can manage, and remember they are novices and will make novice mistakes. The Assessment of TPEs and Clinical Practice Summary forms are most crucial to the teacher candidates as these forms go into their official files. The University appreciates your timely collaboration in the completion of these forms.

School of Education Clinical Practice Placement Policy CSUSM-SOE policy requires that all teacher candidates complete their field work in a public school setting. A public school setting is defined as one of the following: traditional public school or a public charter school. The only exception is a private school that receives public funding for specific services to public school students with special needs, as defined in an IEP. There are no other exceptions. This policy ensures that candidates fully experience the dynamics of public education. The following lists the minimum requirements for all School of Education programs. Individual programs may implement and maintain additional requirements. Clinical Practice I Requirements In order for a teacher candidate to be placed in a clinical practice setting for coursework and/or field experience purposes and be assigned a university supervisor, the following requirements must be met. A. Registration in a clinical practice course (EDMS 571, EDMI 571 or EDMS 573). B. CTC certificate of clearance. C. Tuberculin Clearance. D. Passing scores on the subject specific CSET and the CBEST tests. Clinical Practice II Requirements In order for a teacher candidate to be placed in a clinical practice setting for coursework and/or field experience purposes and be assigned a university supervisor, the following requirements must be met. A. Registration in a clinical practice course (EDSS 572 or EDSS 573) B. CTC certificate of clearance C. TB clearance D. Successful completion of first semester coursework with a C+ or better and an overall GPA of 3.0 E. Successful completion of Clinical Practice I. Risk Management at School Sites In the case of an injury that requires medical attention at the clinical placement site, the following steps must be followed: Teacher Candidate: Attend to Injury Immediately report the injury to your Cooperating Teacher, University Supervisor and Program Coordinator, Julie Rich; jrich@csusm.edu Cooperating Teacher: Immediately report the injury to the University Supervisor University Supervisor: Immediately Report the Injury to the Program Coordinator, Julie Rich; jrich@csusm.edu

Program Coordinator: Complete IIPP5 Track Incident

CLINICAL PRACTICE FORMS


IMPORTANTFORMSSINGLESUBJECTPROGRAM AllformsshouldbeobtainedfromtheSOEWebsite. http://www.csusm.edu/education/ClinicalPractice/HandbookSS.html

FormsPertinenttoAllParticipants

TeacherPerformanceExpectations:TPEs AssessmentofTeacherPerformanceExpectationsClinicalPracticeI AssessmentofTeacherPerformanceExpectationsClinicalPracticeII AssessmentofTeacherPerformanceExpectationsSample TeacherPerformanceExpectationsFullText TeacherPerformanceExpectationRubric

ClinicalPractice ClinicalPracticeObservation ClinicalPracticeObservationSample ProfessionalDispositionsSingleSubjectProgram Coteachingwebsitelink:http://community.csusm.edu/course/view.php?id=9 ClinicalPracticeISummary

FormsPertinenttoUniversitySupervisors
ClinicalPracticeIISummary ClinicalPracticeExitPaperworkReminders StatementofConcern StatementofConcernGuidelines StatementofConcernForm/ActionPlanClinicalPractice StatementofConcernForm/ActionPlanCoursework StatementofConcernPerformanceContractContinuationClinicalPractice StatementofConcernPerformanceContractContinuationCoursework TeacherCandidatePlacementForm UniversitySupervisorVisitationLog OnSiteLiaisonActivityChecklist

FormsPertinenttoOnSiteLiaisons

FormsPertinenttoCooperatingTeachers
CooperatingTeacherTrainingManual

WeeklyProgressReporttosubmittoUSandOSL

FormsPertinenttoTeacherCandidates
TeacherCandidateWeeklyLog SingleSubjectLessonPlanTemplate TPEPortfolioBinderinformation

AgreementFormClinicalPracticeHandbook