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Grandmaster WincheII P.C.

Woo
Written by Wayne Yee for Grandmaster Winchell
P.C. Woo
Grandmaster Winchell P.C. Woo is an old-time
master. He has been studying kung fu for more than
60 years. He started when he was 12 years old,
which is late, compared to many other well-known
kung fu masters of his time. He was first introduced
to kung fu when he wrote on a chalkboard in a local
market to log in all the incoming produce. One of the
workers, Foon Sing, noticed his strong writing on the
chalkboard, using up too many pieces of chalk
compared to the other workers. This showed his
strong chi even at an early age. Foon Sing was a
Master trained at Baat Pai Temple and took the
young P.C. Woo under his wing to train him from the top down. Master Foon
Sing was a famous kung fu master of his time, having trained over 30,000
students!
The young Ping Chiu Woo was, at first, hesitant to learn kung fu until one day,
while out with Foon Sing, the Master showed him a kung fu skill that he would
never forget. Coming out of a store where Foon Sing was clearly agitated by the
owner of a business, he proceeded to pull out three red bricks from the building.
One by one, he would hold the brick in one hand and break it in half with one
finger from the other hand then toss the brick over his shoulder.
This so impressed the young P.C. Woo that he started studying kung fu from that
day forward.
Grandmaster Woo was born in Canton, China and is the son of an American
citizen, who was a U.S. Marine, who died while fighting in WW. Young PC Woo
grew up in China taking a great interest in kung fu and earned a reputation as a
highly skilled fighter among his peers, also learning various skills from many well-
known martial artists in different styles.
n 1960, Grandmaster Woo moved to Boston, Massachusetts and continued his
learning under the highly skilled and respected Grandmaster Tang Kwok Wah.
Grandmaster Wah's lineage is directly descended from Grandmaster Wong Fei
Hung, Grandmaster Lam Sai Wing, and Grandmaster Lam Jow. All are famous
masters in a list of who's who in the Hung Gar lineage with the reputation and
skills to back up their place in martial arts history.
Grandmaster
x.--/.:: . _. x--
Grandmaster
x.--/.:: . _. x--
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n 1967, Grandmaster Tang Kwok
Wah bestowed Winchell Woo with
the traditional Master's Certificate,
to open his own school to teach
Hung Gar, continuing the lineage
of an already impressive list of
descendants. n that same year,
Grandmaster Woo opened the
Bamboo Hut Gung Fu Club, one
of the first authentic kung fu
schools in Boston. The Bamboo
Hut Gung Fu Club performed
legendary lion dances and
unforgettable kung fu
demonstrations for traditional
Asian festivals, community
gatherings and other various
functions.
n the 1970's, Grandmaster Woo
was one of the founders of the
New England Kung Fu
Federation. He hosted the first
Beijing Wushu team to come to
New England to demonstrate their
amazing martial arts skills that had not been previously seen. n 1992, he hosted
the Shaolin Monks in Boston during their world tour.
Grandmaster Woo maintains a notable relationship with the Shaolin Temple,
having been invited by Shi Deli, a 31
st
generation disciple, to teach as their
Master nstructor at the Shaolin Temple Damo Zen Wushu Academy in the
United States. Grandmaster Woo is also an Honorary Chairman of the Academy.
Grandmaster Woo's kung fu skills are
extraordinary accomplishments that truly
allow him to be listed as one of the top
martial arts masters of the world. His ron
Body skill is still being demonstrated even at
the age of 74, as he bends spears in 6
different pressure points on his body, which
includes the throat, and has a cylinder block
of cement broken over his back at the same
time. At one demonstration, one of the spear holders failed to move in unison
with the other spear holders. The result was a bent spearhead at 90! This spear
was positioned in his Dan Tien just below his belly button. Grandmaster Woo has
perfected the skill of Gum Joon Jow, the ability to bring up the chi to protect all
his important pressure points when needed.
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Currently, Grandmaster Woo is concentrating his efforts to promote the 5
Elements Tai Chi form that he has created and only recently introduced to the
public and made available for lessons. Taking all of the most important and
useful techniques in his lifelong study in Hung Gar, Chi Gong, and his
association with masters in other styles, Grandmaster Woo has combined them
into one very beautiful yet practical form that promotes good health and self-
defense.

;
All the movements in the 5 Elements Tai Chi form have practical applications,
including the simplest Chi Gong movements that many practitioners regard as
only an exercise. There are also breathing exercises from simple to advanced
to promote the growth of chi, the life force of all living things. 5 Elements Tai Chi
combines, not only the elements of Fire, Earth, Gold, Water and Wood, but also,
the five animals found in Hung Gar, Tiger, Crane, Dragon, Leopard, and Snake.
The 5 Elements Tai Chi form is a form for life. The more you study it, the more it
reveals to you.
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Grandmaster Winchell Woo is an Official Representative of Hung Gar for Lam
Jow, Tan Kwok Wah, and the Hong Kong Association. Over the years,
Grandmaster Woo has had schools in Boston, Belmont, Hudson and Springfield,
all in Massachusetts, as well as Guangdong and Fushun, China.
He is also recognized by the following organizations for his skill and contributions
to the martial arts:
WOMA (World Organization of Martial Arts)
World Self-Defense Federation
The Dragon Combat Kungfu Society
World Soke Head Council of Japan
United States Martial Arts Association
United States Ju-Jitsu Federation
American Taiho Jitsu Association
Tang's Kung Fu Federation Chinese Siu Lam Kung Fu Association Greece
North American Grandmasters Council
Headmasters & Founders Assembly of Sokeships
Martial Arts Masters, Pioneers & Legends Hall of Fame
Korean Yudo & Hapkido Association
Pioneers Legends Hall of Fame
Grandmaster Winchell P.C. Woo resides in Massachusetts and can be reached
through his school, Chiu Mo Kwoon, 164 Lincoln St, Boston, MA. The school's
website is www.hunggarboston.com
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